Tag Archives: Kristina Quynn

Sunset on the Oval, image by Colorado State University

  • Dan Beachy-Quick had a conversation with Alex at Wolverine Farms that is now this podcast: http://www.wolverinefarm.org/matter-podcast/
  • Sue Doe and Mike Palmquist presented a workshop on writing across the curriculum to the faculty at CSU Pueblo last Thursday. They enjoyed the drive south and the conversation in both directions, but didn’t have a lot of good things to say about the snow, ice, and parking-lot conditions on I-25 south of Denver.
  • A Release Party for new poetry collections by Camille Dungy with Eleni Sikelianos and Julie Carr at Old Firehouse Books was held Sunday, March 5. 4-5:30 pm.
  • Kristina Quynn chaired a panel on innovative literary criticism at the Literature and Culture Since 1900 Conference at the University of Louisville last week.  Her paper, “Good Writers, Bad Selfies,” explored avant-garde, self-reflexive literary portraits in the work of Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, Anaïs Nin, and Kristjana Gunnars.
  • Caleb Gonzalez’s travel essay “One Ticket, Twenty Euros” that he wrote for Sarah’s Sloane’s CNF Workshop last semester was published in InTravel Magazine this week! http://www.intravelmag.com/intravel/interest/one-ticket-twenty-euros-pamplona-at-the-running-of-the-bulls 

Food Student Essay Contest 2016/2017 

CO150 Faculty: If you’re using the FOOD reader, please encourage your best students to submit essays for the Food essay contest!

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 14th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies.  Undergraduate applicants must be registered English majors or minors; essays from graduate applicants should have been written for a graduate-level class at CSU.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 24, 2017.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies.  Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages.  Shorter papers are welcome.  Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility: (1)  Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept. (2)  Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 3, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. 

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover sheet with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minor, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your essays and cover sheet to: Professor Zach Hutchins, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773.  Submissions can also be dropped off at the English Department Office on the third floor of Eddy.

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CSU Ethnic Studies Assistant Professor Ray Black gave the charge to the marchers in Old Town for the MLK Day March.

CSU Ethnic Studies Assistant Professor Ray Black gave the charge to the marchers in Old Town for the MLK Day March, (image source: SOURCE).

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher had a couple of lyric essays accepted for publication over the break: “Coyote Crossword” in Permafrost and “Conjugation” in Uproot. He was also profiled in High Country News http://www.hcn.org/articles/harrison-candelaria-fletcher-uncommon-westerner
  • Sue Doe’s co-authored article with Mary Pilgrim and Jessica Gehrtz, “Stories and Explanations in the Introductory Calculus Classroom: A Study of WLT as a Teaching and Learning Intervention,” Volume 27 of The WAC Journal, is now viewable at: http://wac.colostate.edu/journal/vol27/doe.pdf
  • Camille Dungy is included on a list of 11 Poets Every 20-Something Should Be Reading. “Coming so close to a recent decidedly not-20-something birthday, I am deeply gratified to have made this list on Bustle.com.” https://www.bustle.com/p/11-poets-every-20-something-should-be-reading-28280
  • The Community Literacy Center welcomes Shelley Curry, Sarah van Nostrand, Lizzy Temte, and Alina Lugo as spring 2017 interns.
  • Kristina Quynn presented in two sessions at the 2017 Modern Language Association Conference in Philadelphia. She presented on “Engaged Reading and Criticism” in a special session about “Feminism, Pedagogy, and the New Modernist Studies.” This session and presentation connects with the MLA Teaching Approaches collection on Modernist Women’s Writing, which is forthcoming 2018. Kristina also organized and presented on a panel about “Narratives of Contingency: Unsettling Trends in the New Academic Novel.” Her paper was titled, “Mimetic Drudgery, Magic Realism, and the New Academic Novel.”
  • Shoaib Alam’s short story “Wonderland” from his master’s thesis will appear in May/June issue of The Kenyon Review’s KROnline. Alam is back in his hometown, Dhaka, Bangladesh, working with the Teach For All network partner there, Teach For Bangladesh, on partnership development.

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~from English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub

After a brief hiatus, the English department Colloquium has returned. For those of you who don’t know, colloquium is an event where we gather, with fine appetizers and drinks in hand, to enjoy one another’s company and hear about the work that our colleagues are doing. All department faculty and graduate students are welcome, and the event is typically held at the home of Louann and David Reid.

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As promised, department faculty and graduate students gathered with fine appetizers and drinks in hand.

After a bit of socializing, typically two faculty present their work, with a discussion following each presentation. Stephanie G’Schwind, Director of the Center for Literary Publishing, facilitates the event — everything from helping to make plates of snacks and welcoming people as they arrive, to introducing the speakers and facilitating the discussion. As anyone who has read an issue of the Colorado Review already knows, she’s a master at bringing voices together, engaging an audience, and keeping things organized as well as beautifully presented.

For this most recent colloquium, the presenters were Assistant Professor Doug Cloud and English Instructor Kristina Quynn.

Doug Cloud presented his in-progress work on how speakers conceal animus toward marginalized groups in public discourse. He shared the results from an analysis of recent “bathroom bill” and transgender-rights discourse, to show how speakers are able to make prejudicial claims about transgender people indirectly. He proposes that understanding and revealing these techniques can help us be smarter consumers and producers of public rhetoric.

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Before starting, there was a short lesson from department chair Louann Reid on how to adjust the new leather couch for maximum comfort, which led to an interesting fact you might not know about Doug Cloud — he worked at an IKEA during graduate school. “I used to sell couches and that’s a good couch.”

Once we all got settled, Doug started by saying “I’ll jump right in, like I do with most things — eyes closed, head first.” The title of his talk was, “An Incitement to Essentialism: Recent Conservative and Religious Rhetorics on Transgender Rights and Their Implications.” He said that we often see two sides of an issue as needing to fight each other or remain locked in some sort of opposition until someone “wins,” when actually we could see such engagements as a drug and a bacterial strain or two fencers might approach each other — each on their own “side” but not needing to be at war. Rather they can dance with each other and adapt. “Movements and counter-movements influence one another’s rhetoric.”

Doug considered examples of the rhetoric in petitions written by six different conservative organizations, crafted in response to three events that brought transgender identities into the national spotlight in the past year: HB2 in North Carolina, the bathroom policy at Target, and Obama’s letter to schools about the issue. It was in part a fascinating look at the many ways we try to define gender, and what our definitions reveal about what we value and believe. While Doug admitted, “It’s hard to nail down the effect of any rhetoric or discourse, even tougher to predict what impact it will have,” working with this issue and writing about it is his way of “staying on the bus.” A good discussion followed, and it’s probably safe to say we didn’t answer all the questions involved with this complex issue that night.

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Kristina Quynn talked about the phases of CSU Writes so far: where it started last year, where it currently is, and where she sees it going. She touched on the reasons she started CSU Writes (including her own research agenda), the writing productivity research and models of women’s collectives that guide its vision, and some of the wonderful success stories of graduate students and faculty who have participated in CSU Writes organized retreats, workshops, and writing groups.

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Kristina’s original search was a personal one, “I was looking for a writing group for myself to support my own work.” Her search led to starting CSU Writes, originally funded through a grant awarded to her by The Ripple Effect. Although the writing productivity research and models of women’s collectives guided her vision of the project, she knew it couldn’t just be for women, that it should be open to everyone — all genders, graduate students and faculty, undergraduates and staff. The project began with Writing Groups, Drop In writing sessions (Show Up & Write), and workshops.

Kristina learned some things early on in the project, about what was needed and by whom, and more importantly about who the project might best serve. She realized that the project should focus on purely academic writing, and refocused the program to support the needs of academic writers (Faculty and Graduate Students) writing projects with the goal of either publication or degree completion. Last year, the project worked with 277 writers, fostered 36 writing groups, held 16 workshops on the 4 topic that writers struggle with most (space, time, energy, and style), had 126 Show Up & Write sessions, and invited one guest speaker. Kristina also published an essay in an edited collection, had another accepted for the MLA Approaches to Teaching Series, had 3 conference paper proposals accepted at MSA & MLA, and has recently finished work co-editing a collection on experimental literature and criticism soon to be coming out at Palgrave Press, thus meeting her original personal goal for the project.

CSU Writes had writing retreats for graduate students that were very popular. Almost too popular. There were 30 spots and after the first few days the first retreat was open for registration, there were 65 applications, and Kristina had to contact me to take down the website submission form. Students who attended practiced writing a lot in healthy, sustainable writing sessions as a writing community. One of the most popular aspects of the retreat was Professor (now Emeritus) John Calderazzo’s session on capturing audience through storytelling.

One of the surprises of the retreats, and of the program in general, is that large numbers of international students who are looking for help for their writing as English Language Learners, that there’s a real need there, but CSU Writes offers support primarily for writing productivity, which isn’t exactly the right fit for student seeking ESL/ELL support.

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Kristina describes what she does facilitating writing groups as being the Match.com for academic writers at CSU. She confessed she even used wedding planning software to help her match writers together into workable writing groups. “There’s a lot of romance involved,” she joked. The primary way she matches people is through their schedules, stated interests, and the length of the project they are working on, but admits that whether their writing group will work out over the long-haul or not is another matter — “Chemistry is more of a mystery.”

During the discussion, John Calderazzo asked her, “how do you measure success?” Kristina answered:

  • Are graduate students experiencing speedier time to degree?
  • Can participants see an overall improvement in the writing?
  • Are participating writers feeling more comfortable and content with their writing practice?

She also suggested that measuring success by tying it to grant money is a bad idea.

Kristina talked about what seems to be at the heart of the struggles of academic writers, and what in turn points to the solutions: space for writing, time to write, maintaining momentum and energy. She suggested that accountability to a group and some practical skills, like using the Pomodoro Technique (which Catherine Ratliff introduced at the graduate student writing retreats), and separating drafting from editing, are some of the benefits of CSU Writes. She also asserted that “binge writing is bad” and suggests “writers are putting off large writing projects to the last minute.” She closed with stating, “I suspect that a lot of the crankiness on campus has to do with a lack of writing.”

It was a great event, and a good time was had by all. Stay tuned for information on next semester’s colloquium, and we hope to see you there.

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Moonlight over Eddy Hall

Moonlight over Eddy Hall

  • “Points of Intersection,” a conversation between Andrew Altschul and the writer-brothers Geoffrey and Tobias Wolff, has been published in the most recent issue of Zyzzyva.
  • Tim Amidon’s peer-reviewed article, “(dis)Owning Tech: Ensuring Value and Agency at the Moment of Interface,” was published in Hybrid Pedagogy: A Digital Journal of Learning, Teaching, and Technology. Those interested in reading this work can find the article at http://www.digitalpedagogylab.com/hybridped/disowning-tech-ensuring-value-agency-moment-interface/
  • Airica Parker‘s poem “Whispering” appears in the anthology Mycoepithalamia, edited by Art Goodtimes and Britt A. Bunyard. You can learn more about Fungi Press and its citizen-science mission by visiting: fungimag.com
  • Sarah Pieplow would like you to know/be reminded that the GLBT Resource Center’s Safe Zone training is back! It’s fun! (And she is one of the trainers!) If you would like to better learn how to support students, faculty, and staff in the GLBTQQIA community (and figure out that acronym), these trainings can help you do that. If you go to a training, you can also sign a pledge to work toward ally-ship, and get a Safe Zone triangle sticker for your office. These stickers are meant as visual symbols to signify where people in the GLBTQ+ community can go for support or feel free to speak openly about their experiences. To sign up for a training, go to http://www.glbtrc.colostate.edu/safe-zone. To ask more questions about what the heck this involves, go to Sarah.
  • This summer Kelly Weber had poems picked up in the following publications: The Midwest Quarterly, The Bone Parade, Clade Song, Allegro Poetry, and two forthcoming anthologies.
  • The NTTF Committee met on August 26, 2016 and elected positions for the 2016-17 academic year. We all look forward to working as a committee and representing NTTF during the upcoming year.  Positions are as follows:

     

     

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      Chair: Catherine RatliffSecretary: Joelle Paulson

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      Co-Public Relations Officers: Kristina Quynn and Hannah Caballero

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      Executive Committee Representative: Sean Waters

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      CLA-AFA Representative: Kristina Quynn

       

       

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick will be on Colorado Matters on the Denver NPR station on May 11.
  • Ellen Brinks has been invited to give a plenary talk at the conference “Forgotten Geographies in the Fin de Siècle, 1880-1920,” at Birkbeck College, University of London, in early July.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, “Talking Climate Change Across Difference” has been accepted for publication in a special issue of Reflections focused on “Sustainable Communities and Environmental Communication.” The issue will be out this fall.
  • Roze Hentschell will be leading a group of 10 CSU Honors Program students to study in Oxford, England. From late May through June, the students will take her 3 credit class, “Shakespeare in Oxford,” and they will take field trips to Bath, Windsor, Stratford-upon-Avon, and London. The students will also take a 3 credit independent tutorial with an Oxford professor in their field of study.
  • A short story from Colorado Review, “Midterm,” by Leslie Johnson (Spring 2015), has been selected for the 2017 Pushcart Prize anthology. You can read the story here: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/features/midterm/
  • The Community Literacy Center received a $5000 grant from the Bohemian Pharos Fund in support of the youth SpeakOut writing workshops.
  • Tobi Jacobi and Lara Roberts’s essay, “Developing Self-Care Strategies for Volunteers in a Prison Writing Program” appears in the new edited collection, The Volunteer Sector in Prisons: Encouraging Institutional and Personal Change (May 2016).
  • Larissa Willkomm’s research poster on a collaborative writing project on women, jail, and addiction won a 3rd place service learning prize at the recent CSU CURC competition.  Larissa completed this project as part of her CLC internship and work with SpeakOut.

    Larissa presenting her work at the recent CURC

    Larissa presenting her work at the recent CURC

  • Dana Masden’s short story “Exercise, a Good Book, and a Cup of Tea” will be published in an upcoming issue of Third Coast.
  • Kristina Quynn’s essay “My Brother, My….” is part of the just published collection of personal essays from 2Leaf Press on white privilege and whiteness in America.  The collection, What Does It Mean to Be White In America, includes an introduction by Debby White and an afterword by Tara Betts. While not light summer reading, it could be useful to those teaching about race in America.  You can find more information at: http://whiteinamerica.org
  • The following group presented a panel at the April 29 Writing on the Range Conference at the University of Denver, where Cheryl Ball was the featured speaker: Tim Amidon, Hannah Caballero, Doug Cloud, Sue Doe, Ed Lessor, Amanda Memoli, and James Roller. The group focused on examples, challenges, questions, and opportunities associated with integrating multimodality into writing. The presentation was entitled:”A Case of Wishful Thinking?  Our Plans for an Integrated and Coordinated Multimodal Curriculum.”
  • Mary Crow will take part in a public reception and reading for artworks inspired by poems May 19 in Loveland at Artworks, 6:30 p.m., 310 N. Railroad Ave. (Hwy 287 to 3rd, then R a block). She will read her poem. “Dear X,” and the artwork it inspired will be part of the exhibit.
  • “Food for Bears” by Kayann Short (BA 81; MA 88), an essay about the 2015 Front Range food collapse, appears in the latest issue of the environmental literary magazine, The Hopper.
  • Kathleen Willard’s (MFA, poetry Spring 2004) poetry chapbook Cirque & Sky won Middle Creek Publishing & Audio’s Fledge Chapbook Contest. Her book is a series of pastorals and anti-pastorals that “attunes its lyric eye to local ecological crises” (Dan Beachy-Quick)  & evokes “a periodic table of agitation over the continued plunder of Colorado and by extension the world.” (John Calderazzo). Her book is available online at Middle Creek Publishing and Audio, and Amazon.

    Kathleen Willard gave a reading with other Middle Creek Publishing & Audio poets in Pueblo, Colorado as part of the Earth Day Celebration sponsored by Colorado State University at Pueblo and the Sierra Club on April 23rd at Songbird Cellars, a local winery.

    She is also speaking at the Colorado Creative Industry Summit at Carbondale, Colorado on May 5th. In her presentation “Thinking Outside the Book”, she will share how receiving a Colorado Creative Industry Career Advancement Grant shifted her thinking about publishing poetry, how by using some basic business practices increased her poetry readership, and led her to pursue alternative spaces for her poetry, such as art galleries, community newspapers, installations, & the Denver Botanic Gardens CSA Art Share Project. While still wildly interested in the traditional modes of book publication, she would like to increase chance encounters that the public may have with poetry outside the book.

    She is also curating with Todd Simmons of Wolverine Farm and Publishing, a Food Truck Reading Series at Wolverine Farm Letterpress this summer, which is being supported by New Belgium Brewing Company.

    The Fort Collins Book Launch for Cirque & Sky will be June 21st, Midsummer’s Eve at Wolverine Letterpress.

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick gave a reading in Salt Lake City for the University of Utah and the Utah Arts Council. A poem, “A Century of Meditation,” has been accepted for the Kenyon Review’s special issue on long lyric forms.
  • The Center for Literary Publishing received funding from the VPR’s FY2016 Quarterly Strategic Investment Process to support travel to this year’s Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Los Angeles, to be held at the end of March. Twelve graduate student interns will receive travel funds, as well as the director and two faculty editors.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s new book, Spool, winner of the New Measure Prize, has been released by Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press. Information re: the book can be found at http://www.parlorpress.com/freeverse/cooperman
  • Sue Doe’s article, ‘Affective Activism: Answering Institutional Productions of Precarity in the Corporate University,” and  coauthored with Janelle Adsit, Maria Maisto and others, was published in Feminist Formations (Volume 27, Issue 13, Winter 2015) and is now viewable via Project Muse: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/feminist_formations/toc/ff.27.3.html
  • Sue Doe gave a presentation at the January 2016 Modern Language Association annual convention entitled “Academic Freedom for Contingent Faculty Members: Strategies for Establishing Due Process.”
  • Sue Doe’s workshop, “Don’t Throw Up Your Hands, Throw Up a Scene” has been accepted as part of the Spring 2016 LEAP (Leadership, Entrepreneurship, Arts Advocacy and the Public) Masters program in Arts Leadership and Administration.
  • Todd Mitchell’s graphic novel project Broken Saviors received a generous grant from Colorado Creative Industries and National Endowment for the Arts to continue producing issues of the story. Many thanks to all who have helped support this project. You can view the first 47 pages of the project at www.ToddMitchellBooks.com. Todd is traveling to several elementary and middle schools across the state this month (including a full day visit to McGraw Elementary in Fort Collins on February 10th) to run workshops and give presentations focused on promoting literacy and developing creativity.
  • Airica Parker is featured in CALYX Journal’s blog: https://calyxpress.wordpress.com/2016/01/22/identity-by-airica-parker/
  • Kristina Quynn’s article “’My Vagina Had Rewritten Joyce:’ Teaching Critical Engagement from Virginia Woolf to Shelley Jackson” has been accepted in the MLA’s options for teaching volume Teaching Modernist Women’s Writing in English.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s 50 word fiction piece, “Procedures” has been accepted for publication at the *82 Review, in a special 50-word themed issue, to be released at some point between May and August.
  • For its commemorative issue, Pinyon magazine has selected Mary Crow’s poem, “And Though He’s Cut Out for Noble Acts.”
  • Black Warrior Review has accepted Mandy Rose’s lyric essay, Incident Checklist, for publication.

 

CSU Writes is honored to announce Dr. Joli Jensen—expert on faculty writers and writing programs—from University of Tulsa will guest present and lead workshops for graduate students and faculty writers.  Friday & Saturday, February 26 & 27 on the topics of PROTECTING TIME, SPACE AND ENERGY (graduate student), STALLED PROJECTS: FINDING WAYS TO MOVE AHEAD (faculty), and SEMESTER WRITING PLAN & LAUNCH (faculty).

If you are interested in the topic of faculty writers and faculty writing support, you are welcome to join Joli and Kristina on Thursday evening for conversation (more details to follow). Email Kristina at quynn@colostate.edu if you are interested.

CSU Writes fosters writing groups for faculty, graduate students, and creative/life-writers who write for publication or degree completion. CSU Writes also offers workshops, regular drop in writing sessions, and consultations. The Spring Workshop Schedule includes: INTRODUCTION TO WRITING GROUPS (Feb 3 & 4); CLOCKWORK MUSE WORKSHOP (Feb 9 & 10); JOLI JENSEN GUEST PRESENTER (Feb 26 & 27); and SUFFERING FROM JARGONITIS? (Apr 5 & 6).

More information on workshops and CSU Writes offerings can be found at: http://english.colostate.edu/csu-writes/

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Assistant Professor Zach Hutchins and his E630D Special Topics in Literature: Gender Studies – Witchcraft class.

Assistant Professor Zach Hutchins and his E630D Special Topics in Literature: Gender Studies – Witchcraft class.

  • Zach Hutchins has been awarded a 2016 Fellowship by the National Endowment for the Humanities. NEH support will facilitate research on Hutchins’s current book project, a prehistory of the North American slave narrative. For his research, Hutchins is reading thousands of issues of early American newspapers and transcribing every news item related to slavery, from slave-for-sale advertisements to discussions of enslaved African princes and news of runaway slaves. Those transcriptions contribute, Hutchins argues, the rhetorical framework for subsequent representations of the African American experience and the generic codes of the slave narrative.
  • This past Tuesday, Doug Cloud gave a workshop for SoGES Sustainability Fellows titled “Communicating Science to Skeptical Audiences: Some Rhetorical Strategies for Scientists.”
  • Kristina Quynn’s personal essay, “My Brother, My…,” about growing up in an interracial family is to be published in the collection What Does It Mean to Be White in America? by 2Leaf Press.
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “Tomb at the Village of the Workmen,” accepted for publication in Indianola Review. Her book of poems, Jostle, is a finalist for the T. S. Eliot Publication Award. Her history of Colorado poetry has been posted on the website of The Poetry Foundation (Poetry Magazine); it was originally written for the Academy of American Poets (and now is a bit dated).
  • Steven Schwartz’s Madagascar: New and Selected Stories will be published by Engine Books in Fall 2016. His play, “Stranger,” was selected as one of three from a national playwriting competition and received a staged reading in Los Angeles.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s 101 word flash-fiction piece, “Motherland” has been accepted for publication in Crack The Spine!

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Kristina-Quynn-CSU-Writes (2)

Born and raised in Colorado, Dr. Kristina Quynn has been able to call CSU home since childhood. With her father serving as a CSU chaplain, she first learned how to play tennis on the old campus courts. After completing her PhD in Michigan, she answered a job posting to come home again.

Ever since I decided to call CSU my home, Kristina has been such a wonderful professor and mentor to me. A few semesters after taking her course in British Literature, I asked if she would like to be my advisor for my senior thesis on women in Irish film because of her expertise in Irish literature and storytelling.

Perhaps that’s why I was able to break the ironclad rule of Show Up & Write: no talking. Tagged as “like drop in yoga without the downward dog”, Show Up & Write is a part of Kristina’s new CSU Writes project. I stopped by the drop in writing group’s first meeting this past Wednesday to ask about teaching, writing, and Green Eggs and Ham.

A: What inspired you to pursue a degree in English?

K: I fell into being an English major, quite honestly. I changed my major five times. But it made sense, ultimately, that because I was always interested in texts and how texts work I would pursue English (rather than History, Journalism, or Film, which were some of her other majors as an undergraduate).


A: What do you enjoy the most about your work?

K: I love the dynamic exchange of ideas among people who are interested texts, reading and writing and constructions of sex and gender. I think in terms of teaching what I enjoy most is conversations with students that take them from one place of understanding to a newly shaped idea.


A: What accomplishments are you most proud of?

K: I’m really proud of having done my doctorate and dissertation. I’m really proud of the research and work that I did to write on gender and mobility in modern women’s writing. I didn’t realize when I first started out working on the PhD how much you have to do to put together a research project like that.

I finished up a PhD in six-and-a-half years as a single mother, which is remarkable in the field of English. It’s usually much more along the lines of seven plus years. The fact that I was able to do that with kids was only because I had a strict schedule and I had a writing group that I could submit work to.

A: Is that what inspired you to start CSU Writes?

K: When you teach four classes, it’s very difficult to continue doing research and being productive. The writing group in graduate school had helped me stay focused and on task, so when I got here to CSU, I was looking for a similar kind of group. I didn’t find it easily. There wasn’t such a thing as a faculty writing group. I thought, “Well, that’s a program waiting to happen.” So when I saw the Ripple Effect grant call, I applied.

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A: I think the faculty knows a lot about the Ripple Effect, but I’m not sure that students do.

K: The Ripple Effect is about CSU acknowledging that there are gender biases at work in academia. Women in academia do struggle in different ways depending on your department or your discipline, whether you’re faculty or staff or janitorial crew. It’s important to recognize that gender does influence how we work and are treated in the workplace. I think it’s great that the Ripple Effect is taking that on. I’m grateful to the Ripple Effect for putting out monies to allow faculty to be creative and put together initiative that make the campus a better place for women to work. I think it’s so cool that I get to create CSU Writes out of it.


A: Who is CSU Writes for?

K: The writing group programs are open to all CSU faculty, students, staff, and even emeritus community. The writing groups are more focused on people who are working on larger projects for publication and creating some sort of support network so that people can publish more here. So they’re a little specialized, but it is still a program that’s open to anyone and everyone who wants to be part of it.


A: And Show Up & Write is for all students?

K: You don’t have to be part of a writing group to participate in Show Up & Write. It is open to anyone, whether you’re working on a CO 150 paper or a Capstone project for a course. The Show Up & Write sessions contribute to the CSU Writes program because people who have a regular writing practice are much more apt to finish those long-term writing projects.

Ideally, I want Show Up & Write to become so big that we fill not just 102 Shepardson Hall, but the large auditoriums on campus with 200 or 300 or 400 writers. And, ultimately, if we could fill the whole stadium three times a week with writers, I think that would be a great use of the stadium.

A: You’ll be using Show Up & Write sessions to work on your own writing as well. What kind of projects do you think you’ll be doing?

The one thing that I brought to work on today is a book proposal for a book called My Breasts and Clam. It’s a revisionist story of Dr. Seuss’ Green Eggs and Ham. It’s a lesbian revisionist tale about a pesky character called, “Pam” instead of “Sam.”

A: One last question: if Show Up & Write is like drop in yoga without the downward dog, what is the standard position for drop in writing?

K: Feet up. Pen to page.

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Show Up & Write sessions are on M-W-F from 1-2:50 PM in 102 Shepardson Hall.

To join a CSU Writes group, attend one of the introductory workshops on Tuesday, September 15 (Clark C359) or Wednesday, September 16 (Clark 358) from 4-5:30 PM.

For more information, visit www.english.colostate.edu/csu-writes or email Dr. Kristina Quynn at quynn@colostate.edu.

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Workers on a lunch break. Ingersoll Hall is officially under construction.

Workers on a lunch break. Ingersoll Hall is officially under construction.

  • Antero Garcia recently received grant funding as a co-PI on a project funded by the George Lucas Educational Foundation. “Composing Our World: Supporting Literacy and Social and Emotional Learning through 9th Grade ELA Project-Based Learning” is a three year study taking place throughout Northern Colorado.
  • On May 2, Nancy Henke will be inducted into the Forensics Hall of Fame at Boise State University in Boise, Idaho.  She and the other members of the 2005 Boise State University Speech and Debate team are being honored to commemorate the ten-year anniversary of the team’s first national championship.  Boise State has won three more national titles in forensics since the first win in 2005.
  • Kristina Quynn’s article “Elsewheres of Diaspora: Dionne Brand’s In Another Place, Not Here” will be published in the spring special topic issue on theorizing elsewhere of the Journal of Midwest Modern Language Association.
  • Three Community Literacy Center interns presented research at the 2015 Celebrate Undergraduate Research and Creativity poster showcase. English major Meg Monacelli and Sociology major Chelsea Mitchell presented their collaborative poster on prison re-entry education and training programs. English major, Hannah Polland presented a poster on her research on literacy and sex trafficking. Hannah’s poster/presentation earned 1st place in the service-learning category. Congratulations, Meg, Chelsea, and Hannah!
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Moon Body” was accepted for publication by Berkeley Poetry Review.  She has also accepted an offer to attend UC Davis’s PhD in Literature program, where she will be a Provost’s Fellow in the fall.
  • Olivia Tracy will be presenting her paper “‘Rise Up Through the Words’: Nature and Power in Haitian Uncoverings of Anacaona” in June at the 2015 ASLE Biennial conference in Moscow, Idaho. She will be presenting as part of the panel “Postcolonial Uncoverings: Caribbean Ecologies.”
  • Earlier this week Alam Shoaib (MFA, fiction) heard from the editors at the British literary magazine Wasafiri. They have accepted his poems “Customs,” “Sepulchre,” and “Apartment 651J” for their upcoming November special issue on Writing from Bangladesh.
  • Davis Webster, a current English (Creative Writing) undergraduate, is a finalist in the New York Times “Modern Love” College Essay Contest. His essay, one of ten chosen out of 1800 essays from 400 colleges, will be appearing on the New York Times’ website next week.
  • Janelle Adsit, MA student (’09) in the English department (communication development) has accepted a tenure-line position at Humboldt State University. She will be teaching creative writing workshops there. Humboldt State is the northernmost Cal State school.

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English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub and author Neil Gaiman. Jill waited in line for seven hours at Old Firehouse Books to meet Gaiman, who stayed at that table signing books for eleven hours, until there was no more line.

English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub and author Neil Gaiman. Jill waited in line for seven hours at Old Firehouse Books to meet Gaiman, who stayed at that table signing books for eleven hours, until there was no more line.

  • Tim Amidon’s collaboratively authored chapter (with Jessica Reyman) titled “Authorship and Ownership of User Contributions on the Social Web” is now out in Cultures of Copyright  (Eds. Dànielle Nichole DeVoss and Martine Courant Rife). Additionally, this semester he is teaching “CO402: Principles of Digital Rhetoric and Design” which is the first time this course has been offered here at CSU. He will be presenting an interactive talk titled “Navigating Fair Use: Remix, Appropriation, Attribution” at the TILT MTI next Tuesday, February 10, 2015 from 12:00-1:00 PM at TILT 105.
  • Leslee Becker has won the CLA John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award.
  • Next week, John Calderazzo will conduct a science communication story-telling workshop for SoGES Ph.D and post-doctorate scholars. Also in February, he’ll give a talk/reading–“High Culture: Mountains & Our Minds”–at the Walking Mountains Science Center in Avon, Colorado.
  • Todd Mitchell spent a day last week working to inspire literacy and creativity with elementary and middle school students and faculty at Littleton Academy, in (not surprisingly) Littleton.
  • Kristina Quynn was awarded a Ripple Effect Grant to fund the first year of “CSU Writes,” a program that will set up and foster writing groups on campus for faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and the CSU community. “CSU Writes” will start in Fall of 2015 and will help support those at CSU who research and/or write for publication.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poetic sequence “The Somatic Wager: A Proof in Verse” was accepted for publication in Juked (Print).
  • Kylan Rice had a chapbook of poetry published digitally on February 5th at Gauss-PDF: http://www.gauss-pdf.com/post/110170340600/gpdf155-kylan-rice-captions
  • Kendall Umetsu, currently student teaching at Kinard Core Knowledge Middle School in Fort Collins, recently attended the University of Northern Iowa Overseas Recruiting Fair, where she signed her first teaching contract.  Starting in August, she will be moving to The Kingdom of Bahrain to teach 10/11th grade English at the Modern Knowledge School.  Congratulations, Kendall!
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “As Can Happen with an Island,” accepted for publication by Greensboro Review and she has been accepted for this year’s Ashbery Home School workshop.
  • Steven Schwartz will be the featured reader for fiction at the 2015 Rosenberry Writers’ Conference on Wednesday, March 4, 7 p.m. in the University Center Panorama Room of the University of Northern Colorado campus. Admission is free.
  • James Work’s Christmas video “Stone Soup Christmas” on Vimeo reached more than two thousand people over Christmas. His poem “The Empty Cross” is being set to music for the Easter cantata at Mountain View Presbyterian Church.

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