Tag Archives: Mary Hickey

springcrocus

The internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students, unless otherwise noted.

 

Publishing/Editorial Internships:

Education Internships:

Non-Profit/Communications Internships:

 

Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu for more information on these internships and how to apply.

To learn more about the internship program at CSU, visit:

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sunflower-bee

image by Jill Salahub

Summer 2016 Internships Available!

Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students.

Publishing/Editorial Internships:

Educational Internships:

Non-Profit/Communications Internships:

Other:

Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu  for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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CSU lagoon, image by Colorado State University

CSU lagoon, image by Colorado State University

Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students.

SPRING:

  • Publishing/Editorial Internships:
    • Editorial Interns, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
    • Writing/Editorial Internships (several positions), The Borgen Project (remote)

 

  • Educational Internships:
    • Adult ESL Teacher, Global Refugee Center (Greeley, CO)
    • Grading Assistant, NCTE@CSU with Poudre High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing Coach and Grader, NCTE@CSU, Fort Collins High School (Ft. Collins)

 

  • Non-Profit/Communications Internships:
    • Communications Intern (paid), CSU English Department
    • Learning and Organizational Development Intern, City of Fort Collins
    • Social Media and Communications Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)

 

Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu  for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • John Calderazzo has accepted an invitation to join the Fort Collins Climate Action Plan communication team.  The City’s plan is widely regarded as among the strongest in the nation.This week, John conducted a story-telling workshop for CSU’s External Relations Team.  He also moderated part of a panel at the Foothills Unitarian Church on The Moral Imperative for Climate Action.
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay, “‘A Tangle of Circumstance’: Life in the Early Years of the NYS Training School for Girls in Hudson,’ appears in the Fall 2015 issue of the Columbia County History & Heritage Magazine.
  • Barbara Sebek attended a conference on Appropriation in an Age of Global Shakespeare in Athens, Georgia.  She presented a paper, “Blurring Binaries in Frank McGuinness’s Mutabilitie (1997).”
  • A review of Dan Robinson’s novel, Death of a Century, in the Manhattan Book Review concluded with this admonition: “This is a book not to be missed.”
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s story, “The Next Step” (1721 words) has accepted for publication in the upcoming issue of Gravel Magazine.
  • Adam Mackie, English Education graduate and former composition instructor at Colorado State University, promised he’d stay in touch with the English Department at CSU. Adam recently has accepted a full-time English language arts position in his hometown of Anchorage, Alaska. Starting in January 2016, Adam will teach classic mythology and American literature at West Anchorage High School. Adam also published a set of poems with BlazeVOX in Western New York that he’d like to share with everyone: http://blazevox.org/index.php/journal/

 

TONIGHT: Grand Opening – Wolverine Farm Publishing – come celebrate the new Letterpress & Publick House on from 8-11pm. Listen to the beautiful words of  Poet Laureate (and CSU alumna) Aby Kaupang and the fabulous sounds of Souvenir Thread.

 

Reminder: Deadline for Greyrock Review submissions is December 9th. Visit greyrockreview.colostate.edu to submit.

 

December 1st: Scholarship online application opens.  The application for all scholarships in the English department is online at www.ramweb.colostate.edu. Sign in using your eID and select the CSU Scholarship Application link.

 

Spring 2016 Internships Available!

Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students. Please note that the list is likely to grow with more opportunities, so stay tuned!

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SPRING:

  • Publishing/Editorial Internships:
    • Editorial Interns, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
    • Publishing Assistant Internship (2 positions), Bailiwick Press (Ft. Collins)
    • Publication Assistant, Wolverine Farm Publishing Co. & Bookstore (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing/Editorial Internships (several positions), The Borgen Project (remote)

 

  • Educational Internships:
    • Grading Assistant, NCTE@CSU with Poudre High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing Coach and Grader, NCTE@CSU, Fort Collins High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Adult ESL Teacher, Global Refugee Center (Greeley, CO)

 

  • Non-Profit/Communications Internships:
    • Social Media and Communications Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)
    • Communications Intern (paid), Otter Products (Ft. Collins, CO)

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Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu  for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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Justin Goodfellow
English Major (Creative Writing) with a Business Administration Minor
Graduated May 2012

justingoodfellow


Why did you choose to study English at CSU?

I initially started out as a Business Major, but it was only in my English classes that I felt completely and wholly stimulated by everything I was engaged with. I think you have to devote yourself to that feeling when you are lucky enough to find it.


Where are you now? What are you doing?

I currently live in Brooklyn, NY, and I work at the world’s largest book publisher called Penguin Random House. Specifically, I am a Sales Manager for all of the Adult books on the Penguin side, and I work with independent bookstores located in metro New York. Before publishing, I spent 3 years working as a bookseller in Fort Collins’ own Old Firehouse Books.

How did your major prepare you for the work, the life you have now?

My English major was extremely important! Through the study of English, I learned to think critically, and I was introduced to a variety of different reading materials. Being well-read is hugely important for me since all of the booksellers and publishers I currently work with have a variety of tastes in the books they choose to read and work with.

Please share a favorite memory from your time with the English Department.

One of my very favorite memories was when the “A” Literary Journal (now Garden Level) had its publication party at Avogadros Number. I worked as an associate poetry editor, and seeing all of the people whose poems I worked on perform and pick up their copies of the journal was powerful for me. My colleagues and I worked on the journal throughout the course of a year, and to see its completion has always been one of my most valued experiences at CSU.

Was there a specific class, professor, advisor, or fellow student who made an impression on you, helped you, or inspired you when you were here?

Dan Beachy-Quick is the best professor I had during my undergraduate education. He is a brilliant individual, and his lessons helped shape the person I’ve become. Dan’s teaching style embodies patience and grace. I attribute him with helping me fully realize my love of language. If I could, I would still take classes with him now!

Tell us about the internship you did while at CSU.

I participated in two internships during CSU. I mentioned my experience as an associate poetry editor for “A” Literary Journal, so I’ll focus more on my time with Bailiwick Press. Karla Oceanak and Kendra Spanjer are the founders of the small press, and I was brought on as a publishing assistant for a semester. In this role, I primarily worked on the Aldo Zelnick series. Bailiwick was a great environment for learning about the publishing process because interns are allowed to work in several areas like editorial, marketing, digital production, and sales.

What did you learn from your internship experience? Did your internship impact where you are now?

I knew that I wanted to work in publishing, so Bailiwick helped me sort out which area of publishing was the best fit for me. I enjoyed how the internship gave me real world experience, but it also served as a sampler. For instance, I learned that I wasn’t particularly good at video production, but I had more aptitude for line-editing. Your skills (or lack of skills) can become much clearer when you put them to practice.

What advice do you have for other students doing an internship?

Take full advantage of your time in the internship! It is a safe space to experiment, learn, and explore. Internships allow us to get a real glimpse of English skills in use, and I would say go as far out of your comfort zone as you can. Those are the moments and the opportunities that help you grow.

Why is it important to study the Humanities?

Human culture is not only important in my mind, but absolutely vital. Within the Humanities are so many examples of human ambition, and it is worth our time to study all of them. It feels essential to learn about what we have accomplished throughout human existence, and I deeply believe that the Humanities strive to help us reach new places.


What advice do you have for CSU English Department students?

Your education is very much what you make of it, and if you are willing to put in the time, then CSU has multitudes of resources that will educate and support you! I would also urge you to engage with your community as well. Bookstores, libraries, theaters, schools—these are all places that are friends of the English major. It is largely clichéd that the English major has limited options in the job market, but that is simply not true. Your degree makes you relevant and useful in many places, fields, and companies. Don’t forget that!


What are your hobbies or special interests, what do you enjoy doing with your free time?

I’m always reading, but when I’m taking a break from the book world, I love to go on walks with my dog and listen to music. I also play guitar for fun these days, but I used to be in a band for many years. I’m hoping to get back into the swing of road biking like I used to do in Colorado, but it’s a bit more difficult to do it out here in New York City. And cooking!

Any other news you’d like to share with us?

Publishing is a challenging, but rewarding field to work in. The book world continues to evolve and adapt to meet the needs of readers every day, and trust me, printed books aren’t going away! If you have questions about the industry then ask the English Department to put you in touch with me. I’m happy to answer questions.


Interested in doing an internship? Check out the list of available internships for Fall 2015, and contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

Fall 2015 Internships Available!

Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students. Please note that the list is likely to grow with more opportunities, so stay tuned!

Publishing/Editorial Internships:

  • Editorial Interns, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
  • Publishing Assistant Internship (2 positions), Bailiwick Press (Ft. Collins)
  • Editorial Intern, Ruminate Magazine (Ft. Collins)
  • Internships (several positions), The Black Sheep (Ft. Collins, CSU)
  • Publication Assistant, Wolverine Farm Publishing Co. & Bookstore (Ft. Collins)
  • Writing/Editorial Internships (several positions), The Borgen Project (remote)

Educational Internships:

  • Grading Assistant, NCTE@CSU with Poudre High School (Ft. Collins)
  • Writing Coach and Grader, NCTE@CSU, Fort Collins High School (Ft. Collins)
  • Adult ESL Teacher, Global Refugee Center (Greeley, CO)

Non-Profit/Communications Internships:

  • Social Media and Communications Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)

 

Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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Colorado Review Managing Editor Drew Webster, with Center for Literary Publishing interns Melissa Hohl and Neil FitzPatrick at AWP

Colorado Review Managing Editor Drew Webster, with Center for Literary Publishing interns Melissa Hohl and Neil FitzPatrick at Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP) 2015

Summer and Fall 2015 Internships Available!

Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students. Please note that the list is likely to grow with more opportunities, so stay tuned!

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SUMMER:

  • Editorial Intern, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
  • Editorial Intern, Ruminate Magazine (Ft. Collins)

 

  • Marketing Intern, Global Village Museum of Arts and Cultures (Ft. Collins, CO)
  • Business Communication and Government Affairs Intern, Woodward MPC (Ft. Collins, CO)
  • Organizational Development Intern, Change Corps (Denver, CO)

 

FALL:

CSU English Department Internships:

  • Intern, Community Literacy Center
  • Writing Consultant, Writing Center
  • English Department Communications Internship, Communications
  • Publishing/Editorial Internship, Greyrock Review
  • Graduate Student Internship, Center for Literary Publishing

 

Publishing/Editorial Internships:

  • Editorial Interns, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
  • Publishing Assistant Internship (2 positions), Bailiwick Press (Ft. Collins)
  • Editorial Intern, Ruminate Magazine (Ft. Collins)
  • CSU’s Journal of Undergraduate Research and Scholarly Excellence (JUR) Internships:
    • Associate Editor Intern
    • Copy Editor Intern
    • Graphic Design & Web Development Intern

 

Educational Internships:

  • Grading Assistant, NCTE@CSU with Poudre High School (Ft. Collins)
  • Writing Coach and Grader, NCTE@CSU, Fort Collins High School (Ft. Collins)

 

Non-Profit/Communications Internships:

  • Social Media and Communications Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)

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Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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Catherine Hackney
English Major (Literature) with a Business Administration Minor
Graduated Cum Laude May 2012

CatherineHackney

Why did you choose to study English at CSU?

My sister went to CSU seven years before me. When I was in middle school and high school I was able to visit her in Fort Collins with my parents and quickly realized how beautiful and full of opportunities the city was. Then as I got closer to the age of applying to universities, my parents told me to choose a major that I would enjoy and not to worry about what kind of paycheck it would get me when I graduate. That way studying was not a chore. I took their advice and loved every minute of my time at CSU and in Fort Collins. And learned the income really does follow when you are doing what you enjoy.

Where are you now? What are you doing?

I currently work in the Denver Tech Center at Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), a national professional association for medical administrators. I have been with MGMA for about a year. I began in an assistant role but was promoted after just a few months to Membership Engagement Coordinator. In my position I act as liaison between MGMA and state affiliates across all 50 states, including over 100 local affiliates. My work with the MGMA affiliates ensures that they have the resources to do all that they can do to help further the medical practice management profession. I help in planning conferences where members and nonmembers of MGMA come to learn practical leadership and job skills. Also, I assist in managing an online networking community where over 9,000 members are active.


How did your major prepare you for the work, the life you have now?

English literature turned out to be the best major I could have chosen. As an English major I was allowed a large number of elective classes, which I took advantage of. Simply by majoring in English, I believe a person is taught how to be a critical thinker, well-rounded, and best of all, you are taught how to learn. My ability to enter a new environment and learn new skills is really the best asset I have, not just at my job, but for life in general. So many doors are open to me that I can choose and change my path as I desire.


Please share a favorite memory from your time with the English Department.

My favorite memory with the English Department was when I was a sophomore sitting in Professor SueEllen Campbell’s office feeling uncertain if I had chosen the best major for me because I was struggling to understand the theory being taught in her class. Professor Campbell talked to me about the possibilities that come along with an English degree, then I remember mentioning that I had read Paradise Lost on my own the winter before and she said, in that case, I was exactly where I should be. And she was right. I never again questioned my decision and am very thankful for the support and guidance that I received in the English Department.

Was there a specific class, professor, advisor, or fellow student who made an impression on you, helped you, or inspired you when you were here?

Professor Barbara Sebek. Professor Sebek was endlessly enthusiastic and challenging, bringing out the best in her students. I intentionally took a number of classes with her because of her energy and her ability to get me to appreciate writing that I did not previously understand (such as Shakespeare – not my personal favorite, but I have a true appreciation for him now). She was always encouraging, helpful, and available for her students.

Tell us about the internship you did while at CSU.

While at CSU I completed two internships. I completed a third the summer after graduation. First, I worked on, what was called at the time, the “A” literary journal. “A” showcased student writings and art and was published by the English Department. This internship lasted the duration of my junior year. For the literary journal we submitted our resumes and the advisor chose which position each person would have. I was given the job of overseeing advertising and fundraising. I was hoping for a more editorial position, but was not disappointed in my experience with the business side of producing a journal, and was happy to be able to also help with editing and layout.

During my second internship, with Wolverine Farm Inc. I was able to explore my journalism skills. Wolverine Farm produces a quarterly Fort Collins community newspaper and regular literary journals. This publisher is a nonprofit that receives funding from grants and from revenue generated by a used bookstore in the back of a local coffee shop. While working here I worked in the bookstore, interviewed members of the community for newspaper articles, and helped to select and edit submissions for the literary journal. This was a very unique and fulfilling experience.

Finally, just after graduation and immediately following my time with Wolverine Farm Inc. I began a paid summer internship with Interweave. Interweave is a publisher of do-it-yourself/craft magazines and eBooks. At Interweave I did a number of different tasks for the jewelry team. I was a proofreader, a mail clerk, social media poster, and organization specialist. I created reports, wrote material descriptions, acted as customer service rep for contributors of jewelry submissions, and even got to make some of the jewelry myself. I enjoyed my time with Interweave so much, it showed in my work, and I was asked to stay a few months longer than the regular internship term.

What did you learn from your internship experience? Did your internship impact where you are now?

I would say that each of my internships has impacted each job I’ve held since I completed them, including the internship that came next. Each one was similar due to my interest in publishing, but each taught me very different skills that carry over into my current position. Even though I am not working in publishing as I thought I would, I am with an organization that I had never even considered in the past. And I know that the skills I learned while at CSU and in my internships have helped me shine at work. Also, I know my internships helped me to realize my love of working for an organization with an admirable mission. As long as I believe in what the organization stands for, I know I will love going to work in the morning.

What advice do you have for other students doing an internship?

The best thing you can do is complete an internship while you are a student. Once you graduate, it gets much tougher. Kudos to you for being on the right track! CSU has so many resources to help get you into a great internship. Use those resources to their fullest extent! There is no way for an internship to be a waste of time. All it does is help you grow in your career and looks great on a resume. You might even be lucky enough to be hired after the internship.


Why is it important to study the Humanities?

The humanities are important to keep alive because without them, there would be very little progress or creative thought in the world. To continue moving forward as a species, we have to learn to be multifaceted learners, understand the past, and open our minds to possibilities for the future. Without the humanities the world would be rather stagnant, and not a very fun place to live.

What advice do you have for CSU English Department students?

You chose a good major. Now to find out what you want to do with it. English majors do not only have to become professors and writers (as everyone assumed I wanted to be when I would say I am an English major). I have held positions where I worked with grant writing, television commercials, magazine publishing, healthcare, big corporations, smaller nonprofits. There is a whole world full of interesting careers to consider for which an English major is ideal. An internship (or several) is a great way to explore and find a path that fits you best.


What are your hobbies or special interests, what do you enjoy doing with your free time?

I enjoy reading fictional novels and ancient epics every once in a while. I also love to ride my bike on the Cherry Creek and Highline trails, hike or snowshoe in the mountains, and attend every Oktoberfest our state has to offer!

 Any other news you’d like to share with us?

I just bought my very first home. It’s a small but fitting condo near my current place of work. The process has been an exhilarating step for me to explore my maturity, independence, and freedom. I wouldn’t be where I am now in life, three years after graduating from college, if I hadn’t taken complete advantage of all the opportunities that CSU has to offer.


If you are a current student interested in learning more about internship opportunities, please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu for more information.

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Joe LaFond
English Major (Writing Concentration)
Graduated December 2013

JoeLaFond02

Why did you choose to study English at CSU?

When I was a junior in high school, I had a teacher who insisted that I transfer from her English class into AP English. At the time, I really had no desire to switch from my current class because it was high school, and I wasn’t necessarily looking for a challenge. After a little coaxing I ended up switching into AP English, and I’m very glad I did. Though I knew that I liked English and everything that goes with it (reading, writing, speaking, etc.), I found that I LOVED English and was fairly good at it when I was forced to challenge myself in AP. When it came time to start visiting and applying to colleges, I wanted to stay in Colorado, so I visited CU and CSU. I guess I just felt more at home in Fort Collins on the CSU campus than I did in Boulder. My brother was also going to CSU at the time, so that helped push me towards CSU.

Where are you now? What are you doing?

Currently I am working for the CU School of Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora (ironic—I know). I am the Benefits Assistant in the office of Graduate Medical Education. In a nutshell, I help administer health and dental benefits to the (medical) Interns, Residents, and Fellows that are in various training programs in the School of Medicine. It’s a fine job, but I am mostly excited about the writing I have been doing on the side. On top of my 9-to-5, I am also a freelance contributor to The Rooster magazine, and I do freelance blogging for two different websites. I write primarily about music, specifically electronic and local music, and that has been beyond satisfying. I get to attend concerts for free, and I get to interview a bunch of artists that are coming to town—it’s pretty awesome. I’ve been really lucky to have so many opportunities. Right now, I’m just working on building up my portfolio, making connections, and trying to pay the bills.


How did your major prepare you for the work, the life you have now?

I think the most valuable skills I took from being an English major, at least in terms of preparing me for entering the workforce, are critical thinking and analyzing skills. My current job requires a really sharp eye for detail, and it requires me to wade through a lot of information and pick out the things that are important or that affect me and my work in some way. Critical thinking skills and being able to think outside the box to solve problems creatively are definitely the most important skills that anyone could have as he/she enter workforce. Regardless of what he/she studied in college or what he/she plans on doing for work, critical thinking and problem solving skills are paramount. Outside of my working life, being an English major taught me to see below the surface of things; to look, listen, examine things carefully; to find the beauty and excitement in the little details of life that usually go unnoticed.


Please share a favorite memory from your time with the English Department.

I’m not sure I have one particular memory that sticks out as the best, but I look back fondly on my time as an English major. I didn’t appreciate it at the time, but nowadays I love thinking of all the times I would cozy up in bed with a stack of books next to me and nothing but time (usually between the hours of 11 pm and 4 am) to read. Without being interrupted; that doesn’t really happen anymore (mainly because I can’t stay awake past 10 pm). I miss walking around campus and people watching. I also really enjoyed my internship. But perhaps the most important memory that I have is when I switched my concentration from education to writing. Looking back, it wasn’t necessarily a great time for me because I was experiencing lots of inner turmoil about switching from education to writing (which was somewhat riskier in my opinion). In the end, I know that I made the right choice, but I do sometimes wish that I were in a classroom every day.

Was there a specific class, professor, advisor, or fellow student who made an impression on you, helped you, or inspired you when you were here?

Where do I start? Just about all of the professors that I had were pretty amazing. Perhaps those who made the greatest impression on me were Carrie Lamanna, Lisa Langstraat, Sarah Sloane, Michael Boatright, Kathleen Kiefer, and Pam Coke. I owe these people a BIG thank you! Some of my favorite (or at least most important classes) were: Reading & the Web, Writing Online, Principles of Literary Criticism, Writing & Style, English Language For Teachers, Advanced Composition, the Rhetoric of Sports, and Communications and Pop Culture.

Tell us about the internship you did while at CSU.

In my fourth year, I was an intern at Bailiwick Press, home of the Aldo Zelnick comic novel series. While I was at Bailiwick, I helped with various tasks while Karla (author), Kendra (illustrator), and Launie (graphic designer) were busy working on the latest book called Hotdogger. I contacted youth literature blogs and websites to get the word out about the new book. I participated in editorial meetings and helped brainstorm ideas for the story. I helped maintain the Aldo Zelnick website. I even helped write the back cover summary for Hotdogger!

What did you learn from your internship experience? Did your internship impact where you are now?

I learned a lot from my internship experience. I think the most important thing that I learned was that I had in fact made the right choice by choosing to pursue a career in writing. I learned that a writing career is possible, but it does require patience, time, and hard work. Before my internship ended, Karla gave me the best advice that a young writer could get: “Find someone who will let you write for them. Chances are that you won’t get paid for it immediately, but the experience is priceless.” That advice has had a huge impact on where I am today. Even though I don’t get paid for most of my writing, I do get some cool perks every now and then (free concerts, meeting artists, etc.), and I have been able to make really valuable connections that will help me in the future. Plus, having some published writing is invaluable as I try to take my writing career even farther.


What advice do you have for other students doing an internship?

The same advice that Nike gives everyone: Just Do It. That’s the first step; internships and the experience you get with one are a game-changer when you start looking for other jobs. My other advice is to be open-minded and eager to work and learn. I would also recommend staying in touch with your internship supervisor as they can often help you network with other professionals and jobs. Also, I would recommend that you try to get in with Bailiwick Press—really fun experience and great people to work with.


Why is it important to study the Humanities?

Because there are too many people in the world that think studying the Humanities and liberal arts is pointless. Math, Science, Economics, Business, Technology—those fields helps us understand how the World works. But fields in the Humanities and liberal arts help us understand the people that we share the World with. Those are equally important understandings if you ask me.

What advice do you have for CSU English Department students?

My advice to English students—and any soon-to-be graduates for that matter—is something that I wish was more clear to me when I graduated. The time immediately after you graduate college is by far the strangest, most stressful, exciting, and (sometimes) disappointing time in your life. Chances are that your dream job is not waiting for you right after you graduate, so don’t expect it. Searching for a job that fits you is difficult, time-consuming, and stressful; most likely, you’re going to end up doing a job that isn’t a good fit for you—everyone does. But this is also one of the most important times in your life; it’s when you really find out who you are and where you want to go—it’s all up to you! That said, my advice is to STAY POSITIVE AND CONFIDENT. Life won’t hand you anything; go out and make things happen for yourself because that’s the only way that you will get to where you’re trying to go!

What are your hobbies or special interests, what do you enjoy doing with your free time?

Shockingly, I love to read and write in my free time. I wish I had more free time because I end up doing more writing than reading, and I have like 100 books that are waiting for me. I also love spending time with my beautiful fiancé and our friends. I am addicted to live music, and I spend a lot of time going to concerts and discovering great new music. And, of course, I am guilty of the (not so) occasional Netflix binge, but I recommend finding a better use for your time.


If you are a current student interested in learning more about internship opportunities, please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu for more information.

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Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Please note that both lists are likely to grow with more opportunities, so stay tuned!

SUMMER:

  • Social Media Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)
  • Intern, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
  • Prospect Research Internship, Trees, Water, People (Ft. Collins)
  • National Development Intern, Trees, Water, People (Ft. Collins)
  • Editorial and Marketing Interns, Dzanc Books (correspondence)
  • Production and Writing Intern, CSU Society of Senior Scholars (summer and fall)

FALL:

  • Publishing Intern, Bailiwick Press (Ft. Collins)
  • Social Media Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)
  • Grading Assistant, NCTE@CSU with Poudre High School (Ft. Collins)
  • Writing Coach and Grader, NCTE@CSU, Fort Collins High School (Ft. Collins)
  • CSU Community Literacy Center Internship (2 semester commitment and AmeriCorps Stipend offered)
  • Intern, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
  • Editorial Intern, Evergreen Custom Media (correspondence)
  • Intern, High Country News, Paonia, CO

Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu for more information on these internships and how to apply.

 

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