Tag Archives: Sasha Steensen

  • Genesea Carter’s edited collection Class in the Composition Classroom: Pedagogy and the Working Class was just published by Utah State UP. She has co-written the introduction with her co-editor, Bill Thelin, and has a single-author chapter in the collection titled “’Being Part of Something Gave Me Purpose’: How Community Membership Impacts First-Year Students’ Sense of Self.” To learn more about the collection, visit the book’s page at: https://upcolorado.com/utah-state-university-press/item/3161-class-in-the-composition-classroom.
  • Doug Cloud did an interview for Bustle magazine on why word choice matters in news stories about sexual assault. You can read it here: https://www.bustle.com/p/calling-2017-hollywoods-sexual-assault-allegations-a-blizzard-avalanche-is-a-bigger-problem-than-you-think-it-is-3131240
  • EJ Levy is the fiction judge for Carve’s Prose & Poetry Contest. Deadline November 15, 2017. For more info on how to enter, see: https://www.carvezine.com/prose-poetry-contest/
  • Sasha Steensen’s chapbook Thirty-Three Hendes was recently published by Dancing Girl Press.  You can have a look here: https://dulcetshop.myshopify.com/collections/frontpage/products/thirty-three-hendes-sasha-steensen
  • Lauren Lynn Matheny (third year fiction) has been selected as one of the best emerging poets from Oklahoma by Z Publishing. Her poem “Seizures” will be featured in their new book, Oklahoma’s Best Emerging Poets: An Anthology. 
  • David Milofsky’s short story, “Rumors,” has been published in The Ink Anthology (UK). Earlier this year I published my fifth novel, Managed Care.
  • Nate Barron, MFA graduate, won the Iron Horse Literary Review Prize for his novel-in-progress.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s poem, “Syllabus for Homer,” accepted by the journal known as The Journal, and have had three sections from the forthcoming book Of Silence and Song accepted by Diagram.
  • Leslee Becker won 1st Prize in Writers@Work Flash Fiction Contest for her story, “The Contender.”
  • Camille Dungy has been awarded a 2018 fellowship in prose from the National Endowment for the Arts. https://www.arts.gov/news/2017/nea-fellowships-support-creative-writers-and-literary-translators-total-12-million
  • Todd Mitchell’s middle grade novel, The Last Panther, was selected as a “Best New Book for Kids” by Southern Living magazine. Over the past several weeks, Todd Mitchell has visited several elementary and middle schools across the state to encourage literacy, creativity, and positive activism. So far this semester he’s talked with over 3,000 students and teachers about environmental and social challenges, and how reading and writing can be used to create a better future. Todd Mitchell also recently presented sessions on writing and teaching writing at the Castle Rock Writing Conference, the Niwot Writers Conference, and a Windsor CCIRA teacher meeting.
  • Several of Catie Young’s poems from “Stopgap” were published by The Elephants this week: http://www.theelephants.net/records/cl-young
  • The GradShow Awards recognize excellence in research, creativity and entrepreneurship in a variety of categories.  The 2017 winners were announced by the Graduate School and the Office of the Vice President for Research Nov. 9 at the reception following a day of presentations and professional development.  Among the top 50 winners are two from the English Department, honored for Distinction in Creativity: 1st Place for $250, Michelle LaCrosse – College of Liberal Arts, English AND 2nd Place for $150, Katherine Indermaur – College of Liberal Arts, English.
  • MFA alum Devin Murphy’s debut novel has been selected as a Fall 2017 Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers title and received a terrific review in last week’s The New York Times (see link below). His second novel recently sold to Little Brown. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/10/books/review/the-boat-runner-devin-murphy.html

 

Writing Center Position: Graduate Student Assistant Director (GTA)

 

The CSU Writing Center Graduate Student Assistant Director (GTA) Application

The CSU Writing Center is currently accepting applications for the Graduate Student Assistant Director (GTA) position for AY 2018/19. If you have worked at the CSU Writing Center for at least one semester and are/will be enrolled in the English Department graduate program (MA or MFA) in 2018/19, we invite you to apply.  The pay scale for this position is the same as a teaching GTA position in the CSU English Department: tuition remission and salary of approximately $13,932.00 per 9-month contract.  (Note that this is the 2017/18 salary; if next year’s budget follows past patterns, we can expect a 2-3% increase in the base stipend.)

The Graduate Student Assistant Writing Center Director (GTA) position entails the following responsibilities:

  • A commitment of 20 hours per week to the CSU Writing Center.
  • Collaboration with the CSU Writing Center Directors to
    • Develop and implement CSU Writing Center policy,
    • Contribute to procedures for consultant training and supervision,
    • Coordinate daily administrative operations (e.g., determine consultant schedules, oversee payroll procedures, supervise work-study staff, maintain records of meeting minutes and online appointment system information, etc.).
    • A commitment to working in the CSU Writing Center for fifteen hours per week in summer, 2019. Summer pay, at $12/hour, is in addition to the 9-month GTA stipend.

                                                                                                                     If you would like to apply, please complete the following:

  • A brief, 1-2 page cover letter to the Writing Center GTA Hiring Committee that describes your interest in the position, the skills you will bring to the position, and other relevant information you’d like us to know.  Be sure to describe any administrative experience you’ve had, including supervisory or leadership positions.
  • A current vita or resume.
  • Two letters of recommendation from CSU faculty.

Deadlines:  Application materials are due on Friday, January 12, 2018. Please email applications to CSU Writing Center Director, Dr. Lisa Langstraat (lisa.langstraat@colostate.edu), and don’t hesitate to contact her with any questions about the application procedures.  After reviewing the applications, the Writing Center GTA hiring committee will schedule interviews with qualified applicants. Interviews will take place in early February, 2018.

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Image by Eric Salahub

  • Leslee Becker has been named a Finalist for the Pirate’s Alley Faulkner Award in Short Stories.
  • Doug Cloud’s co-authored essay, “How People Make Sense of Trump and Why It Matters for Racial Justice” has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Contemporary Rhetoric. It should be out in November or December.
  • A number of current and former English Dept faculty and students read at the Fort Collins Book Festival. John Calderazzo led a nonfiction workshop, Sue Ring deRossett led a fiction workshop,  and Sasha Steensen led a poetry workshop. The Poetry Lounge Reading featured Sue Ring deRossett, Bill Tremblay, Chloe Leisure, Khadijah Queen and Matthew Cooperman, at Wolverine Farm Publick House. The Listening Room fiction/nonfiction reading featured Leslee Becker, Christopher David Rosales, Blair Oliver and Junior Burke, at Wolverine Farm Publick House. And finally, the Deep Tracks Poetry reading featured Sasha Steensen, Kate Northrup, Lisa Zimmerman and Aby Kaupang, also at Wolverine Farm Publick House. More information on the festival can be found at https://www.focobookfest.org/schedule/
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poem “What we say” is published in the current issue of Bear Review. You can find it under her publishing name, slp.
  • Kristina Quynn’s co-edited collection of essays, Reading and Writing Experimental Texts: Critical Innovations, was released this week by Palgrave/Macmillan. The collection offers innovative approaches to contemporary literary criticism and includes feminist and queer readings of avant-garde twentieth- and twenty-first-century texts.  http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9783319583617
  • Last weekend James Rankin presented his paper titled “Sex, Punishment, and the Body Politic: Blood and Moral Agency in Measure for Measure” at the Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association’s conference in Spokane, WA.

 

 

Student Writing Group 

Do you have writing that needs to be workshopped by fellow writers? Do you want an informal environment of people who can help? My name is Kenna Castleberry, and I may be able to help you out. I’m hoping to start a student writing group (no more than 7 people) to meet up once a week or so and swap and discuss our writing. I’m flexible on timing as well as genres. If you have some work that needs to be workshopped, please contact me via email: kcastle@rams.colostate.edu. Thanks, fellow wordsmiths!

 

Campus Equity Week

 

CAMPUS EQUITY WEEK EVENTS!  OCTOBER 30 AND 31

Activities planned for Monday, October 30th include:

  • 9:40 am, “Chalk and Talk,” a student engagement activity on the plaza with ART100 students taking the role of the artist working in a public space with statements addressing “the importance of academic freedom in a democratic society.” GTAs from English will work with ART100 students to assist with statement construction which will be edited and chalked on the plaza adjacent to the Lory Student Center. CO150 students and their teachers will participate in reviewing, discussing, and responding to the chalk art.
  • 5:00 PM Directions Gallery, Visual Art Building, opening remarks for Honor the Precariat, art installation commenting on the role of NTTF at CSU.
  • 5:30 PM opening remarks in the Electronic Art Gallery, Visual Art Building for a monologue performance addressing issues of contingency.
  • The Center for the Study of Academic Labor will host a reception in the Visual Arts Building in conjunction with the 5:00 and 5:30 remarks.

Activities planned for Tuesday, October 31st at CSU to celebrate the national day of action include:

  • 12:00 noon – 1:00 PM, Morgan Library Events Hall. AAUP will host a Brown Bag Panel Discussion on NTTF issues, most likely focusing on questions and comments regarding the pending CoNTTF proposal. Participants include:
  • Rick Miranda (Provost)
  • Stephen Mumme (AAUP, Colorado)
  • Jenny Morse (CoNTTF Chair)
  • Mary Meyer (AAUP, CSU)
  • Tim Gallagher (Faculty Council, Chair)
  • Sue Doe (Faculty Council, Vice Chair)
  • 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM College of Liberal Arts Adjunct Faculty Committee will host an informational session about contingent issues (focus to be announced).

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As National Poetry Month comes to a close, we’ll spend the final days focusing close to home, on our very own English department poets — Matthew Cooperman, Sasha Steensen, Dan Beachy-Quick, and Camille Dungy.

Professor Sasha Steensen has published numerous chapbooks and full-length poetry collections, including correspondence (a collaborative work she completed with Gordon Hadfield in 2004), A Magic Book (2004), The Future of an Illusion (2008), The Method (2008), A History of the Human Family (2010), Waters: A Lenten Poem (2012), and most recently, House of Deer (2014). She has also written and published a number of essays and reviews.

April 2014: “My mother is on the cover. I was about 2 years old when the photo was taken. She is in our garden in Ohio, where we were back-to-the-landers. The book is about that experiment, as well as the larger experiment of family, so it seemed fitting to feature her on the cover.”

A Magic Book received the Alberta duPont Bonsal Prize.

In addition to teaching poetry and literature courses at CSU, Steensen also serves as co-poetry editor for the Colorado Review.

This Steensen poem from 2008, “Parchment, Please,” originally appeared in The Method: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/55599

Check out Steensen’s faculty profile for more.

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Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Recently, Tim Amidon presented research at two concurrent conferences in Portland: the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (ATTW) and the Conference on College Composition and Communication. At ATTW, Battalion Chief Randy Callahan of Poudre Fire Authority joined Tim to speak about the ongoing community based research projects that they have been undertaking in partnership.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s flash piece, “Dawn,” was named as a finalist in The Best Small Fictions 2017 by guest judge Amy Hempel. “Dawn” was nominated by the editors of Eleven Eleven.
  • EJ Levy’s hybrid essay, “Natural World,” appears in the most recent issue of Passages North. She will be Visiting Writing at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell on March 22-23, 2017.
  • Sasha Steensen’s chapbook, Thirty-Three Hendes was a finalist for the Tupelo Sunken Gardens chapbook contest. It will be published by Dancing Girl Press this summer.
  • Michael Knisely has a photography exhibit going on in Boulder through April at the Rocky Ridge School of Music in the Lucky’s Market shopping center at Broadway and Spruce. These are performance art photos from when he was the University of Nebraska Dance Dept.’s photographer, plus a few old concert photos (Peter, Paul, and Mary, and Bruce Springsteen).
  • Dana Chellman’s essay “How to Get to Heaven from Colorado” is a winner for the AWP Intro Journals Project, and it is being published in Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Jennifer Stetson-Strange, Spring 2017 MA candidate in TEFL/TESL, has been offered an opportunity related to her final project, “Needs Analysis and Curriculum Development for Occupational ESP: English for hotel workers.”  Over the past nine months she dedicated over 80 hours to conducting a thorough needs analysis, compiling and analyzing specific language needs of L2 (second language) learners in order to develop a curriculum for workers in the hospitality industry and specifically housekeepers at a local hotel.

    Jenny observed more than 20 participants who worked in the housekeeping department of a local hotel in Northern Colorado.  She found it a rewarding experience to be a part of this project, including building key relationships with participants at the hotel.  At her final defense in March, the majority of the housekeeping staff attended as well as the general manager of the hotel, filling the defense room with 35-40 people.  Jenny was overwhelmed by the attendance and thankful they all were there because, as she writes, “The entire project was about them!”

    Currently, the general manager would like Jenny to implement the curriculum as soon as possible.  She will be teaching the staff once a week until she graduates.  This summer, she hopes to continue teaching the housekeeping staff twice a week.  Her future goal is to implement this program at different hotels and restaurants in Northern Colorado.

  • Mary Crow has had eight poems from her collection Addicted to the Horizon translated into Spanish by Silvia Soler-Gallego and Francisco Leal and published in AEREA: Revista Hispanoamericana de Poesia along with the English originals. This literary magazine is a joint publication of the University of Georgia and the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute.
  • James Work’s novel The Contractor was voted First Finalist in the annual Spur Award competition of Western Writers of America. His first novel of a projected series of “cozy” mysteries has been accepted by FiveStar Publishing. The title is Unmentionable Murders and the main character of the series is a RMNP ranger in the 1920s. Lots of gangsters, flappers, bootleg hooch and, of course, mysterious murder.
  • Cedar Brant has a sculpture in the CSU Art and Science Exhibition in the Curfman Gallery in Lory Student Center.  http://source.colostate.edu/celebrate-creativity-csus-art-science-exhibition-march-24/

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oval

Image by Paul L Dineen

  • SueEllen Campbell has three recent publications: “Making Climate Change Our Job,” the lead article in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, eds. Siperstein, Hall, and LeMenager, Routledge, 2017; the forward, “Sunrise, Celebration,” to Ellen Wohl, Rhythms of Change in Rocky Mountain National Park, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016; and “The White-tailed Ptarmigan,” an excerpt from Even Mountains Vanish, in The Rocky Mountain National Park Reader, ed. James H. Pickering, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016. She continues her work on the 100 Views of Climate Change website, http://changingclimates.colostate.edu, endeavoring to deal with a backlog of good new accessible sources of information of all kinds.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher just had a prose poem sequence accepted for the Manifest West anthology on “Women of the West.” The anthology is due out later this year.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, titled “Re-Writing a Discursive Practice: Atheist Adaptation of Coming Out Discourse” has been accepted for publication in Written Communication. It will be out this April.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s essay “Notes Toward a Poetics of Drought” is up at Omniverse right now. The essay, part of panel proceedings from a panel organized and chaired by Kristen George Bagdanov (MFA ’15), is a three-part series being run by Omniverse. You can find it here: http://omniverse.us/poetics-of-drought-matthew-cooperman/
  • From Sue Doe: “I am excited to announce a new online journal, Academic Labor:  Research and Artistry. ALRA is published by the Center for the Study of Academic Labor, a CSU center supported by President Tony Frank (see http://csal.colostate.edu/about/tony-franks-statement/) and Dean Ben Withers. We seek to provide perspectives from the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts on contingency, tenure and the future of higher education. Please consider submitting something for the inaugural issue, and please circulate the CFP to your colleagues and distribute it to disciplinary list-servs, journals, websites, discussion boards, etc. Note that the journal invites varied genres, including art.”
  • Todd Mitchell launched a new program today to encourage literacy, creativity, and caring for our earth by delivering free books and free author visits to underfunded schools in Colorado. If you want to learn more (or become a supporter), check out http://youcaring.com/Books4Change.
  • Todd Mitchell cover reveal. After years of writing and countless drafts. I’m finally able to share with you the cover for my new book. It’s coming out in August, 2017. Just in time for the new school year. I can’t wait to release this one into the wild, along with several new presentations for schools! Click to read early reviews, preorder a copy, and learn more about why I wrote this book.  lastpanther
  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Bellwethers: Shame and My Left Breast” is up at Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-83/
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the January 2017 issue of OmniVerse and other poems have recently been accepted in the Raleigh Review, Bellingham Review, and Sugar House Review. Her blogpost “Consideration of Self in Poetry: You & the Page” is up at North American Review, and a new interview with poems can be found online at HocTok.

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~from intern Joyce Bohling

Francisco Leal and Silvia Soler

Francisco Leal and Silvia Soler

Francisco Leal and Silvia Soler, both professors in CSU’s Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, are trying to do something they themselves describe as “impossible”: to translate the work of CSU poets into Spanish, including Camille Dungy, Sasha Steensen, Dan Beachy-Quick, and Professor Emeritus Mary Crow. In fact, they’re planning to publish a book of their translations in spring of 2017.

Dr. Leal, whose academic work focuses primarily on contemporary Latin American poetry and who writes his own original poetry, was inspired to start a project of this nature shortly after he came to CSU and read the work of the aforementioned CSU poets. Dr. Soler, an assistant professor with an emphasis in translation and interpretation, was invited to join the project when she came to CSU in fall of 2015.

They have also garnered help from interested undergraduate and graduate students in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, as well as those in other departments, such as the Department of English.

I first found out about their monumental task when I enrolled in LGEN 545: Literary Translation in Theory and Practice, for the fall semester. In the course, the students, who speak four different languages (Spanish, French, German, and Portuguese) are almost all working on translating poems by different CSU poets. Students have the option to submit their translations to be included in the upcoming publication.

Earlier this autumn, I sat down with Dr. Leal and Dr. Soler for an interview to find out more about the project: its hardships, its joys, and what faculty and students in the English department might like to know about it.

The most challenging part of the translation process, the two professors say, is transferring what Dr. Leal called “the invisible poetry” from one poem to another. “I think it’s the detail—that invisible part that’s hard to explain or identify that is moving poetry to poetry, not only word to word”: in other words, not just the literal meaning of the words themselves, but the complex web of symbolism, cultural significance, style, appearance, sound, and in some cases, strict structural constraints.

Dr. Soler was amused by the words “invisible poetry.” “That’s the poet’s explanation,” she teased. “I would never say that.”

“I would say that the most challenging part of translating Sasha and Camille’s poetry—especially Sasha’s—is that it’s very concise. She tries to convey different layers of meaning in very few words.”

Both translators also mentioned the difficulty of identifying and understanding allusions in U.S. poets’ work, both literary and cultural, as both come from other cultures: Dr. Soler from Spain and Dr. Leal from Chile.

“It’s sometimes more difficult for non-natives of this [American] culture…to identify those allusions,” said Dr. Soler. “That has been mentioned by many different writers and scholars in translation studies as one of the main difficulties in literary translation—in any text, but specifically literary translation—when you are evoking or referring to a different literary work or just some cultural or historical event, or just some connotations at the semantic level from a specific culture that we don’t find in dictionaries, of course. We have to use our background knowledge, and if we lack that background knowledge, then we are missing that layer of meaning.”

But what is a challenge, Dr. Leal said, can also be a joy. “When you see that [invisible poetry] moving into a different language, it’s extremely rewarding….I think it goes both ways; what is challenging is also a motivation.”

The two translators emphasized how rewarding it has been to get to work on this project collaboratively, with each other and with the authors of the poems they are translating. Dr. Leal is first and foremost a writer, although he dabbled in some poetry translation prior to meeting Dr. Soler and learning more about the methods, theories, and terminology used by professional translators. “How she can make a translation for me is always magic,” he said.

Dr. Soler, on the other hand, had never had the opportunity to work directly with the author of a literary work before coming to CSU.

The professors of Spanish found the poets from the English department to be quite open to having their work translated, which, Dr. Soler said, came as a bit of a surprise; she had expected more resistance. “You are a writer, an author, and you know that somebody’s going to try to interpret what you wanted to convey. I’m not an author, but I think I understand that it’s kind of difficult to not know what is going to be done with your words, feelings, emotions, ideas.” She said she finds the poets—Camille Dungy, Sasha Steensen, Dan Beachy-Quick, and Mary Crow—“amazing” in their willingness to let their work be translated.

Although Dr. Soler stressed that literary translation is not “necessary” in the same way that, for instance, translation of court documents is necessary for someone who doesn’t speak a country’s official language, it still has tremendous benefit.

“It’s just so important, I think, if we want to build healthier and better human communities. And this, to me, means that once you try to think about the world—other humans, and not just other humans but other beings—from different perspectives, and when you have access to other perspectives from which people look at the world, your mind changes. In a good way. It becomes more open and able to accept diversity, which is the basis of healthier, more respectful human communities.”

Dr. Leal agreed that translation can help us understand others from different cultures and with different perspectives, but he also emphasized that it can simultaneously remind us how much we have in common. For instance, in the course I’m currently taking, we read a number of translations of a poem by the eighth century Chinese poet Wang Wei. Because of translation, Dr. Leal said, “it’s not only that we are able to enjoy that poem, but that poem can talk to you straightforward.”

It’s “excellent proof that we all live in one big planet.”

Dr. Soler and Dr. Leal would be thrilled to have more students and faculty from the English department take a literary translation class with them, get involved with translating for their upcoming publication, or both. Collaboration between the English department and the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, they stressed, is very enriching for students and faculty in both programs.

They wished to re-assure students in the English department that one need not be fluent in a language in order to translate from or into that language. “The more you know, the better, but that doesn’t mean you have to be native-speaker level in two languages in order to do translation, necessarily,” said Dr. Leal.

Dr. Soler agreed. “It is important the bilingual competence is always there–no one can say that it’s not important—but…translation is much more than the bilingual competence or the bicultural competence….You are trained in the different methods and strategies and concepts that you need to be aware of, and that helps you start to build your competence as a translator. If you’re able to explain why you do what you are doing, and you’re also aware of the problems that you’re having with the language, the culture, or whatever, that makes you a translator.”

I certainly have gotten a lot out of the literary translation course, even though I’m not fluent in German. Although I was a German minor as an undergraduate, I certainly don’t speak, read or write at a level I would need to translate professionally. Nonetheless, I’ve been able to learn so much from the course about the nuanced differences between languages and found many resources for learning more about German beyond just a bilingual dictionary. It’s also been, as the professors pointed out, an enriching opportunity to get to know students from the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures and hear their unique thoughts and perspectives.

Although no translation classes are being offered next semester, Dr. Soler plans to continue offering courses in a variety of kinds of translation, such as film translation. She and Dr. Leal are also happy to hear from anyone in the English department interested in knowing more about their ongoing translation project.

“800-TRANSLATE is the phone number. Call collect!” joked Dr. Leal.

 

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Fort Collins Discovery Museum, image by Jill Salahub

Fort Collins Discovery Museum, image by Jill Salahub

  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s book of poems, gentlessness, has been named a finalist for the Colorado Book Award in Poetry.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s poem, “Endangered Species,” is up today at the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day site: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem-day
  • SueEllen Campbell and John Calderazzo spent the week of spring break at the University of Montana and in Missoula.  SueEllen read a personal essay and talked about dealing with the emotions raised by the idea of climate change and ran a workshop about teaching climate change in the humanities. John led a community writing workshop on the subject of health. Both were partly sponsored by the Health and Humanities Institute, and SueEllen was also sponsored by the department of English. SueEllen also interviewed faculty and students in the university’s climate change minor for a program review.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem “because it looked hotter that way” is a featured women’s month selection on Poets.org, the online archive for the Academy of American Poets, https://m.poets.org/poetsorg/womens-history-month
  • Roze Hentschell is attending the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America conference in New Orleans, for which she wrote a seminar paper, “Reimagining a New St. Paul’s Cathedral.”
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay “Austerity Behind Bars: The ‘Cost’ of Prison College Programs” appears in Composition in the Age of Austerity, a new collection edited by Anthony Scott and Nancy Welch (Utah State University Press).
  • Leif Sorensen presented a paper on pulp magazines as incubators for contemporary popular genre categories at the meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association in Boston.
  • Leif Sorensen’s book, Ethnic Modernism and the Making of US Literary Multiculturalism just came out from Palgrave Macmillan. The book focuses on the remarkable careers of four ethnic fiction writers: Younghill Kang, D’Arcy McNickle, Zora Neale Hurston, and Américo Paredes and shows how their works played a crucial role in the development of what we now call multiethnic literature in the US.
  • On April 2nd, Sasha Steensen will give a reading at the Ivy Writers Series, a bilingual reading series in Paris, France.
  • Neil Fitzpatrick’s story “The Future of Statues” is featured in the latest issue of A Public Space. He’ll be reading in Manhattan on April 6 with another Emerging Writer Fellow and their mentors. Here’s the link to the issue: http://apublicspace.org/magazine/issue_24. And the event: https://www.facebook.com/events/982453681849010/.

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Image by Jill Salahub

Image by Jill Salahub

  • Antero Garcia has a new chapter titled “Teacher as Dungeon Master: Connected learning, democratic classrooms, and rolling for initiative” in the book The role-playing society: Essays on the cultural influence of RPGs (MacFarland).
  • Antero Garcia has been announced as a judge for the art and writing youth “Twist Fate” challenge. He will co-edit a collection of the entries to be published after the competition challenge ends. The deadline for entries is April 6th and more info can be found here: http://dmlhub.net/newsroom/media-releases/twist-fate/.
  • Sasha Steensen published five poems in the March/ April issue of Kenyon Review, two of which are featured online: http://www.kenyonreview.org/journal/marapr-2016/selections/sasha-steensen/  She was also interviewed for Kenyon Conversations.  You can read the interview here:  http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/sasha-steensen/ She will be reading at Mountain Fold bookstore in Colorado Springs at 7pm on March 19th.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore will be presenting “Affect, Anxiety, and the Abject Corpse in A Study in Scarlet” at the Popular Culture Association/American Cultural Association conference in Seattle on March 24. She was advised regarding this paper (her final graduate project) by Ellen Brinks and Debby Thompson, and she received NTTF professional development funding to support travel for this presentation.
  • Sean Waters published a cool piece about Seth Jansen and Poudre Valley Community Farms, which came out last week in Fort Collins’ Scene Magazine.  http://scenenoco.com/2016/03/02/poudre-valley-farms/
  • Davis Webster’s (an undergrad in creative writing) essay “Wyo.” was accepted for publication in Fourth Genre.
  • Embracing Community through Giving,” an article about Deanna Ludwin’s contributions to the English Department, is included in the February 27 issue of the College of Liberal Arts Newsletter. Jill Salahub is the article’s author. Deanna’s poem “Focus” was published in Fjords Review’s “Free Womens Edition.” (Go to fjordsreview.com and click on “Featured” then “Archives.”) Her article about attending a poetry workshop in France, “Opening the Senses in Southern France,” was included in volume 6, issue 1 of CSU’s Society of Senior Scholars Newsletter.
  • Edward Hamlin, winner of Colorado Review’s 2013 Nelligan Prize for Short Fiction, will read from his recently published collection Night in Erg Chebbi and Other Stories, winner of the Iowa Short Fiction Award and one of two finalists for this year’s Colorado Book Award (short story collection category), at Wolverine Farm’s Publick House Saturday April 16, 7:30 pm. (Please note: this event was rescheduled due to weather, and will take place at the same location on May 20, 7:30 pm).

 

Commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death this summer in E343: Shakespeare II with Dr. Roze Hentschell. Registration begins March 22nd.

Shakespeare flyer 1.0

 

Tools from the Workshop: Theory and “Hands On” Practice with Multimodal Engagement in UD Composition Courses Part II

The Upper Division Composition Professional Development Workshop Series is proud to present the second installment of our spring 2016 offerings: During the week of March 21st we will hold our second workshop: The Possibility of Actually Composing a Visual Argument  (Room and Time TBA after the Doodle Poll Results are In)

Come join us as we discuss a sprinkling of theory that connects visual argument with the course goals of CO 300. The bulk of the workshop will be devoted to a “hands on” exploration of the new Photoshop software that has been installed on the computers in Eddy 2 and 4. Help us explore this rich visual editing software and envision ways that it can be effectively utilized in the classroom. A nice takeaway from the workshop will be the production of a flyer to advertise one of your upcoming classes. (Never be caught unprepared when the call for a class flyer is issued!)

All are welcome to join.

Four great incentives:

  1. Conversation with your awesome peers
  2. Certificate of Completion for those pesky Evaluation files
  3. Intellectual Engagement
  4. Snacks!  

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The cake for the Homecoming open house was delicious

The cake for the Homecoming open house was delicious, and eventually it was all gone

  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Openings: Into Our Vertical Cosmos,” was released by Essay Press as a digital chapbook.  She thought of titling the essay “What Not to do on Sabbatical,” in case that piques your interest.  You can read the essay here:  http://www.essaypress.org/ep-40/
  • Skyhorse Press has released Dan Robinson’s first novel, After the Fire, in paperback, so those who didn’t buy it in the first go round can find it now.  When it was first published in hardback, Wildland Firefighter Magazine said that it contained “some of the best stuff ever written about [fire] crews,” Bloomsbury Review wrote that it “engages you with a kind of terrible beauty,” and Booklist called it “a fine debut.”
  • Courtney Polland’s proposal “Playing with Pastoral: Socio-Economic and Geographic Relations in Herrick’s Hesperides” has been accepted to the Graduate Student Showcase, November 11.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s, MFA (Fiction) 420 word flash-fiction piece, entitled “Love and Reefer” has been accepted for publication in Straylight Literary Magazine.
  • Meagan Wilson’s proposal “Mere Imagination: Mind & Material” was accepted to the Graduate Student Showcase, November 11. She’ll present from 11-12:30.

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computerlabhours

  • Tim Amidon and Mike Caggiano (Forestry) received funding from the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute for an interdisciplinary research project that seeks to learn how landowners, land managers, and emergency personnel in the Front Range understand the potential risks and benefits associated with Defensible Space migration efforts. The researchers have nearly completed their interviews, and will begin analysis of the data later this semester.
  • “Composing MOOCs: Conversations about Writing in Massive Open Online Courses,” a collaborative, scholarly webtext, appeared in the current issue of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, & Pedagogy. The webtext, created by Tim Amidon, Chris Andrews (McMurry University), Elkie Burnside (University of Findlay), D. Alexis Hart (Allegheny College), & Margaret M. Strain (University of Dayton), is structured like an interactive MOOC discussion board and offers insights from leading scholars within rhetoric and composition who have recently taught or designed massive open online courses in composition in local or national contexts. The webtext can be found at http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/20.1/interviews/amidon-et-al/index.html.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an essay on Moby-Dick up at the Boston Review: http://bostonreview.net/poetry/dan-beachy-quick-moby-dick
  • Pam Coke’s proposal entitled “What Are They Selling?  What Are We Buying?: Eating Disorders as Cultural Artifact” has been accepted for the international conference The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers due to take place June 23-24, 2016, at the Université du Maine in Le Mans, France.
  • Camille Dungy’s  poem “Frequently Asked Questions: #10” is featured in the October issue of Poetry, as well as on the journal’s podcast.
  • On October 1st, Roze Hentschell gave an invited lecture, “Church, Playhouse, Market, Home: The Cultural Geography of St. Paul’s Precinct,” at the Early Modern Center at UC Santa Barbara, where she had the good fortune to see two alumna from our MA program, Megan Palmer Browne (M.A. ’06) and Katie Adkison (M.A. ’14). Roze received her Ph.D. at UCSB in 1998.
  • EJ Levy’s essay “Of Liars” was published last month in After Montaigne: Contemporary Essayists Cover the Essays (2015), in which 28 contemporary essayists–from Philip Lopate to Maggie Nelson, Jared Walker to Wayne Koestenbaum, Lia Purpura to Vivian Gornick–“re-write” Montaigne’s topics, just out from University of Georgia Press.
  • Leif Sorensen attended the seventh conference of the Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present (ASAP) in Greenville, South Carolina from September 24-27. He presented two papers: “Constructing Punk Counterpublics: Neoliberalism and the Rise of Punk in Buenos Aires, Montevideo, and São Paulo” and “‘Always start with a big explosion’: Representing Violence in Post 9/11 Genre Fiction,” in panels on the aesthetics of punk rock and violence and globalization, respectively.
  • Sasha Steensen had five poems published in Northside Review. She was interviewed for the series 12 or 20 questions: http://robmclennan.blogspot.com/2015/09/12-or-20-second-series-questions-with_29.html?m=0
  • Cedar Brant had a poem accepted for publication in Black Ocean’s Handsome Journal.
  • Mandy Rose’s essay “Five” has received a nomination for Sundress Publications’ Best of the Net. Her poem, “Nom de Guerre” was accepted by University of Hell Press for an anthology to be published in Spring 2016. Mandy will also be a guest editor for the next issue of Scissors and Spackle, http://scissorsandspackle.net/submissions/, an ELJ Publications imprint. Submissions open October 1st and are read blind, so please consider sending your work!
  • Vauhini Vara has a story in the newly published O. Henry Prize Stories anthology.  The story, originally published in Tin House is called, I, Buffalo

Workshop

Professors Lynn Shutters and Matthew Cooperman will facilitate a professionalization workshop/brown-bag event entitled “Applying to PhD Programs” next Wednesday, October 7, from 12-1:30 in Aylesworth C108. It’s designed for our MA and MFA students who are considering going on to a PhD program. Shutters and Cooperman will cover many topics such as: researching programs and institutions of interest; entrance exams; the application process de-mystified; financial assistance; and online resources. It’s an invaluable seminar designed to help graduate students make their applications as strong and successful as possible.

 

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