Tag Archives: Todd Mitchell

Group discusses the classic novel "Beloved" at Wolverine Letterpress & Publick House as part of Rekindle the Classics

Group discusses “Beloved” at Wolverine Letterpress & Publick House as part of Rekindle the Classics

  • On August 28, Pam Coke co-presented the paper “Examining Attrition in English Education: A Qualitative Study of the Impact of Preparation, Persistence, and Dispositions in Teacher Education” with Heidi Frederiksen and Ann Sebald of the CSU Center for Educator Preparation at the 19th International Conference on Education Studies in Paris, France. This research is part of a longitudinal qualitative study on why English Education students do/not stay in their education programs.  If you would like to learn more, you can view the abstract here: file:///C:/Users/pamel/AppData/Local/Packages/Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe/TempState/Downloads/abstract.pdf
  • Matthew Cooperman’s Spool received two very positive reviews in the past few months, one at Sugar House Review (scroll to second review) http://sugarhousereviews.blogspot.com and one at Mayday Magazine http://www.maydaymagazine.com/issue11reviewburzynskispool.php
  • Camille Dungy was the keynote speaker at the Kentucky Women Writers Conference on 9/15/17. https://womenwriters.as.uky.edu/
  • Sarah Green’s poem “Scar Stars” was selected as the winner of Ghost Proposal‘s Instagram contest, and appears in this month’s issue of Letterboxes.
  • Katherine Indermaur’s poem, “American Bison,” that was just published this morning, at Muse /A Journal: http://www.museajournal.com/2017/09/k-indermaur/
  • Meghan Pipe’s short story “Alternating Current” appears in the Fall/Winter 2017 issue of Nimrod. The story was an Honorable Mention for the Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction.
  • John Calderazzo will tell a story about hiking in the mountains of Bhutan as part of KUNC’s “The Great Outdoors” Live Storytelling Event at Wolverine Farm’s Publick House next Wednesday, September 20, starting at 6 p.m. Further details here: http://www.kunc.org/post/great-outdoors-live-storytelling-event John is also slated to run four workshops for City of Fort Collins’ Climate Action Plan employees on how to use stories to communicate science and environmental research to the public.
  • Ricki Ginsberg’s article, “Opportunities for Advocacy: Interrogating Multivoiced YAL’s Treatment of Denied Identities” was published in English Journal.
  • Four of Colorado Reviews essays made the Notables list in the Best American Essays 2017: CSU MFA Fiction (1992) alum Wendy Rawlings‘s “Portrait of a Family, Crooked and Straight,” Emily Strasser’s “Exposure,” Stephanie Harrison’s “What We Have Left,” and Rose Whitmore‘s “Witness.”
  • Todd Mitchell recently completed two Books for Change author visits to Colorado schools. He was at Dunn elementary last week, and Columbine Elementary School in Boulder this week, speaking with over 700 elementary school students, and giving interactive writing presentations with students and teachers to inspire literacy, creativity, and positive activism. Many thanks to all the kind souls who supported Books for Change, and helped make these visits possible. Todd Mitchell also participated in a YA and middle grade author tea party talk with the fabulous YA author Anna-Marie McLemore (author of Wild Beauty, The Weight of Feathers, and When the Moon Was Ours, a Stonewall Honor book) at Old Firehouse Books.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Tilting at Windmills,” was selected as a semi-finalist for the 2017 American Short Fiction Prize.
  • Mary Crow has had two poems, “Theory of the Angelic Figure” and “Theory of the Human Figure,” accepted for publication by 2river (Fall 2017).
  • Shoaib Alam has recently taken on the role of Chief of Staff at Teach For Bangladesh, a nonprofit based in Dhaka, his hometown. Alam spends his evening writing fiction and is currently hoping to draw the attention of American poets and writers to the ongoing Rohingya genocide currently engulfing Bangladesh. Please get in touch with him to learn more about this crisis. great–shoaibalam@outlook.com.

 

CSU to launch a Feminist Fight Club with Events & Book Signing on Sept 25

Feminist Fight Club author gives public talk

In keeping with the University mission to improve campus culture and climate around gender and make Colorado State University the best place for women to work and learn, CSU has joined with Feminist Fight Club author Jessica Bennett to establish the first campus chapter of the Feminist Fight Club on Monday, September 25th, 2017.

Purchase a copy of Feminist Fight Club and get it signed by Jessica Bennett!
Book sales and book signing will be available from 10:30-11:30am outside of Ballroom D in the Lory Student Center.

Fireside Chat on Challenging Subtle Sexism in the Workplace with author, Jessica Bennett
1:00-2:15 in Ballroom D of the Lory Student Center
(This event is free and open to the public; no registration required).

 

 

Symbols and History of Lynching in America

Symbols of Lynching event flyer

CLA along with the Departments of Communication Studies, Ethnic Studies, and History are working with BAACC and ACT to host a special event during the Diversity Symposium: Symbols and History of Lynching in America. The event is Wednesday, Sept. 27 from 5:30–7 p.m. in the LSC Theatre. It’s free to attend and contributes to the college’s thematic focus on diversity, inclusion, and free speech. Read more about the film and filmmakers here: http://www.aaihs.org/an-outrage-a-new-film-about-lynching-in-the-american-south/

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Welcoming new English majors

  • Leslee Becker was named the 3rd-Place Winner of the Marguerite McGlinn Prize for Fiction, sponsored by Rosemont College/Philadelphia Stories & PS Books (“the POWER of Small”) for her short story, “The Grotto.”
  • The Community Literacy Center is happy to welcome six new interns for Fall 2017-Spring 2018. Interns who will develop research and outreach projects with the CLC while facilitating SpeakOut! workshops for youth and incarcerated adults are: Zoe Albrecht (Creative Writing/Fiction with minor in Sociology), Emmy Earsom (Psychology with minor in Spanish), Laney Flanagan (English), Kelly Kuhn (Criminal Psychopathology), Kelly Martin (graduate student, English Rhetoric/Composition), Shelby Spies (Human Development and Family Studies with minor in Business and English).
  • SpeakOut! is still seeking a few serious volunteers for this engaging work! Trainings on August 30 and September 1. Please contact clc@colostate.edu immediately with your application found here: https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/
  • A book launch party to celebrate the release of Todd Mitchell’s The Last Panther (Delacorte Press) took place August 25th at Everyday Joe’s Coffee House.
  • Emma Hyche’s poem “Field Trip to the Dead President’s House” was published in the Tampa Review over the summer!
  • This summer, Kelly Weber presented poetry in Detroit at the Twelfth ASLE Biennial Conference Rust/Resistance: Works of Recovery. She read as part of a panel considering rusting language/languaging rust, as well as participating in conversations around environmental crisis and recovery. https://www.asle.org/conference/biennial-conference/

 

Hope Behind Bars 

“Hope Behind Bars” is a musical presentation at Old Town Square on Saturday, August 26 from 4pm to 8pm, which highlights Blues music and other, from groups in the Larimer County Jail (LCJ). The Community Literacy Center and SpeakOut! will be present to represent the writing that comes from its programs in the LCJ. Stop by and send your friends to connect with these programs that do important creative work in our community.

Rekindle the Classics 

The next Rekindle the Classics discussion will be on Wednesday, September 13, 6:30-8:30 pm at Wolverine Farms Publick House. MFA student Kelly Weber will lead a discussion of Morrison’s Beloved. Rekindle the Classics brings together CSU English faculty and graduate students and lovers of literature in the Fort Collins community.

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A powerful tale. ~Kirkus

Told in vivid, heartbreaking detail and filled with strong, developed characters, this novel tackles an important theme in a compelling way. In Kiri, young readers will find a protagonist who, although at times afraid, finds the courage to do what she believes to be right. ~Booklist

Earnest, heartfelt, and passionate, this book will likely inspire new environmentalists.  ~Bulletin

The Last Panther, Assistant Professor Todd Mitchell’s latest book, was officially released this week. A book launch party is being held tomorrow, Friday the 25th, at Everyday Joe’s Coffee House, 5-6:30 pm, (find out all the details here). Even though it’s a busy week for him, Todd was kind enough to take the time to answer a few of our questions about the book, his process, and his advice for aspiring writers.

Where did the idea for this book come from?
For years, I was looking for a book that could be used to discuss, with young people, our connection to the greater ecology, and the ways we can act to address some of the biggest environmental problems we currently face. I wasn’t able to find the sort of book I was looking for, though. Most novels that addressed issues like climate change, resource depletion, and species extinction were for older audiences. And the books I did find that addressed such issues were often apocalyptic and depressing. Then, one day, it hit me: Why not write the book I’m looking for? Why not create a story where I could explore, from all angles, the issues I care most deeply about?

It’s funny how long it took me to come to that conclusion. I think I spent a long time avoiding writing about the issues closest to my heart because I feared it would be too difficult to explore such issues in an entertaining way. I wanted others to shoulder the burden of figuring out how to tell such a story. However, writing this book wasn’t a burden at all. Once I gave myself permission to tell the story I wanted to tell, it became the best writing experience of my life.

You mentioned that you wrote this book with your daughter. How was that process different from writing your other books?
This is what made writing this book so much fun: I knew exactly who I was writing for. My daughter, Addison, was ten at the time I developed the first draft. Every night, I’d read a chapter to her and get her feedback on what she liked, what confused her, and what other ideas she had for the story. Then I’d revise that chapter, keeping her feedback in mind, and how she reacted to the story as I read it.

The book’s “co-author” Addison on the left.

I think having a clear audience in mind is vital for any writing project. This was the first time, though, that I was able to read to that audience on a nightly basis and get her feedback. I’m grateful for all that Addison added to the book (the pet rat was her idea, BTW. And she’s the one who named him Snowflake).

Is there an ongoing theme (or themes) in your books? Is there a common thread or message in the stories you tell?
I usually write books to explore questions that interest and trouble me. So if there’s a common theme among my books, it’s that every book began with a question I couldn’t stop asking myself. With The Last Panther, that question was “What is a species worth?” How far would you go to keep a species, like the Florida panther, from extinction? How far should we go as a society to do this? And how do we value other parts of creation? Each of the main characters is brought to a point in the story where he or she must decide what they value most. And each comes up with a different answer (sometimes this answer surprises them). Writing this book helped me to understand the deep, often unstated values that underly many of our current conflicts.

What advice do you have for aspiring writers?
Write the story you’re most afraid to tell. The difficulty here is that sometimes, you don’t even know what you’re afraid to talk about until you discover that something’s holding you back. I think it’s important to give yourself permission to speak and write about the things you care most deeply about, even if you sound ridiculous doing it. This is a hard thing to do, because we’re afraid to be criticized for what we care about, or because we’re afraid to explore what’s difficult, or because we’re afraid to put ourselves at risk this way. But as the poet, Lee Upton, put it, “Our risk is our cure.” This is how you find the stories that mean the most to you. And if you can do that, you’ll probably find stories that mean something to others, too.

 

Join us in congratulating Todd on his new book, and for the release party!

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~From intern Katie Haggstrom

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The beginning of August means that fall classes start in less than three weeks. But there are still plenty of literary events happening around Fort Collins, both before and after school starts. From Fort Collins own Comic Con to a release party for English Professor Todd Mitchell’s new book, there are plenty of things to do between classes. Let us know if you’re going to a literary event not on our list! 

August 3 – Book Talk with Peter Maeck. Stop by Old Firehouse Books in downtown Fort Collins at 6pm. Visit the event page for more information. 

August 7 – Old Firehouse Books will host a book talk with Danya Kukafka. Kukafka, a Fort Collins native, will be discussing her new book Girl in Snow. The event starts at 6pm, visit the Facebook event page for more information.

August 17 – Summer Bike-In Cinema Series: “Get Out.” Bring your friends out to New Belgium Brewing from 6-10pm for a screening of the horror film “Get Out.” Tickets are $2 per person with proceeds going to Wolverine Farm Publishing. More information is listed on their event page

August 24 – FoCo Drink & Draw at the Wolverine Farm Letterpress from 5-7pm. The event invites people to “drink a few beers and draw a few pictures.” While some of you many see yourself only as writers, don’t hesitate to get in touch with your inner artist. Visit their event for more details. 

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August 25 – Our own English Professor Todd Mitchell will have a release party for his new book The Last Panther. Come help him celebrate at Everyday Joe’s Coffee House in downtown Fort Collins, starting at 5pm. The Facebook event page has more information. Read our Faculty/Alumni profile to learn more about Mitchell and his works.

August 26-27 – Fort Collins Comic Con. All tickets proceeds go toward the Poudre River Public Library District. Spend the weekend celebrating your favorite book fandoms. Visit the Comic Con website for ticket and event information. Visit their Facebook page to get a sneak peak of who’s attending. 

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Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

Click image for larger view

 

We’re Hiring!

 

CLC is looking for interns!

Internship with the Community Literacy Center (CLC)

Job Description:  The intern (junior, senior or grad student) will work with the Community Literacy Center faculty to design a set of literacy research and outreach projects.  Projects might include one or more of the following:

  • working with a faculty mentor to pilot community literacy programming such as creative writing mini-classes, workplace writing mentorships, or literacy tutoring experiences;
  • investigating current policy on a national and regional level in order to understand the politics of funding public education;
  • developing training materials for community-based literacy partnerships;
  • researching and writing grant proposals;
  • working directly with a community partner in order to understand a research question (e.g. what is the relationship between socio-economics and an extracurricular book club?);
  • researching and building the CLC webpage;
  • planning and facilitating a local literacy event (readings, workshops, etc.);

developing assessment tools in order to measure how literacy skills are advanced by a particular classroom approach or set of materials;

  • working with a mentor in the CLC office to gain experience with literacy program administration;
  • designing a research study and collecting primary data on existing literacy outreach programs; or
  • an alternative project designed by you.

Interns manage one community literacy workshop (weekly, 1.5 hours) and are responsible for transcribing writing, encouraging writers with written feedback, and managing a small team of volunteers.

Credit:  Interns can earn up to 6 credits for their work.

The application for an internship is online at https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/.  Please apply by May 5.

All independent internships must be approved by the English Department’s Internship Coordinator, Cassie.Eddington@colostate.edu.

Additional opportunity:  If you are interested in volunteer work with the CLC, go to https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/ for more information.

 

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CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

 

English Department Awards Reception TODAY!!!

Monday, 4-6pm in the LSC North Ballroom – Presentations at 4:30pm.

  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang recently gave a reading & talk at Colgate University in New York. Matthew has an essay up on Hart Crane at At Length on “the poem that won’t leave you alone.” http://atlengthmag.com/poetry/the-poem-that-wont-leave-you-alone/
  • On Saturday, April 29, 4pm, Old Firehouse Books, Dan Beachy-Quick, Matthew Cooperman and Bill Tremblay will read from their work as part of National Independent Bookstore Day, and the closing of National Poetry Month.
  • Roze Hentschell was invited to speak at The Senior Center in Fort Collins, where she spoke on “Shakespeare and the Sonnet Tradition.”
  • Jaime Jordan invites everyone to explore how she uses the Serial podcast to tackle unconscious bias in her CO150 class. Those interested can check out the display in the northwest corner of the 3rd floor at the “lunch counter.”
  • Todd Mitchell recently conducted a full day of fiction and poetry workshops with teens at Fort Collins High School, where they have several outstanding writers (who might hopefully come here). He also conducted virtual visits (via Skype) to high school and middle school students in southern Colorado.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore presented “Affect, Anxiety, and the Abject Corpse in A Study in Scarlet” at the Popular Culture Association/American Cultural Association conference in San Diego on April 15. This paper was advised by Ellen Brinks and Debby Thompson (for her master’s final project).
  • Rebecca Snow will give a brief talk along with other local authors at the Quid Novi book fair, April 27th, 6-9 pm. She can get CSU authors table space to display/sell their books as her guest for 1/2-price ($25.00) and free registration, up until the day of the event: https://www.quidnoviinnovations.com/Spring-Innovation/
  • Mary Crow has had four poems accepted for publication: “Theory” and “But You Came anyway” by New Madrid and “Taking the Heat” and “The Necessary Existence of the Old World” by The American Journal of Poetry.
  • The Writing Center and the English Department were well-represented at the Colorado and Wyoming Writing Tutors Conference. Here is a list of presenters and presentations:
    • Kiley Miller & Wendy-Anne Hamrick
      “Is that an effective question?”: Meaningful and Interactive Grammar Feedback in Multilingual Consultations
    • Leah White & Katherine Indermaur
      Mindfulness for Tutor Resilience
    • Shirley Coenen & Leslie Davis
      Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate and Graduate Student Writing Support
    • Jennifer Levin, Tiffany Akers, and Alina S. Lugo
      Strategies for Increasing Engagement in Tutoring Sessions
    • Sheri Anderson, Sue Doe, and Lisa Langstraat
      Student-Veterans in the Writing Center: Dispelling the Myths and Providing Genuine “Military Friendly” Support

English Department Career Event: Freelance Editing Panel

Please join us for a special panel on working in the world of freelance editing. Panelists Ann Diaz (M.A. 17) and Nathan DelaCastro (B.A. 15) will share their experiences working as freelance editors and making a living!

When: Friday, May 5, from 3:00 to 4:15pm
Where: Location TBA

More details and information are forthcoming, so stay tuned! Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, with any questions.

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  • Matthew Cooperman currently has new poems out in The Laurel Review and Saltfront, in print. Online, Mary: A Journal of New Writing, is featuring three of his poems at http://maryjournal.org/fall2016/?page_id=416
  • On Wednesday, April 5, Camille Dungy will present at the Newberry Library, Chicago as part of a panel in celebration of the centennial of poet and former US Poet Laureate Gwendolyn Brooks. As part of a citywide celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks marking the one-hundredth anniversary of her birth, the Newberry will gather poets, scholars, historians, and archivists to discuss the historical context of Brooks’ groundbreaking first book of poems, A Street in Bronzeville. Published in in August 1945—the same month that World War II ended—the collection expresses the rich complexities of life on Chicago’s South Side within the larger fight for democracy both at home and abroad. https://www.newberry.org/04052017-gwendolyn-brooks
  • Todd Mitchell attended and delivered a session on “Teaching Dystopian Fiction” at this year’s Colorado Teen Literature Conference in Denver.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Choose Your Own,” was accepted for publication in the next issue of Black Warrior Review.
  • Steven Schwartz’s Madagascar: New and Selected Stories is a finalist for the Colorado Book Award for Literary Fiction and the Foreword Review Award for Short Stories.
  • Rico Moore, MFA Summer 2011 (Poetry), has had four poems (“Immanence of Star,” “Three Lyrics Composed of Words from Seneca’s Epistle, ‘On the God within Us,’” “When Awakened at Night by the Quiet,” and “What You’ve Unearthed from the Past,” appear in the journal, LVNG, number 17, online at https://lvngmagazine.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/lvng17.pdf.In addition, Rico has been a freelance writer for the past two years with Boulder Weekly. He writes about plans through which the Colorado Department of Parks and Wildlife hopes to kill mountain lions and bears in the name of boosting mule deer populations. His articles include “Off target: are mountain lions and bears about to be killed for the sins of the oil and gas industry?,” “Update: Commission asked to delay killing of mountain lions and bears in the name of sound science,” and “CPW and the oil and gas industry can’t have it both ways.”  An update, published Thursday, deals with an injunction filed by WildEarth Guardians.  You can read these articles online at http://www.boulderweekly.com/author/ricomoore/.
  • On March 27 at a ceremony at the Tishman Auditorium in New York, Natalie Scenters-Zapico accepted the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry for her book The Verging Cities, published by the Center for Literary Publishing as part of the Mountain West Poetry Series.

Rekindle the Classics 

The next Rekindle the Classics discussion will be on Wednesday, April 12, 6:30-8:30 pm at Wolverine Farms Publick House. MFA student Lauren Matheny will lead a discussion of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary. Rekindle the Classics brings together CSU English faculty and graduate students and lovers of literature in the Fort Collins community. For more information, see http://blog.poudrelibraries.org/2017/01/rekindle-a-love-of-the-classics/

English Department Writing Contests

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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'Old School' research in the library. Remember catalog cards? 1975. University Historic Photograph Collection

‘Old School’ research in the library. Remember card catalogs? 1975. University Historic Photograph Collection. (Image shared by the Morgan Library on Facebook last week).

  • On Thursday, February 9, the Community Literacy Center hosted Kay Adams, Founder and director of the Center for Journal Therapy in Denver as part of their spring SpeakOut! facilitator training event. Fourteen students, faculty, and community members participated in dialogue on writing through times of chaos.
  • Beth Lechleitner’s collaborative poetry/visual art piece “Mettle” has been accepted into the CSU Art and Science exhibition at the Curfman gallery.  The show opens Feb 21 and runs through March 24.
  • Todd Mitchell attended and presented two sessions at last weekend’s 50th Anniversary CCIRA Conference in Denver. One grimly packed session on “Teaching Dystopian Fiction,” and a second on “Using Writing Games to Develop Literacy and Creativity.”
  • Claire Boyles (second year MFA candidate in fiction) has been accepted to the Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference in fiction and awarded a Katharine Bakeless Nason scholarship to attend.
  • Bill Tremblay’s memoir on jazz “The Music While the Music Lasts” will appear in Brilliant Corners in the Summer, 2017, issue.
  • Slope Editions announced that Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) book, Instrument of Gaps, was selected for publication from their Fall 2016 Open Reading Period. Read more information on the Slope Editions news page. She also has a poem accepted in Beloit Poetry Journal, her poem “A long road never takes us” is out in the Winter 2017 edition of North American Review, and she participated in a Parlor Press reading in D.C. for AWP on Thursday, February 9.

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Image by Paul L Dineen

  • SueEllen Campbell has three recent publications: “Making Climate Change Our Job,” the lead article in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, eds. Siperstein, Hall, and LeMenager, Routledge, 2017; the forward, “Sunrise, Celebration,” to Ellen Wohl, Rhythms of Change in Rocky Mountain National Park, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016; and “The White-tailed Ptarmigan,” an excerpt from Even Mountains Vanish, in The Rocky Mountain National Park Reader, ed. James H. Pickering, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016. She continues her work on the 100 Views of Climate Change website, http://changingclimates.colostate.edu, endeavoring to deal with a backlog of good new accessible sources of information of all kinds.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher just had a prose poem sequence accepted for the Manifest West anthology on “Women of the West.” The anthology is due out later this year.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, titled “Re-Writing a Discursive Practice: Atheist Adaptation of Coming Out Discourse” has been accepted for publication in Written Communication. It will be out this April.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s essay “Notes Toward a Poetics of Drought” is up at Omniverse right now. The essay, part of panel proceedings from a panel organized and chaired by Kristen George Bagdanov (MFA ’15), is a three-part series being run by Omniverse. You can find it here: http://omniverse.us/poetics-of-drought-matthew-cooperman/
  • From Sue Doe: “I am excited to announce a new online journal, Academic Labor:  Research and Artistry. ALRA is published by the Center for the Study of Academic Labor, a CSU center supported by President Tony Frank (see http://csal.colostate.edu/about/tony-franks-statement/) and Dean Ben Withers. We seek to provide perspectives from the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts on contingency, tenure and the future of higher education. Please consider submitting something for the inaugural issue, and please circulate the CFP to your colleagues and distribute it to disciplinary list-servs, journals, websites, discussion boards, etc. Note that the journal invites varied genres, including art.”
  • Todd Mitchell launched a new program today to encourage literacy, creativity, and caring for our earth by delivering free books and free author visits to underfunded schools in Colorado. If you want to learn more (or become a supporter), check out http://youcaring.com/Books4Change.
  • Todd Mitchell cover reveal. After years of writing and countless drafts. I’m finally able to share with you the cover for my new book. It’s coming out in August, 2017. Just in time for the new school year. I can’t wait to release this one into the wild, along with several new presentations for schools! Click to read early reviews, preorder a copy, and learn more about why I wrote this book.  lastpanther
  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Bellwethers: Shame and My Left Breast” is up at Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-83/
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the January 2017 issue of OmniVerse and other poems have recently been accepted in the Raleigh Review, Bellingham Review, and Sugar House Review. Her blogpost “Consideration of Self in Poetry: You & the Page” is up at North American Review, and a new interview with poems can be found online at HocTok.

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  • On November 16 and 17, Camille Dungy spoke at the University of Arizona Poetry Center as part of their Climate Change & Poetry Series. “Starting in October 2016, the UA Poetry Center features eight world-class poets as they address what overlaps, contradictions, mutual challenges, and confluences the categories of Climate Change & Poetry share with each other; in a series of investigative readings, we hope to offer some answers, some questions, and some new ways of thinking. In this second installment of readings built around a common question, we wonder: what role does poetry have in envisioning, articulating, or challenging our ecological present? What role does poetry have in anticipating, shaping – or even creating – our future?” http://poetry.arizona.edu/climatechange
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s newest book, Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams, just received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews, whose editors also chose it as a “Kirkus’ Indie Books of the Month Selection” for January. https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/harrison-candelaria-fletcher/presentimiento/
  • Todd Mitchell spoke on the Author Panel last weekend at the Loveland Library Author Showcase. He also spoke with the IRS after they read one of his books (the IRS is the Poudre Library’s Interested Reader Society of teen readers. If you’re interested in finding engaged teen readers, contact the IRS. They’ll give you hope for our future).
  • In recent months, John Calderazzo has run science communication workshops for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability, the Graduate School, the College of Engineering, and the Office of the Vice President for Research. He continues to both volunteer and consult for the City of Fort Collins’ Climate Action Plan. John will also be the Guest Judge for the 2017 Waterston Desert Writing Prize. You can find out more about it here: http://www.writingranch.com/waterston-prize-for-desert-writers/
  • Bill Tremblay’s commentaries on drawings by Norman Olson will appear in Lummox #5, forthcoming 2017.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) second book, & in Open, Marvel, has been accepted by Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press for publication in 2017. She also has a new poem in Tupelo Quarterly, a poem in a special election issue of Tarpaulin Sky Magazine, a poem accepted at Mid-American Review where she was a runner up for the 2016 Fineline Competition, a new poem accepted in The New Guard where she was semi-finalist in the Knightville Poetry Contest, three poems in the newest issue of Witness Magazine, four poems available in the newest issue of West Branch featuring women and the avant-garde, and she is currently participating in the Tupelo 30/30 Project for the month of November.

 

2016 Graduate Showcase Awards

 

English Department Distinction In Creativity Award – The Distinction in Creativity award is presented in Collaboration by the Graduate School and Office of Vice President for Research. This award recognizes the passion and personal contributions of these talented graduate students, and honors their commitment and efforts in their area of work.

1st Place – Kelly Weber

2nd Place – Cedar Brant

 

College of Health and Human Sciences Excellence in Creativity

Alyson Welker

 

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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