Tag Archives: Mandy Rose

Have a happy & safe #Halloween weekend, State đŸ‘»đŸŽƒRemember, Rams take care of Rams. #ColoradoState đŸ“·: @aleora2013

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  • Skyhorse Press will re-release Dan Robinson’s latest novel, Death of a Century, in paperback in April 2017.  If people didn’t purchase it in its glorious hardback edition, they can now purchase it in its cheaper (altho no less glorious) paperback form — same cover but a slight change to the ending.
  • A short story from Shoaib Alam’s master’s thesis titled “Guildwood Village” was a finalist in Glimmer Train’s July/August Fiction Open. He wrote the first draft for Steven Schwartz‘s fiction workshop and revised subsequent versions with help from Leslee Becker, E.J. Levy, and Alexandra Bernasek.
  • Claire Boyles’ short story, “Ledgers,” received second place in the Short Story Award for New Writers contest from the Masters Review. It is published on their site at the following link: https://mastersreview.com/new-voices/ledgers-by-claire-boyles/
  • Joanna Doxey’s poem “Guidebook to Landscape: The Border” is in the current issue of Tinderbox Poetry Journal, here – http://tinderboxpoetry.com/
  • Mandy Rose’s “On Car Accidents and Second Wives” was cited in Christian Exoo’s pedagogical piece, “Using CNF to Teach the Realities of Intimate Partner Violence to First Responders: An Annotated Bibliography,” published in Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies, issue 3.1.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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  • Camille Dungy’s poems have been published in two new anthologies: Of Poetry & Protest: From Emmett Till to Trayvon Martin. (W.W. Norton) and Read America(s): An Anthology (Locked Horn Press). Camille will be a member of the faculty of the Napa Valley Writer’s Conference this summer. The other conference faculty will be Brenda Hillman, Brian Teare, Major Jackson. Applications are still being accepted for remaining spots: http://www.napawritersconference.org/attend-the-conference/apply/
  • Todd Mitchell presented a master class on Earning The Transformation at this year’s Northern Colorado Writer’s Conference last weekend.
  • Neil FitzPatrick was awarded a 2016-2017 fiction Fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Fellowships last from October – May, and Fellows receive a live/work space and a stipend.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s “The Story of A Starry Night” has been accepted for publication in Crab Fat Magazine.
  • Kiley Miller and Michelle Wilk presented last Saturday at the Colorado Wyoming Writing Tutors Conference in Denver. Their presentation was titled, “Power Dynamics: Navigating the Needs and Demands of the Writing Center.”
  • Bill Tremblay will do a reading on Thursday, May 5, at the Wolverine Publick House and Letterpress, 316 Willow St, Ft. Collins, from his just-published book, Walks Along the Ditch: Poems, starting at 8:00 PM.
  • From Publishers Lunch, Fiction: Debut … “Devin Murphy’s (MFA, Fiction ’09) The Boat Runner, the story of a wealthy Dutch family, industrious owners of a lightbulb factory in a small town, whose world is upended over the course of four years during the WWII Nazi occupation; we follow the youngest son through the forests of France, the stormy beaches of England, and deep within the secret missions of the German Navy, as he is confronted with the moral dilemma that will change his life forever—a novel that explores the human cost of war and questions what national borders really mean when weighed against a single human heart, pitched as reminiscent of All the Light We Cannot See and Cold Mountain, to Laura Brown at Harper Perennial, for publication in Fall 2017, by Rayhane Sanders at Lippincott Massie McQuilkin (World English).”
  • Mandy Rose reviewed Lynn Pederson’s book, The Nomenclature of Small Things, for the April issue of Stirring: A Literary Collection. The review can be found here: http://www.sundresspublications.com/stirring/

English Department Internship Opportunity

Reading

 

Please join the Department of English and the Creative Writing program at the University of Denver to hear the internationally renowned poet, RaĂșl Zurita.

When: Monday, May 9th / 7pm
Where: The University of Denver
Sturm Hall / Room 454

RaĂșl Zurita is one of Latin America’s most celebrated and controversial poets. After Augusto Pinochet’s 1973 US-supported military coup that ousted Salvador Allende’s democratically elected government, Zurita’s poetry sought to register the violence and atrocities committed against the Chilean people and the corruption of the Spanish language. During the dictatorship that lasted from 1973 to 1990, Zurita published a trilogy of books (Purgatory, Anteparadise, and The New Life), wrote poems in the sky above New York City, bulldozed poems in the Chilean desert, and helped to form the art collective “Colectivo de Accion de Arte” that used performance as an act of political resistance. Of his early poetry, C.D. Wright has written: “Under the eyes of church and dictatorship, he began to write and publish his poetry, juxtaposing secular and sacred, ruled and unruled. With a mysterious admixture of logic and logos, Christian Symbols, brain scans, graphics, and a medical report, Zurita expanded the formal repertoire of his language, of poetic materials, pushing back against the ugly vapidity of rule by force.”

Zurita was awarded the Chilean National Prize for Literature, a scholarship from the Guggenheim Foundation, and he has held poetry readings at numerous American universities including Harvard, Yale, Stanford and Berkeley. His books in English translation include Anteparadise (translated by Jack Schmitt), Purgatory (translated by Anna Deeny), INRI (translated by William Rowe) and Song for His Disappeared Love (translated by Daniel Borzutzky). He lives in Chile.

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick gave a reading in Salt Lake City for the University of Utah and the Utah Arts Council. A poem, “A Century of Meditation,” has been accepted for the Kenyon Review’s special issue on long lyric forms.
  • The Center for Literary Publishing received funding from the VPR’s FY2016 Quarterly Strategic Investment Process to support travel to this year’s Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Los Angeles, to be held at the end of March. Twelve graduate student interns will receive travel funds, as well as the director and two faculty editors.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s new book, Spool, winner of the New Measure Prize, has been released by Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press. Information re: the book can be found at http://www.parlorpress.com/freeverse/cooperman
  • Sue Doe’s article, ‘Affective Activism: Answering Institutional Productions of Precarity in the Corporate University,” and  coauthored with Janelle Adsit, Maria Maisto and others, was published in Feminist Formations (Volume 27, Issue 13, Winter 2015) and is now viewable via Project Muse: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/feminist_formations/toc/ff.27.3.html
  • Sue Doe gave a presentation at the January 2016 Modern Language Association annual convention entitled “Academic Freedom for Contingent Faculty Members: Strategies for Establishing Due Process.”
  • Sue Doe’s workshop, “Don’t Throw Up Your Hands, Throw Up a Scene” has been accepted as part of the Spring 2016 LEAP (Leadership, Entrepreneurship, Arts Advocacy and the Public) Masters program in Arts Leadership and Administration.
  • Todd Mitchell’s graphic novel project Broken Saviors received a generous grant from Colorado Creative Industries and National Endowment for the Arts to continue producing issues of the story. Many thanks to all who have helped support this project. You can view the first 47 pages of the project at www.ToddMitchellBooks.com. Todd is traveling to several elementary and middle schools across the state this month (including a full day visit to McGraw Elementary in Fort Collins on February 10th) to run workshops and give presentations focused on promoting literacy and developing creativity.
  • Airica Parker is featured in CALYX Journal’s blog: https://calyxpress.wordpress.com/2016/01/22/identity-by-airica-parker/
  • Kristina Quynn’s article “’My Vagina Had Rewritten Joyce:’ Teaching Critical Engagement from Virginia Woolf to Shelley Jackson” has been accepted in the MLA’s options for teaching volume Teaching Modernist Women’s Writing in English.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s 50 word fiction piece, “Procedures” has been accepted for publication at the *82 Review, in a special 50-word themed issue, to be released at some point between May and August.
  • For its commemorative issue, Pinyon magazine has selected Mary Crow’s poem, “And Though He’s Cut Out for Noble Acts.”
  • Black Warrior Review has accepted Mandy Rose’s lyric essay, Incident Checklist, for publication.

 

CSU Writes is honored to announce Dr. Joli Jensen—expert on faculty writers and writing programs—from University of Tulsa will guest present and lead workshops for graduate students and faculty writers.  Friday & Saturday, February 26 & 27 on the topics of PROTECTING TIME, SPACE AND ENERGY (graduate student), STALLED PROJECTS: FINDING WAYS TO MOVE AHEAD (faculty), and SEMESTER WRITING PLAN & LAUNCH (faculty).

If you are interested in the topic of faculty writers and faculty writing support, you are welcome to join Joli and Kristina on Thursday evening for conversation (more details to follow). Email Kristina at quynn@colostate.edu if you are interested.

CSU Writes fosters writing groups for faculty, graduate students, and creative/life-writers who write for publication or degree completion. CSU Writes also offers workshops, regular drop in writing sessions, and consultations. The Spring Workshop Schedule includes: INTRODUCTION TO WRITING GROUPS (Feb 3 & 4); CLOCKWORK MUSE WORKSHOP (Feb 9 & 10); JOLI JENSEN GUEST PRESENTER (Feb 26 & 27); and SUFFERING FROM JARGONITIS? (Apr 5 & 6).

More information on workshops and CSU Writes offerings can be found at: http://english.colostate.edu/csu-writes/

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  • Tobi Jacobi presented at the Community Writing Conference in Boulder on Friday, October 16.  She gave a retrospective talk on 10 years of directing the SpeakOut writing program and co-facilitated a “deep think tank” workshop on homelessness, prison, and poverty with Phyllis Ryder, Paula Mathieu, Mike Homner, and Isabel McDevitt.
  • EJ Levy has been invited to teach fiction at the Kenyon Review Writers Conference, June 18-25, 2016. Faculty include Lee K. Abbott, Stanly Plumly, Carl Phillips, Linda Gregerson, Dinty Moore, and Brenda Miller. Applications to this generous, generative gathering will be accepted in January 2016.
  • Debbie Vance, first-year MFA student (Fiction)’s short story, “Black Mountain Lullaby,” will appear in Flyway: Journal of Writing & Environment this Saturday, October 31. The link to the journal: https://flyway.org.
  • Pete Garrison, MA candidate in English Education, recently completed two years of volunteer service as a member of CSU’s Peace Corps Master’s International Program. Pete served in northern Ethiopia, where he taught classes and facilitated trainings at a college of teacher education. Although he will miss Ethiopia’s generous culture and delicious cuisine, he is excited to be returning to CSU this spring.
  • Aby Kaupang Cooperman recently participated in Essay Press’s EP interview project with H.L. Hix, Shane McCrae, Jena Osman and Bino A. Realuyo in a chapbook titled “Bound to the Past: Poetry (out from) under the Sign of History.” The chapbook is free online and can be found here: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-37/#HDEVk3bYIOt8vA87.99
  • Gesture Press has accepted Mandy Rose’s chapbook, Letters to Pluto, for publication in Spring 2016.

CSU Creative Writing Program Reading Series Writers’ Harvest Festival: Andrew Altschul, newest member of the CSU faculty and author of Deus Ex Machina and Julie Carr,  CU – Boulder faculty member and prize-winning author of six poetry collections. 7:30pm, University Center for the Arts, Hatten Gallery. This event is part of an annual national festival aimed to support local food banks. Bring a nonperishable food item to qualify for our exciting raffle! Thursday, November 5th, 7:30pm, Art Museum, University Center for the Arts, CSU.  Free & Open to the public. Seating on a first-come basis – no ticket required.

internshippanel

 

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  • Tim Amidon and Mike Caggiano (Forestry) received funding from the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute for an interdisciplinary research project that seeks to learn how landowners, land managers, and emergency personnel in the Front Range understand the potential risks and benefits associated with Defensible Space migration efforts. The researchers have nearly completed their interviews, and will begin analysis of the data later this semester.
  • “Composing MOOCs: Conversations about Writing in Massive Open Online Courses,” a collaborative, scholarly webtext, appeared in the current issue of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, & Pedagogy. The webtext, created by Tim Amidon, Chris Andrews (McMurry University), Elkie Burnside (University of Findlay), D. Alexis Hart (Allegheny College), & Margaret M. Strain (University of Dayton), is structured like an interactive MOOC discussion board and offers insights from leading scholars within rhetoric and composition who have recently taught or designed massive open online courses in composition in local or national contexts. The webtext can be found at http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/20.1/interviews/amidon-et-al/index.html.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an essay on Moby-Dick up at the Boston Review: http://bostonreview.net/poetry/dan-beachy-quick-moby-dick
  • Pam Coke’s proposal entitled “What Are They Selling?  What Are We Buying?: Eating Disorders as Cultural Artifact” has been accepted for the international conference The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers due to take place June 23-24, 2016, at the UniversitĂ© du Maine in Le Mans, France.
  • Camille Dungy’s  poem “Frequently Asked Questions: #10” is featured in the October issue of Poetry, as well as on the journal’s podcast.
  • On October 1st, Roze Hentschell gave an invited lecture, “Church, Playhouse, Market, Home: The Cultural Geography of St. Paul’s Precinct,” at the Early Modern Center at UC Santa Barbara, where she had the good fortune to see two alumna from our MA program, Megan Palmer Browne (M.A. ’06) and Katie Adkison (M.A. ’14). Roze received her Ph.D. at UCSB in 1998.
  • EJ Levy’s essay “Of Liars” was published last month in After Montaigne: Contemporary Essayists Cover the Essays (2015), in which 28 contemporary essayists–from Philip Lopate to Maggie Nelson, Jared Walker to Wayne Koestenbaum, Lia Purpura to Vivian Gornick–“re-write” Montaigne’s topics, just out from University of Georgia Press.
  • Leif Sorensen attended the seventh conference of the Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present (ASAP) in Greenville, South Carolina from September 24-27. He presented two papers: “Constructing Punk Counterpublics: Neoliberalism and the Rise of Punk in Buenos Aires, Montevideo, and SĂŁo Paulo” and “‘Always start with a big explosion’: Representing Violence in Post 9/11 Genre Fiction,” in panels on the aesthetics of punk rock and violence and globalization, respectively.
  • Sasha Steensen had five poems published in Northside Review. She was interviewed for the series 12 or 20 questions: http://robmclennan.blogspot.com/2015/09/12-or-20-second-series-questions-with_29.html?m=0
  • Cedar Brant had a poem accepted for publication in Black Ocean’s Handsome Journal.
  • Mandy Rose’s essay “Five” has received a nomination for Sundress Publications’ Best of the Net. Her poem, “Nom de Guerre” was accepted by University of Hell Press for an anthology to be published in Spring 2016. Mandy will also be a guest editor for the next issue of Scissors and Spackle, http://scissorsandspackle.net/submissions/, an ELJ Publications imprint. Submissions open October 1st and are read blind, so please consider sending your work!
  • Vauhini Vara has a story in the newly published O. Henry Prize Stories anthology.  The story, originally published in Tin House is called, I, Buffalo

Workshop

Professors Lynn Shutters and Matthew Cooperman will facilitate a professionalization workshop/brown-bag event entitled “Applying to PhD Programs” next Wednesday, October 7, from 12-1:30 in Aylesworth C108. It’s designed for our MA and MFA students who are considering going on to a PhD program. Shutters and Cooperman will cover many topics such as: researching programs and institutions of interest; entrance exams; the application process de-mystified; financial assistance; and online resources. It’s an invaluable seminar designed to help graduate students make their applications as strong and successful as possible.

 

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Construction progress on the main entrance of Eddy Hall

Construction progress on the main entrance of Eddy Hall

  • John Calderazzo did a talk/workshop on January 14 to the staff and field workers of the National Wildlife Research Center on using story-telling to communicate science to the public.
  • Doug Cloud’s journal article, “The Social Consequences of Dissociation: Lessons from the Same-Sex Marriage Debate” is now out in ‘Argumentation and Advocacy,’ a publication of the American Forensic Association.
  • Camille Dungy has been named as one of 10 young American poets changing the face of poetry, http://theculturetrip.com/north-america/articles/10-young-american-poets-changing-the-face-of-poetry/. On a side note, one of the others on the list visited Camille’s class via Skype last semester.
  • Over winter break, Todd Mitchell performed readings and presented sessions on creative writing at Antioch University in Los Angeles and at the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts on Whidbey Island, Washington.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Resurrection Body” was accepted for publication in The Cincinnati Review.
  • A review Meagan Wilson wrote of Emily Skillings’s book of poems, Backchannel, was just published in Heavy Feather Review. It’s in the Reviews section of heavyfeatherreview.com.
  • Mandy Rose has a creative nonfiction piece, titled Five,  published in Alyss. The essay can be found here: http://alysslit.com/2014/12/29/five/

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