Tag Archives: Tobi Jacobi

Fog last week, snow this week, (image credit Colorado State University)

  • There’s a short interview with Dan Beachy-Quick up at the New England Review’s website about the poem they recently published, “Memory-Wax, Knowledge-Bird”: http://www.nereview.com/category/behind-the-byline/.
  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang (MFA ’07) recently gave three readings in Utah, courtesy of the Utah Humanities Book Festival, and its Director, Michael McLane (MFA ’08)-one at the Salt Lake City Public Library, one at the University of Utah, and one at Utah State, in Logan. Matthew’s long hybrid piece, “Difference Essay,” is out in the latest issue of Seattle Review.
  • On October 5, Camille Dungy was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award from Outdoor Afro. The organization “celebrates and inspires African American connections and leadership in nature.” The award recognizes Dungy’s continuing role as an environmental writer, editor, teacher and activist.

    On Saturday, October 7, Dungy took part in the Watershed Environmental Poetry Festival in Berkeley, CA, where she was featured along with writers such as Bob Hass, Maxine Hong Kingston, Tess Taylor and Maw Shein Win.

  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper entitled, “Dazzled by Lila: Telling Stories from the 1920s Hudson Training School for (Incorrigible) Girls” at the Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Dayton, OH.  She also led a “morning meeting” session with Dr. Wendy Hinshaw on incarcerated writing and feminist tactics for literacy activism.
  • Mike Palmquist led two workshops and presented the keynote address at the College Reading and Writing Conference at Valencia College in Orlando on September 22nd and 23rd.  Mike’s talk, “WAC and Critical Thinking: Enhancing Student Learning through Writing,” explored the connections between writing-across-the-curriculum and critical thinking.
  • Skyhorse, the publisher of the paperback and ebook editions of Dan Robinson’s 3rd novel, Death of a Century, is doing an October BookBub promotion for Death of a Century.  BookBub is an online ebook book club.  Give it a look, buy the ebook, write a rave review (or don’t buy the book and still write a rave review).
  • Several MFA and MA students from the English Department will be reading original work at the GradShow on Thursday, November 9 in the Grand Ballroom in Lory Student Center:

    – 9:50AM: Emma Hyche

    – 10AM: Katherine Indermaur

    – 10:10AM: Sam Killmeyer

    – 10:50AM: Michelle LaCrosse

    – 11AM: David Mucklow

    – 11:10AM: Zach Yanowitz

    – 11:20AM: Catie Young

  • Three translations by Mary Crow of Olga Orozco’s poems are featured in the current newsletter of the Academy of American Poets online. Her new translation of a poem by Roberto Juarroz will be part of an exhibit in Dublin at the Instituto Cervantes. Both poets are Argentine. The Orozco poems are from Crow’s book of Orozco translations, Engravings Torn from Insomnia, published by BOA. She also has two books of Juarroz translations: Roberto Juarroz: Recent Poems and Roberto Juarroz: Last Poems, both from White Pine. The latter book was a finalist for the Pen America translation award.
  • Aby Kaupang’s paired tribute poems to David Bowie and C.D. Wright, “Flame Falls As Falls The World Down” and “Sunlight Come Shining,” were accepted for publication by The Laurel Review in their upcoming issue.
  • Steven Schwartz’s essay “The Loneliest Moon” has been accepted for publication by The Missouri Review and will be published in the spring 2018 issue.

 

Zambia Study Abroad Program, Summer 2018.

Info Session Wednesday, October 18 at 4pm in LCS room 304.

 

Fort Collins Book Fest

Writings and Riffs celebrates books, poetry and music as a means of storytelling, self-expression and social conversation. The day-long event is free and open to the public, and will include presentations, panel discussions, writing workshops, author readings and book signings. The event takes place at venues throughout Old Town Fort Collins from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 21. The full schedule and more information is available at www.FoCoBookFest.org. Also read more on LibartsSOURCE.

 

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  • The Center for Literary Publishing’s latest nonfiction anthology, Beautiful Flesh: A Body of Essays, will officially release May 15. The production team was Cedar Brant, Dana Chellman, Cory Cotten-Potter, Michelle LaCrosse, Morgan Riedl, and Stephanie G’Schwind. The book is available from CLP’s distributor, the University Press of Colorado, or via Amazon, barnesandnoble.com, powells.com, and elsewhere.
  • Cassie Eddington’s manuscript if the garden was one of seven finalists in Kelsey Street Press’s 2017 FIRSTS! competition. Her poems will be featured on Kelsey Street Press’s blog.
  • Tobi Jacobi will deliver an invited lecture on jail volunteer training and self-care at the University of Sheffield’s workshop on the Volunteer Sector in Criminal Justice in early June in Sheffield, UK.  The workshop launches an international, multidisciplinary network of researchers, practitioners and policymakers working in the criminal justice voluntary sector led by scholars at the Universities of Cambridge and Sheffield.
  • Lauren Matheny’s short story, “The Dark”, won honorable mention (second place) in the Third Coast 2017 Fiction Contest, chosen by Desiree Cooper 🙂 Lauren says, “Don’t know if that’s worthy of the newsletter, but I’m super excited!!”
  • David Mucklow’s poem “Leaving Sediment” was published in the most recent issue of Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Kelly Weber has poems forthcoming or now appearing in Nebraska Poetry: A Sesquicentennial Anthology, The Flat Water Stirs: An Anthology of Emerging Nebraska Poets, Triggerfish, and Grasslimb.

Eddy 300 Lab
Summer Hours
May 15th– May, 19th, 2017
(Please stop by the English Department office
for access)
May 22nd-August 4th, 2017
10:00am-3:00pm

The Writing Center
Summer Hours
May 15th– August 3rd, 2017
10:00am-12:30pm
In Eddy Hall, Room 23
Online hours TBA

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Image by Jill Salahub

  • Next Wednesday, Doug Cloud will be giving a workshop for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) Sustainability Fellows titled “Talking Science with Conservative, Religious and Other Potentially Skeptical Audiences.”
  • Tobi Jacobi participated at the recent Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) through a panel presentation entitled, “Not “All Ellas”: Risking Exploitation in a Prison Public Memory Project,” and a preconference prison teaching workshop (“The Prison Next Door: What Types of Connections Do We Want to Cultivate?”).
  • Michael Knisely’s Boulder’s Rocky Ridge Music Academy photography exhibit runs through April, he will also showcase additional photographs as part of the Month of Photography exhibit at the ACE Storage gallery on north Broadway also in Boulder. A collaboration of poets and visual artist’s exhibit at the First Congregational Church at Broadway and Spruce Streets in Boulder will feature two of his poems. He will also be reading from his poetry work as part of a large poetry reading this Friday for the First Friday Arts event at the First Congregational Church, which runs from 6:30 – 8:00 this Friday evening.
  • Dan Robinson’s paper, The Second Battle of the Champagne & the Inexpressibility Topos, has been accepted for the XVIII International Hemingway Conference in Paris next summer.
  • Morgan Riedl (MA in CNF, 2017) has a piece up on Brevity’s blog.  It’s a hermit crab essay in the form of a workshop critique of Sean Spicer’s press conferences.  You can read it here: https://brevity.wordpress.com/2017/03/30/workshop-comments-for-sean-spicer/
  • Catie Young’s poem “Merrily Merrily M​errily Merrily” is in the new issue of The Volta: ​http://www.thevolta.org/twstbs-poem185-cyoung.html
  • On April 21, John Calderazzo will read an essay at the Sacred Mountains and Landscapes conference at The New School.  The essay will discuss a centuries-old agricultural ritual in the Peruvian Andes he attended in which Quechua people have recently changed their behavior because of the climate change induced shrinking of their glaciers.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) first book, Of Form & Gather, winner of the 2016 Andrès Montoya Poetry Prize, was released on February 28 from the University of Notre Dame Press. Of Form & Gather is listed as one of the “9 Outstanding Latino Books Recently Published by Independent and University Presses” by NBC News. Her manuscript Galaxy Inside Your Inadequately Small Heart was selected as a finalist in the 2017 Alice James Award and the 2017 Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry. Her poem “In all the pretty roam” was featured on Zòcalo Public Square on Friday, March 17 and her poem “Virgule” was selected by The Georgia Review for publication. Zamora read her poetry for the AKO Collective’s Day Without A Woman recognition event on March 8.
  • Kathleen Willard will be the BreckCreate Breckenridge Creative Arts Tin Shop Guest Artist in Residence for the month of April. In addition to working on her new poetry manuscript, she will give a poetry reading, conduct four poetry workshops, and host a community poetry reading. She hosts Open Studio Hours at the Tin Shop Thursday through Sunday to talk about poetry and share her process. The BreckCreate website has details of her events.

Checkout the English Department’s new lunch counter!  In response to our See Change 2 request for more common space for faculty and staff, we have put the west end of Eddy to work. Two lunch counters are open and ready to entice you out of your offices for lunch and conversation. We will devote the exhibit space above each counter to departmental work on diversity and inclusion for at least the first year.

  • The northwest corner launches this new “Counter Talk” space with an exhibit featuring the 1960 Greensboro lunch counter sit-in and additional images — including two from the Smithsonian’s 2010 50th anniversary celebration.  Look here for some interesting ways to incorporate such moments into your courses: http://americanhistory.si.edu/freedomandjustice.

Stay tuned: Jaime Jordan’s exhibit featuring a moment in her CO150 course will be added next week to the southwest counter.

 

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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Happy New Year!

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has a set of poems and set of essays nominated for a Pushcart Prize.
  • Roze Hentschell, currently serving as Interim Associate Dean in the College of Liberal Arts, emceeed the College of Liberal Arts Fall commencement, Saturday December 17th at 5:00 p.m. If you couldn’t be there in person, check out the webcast archives and watch our wonderful graduates receive their diplomas: http://commencement.colostate.edu/webcast-archives/
  • Congratulations to the 2016-17 CLC interns, Dominique Garnett, Alina Lugo, Sarah Von Nostrand, and Shelley Curry and Associate director, Mary Ellen Sanger on successfully designing and facilitating six SpeakOut writing workshops. Three evening journal launch parties were held. Watch for the winter copy in January.
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay on curating community writing and social action in jail appears in the forthcoming issue of the Community Literacy Journal.
  • Bill Tremblay has a poem entitled “November 9, 2016,” coming out in the next issue of TRUCK magazine.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s “Song of Rachel” has been accepted for publication at The Molotov Cocktail.

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The Poudre River this morning (image by Jill Salahub)

The Poudre River (image by Jill Salahub)

  • On October 28th, Tim Amidon, Elizabeth Williams (Communication Studies), Kim Henry (Psychology), and Tiffany Lipsey (Health and Exercise Science) partnered with the Poudre Fire Authority to host a symposium on the intersections of work, knowledge, and safety in the fireservice. Over 70 fireservice leaders from as far away as Oakland, CA and Ontario, Canada participated in interactive, stakeholder conversations designed to help researchers and participants identify the types of human factors that impact firefighter occupational safety and health outcomes. Breakout sessions included discussions on wearable technologies and next generation PPE, post-traumatic stress, the impact of chronic stress, sleep deprivation, and diet on decision making and cognition, how blue-collar traditions and working class identity impact how firefighters value the types of labor they perform, and how the challenges of certifying skills and building learning organizations through training and education programs. The event was sponsored by PFA and Pre-Catalyst for Innovative Partnerships seed funding awarded to the research team by the Office of the Vice President for Research. Tim would also personally thank our student intern Tiffany Lingo and administrative gurus Sheila Dargon and Lilian Nugent for their support!
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an interview up on the Kenyon Review’s website with: http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/dan-beachy-quick/ and a group of linked essays at EuropeNow: http://www.europenowjournal.org/2016/11/30/sunlight-and-arrows-five-invocations-for-the-silent-muse/
  • John Calderazzo will be presenting a talk on “Climate Change and Quechua Ritual” at the Sacred Landscapes and Mountains conference at the China India Institute in New York City.  The talk is based on a trip he took to a glacier-fed basin in the Peruvian Andes. John will also be the judge for the 2017 Eugene V. Shea National Poetry Contest.
  • Sue Doe and Lisa Langstraat’s essay “Faculty Development Workshops with Student Vet Participants: Seizing the Induction Possibilities” will shortly appear in Reflections: Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning (Volume 16, Issue 2).
  • On November 18, just prior to the start of Fall Break, CO130 faculty welcomed around 75 international students to a Harvest Meal in the Whitaker Room.  It was crazy fun in there, particularly as faculty watered down the soup to make it stretch to meet the larger-than-expected crowd and as Cassie Eddington’s kimchi was pronounced “Superb!” by a Korean student. This event was the brainchild of Karen Montgomery Moore and was assisted by Cassie Eddington, Virginia Chaffee, Kristie Yelinek, Hannah Caballero, Leslie Davis, Sheila Dargon, and Sue Doe.  Thanks go to our Chair, Louann Reid, for her support for this very special and timely event. Thanks also to the front office staff who participated and strongly communicated the department’s support for the diverse students of CO130! Thanks as well to our amazing Eddy custodial staff who not only helped bring food from our cars to the third floor but stuck around late to help clean up the mess!
  • On Saturday, October 15th, the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) hosted its 47th Annual Regional Conference at Metro State University in Denver.  This year’s theme was “For the Love of Teaching: Reclaiming the Classroom.”  CLAS presented CSU’s English Professor Emeritus William McBride with the Legacy Award.  English Education graduate student Jenna (Franklin) Martin shared her presentation, titled “Intercultural Sensitivity in the Middle School Language Arts Classroom.”  Dr. Pam Coke gave a presentation with Cheryl Kula, a fourth grade teacher at St. John the Evangelist Catholic School in Loveland, titled “Hard to Learn, Hard to Teach: Using Problem-Based Strategies in the Classroom.”  A good conference was had by all.
  • On Saturday, November 12th, CSU welcomed high school seniors from around the country to campus to take part in Senior Scholarship Day. English department colleagues led students through a writing workshop, followed by a timed writing competition.  CSU Admissions offered scholarships to the top writers. Our English department team included Tony Becker, Doug Cloud, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Tobi Jacobi, Sarah Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, Catherine Ratliff, and fearless leader Ed Lessor. Thank you, team, for your hard work!
  • On Saturday, November 19th, Dr. Pam Coke presented her research at the National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention in Atlanta.  Her session, titled “Performing Adolescence on the Page and in the Classroom: Using Adolescents’ Literature to Advocate for Students’ Mental Health,” She helped participants examine critical questions for educators, including: Is it ethical to teach a text that I know can trigger forms of PTSD for students?  Is it irresponsible to avoid such issues in the classroom?  If and when I do teach these texts (and I believe it is irresponsible to omit controversial texts from our classrooms), what can I do to best advocate for the mental health and well-being of the students? The presentation sparked valuable conversation among attendees.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology,” published earlier this year in The Bellevue Literary Review, has been nominated for a Pushcart prize.

speakout

SpeakOut!

We have three SpeakOut Journal Launch events during finals week. We will be celebrating the publication of our Fall 2016 issue of the SpeakOut Journal with a reading by our participants and refreshments. Please contact Tobi Jacobi (tjacobi@colostate.edu) if you would like to attend the readings at the jail or community corrections. We’d love to see you there!

SpeakOut! Youth Groups: Monday, December 12 from 6:45 to 8:15pm at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House

SpeakOut! @ Community Corrections and Work Release: Wednesday, December 14 from 7:30 to 8:30pm at LCJ Administration Building

SpeakOut! Men & Women’s Groups @ Larimer County Jail: Thursday, December 15 from 6:30 to 8:00pm at the Larimer County Jail.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick will be on Colorado Matters on the Denver NPR station on May 11.
  • Ellen Brinks has been invited to give a plenary talk at the conference “Forgotten Geographies in the Fin de Siècle, 1880-1920,” at Birkbeck College, University of London, in early July.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, “Talking Climate Change Across Difference” has been accepted for publication in a special issue of Reflections focused on “Sustainable Communities and Environmental Communication.” The issue will be out this fall.
  • Roze Hentschell will be leading a group of 10 CSU Honors Program students to study in Oxford, England. From late May through June, the students will take her 3 credit class, “Shakespeare in Oxford,” and they will take field trips to Bath, Windsor, Stratford-upon-Avon, and London. The students will also take a 3 credit independent tutorial with an Oxford professor in their field of study.
  • A short story from Colorado Review, “Midterm,” by Leslie Johnson (Spring 2015), has been selected for the 2017 Pushcart Prize anthology. You can read the story here: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/features/midterm/
  • The Community Literacy Center received a $5000 grant from the Bohemian Pharos Fund in support of the youth SpeakOut writing workshops.
  • Tobi Jacobi and Lara Roberts’s essay, “Developing Self-Care Strategies for Volunteers in a Prison Writing Program” appears in the new edited collection, The Volunteer Sector in Prisons: Encouraging Institutional and Personal Change (May 2016).
  • Larissa Willkomm’s research poster on a collaborative writing project on women, jail, and addiction won a 3rd place service learning prize at the recent CSU CURC competition.  Larissa completed this project as part of her CLC internship and work with SpeakOut.

    Larissa presenting her work at the recent CURC

    Larissa presenting her work at the recent CURC

  • Dana Masden’s short story “Exercise, a Good Book, and a Cup of Tea” will be published in an upcoming issue of Third Coast.
  • Kristina Quynn’s essay “My Brother, My….” is part of the just published collection of personal essays from 2Leaf Press on white privilege and whiteness in America.  The collection, What Does It Mean to Be White In America, includes an introduction by Debby White and an afterword by Tara Betts. While not light summer reading, it could be useful to those teaching about race in America.  You can find more information at: http://whiteinamerica.org
  • The following group presented a panel at the April 29 Writing on the Range Conference at the University of Denver, where Cheryl Ball was the featured speaker: Tim Amidon, Hannah Caballero, Doug Cloud, Sue Doe, Ed Lessor, Amanda Memoli, and James Roller. The group focused on examples, challenges, questions, and opportunities associated with integrating multimodality into writing. The presentation was entitled:”A Case of Wishful Thinking?  Our Plans for an Integrated and Coordinated Multimodal Curriculum.”
  • Mary Crow will take part in a public reception and reading for artworks inspired by poems May 19 in Loveland at Artworks, 6:30 p.m., 310 N. Railroad Ave. (Hwy 287 to 3rd, then R a block). She will read her poem. “Dear X,” and the artwork it inspired will be part of the exhibit.
  • “Food for Bears” by Kayann Short (BA 81; MA 88), an essay about the 2015 Front Range food collapse, appears in the latest issue of the environmental literary magazine, The Hopper.
  • Kathleen Willard’s (MFA, poetry Spring 2004) poetry chapbook Cirque & Sky won Middle Creek Publishing & Audio’s Fledge Chapbook Contest. Her book is a series of pastorals and anti-pastorals that “attunes its lyric eye to local ecological crises” (Dan Beachy-Quick)  & evokes “a periodic table of agitation over the continued plunder of Colorado and by extension the world.” (John Calderazzo). Her book is available online at Middle Creek Publishing and Audio, and Amazon.

    Kathleen Willard gave a reading with other Middle Creek Publishing & Audio poets in Pueblo, Colorado as part of the Earth Day Celebration sponsored by Colorado State University at Pueblo and the Sierra Club on April 23rd at Songbird Cellars, a local winery.

    She is also speaking at the Colorado Creative Industry Summit at Carbondale, Colorado on May 5th. In her presentation “Thinking Outside the Book”, she will share how receiving a Colorado Creative Industry Career Advancement Grant shifted her thinking about publishing poetry, how by using some basic business practices increased her poetry readership, and led her to pursue alternative spaces for her poetry, such as art galleries, community newspapers, installations, & the Denver Botanic Gardens CSA Art Share Project. While still wildly interested in the traditional modes of book publication, she would like to increase chance encounters that the public may have with poetry outside the book.

    She is also curating with Todd Simmons of Wolverine Farm and Publishing, a Food Truck Reading Series at Wolverine Farm Letterpress this summer, which is being supported by New Belgium Brewing Company.

    The Fort Collins Book Launch for Cirque & Sky will be June 21st, Midsummer’s Eve at Wolverine Letterpress.

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Image by Ashley Alfirevic

Image by Ashley Alfirevic

  • Leslee Becker received the University’s Jack E. Cermak Award for Advising.
  • Stephanie G’Schwind is very proud to announce that Colorado Review will make a second Best American debut this year: Jonathan Franzen has selected “Namesake,” by Mason Stokes (Summer 2015 issue) for Best American Essays 2016. You can read the essay here: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/features/namesake/
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper entitled “The Challenges of Going Public with Archival Prison Materials” on a panel with other prison writing scholars at the recent CCCC meeting in Houston, TX.  She also led a learning circle at the pre-conference prison pedagogy and research workshop.
  • As co-chair of the Qualitative Research Subcommittee of the Standing Commission on the Status of Women Faculty, Lisa Langstraat wrote a Vice Provost of Research Quarterly Funding Grant proposal, “Qualitative Research on the Culture and Climate for Women Faculty at CSU.”  Our committee was awarded all requested funding which will allow for the expansion of current research efforts and summer funds for coding and analyzing data.  This data will inform policy regarding improving the culture and climate for women faculty at CSU as well as nation-wide Advance Grant development.
  • Shoaib Alam’s short story “Guildwood Village” has been accepted for the 2016 Tin House Summer Workshop. He will be at Reed College in Portland from July 10-17 and is looking forward to studying with Chinelo Okparanta.
  • CSU was well represented among this year’s winners of the AWP Intro Journals Award. Cedar Brant won for her poem, “Make Blood,” and Nathaniel Barron won for the first chapter from his novel-in-progress, From the Watchtower. Emily Ziffer received an honorable mention for her nonfiction essay, “Moving Forward, In Russian.” That’s three awards for CSU, the most of any program! All of the nominees will be on our Poster at the English Department Awards Reception.
  • Two TEFL/TESL students, Kathleen Hamel and Brian Doebbeling, successfully defended their portfolios on 4/15.
  • Felicia Zamora (MFA ’12) has four poems accepted in West Branch’s upcoming feature issue focusing on avant-garde contemporary women poets. Other poems have recently been accepted to Cutbank, The Adirondack Review, and Salt Hill.

 

Greyrock Review Release Party!!!

 The Greyrock Review Release Party will be held on, Thursday, April 28th  from 6-8 at Wolverine Farm’s Letterpress & Publick House on Willow.

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Fort Collins Discovery Museum, image by Jill Salahub

Fort Collins Discovery Museum, image by Jill Salahub

  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s book of poems, gentlessness, has been named a finalist for the Colorado Book Award in Poetry.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s poem, “Endangered Species,” is up today at the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day site: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem-day
  • SueEllen Campbell and John Calderazzo spent the week of spring break at the University of Montana and in Missoula.  SueEllen read a personal essay and talked about dealing with the emotions raised by the idea of climate change and ran a workshop about teaching climate change in the humanities. John led a community writing workshop on the subject of health. Both were partly sponsored by the Health and Humanities Institute, and SueEllen was also sponsored by the department of English. SueEllen also interviewed faculty and students in the university’s climate change minor for a program review.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem “because it looked hotter that way” is a featured women’s month selection on Poets.org, the online archive for the Academy of American Poets, https://m.poets.org/poetsorg/womens-history-month
  • Roze Hentschell is attending the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America conference in New Orleans, for which she wrote a seminar paper, “Reimagining a New St. Paul’s Cathedral.”
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay “Austerity Behind Bars: The ‘Cost’ of Prison College Programs” appears in Composition in the Age of Austerity, a new collection edited by Anthony Scott and Nancy Welch (Utah State University Press).
  • Leif Sorensen presented a paper on pulp magazines as incubators for contemporary popular genre categories at the meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association in Boston.
  • Leif Sorensen’s book, Ethnic Modernism and the Making of US Literary Multiculturalism just came out from Palgrave Macmillan. The book focuses on the remarkable careers of four ethnic fiction writers: Younghill Kang, D’Arcy McNickle, Zora Neale Hurston, and Américo Paredes and shows how their works played a crucial role in the development of what we now call multiethnic literature in the US.
  • On April 2nd, Sasha Steensen will give a reading at the Ivy Writers Series, a bilingual reading series in Paris, France.
  • Neil Fitzpatrick’s story “The Future of Statues” is featured in the latest issue of A Public Space. He’ll be reading in Manhattan on April 6 with another Emerging Writer Fellow and their mentors. Here’s the link to the issue: http://apublicspace.org/magazine/issue_24. And the event: https://www.facebook.com/events/982453681849010/.

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  • SueEllen Campbell and John Calderazzo will be busy at the upcoming American Geophysical Union (AGU) annual conference in San Francisco. SueEllen is a co-convener of three sessions about the need for multidisciplinary approach to climate change education, two oral sessions and one poster session. She will also present a poster at the latter. John will moderate and co-present a workshop, Sharing Science in Plain English; he’ll also co-chair and moderate a panel on The Many Sides of Sharing Science. Both will also talk about science communication with the general public in an informal Ask an Expert forum.
  • Antero Garcia’s most recent book Doing Youth Participatory Action Research: Transforming Inquiry with Researchers, Educators, and Students (co-authored with Nicole Mirra and Ernest Morrell) is out now through Routledge.
  • Antero Garcia has an article in the most recent issue of English Journal with Nicole Mirra and Danielle Filipiak titled “Revolutionizing Inquiry in Urban English Classrooms: Pursuing Voice and Justice through Youth Participatory Action Research.” It can be accessed here.
  • Tobi Jacobi has been appointed to serve a three-year term on the College Composition and Communication (CCC) journal editorial board.
  • An interview with EJ Levy about her fiction and essays appears in the current issue of Superstition Review, which has a wonderful archive of author interviews with Maggie Nelson, George Saunders, Tayari Jones, among others. https://superstitionreview.asu.edu/issue16/interviews/ejlevy
  • Sarah Sloane read from an essay-in-progress about her father, “Sammy Safety,” at the Western Literature Association Conference in Reno, Nevada, on October 15, 2015. She has also collaboratively written an article with artist Joe Joe Orangias and Professor Jeannie Simms (School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston) called “Pink Icons: LGBTQ2 Monuments and their Displacement of Culture,” invited and under consideration by Public Art Dialogue. Orangias, Frank Pega (University of Otega, NZ), and Sloane were collaborators on the Pink Dolphin Monument installation in Galveston, TX: http://pinkdolphinmonument.com Finally, Sloane was one of four winners of a local essay contest, “This is Fort Collins,” held annually by The Coloradoan. Her essay was published online and in the September 2, 2015 weekend edition. She also gave a reading of it at Everyday Joe’s Coffee House.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology” has been accepted for publication by the Bellevue Literary Review.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems have been recently accepted for publication in Columbia Poetry Review, Hotel Amerika, Juked, Meridian, Phoebe, and The Burnside Review. Her manuscript, Silence for the Rest of Class, was a finalist in the 2015 Akron Poetry Prize. Three of her poems are currently highlighted on The Normal School website.

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Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • John Calderazzo has accepted an invitation to join the Fort Collins Climate Action Plan communication team.  The City’s plan is widely regarded as among the strongest in the nation.This week, John conducted a story-telling workshop for CSU’s External Relations Team.  He also moderated part of a panel at the Foothills Unitarian Church on The Moral Imperative for Climate Action.
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay, “‘A Tangle of Circumstance’: Life in the Early Years of the NYS Training School for Girls in Hudson,’ appears in the Fall 2015 issue of the Columbia County History & Heritage Magazine.
  • Barbara Sebek attended a conference on Appropriation in an Age of Global Shakespeare in Athens, Georgia.  She presented a paper, “Blurring Binaries in Frank McGuinness’s Mutabilitie (1997).”
  • A review of Dan Robinson’s novel, Death of a Century, in the Manhattan Book Review concluded with this admonition: “This is a book not to be missed.”
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s story, “The Next Step” (1721 words) has accepted for publication in the upcoming issue of Gravel Magazine.
  • Adam Mackie, English Education graduate and former composition instructor at Colorado State University, promised he’d stay in touch with the English Department at CSU. Adam recently has accepted a full-time English language arts position in his hometown of Anchorage, Alaska. Starting in January 2016, Adam will teach classic mythology and American literature at West Anchorage High School. Adam also published a set of poems with BlazeVOX in Western New York that he’d like to share with everyone: http://blazevox.org/index.php/journal/

 

TONIGHT: Grand Opening – Wolverine Farm Publishing – come celebrate the new Letterpress & Publick House on from 8-11pm. Listen to the beautiful words of  Poet Laureate (and CSU alumna) Aby Kaupang and the fabulous sounds of Souvenir Thread.

 

Reminder: Deadline for Greyrock Review submissions is December 9th. Visit greyrockreview.colostate.edu to submit.

 

December 1st: Scholarship online application opens.  The application for all scholarships in the English department is online at www.ramweb.colostate.edu. Sign in using your eID and select the CSU Scholarship Application link.

 

Spring 2016 Internships Available!

Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students. Please note that the list is likely to grow with more opportunities, so stay tuned!

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SPRING:

  • Publishing/Editorial Internships:
    • Editorial Interns, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
    • Publishing Assistant Internship (2 positions), Bailiwick Press (Ft. Collins)
    • Publication Assistant, Wolverine Farm Publishing Co. & Bookstore (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing/Editorial Internships (several positions), The Borgen Project (remote)

 

  • Educational Internships:
    • Grading Assistant, NCTE@CSU with Poudre High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing Coach and Grader, NCTE@CSU, Fort Collins High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Adult ESL Teacher, Global Refugee Center (Greeley, CO)

 

  • Non-Profit/Communications Internships:
    • Social Media and Communications Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)
    • Communications Intern (paid), Otter Products (Ft. Collins, CO)

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Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu  for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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