Tag Archives: Harrison Candelaria Fletcher

English instructor Sean Waters viewing the eclipse

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has poems accepted at Poetry, New England Review, and Cincinnati Review.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher had a couple of lyric essays published during the summer break – “Family Cookbook” in Florida Review and “Flight” in Somos en escrito. He also and taught a few hybrid image and found text workshops at the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program and the VCFA Post Graduate Writing Conference. He’s glad to be back.
  • Camille Dungy’s new book of poems, Trophic Cascade, received a favorable reading in Harvard Review. http://harvardreview.org/?q=features/book-review/trophic-cascade
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow has six ghazals published in the most recent edition of the Denver Quarterly, under her publishing name ‘slp.’
  • In May Leif Sorensen gave a talk on his book in progress titled Worlds of Difference: Race, Ethnicity and Science Fiction at the invitation of the Sogang Institute of American Studies and the American Culture Program at Sogang University in Seoul, Republic of Korea. He also facilitated a special symposium for the American Cultural Studies Graduate Program at Sogang titled “Revisiting Octavia Butler’s Kindred in 2017″ that focused on Butler’s 1979 novel and Damian Duffy’s 2017 graphic adaptation of the novel.In August Leif presented a talk, “Vanishing Races and Endangered Species” that focuses on representations of endangered species in Native American fiction from the 1920s and 1930s at the Modernist Studies Association Conference in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.His 2016 essay “Region and Ethnicity on the Air,” published in the Summer 2016 issue of MELUS won an honorable mention for the Don D. Walker Prize sponsored by the Western Literature Association to honor the best essay published on western American literary studies.
  • Catie Young’s chapbook, What is Revealed When I Reveal it to You, will be published by dancing girl press in early 2018. During the summer, poems from Language Object and Stopgap appeared in Gramma and Ghost Proposal.
  • The Center for Literary Publishing, which produces Colorado Review and other publications, is featured in SOURCE, CSU’s news website.  CR editor Stephanie G’Schwind is assisted by English Department student interns, among them Chelsea Hansen and Kristen Macintyre, who are featured in a special story at http://source.colostate.edu/center-serves-hands-publishing-laboratory-students/.

 

English Department Office Hours 

The English Office hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. (closed during lunch, 12:00-1:00 p.m.).

 

Eddy 300 Computer Lab

Monday – Thursday 7:30 am – 7 pm
Friday – 7:30 am – 5 pm
Saturday 10 am – 2 pm
Sunday 10 am – 2pm

Writing Center Hours

Starting August 28

Eddy Hall, Room 23
Mon-Thurs: 10 am – 4 pm

Morgan Library, Room 171
Sun-Thurs: 6 pm – 8 pm

 

Fall 2017 Internships Available!

 Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students.

Please contact Cassandra Eddington, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Cassie.Eddington@colostate.edu for more information on these internships and how to apply.

 

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A great time was had by all at Bruce Ronda’s retirement celebration

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has a lyric essay, “Family Cookbook,” accepted by Florida Review. It’s part of a new collection exploring mixed-ness and in-between-ness.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Natural History,” was awarded a Pushcart Prize and will be played published in the Best of the Small Presses anthology.
  • Joanna Doxey has a poem in the latest edition of the Denver Quarterly (51.3).
  • Jaime Jordan’s Digital Humanities class (E280) has created a blog showcasing some of the digital projects they’ve worked on this semester.  Check it out at https://exploredhblog.wordpress.com!
  • Second year MFA student Claire Boyles had an essay, “Failing at Important Things: A Parallel History,” place as a runner-up in Vela Magazine’s nonfiction contest, judged by Claire Vaye Watkins. The essay is live on the site: http://velamag.com/failing-at-important-thingsa-parallel-history/
  • Cedar Brant won the Academy of American Poet’s Prize for CSU.
  • David Mucklow was accepted and offered a scholarship to attend the Squaw Valley Community of Writers Poetry Workshop this summer, and will be attending at the end of June. A few weeks ago, his poem, “where Deer Creek dies into the Gallatin,” was published on Daily Gramma. You can find it on their site here – http://gramma.press/
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s flash story, “A Bunny’s Kidnapping” has been accepted for publication at “Gone Lawn.”
  • Come celebrate the new 2017 Fort Collins Poet Laureate (our very own Felicia Zamora!) on Sunday, May 7 from 6-8 PM at Wolverine Farm Publick House! Enjoy readings from Felicia Zamora (MFA alumnae), John Calderazzo (professor of English Emeritus), and Michelle Deschenes (MFA alumnae). For more information, please see the event calendar listing or Facebook event page.

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Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Recently, Tim Amidon presented research at two concurrent conferences in Portland: the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (ATTW) and the Conference on College Composition and Communication. At ATTW, Battalion Chief Randy Callahan of Poudre Fire Authority joined Tim to speak about the ongoing community based research projects that they have been undertaking in partnership.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s flash piece, “Dawn,” was named as a finalist in The Best Small Fictions 2017 by guest judge Amy Hempel. “Dawn” was nominated by the editors of Eleven Eleven.
  • EJ Levy’s hybrid essay, “Natural World,” appears in the most recent issue of Passages North. She will be Visiting Writing at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell on March 22-23, 2017.
  • Sasha Steensen’s chapbook, Thirty-Three Hendes was a finalist for the Tupelo Sunken Gardens chapbook contest. It will be published by Dancing Girl Press this summer.
  • Michael Knisely has a photography exhibit going on in Boulder through April at the Rocky Ridge School of Music in the Lucky’s Market shopping center at Broadway and Spruce. These are performance art photos from when he was the University of Nebraska Dance Dept.’s photographer, plus a few old concert photos (Peter, Paul, and Mary, and Bruce Springsteen).
  • Dana Chellman’s essay “How to Get to Heaven from Colorado” is a winner for the AWP Intro Journals Project, and it is being published in Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Jennifer Stetson-Strange, Spring 2017 MA candidate in TEFL/TESL, has been offered an opportunity related to her final project, “Needs Analysis and Curriculum Development for Occupational ESP: English for hotel workers.”  Over the past nine months she dedicated over 80 hours to conducting a thorough needs analysis, compiling and analyzing specific language needs of L2 (second language) learners in order to develop a curriculum for workers in the hospitality industry and specifically housekeepers at a local hotel.

    Jenny observed more than 20 participants who worked in the housekeeping department of a local hotel in Northern Colorado.  She found it a rewarding experience to be a part of this project, including building key relationships with participants at the hotel.  At her final defense in March, the majority of the housekeeping staff attended as well as the general manager of the hotel, filling the defense room with 35-40 people.  Jenny was overwhelmed by the attendance and thankful they all were there because, as she writes, “The entire project was about them!”

    Currently, the general manager would like Jenny to implement the curriculum as soon as possible.  She will be teaching the staff once a week until she graduates.  This summer, she hopes to continue teaching the housekeeping staff twice a week.  Her future goal is to implement this program at different hotels and restaurants in Northern Colorado.

  • Mary Crow has had eight poems from her collection Addicted to the Horizon translated into Spanish by Silvia Soler-Gallego and Francisco Leal and published in AEREA: Revista Hispanoamericana de Poesia along with the English originals. This literary magazine is a joint publication of the University of Georgia and the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute.
  • James Work’s novel The Contractor was voted First Finalist in the annual Spur Award competition of Western Writers of America. His first novel of a projected series of “cozy” mysteries has been accepted by FiveStar Publishing. The title is Unmentionable Murders and the main character of the series is a RMNP ranger in the 1920s. Lots of gangsters, flappers, bootleg hooch and, of course, mysterious murder.
  • Cedar Brant has a sculpture in the CSU Art and Science Exhibition in the Curfman Gallery in Lory Student Center.  http://source.colostate.edu/celebrate-creativity-csus-art-science-exhibition-march-24/

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oval

Image by Paul L Dineen

  • SueEllen Campbell has three recent publications: “Making Climate Change Our Job,” the lead article in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, eds. Siperstein, Hall, and LeMenager, Routledge, 2017; the forward, “Sunrise, Celebration,” to Ellen Wohl, Rhythms of Change in Rocky Mountain National Park, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016; and “The White-tailed Ptarmigan,” an excerpt from Even Mountains Vanish, in The Rocky Mountain National Park Reader, ed. James H. Pickering, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016. She continues her work on the 100 Views of Climate Change website, http://changingclimates.colostate.edu, endeavoring to deal with a backlog of good new accessible sources of information of all kinds.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher just had a prose poem sequence accepted for the Manifest West anthology on “Women of the West.” The anthology is due out later this year.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, titled “Re-Writing a Discursive Practice: Atheist Adaptation of Coming Out Discourse” has been accepted for publication in Written Communication. It will be out this April.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s essay “Notes Toward a Poetics of Drought” is up at Omniverse right now. The essay, part of panel proceedings from a panel organized and chaired by Kristen George Bagdanov (MFA ’15), is a three-part series being run by Omniverse. You can find it here: http://omniverse.us/poetics-of-drought-matthew-cooperman/
  • From Sue Doe: “I am excited to announce a new online journal, Academic Labor:  Research and Artistry. ALRA is published by the Center for the Study of Academic Labor, a CSU center supported by President Tony Frank (see http://csal.colostate.edu/about/tony-franks-statement/) and Dean Ben Withers. We seek to provide perspectives from the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts on contingency, tenure and the future of higher education. Please consider submitting something for the inaugural issue, and please circulate the CFP to your colleagues and distribute it to disciplinary list-servs, journals, websites, discussion boards, etc. Note that the journal invites varied genres, including art.”
  • Todd Mitchell launched a new program today to encourage literacy, creativity, and caring for our earth by delivering free books and free author visits to underfunded schools in Colorado. If you want to learn more (or become a supporter), check out http://youcaring.com/Books4Change.
  • Todd Mitchell cover reveal. After years of writing and countless drafts. I’m finally able to share with you the cover for my new book. It’s coming out in August, 2017. Just in time for the new school year. I can’t wait to release this one into the wild, along with several new presentations for schools! Click to read early reviews, preorder a copy, and learn more about why I wrote this book.  lastpanther
  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Bellwethers: Shame and My Left Breast” is up at Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-83/
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the January 2017 issue of OmniVerse and other poems have recently been accepted in the Raleigh Review, Bellingham Review, and Sugar House Review. Her blogpost “Consideration of Self in Poetry: You & the Page” is up at North American Review, and a new interview with poems can be found online at HocTok.

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CSU Ethnic Studies Assistant Professor Ray Black gave the charge to the marchers in Old Town for the MLK Day March.

CSU Ethnic Studies Assistant Professor Ray Black gave the charge to the marchers in Old Town for the MLK Day March, (image source: SOURCE).

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher had a couple of lyric essays accepted for publication over the break: “Coyote Crossword” in Permafrost and “Conjugation” in Uproot. He was also profiled in High Country News http://www.hcn.org/articles/harrison-candelaria-fletcher-uncommon-westerner
  • Sue Doe’s co-authored article with Mary Pilgrim and Jessica Gehrtz, “Stories and Explanations in the Introductory Calculus Classroom: A Study of WLT as a Teaching and Learning Intervention,” Volume 27 of The WAC Journal, is now viewable at: http://wac.colostate.edu/journal/vol27/doe.pdf
  • Camille Dungy is included on a list of 11 Poets Every 20-Something Should Be Reading. “Coming so close to a recent decidedly not-20-something birthday, I am deeply gratified to have made this list on Bustle.com.” https://www.bustle.com/p/11-poets-every-20-something-should-be-reading-28280
  • The Community Literacy Center welcomes Shelley Curry, Sarah van Nostrand, Lizzy Temte, and Alina Lugo as spring 2017 interns.
  • Kristina Quynn presented in two sessions at the 2017 Modern Language Association Conference in Philadelphia. She presented on “Engaged Reading and Criticism” in a special session about “Feminism, Pedagogy, and the New Modernist Studies.” This session and presentation connects with the MLA Teaching Approaches collection on Modernist Women’s Writing, which is forthcoming 2018. Kristina also organized and presented on a panel about “Narratives of Contingency: Unsettling Trends in the New Academic Novel.” Her paper was titled, “Mimetic Drudgery, Magic Realism, and the New Academic Novel.”
  • Shoaib Alam’s short story “Wonderland” from his master’s thesis will appear in May/June issue of The Kenyon Review’s KROnline. Alam is back in his hometown, Dhaka, Bangladesh, working with the Teach For All network partner there, Teach For Bangladesh, on partnership development.

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Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has been named one of “The Top Ten New Latino Writers to Watch (and Read) for 2017” by the by LatinoStories.com literary website. http://latinostories.com/Top_Ten_Lists/top_10_authors.htm. The recognition was based on feedback from editors, faculty, librarians and readers. Also, a section from his book, Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams, was just nominated for a 2017 Pushcart Prize from Autumn House Press. Lastly, a new essay, “Outline Toward an Essay on Ethnicity and Miracles,” from a collection in progress, was accepted for publication by the University of Alaska’s hybrid journal, Permafrost.
  • Matthew Cooperman is pleased to report that Aby Kaupang is recovering nicely from back surgery (a discectomy; three weeks now), feeling stronger each day and remembering the joy of walking. Matthew and Aby are also pleased to report that their long-running collaborative project NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified) has been accepted by Futurepoem, a NYC press. A portion of the manuscript appeared last year as an electronic chapbook called disorder 299.00, from Essay Press. It can be found here, http://www.essaypress.org/ep-52/ A recent review of that chapbook is now up at Rain Taxi, http://www.raintaxi.com/disorder-299-00/
  • Our own Camille Dungy will be reading the names at Commencement on Saturday, January 17 at 7:30 p.m. Several faculty are already coming to the ceremony, but please join them If you want to hear Camille and recognize the graduates from our department. Senior Tim Cuevas will carry in the English banner. Thank you, Tim and Camille!
  • Kudos to Nancy Henke and Beth Lechleitner, who led a third fantastic year of the Finals Friends extravaganza. With the extra time and effort they gave, faculty had something special to look forward to in their mailboxes this week last week of classes. If you participated, thank Beth and Nancy next time you see them for this bright, cheerful reminder of how much we enjoy and appreciate each other.
  • Mike Palmquist presented a talk on writing across the curriculum at Indiana University of Pennsylvania on November 9th. He followed the talk with a day-long workshop the following day.
  • Mary Crow’s translations of lines by Roberto Juarroz were published in “Versailles: Aesthetics of the Ephemeral” by Christine Buci-Glucksmann; July, 2016. Catalog for the Exhibit: Olafur Eliasson’s Waterfall. Versailles, France. (7 June – 30 Oct. 2016)

CSU Writing Center

The CSU Writing Center will have limited hours during finals week. We will be open Monday, December 12 and Tuesday, December 13 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in Eddy Hall, room 23. We will be closed during the break, and will reopen on Monday, January 23.

Eddy 300 Lab

The Eddy 300 Lab hours for finals week: Monday –Thursday 7:30-8:00pm

Friday 7:30-4:00pm. We will be closed for winter break from Saturday, December  17th  and return on Tuesday, January 17th.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

 

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happyfallbreak

  • On November 16 and 17, Camille Dungy spoke at the University of Arizona Poetry Center as part of their Climate Change & Poetry Series. “Starting in October 2016, the UA Poetry Center features eight world-class poets as they address what overlaps, contradictions, mutual challenges, and confluences the categories of Climate Change & Poetry share with each other; in a series of investigative readings, we hope to offer some answers, some questions, and some new ways of thinking. In this second installment of readings built around a common question, we wonder: what role does poetry have in envisioning, articulating, or challenging our ecological present? What role does poetry have in anticipating, shaping – or even creating – our future?” http://poetry.arizona.edu/climatechange
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s newest book, Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams, just received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews, whose editors also chose it as a “Kirkus’ Indie Books of the Month Selection” for January. https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/harrison-candelaria-fletcher/presentimiento/
  • Todd Mitchell spoke on the Author Panel last weekend at the Loveland Library Author Showcase. He also spoke with the IRS after they read one of his books (the IRS is the Poudre Library’s Interested Reader Society of teen readers. If you’re interested in finding engaged teen readers, contact the IRS. They’ll give you hope for our future).
  • In recent months, John Calderazzo has run science communication workshops for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability, the Graduate School, the College of Engineering, and the Office of the Vice President for Research. He continues to both volunteer and consult for the City of Fort Collins’ Climate Action Plan. John will also be the Guest Judge for the 2017 Waterston Desert Writing Prize. You can find out more about it here: http://www.writingranch.com/waterston-prize-for-desert-writers/
  • Bill Tremblay’s commentaries on drawings by Norman Olson will appear in Lummox #5, forthcoming 2017.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) second book, & in Open, Marvel, has been accepted by Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press for publication in 2017. She also has a new poem in Tupelo Quarterly, a poem in a special election issue of Tarpaulin Sky Magazine, a poem accepted at Mid-American Review where she was a runner up for the 2016 Fineline Competition, a new poem accepted in The New Guard where she was semi-finalist in the Knightville Poetry Contest, three poems in the newest issue of Witness Magazine, four poems available in the newest issue of West Branch featuring women and the avant-garde, and she is currently participating in the Tupelo 30/30 Project for the month of November.

 

2016 Graduate Showcase Awards

 

English Department Distinction In Creativity Award – The Distinction in Creativity award is presented in Collaboration by the Graduate School and Office of Vice President for Research. This award recognizes the passion and personal contributions of these talented graduate students, and honors their commitment and efforts in their area of work.

1st Place – Kelly Weber

2nd Place – Cedar Brant

 

College of Health and Human Sciences Excellence in Creativity

Alyson Welker

 

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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~from intern Haley Huffman

writersharvest

The Writer’s Harvest isn’t just a bounty of award winning literature, but it is also a food drive for the Larimer County Food Bank. It is an opportunity to provide food for those less fortunate. A community gathered to share a passion for the humanities in an art gallery that was stark in appearance, but felt very warm and inviting.

Well-lit white walls with small works of strategically framed artwork enclosed the audience. I felt a little out of place because everyone there seemed so cultured and this was certainly not my average weeknight activity, and this was my first reading. I stood in the back wondering to myself what etiquette accompanied a literary reading and how I was supposed to behave.

The audience

The audience

The atmosphere warmed up drastically after the reading began. As everyone settled in, their attention shifted to the readers. My own focus shifted too and my worries about fitting in drifted away.

Harrison Candelaria Fletcher gave a vibrant reading that transported the audience to the deserts of New Mexico with beautiful descriptions of the landscape and of his family bonds. Fletcher read several passages that reflected on his bond with his mother and their collective bond to the land. Fletcher’s words and descriptions completely blew me away and I could picture myself standing in the middle of the desert, with the red sand blowing around me. Fletcher read about the warm nourishing wind that blows through New Mexico and Professor Dungy likened that wind to the literary community that gathered that evening.

The theme of nourishment continued as Tess Taylor read from her latest book of poetry Works and DaysWorks and Days is about her experience working on a farm in New England. Farming is an experience that I don’t necessarily identify with as I’ve never worked on a farm, but Taylor’s descriptions made perfect sense. Her poetry was moving and elegantly combined farm life with the changing of seasons and the inherently human thoughts that both evoke.

The evening was dedicated to feeding Larimer County with non-perishable food donations, and it also fed the souls of the audience with literature. After experiencing my first reading, I realized that no one is paying attention to what other people are doing. The experiences that are portrayed through the readings captivate everyone’s attention and transport them all to different places, together.

Donations

Donations of non-perishable food brought to the reading

 

The Larimer County Food Bank is always accepting monetary donations and non-perishable food. For every $1 donated, they provide $5 of food. For more information visit: www.foodbanklarimer.org.

 

 

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Green and gold, our favorite colors

Green and gold, our favorite colors

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has a group of poems in the new Flag + Void: http://flagandvoid.com/volumeeight. He also has an essay published at Full-Stop: http://www.full-stop.net/2016/09/14/features/essays/danbeachyquick/whitenesses/
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s essay, “Open Season,” has just appeared in Brevity’s Special Issue on Race, Racism and Racialization http://brevitymag.com/current-issue/open-season/. Another essay, “Dawn,” appears in the Fall 2016 issue of Eleven Eleven. This summer he gave readings at Vermont College of Fine Arts and the Lighthouse LitFest in Denver, and his new memoir, Presentimiento: A Life In Dreams, was named Autobiography Finalist in the 2016 International Latino Book Awards, alongside Ana Castillo and Nasario Garcia.
  • Mike Palmquist was the keynote speaker at the 6th American Midwest Confucius Institute Director Conference on September 3rd. His talk, “The Power of Story: The Role of Narrative in Shaping and Interpreting Our Actions,” drew on narrative theory and narrative inquiry to explore how story brings us together within and across cultures.
  • Hosted by poet Wendy Videlock and Lithic Bookstore, Airica Parker is a featured reader and workshop leader for a regional retreat in Palisade this weekend.
  • Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub spent the last few weeks collecting memories and pictures of Bev McQuinn. See the full post here: http://english.colostate.edu/news/memory-bev-mcquinn/

 

Creative and Performing Arts Scholarship Competition in Creative Writing 

Deadline: Friday, October, 7, 2016 by 4:00pm 

  • The Creative Writing Program is conducting its annual university-wide creative writing competition for Creative & Performing Arts scholarships.
  • Students can submit multiple genres. Undergraduate submissions may include one or more of the following genres: three to five poems OR one short story OR one creative essay.
  • Awards are typically $500 per academic year in the form of tuition waivers; awards of $1,000 – $5,000 may be given for special merit.
  • Multiple awards are available. 

Submission Guidelines:

  • Students may submit 3 to 5 poems OR 1 short story OR 1 creative nonfiction essay (not an academic paper).
  • DO NOT PUT NAME OR ADDRESS ON THE MANUSCRIPT. Include only page numbers and title on manuscript.
  • Attach a cover letter stating name, address, phone number, CSU I.D. number (NOT ssn number), and genre.
  • Address manuscripts to: Professor Dan Beachy-Quick, Directory, Creative Writing Program, Eddy Hall, CSU. Campus Delivery 1773
  • Please be sure to either mail OR Hand-Deliver submissions to English Department mailbox in Eddy Hall by Friday, October 7, 2016 at 4:00pm.

Criteria for Award:

  • Must have a minimum 2.4 GPA.
  • Must be undergraduates (working on first bachelor’s degree)
  • Must be enrolled full-time (12+ credits).
  • Should be making satisfactory progress toward a degree, i.e., must have satisfactorily completed 75% of CSU courses attempted and must not have accumulated excessive credits. (See Office of Financial Aid for further details).
  • Must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident.

The Creative Writing Faculty cannot comment on the writing; manuscripts will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

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fletchermugDr. Harrison Candelaria Fletcher is the author of Descanso For My Father: Fragments Of A Life, winner of the Colorado Book Award for Creative Nonfiction and International Book Award for Best New Nonfiction, and Presentimiento: A Life In Dreams, selected by Dinty W. Moore from more than 200 entries as winner of the 2015 Autumn House Press Nonfiction Prize and selected as a Best Autobiography finalist in the 2016 International Latino Book Awards.

His work has appeared in many journals and anthologies including New Letters, Fourth Genre and Puerto del Sol as well as Brief Encounters: A Collection of Contemporary Nonfiction and The Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction. His honors include the New Letters Literary Award, High Desert Journal Obsidian Prize, Sonora Review Essay Award, Pushcart Prize Special Mention and fellowships from the Arizona Poetry Center and Vermont Studio Center.

Dr. Harrison Candelaria Fletcher was also a former columnist and feature writer at newspapers throughout the West and a former professor at Virginia Commonwealth University and Vermont College of Fine Arts. We are happy to welcome him as a new faculty member to the English Department here at CSU!

Learn more about Dr. Harrison Candelaria Fletcher in the following interview below, and make sure to check out his class E370: American Literature in Cultural Contexts: Growing Up Latino(a) this fall. For more information on this class and the other classes we are offering this fall, see our courses page.


What brought you to CSU?  

I’m very much looking forward to joining the Creative Nonfiction Program at CSU. I’m constantly inspired by its many forms and mutations (literary journalism, memoir, collage, lyric essay, video essay) and I love being in the middle of it all. I’m excited by the future of CNF at CSU and the opportunity to work with Sarah, Debby, and the rest of the English Department aces. Can’t wait.

Also, as corny as it sounds, the sky. I’m a New Mexican native and I also lived in Colorado for fifteen years. The West is home. Landscape is very important to me and my work. I’m fascinated by place, identity, memory, culture and history and the interactions between them. Richmond VA is beautiful, but I missed the sky.

And let’s not forget the green chile.

Or beer.

What is your favorite thing to teach? 

Creative writing. I love exploring the power of story and intricacies of form, narrative, character, theme, structure, etc. The possibilities of story inspire me.

What is your favorite thing about teaching?

My favorite thing about teaching? Discovery. Every time I leave a classroom or a workshop, students have shown me something new.

How would you describe your teaching style, your philosophy?

Listening is important – a legacy of my columnist-feature writer days. I’m probably more of a facilitator than a lecturer – one of those people who believe in the bottom-up approach to writing and literature in which issues of craft, style, theory and context issues rise from the manuscript or book in hand rather than the lectern down. I work best during the give-and-take of discussion.

FletcherLitFest

Harrison Candelaria Fletcher at the Lighthouse Writers Lit Festival in Denver

Are you working on any special projects right now?

A few: An essay collection exploring mixedness, a documentary poetry prospect, and a hybrid thing involving found visuals and documents, but I probably shouldn’t say more because I’m superstitious about jinxes in the initial stages.

When you’re not working or teaching what do you like to do?

Multiple choice (in no particular order):

Jump shots.

IPAs.

Found photos, found texts, found-objects things.

Netflix (currently “Peaky Blinders”).

Date nights with my wife.

Long walks where I can see the sky.

Pen and ink.

PS3 with the kids.

Poetry.

Soundgarten.

Couch with the cats.

Rolling Stone magazine.

Sleep.

What are you doing with your summer before you start teaching?

Packing. Packing. Packing.

Moving across country with cats.

Unpacking. Unpacking. Unpacking.

Appeasing cats.

(I also teach in the MFA Program at Vermont College of Fine Arts, so I spent a good bit of time in Montpelier. I participated in the terrific Lighthouse Writers LitFest in Denver as well – see photo. Then more packing).

What is something about you that most people would be surprised to learn?

I could dunk a basketball (many moons ago). I’m also the proud recipient of the 2010 Green Chile Prize from the Chicano Arts and Humanities Council in Denver (for visual art).

 

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