Tag Archives: Felicia Zamora

Poet and CSU alumna Felicia Zamora returned to campus for a Creative Writing Reading Series reading. The reading series is part of the CLA 2017 Diversity and Inclusion theme. This is an important theme for Zamora and her writing. Just last year, Zamora’s Of Form & Gather was awarded the 2016 Andres Montoya Poetry Prize, created to help support the first publication by a Latino/a poet in the United States. Zamora was also chosen as the 2017 Fort Collins Poet Laureate.

Camille Dungy opens the reading.

Camille Dungy, CSU professor and Director of the Creative Writing Reading Series, opened the reading and MFA student Christa Shively introduced Zamora. Shively spoke of Zamora’s dedication to craft and the way she writes about both the known and unknown world.

Zamora’s reading took us through a journey of her poetry, and her process towards finding her voice. Since graduating with an M.F.A. from CSU, she challenged herself to write one manuscript each year, a challenge she has accomplished. Just this year, Zamora published two collections of poetry: Of Form & Gather (February) and & in Open, Marvel (October).

Zamora’s biggest piece of advice was to “just write.” Writing does lead to editing, but Zamora also advised to not over edit any piece of work. Eventually, you’ll find yourself writing new poems and new manuscripts instead of tapping into the same mindset that inspired the original draft.

Sometimes, it happens that the first collection you write may not be the first one published. For Zamora, her fourth manuscript was Of Form & Gather, but it was published before her third manuscript, & in Open, Marvel. By this fourth manuscript, Zamora felt that she had found her voice and the direction she wanted her poetry to go.

Zamora read from Of Form & Gather, described by CSU faculty Dan Beachy-Quick as “Charting out circles and cycles and containments, these people also become that complicated mirror that doesn’t simply reflect us back to ourselves, but as all that is not exactly us, where the body goes animal, goes vegetal, ‘& mind becomes becomes becomes.’”

Of Form & Gather observes and speaks of the absence of the thing, and the idea that all truths are half known. Her use of ampersands and semi-colons appear throughout each poem, as Zamora challenged herself to write an entire collection using only semi-colons.

The use of these two pieces of punctuation was deliberate, and speaks to the tone Zamora wants for her poetry. The semi-colon is slower than a comma, but also faster than a period. Instead of ending each thought, Zamora can carefully piece together larger themes, each poem working as an extension of the others.

Through this collection, Zamora hopes to show that “horror and beauty are not necessarily opposites.” This fact inspired her poem “& in wonder too,” drawing from an encounter where a hawk swooped in front of her to grab a prairie dog, both a horrific and beautiful scene.

Zamora reads to a crowded room.

Zamora gave us a wide sampling of her writing and collections, reading from & in Open, Marvel and Instrument of Gaps, a collection that has been chosen for publication.

To close, Zamora previewed a portion of a manuscript she just finished writing. While she has avoided strong social justice motifs in her past poetry, this collection is heavily political. With each poem, she covers topics like diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice.

But Zamora explained how these poems were challenging for her to write. Each poem required a process filled with emotions and issues that are difficult to convey through poetry. With this collection, Zamora hopes to give a voice to the voiceless.

In closing, Zamora left us with one final, powerful piece of advice for aspiring poets and writers alike: “Be the artist you’re supposed to be.”

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A great time was had by all at Bruce Ronda’s retirement celebration

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has a lyric essay, “Family Cookbook,” accepted by Florida Review. It’s part of a new collection exploring mixed-ness and in-between-ness.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Natural History,” was awarded a Pushcart Prize and will be played published in the Best of the Small Presses anthology.
  • Joanna Doxey has a poem in the latest edition of the Denver Quarterly (51.3).
  • Jaime Jordan’s Digital Humanities class (E280) has created a blog showcasing some of the digital projects they’ve worked on this semester.  Check it out at https://exploredhblog.wordpress.com!
  • Second year MFA student Claire Boyles had an essay, “Failing at Important Things: A Parallel History,” place as a runner-up in Vela Magazine’s nonfiction contest, judged by Claire Vaye Watkins. The essay is live on the site: http://velamag.com/failing-at-important-thingsa-parallel-history/
  • Cedar Brant won the Academy of American Poet’s Prize for CSU.
  • David Mucklow was accepted and offered a scholarship to attend the Squaw Valley Community of Writers Poetry Workshop this summer, and will be attending at the end of June. A few weeks ago, his poem, “where Deer Creek dies into the Gallatin,” was published on Daily Gramma. You can find it on their site here – http://gramma.press/
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s flash story, “A Bunny’s Kidnapping” has been accepted for publication at “Gone Lawn.”
  • Come celebrate the new 2017 Fort Collins Poet Laureate (our very own Felicia Zamora!) on Sunday, May 7 from 6-8 PM at Wolverine Farm Publick House! Enjoy readings from Felicia Zamora (MFA alumnae), John Calderazzo (professor of English Emeritus), and Michelle Deschenes (MFA alumnae). For more information, please see the event calendar listing or Facebook event page.

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Maybe we are biased, but we have some of the best alumni. They are a diverse group of amazing humans doing interesting and important work in the world. We miss them after they are gone, and love nothing more than to brag about them, to share with you all the good stuff they are doing. When thinking about poetry, there are two alumna in particular that come immediately to mind: Chloe’ Leisure (MFA Creative Writing: Poetry, Spring 2006), and Felicia Zamora (MFA Creative Writing: Poetry, 2012).

Chloe’ Leisure was born and raised in Marquette, Michigan. She teaches community and elementary enrichment creative writing classes in Fort Collins, Colorado. She is the author of the chapbook, The End of the World Again (2015), and her poetry has appeared in publications including Fort Collins Courier, Matter, PANK, Paterson Literary Review, A Poetic Inventory of Rocky Mountain National Park, and Permafrost. She received her MFA from CSU and was the 2014 Fort Collins Poet Laureate.

 

A few more interesting things about and from Chloe’:

 

Felicia Zamora’s bio on her website says, “Felicia Zamora’s books include Of Form & Gather, winner of the 2016 Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize (University of Notre Dame Press 2017), & in Open, Marvel (Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press), and Instrument of Gaps (Slope Editions). She won the 2015 Tomaž Šalamun Prize from Verse, and authored the chapbooks Imbibe {et alia} here (2016) and Moby-Dick Made Me Do It (2010). Of Form & Gather was listed as one of the “9 Outstanding Latino Books Recently Published by Independent and University Presses” by NBC News… She is an associate poetry editor for the Colorado Review and holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Colorado State University. She lives in Colorado with her partner, Chris, and their three dogs, Howser, Lorca, and Sherlock.”

A recent update from Felicia shared that her manuscript Galaxy Inside Your Inadequately Small Heart was selected as a finalist in the 2017 Alice James Award and the 2017 Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry. Her poem “In all the pretty roam” was featured on Zòcalo Public Square on Friday, March 17 and her poem “Virgule” was selected by The Georgia Review for publication. Zamora read her poetry for the AKO Collective’s Day Without A Woman recognition event on March 8.

A few more interesting things about and from Felicia:

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Image by Jill Salahub

  • Next Wednesday, Doug Cloud will be giving a workshop for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) Sustainability Fellows titled “Talking Science with Conservative, Religious and Other Potentially Skeptical Audiences.”
  • Tobi Jacobi participated at the recent Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) through a panel presentation entitled, “Not “All Ellas”: Risking Exploitation in a Prison Public Memory Project,” and a preconference prison teaching workshop (“The Prison Next Door: What Types of Connections Do We Want to Cultivate?”).
  • Michael Knisely’s Boulder’s Rocky Ridge Music Academy photography exhibit runs through April, he will also showcase additional photographs as part of the Month of Photography exhibit at the ACE Storage gallery on north Broadway also in Boulder. A collaboration of poets and visual artist’s exhibit at the First Congregational Church at Broadway and Spruce Streets in Boulder will feature two of his poems. He will also be reading from his poetry work as part of a large poetry reading this Friday for the First Friday Arts event at the First Congregational Church, which runs from 6:30 – 8:00 this Friday evening.
  • Dan Robinson’s paper, The Second Battle of the Champagne & the Inexpressibility Topos, has been accepted for the XVIII International Hemingway Conference in Paris next summer.
  • Morgan Riedl (MA in CNF, 2017) has a piece up on Brevity’s blog.  It’s a hermit crab essay in the form of a workshop critique of Sean Spicer’s press conferences.  You can read it here: https://brevity.wordpress.com/2017/03/30/workshop-comments-for-sean-spicer/
  • Catie Young’s poem “Merrily Merrily M​errily Merrily” is in the new issue of The Volta: ​http://www.thevolta.org/twstbs-poem185-cyoung.html
  • On April 21, John Calderazzo will read an essay at the Sacred Mountains and Landscapes conference at The New School.  The essay will discuss a centuries-old agricultural ritual in the Peruvian Andes he attended in which Quechua people have recently changed their behavior because of the climate change induced shrinking of their glaciers.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) first book, Of Form & Gather, winner of the 2016 Andrès Montoya Poetry Prize, was released on February 28 from the University of Notre Dame Press. Of Form & Gather is listed as one of the “9 Outstanding Latino Books Recently Published by Independent and University Presses” by NBC News. Her manuscript Galaxy Inside Your Inadequately Small Heart was selected as a finalist in the 2017 Alice James Award and the 2017 Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry. Her poem “In all the pretty roam” was featured on Zòcalo Public Square on Friday, March 17 and her poem “Virgule” was selected by The Georgia Review for publication. Zamora read her poetry for the AKO Collective’s Day Without A Woman recognition event on March 8.
  • Kathleen Willard will be the BreckCreate Breckenridge Creative Arts Tin Shop Guest Artist in Residence for the month of April. In addition to working on her new poetry manuscript, she will give a poetry reading, conduct four poetry workshops, and host a community poetry reading. She hosts Open Studio Hours at the Tin Shop Thursday through Sunday to talk about poetry and share her process. The BreckCreate website has details of her events.

Checkout the English Department’s new lunch counter!  In response to our See Change 2 request for more common space for faculty and staff, we have put the west end of Eddy to work. Two lunch counters are open and ready to entice you out of your offices for lunch and conversation. We will devote the exhibit space above each counter to departmental work on diversity and inclusion for at least the first year.

  • The northwest corner launches this new “Counter Talk” space with an exhibit featuring the 1960 Greensboro lunch counter sit-in and additional images — including two from the Smithsonian’s 2010 50th anniversary celebration.  Look here for some interesting ways to incorporate such moments into your courses: http://americanhistory.si.edu/freedomandjustice.

Stay tuned: Jaime Jordan’s exhibit featuring a moment in her CO150 course will be added next week to the southwest counter.

 

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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'Old School' research in the library. Remember catalog cards? 1975. University Historic Photograph Collection

‘Old School’ research in the library. Remember card catalogs? 1975. University Historic Photograph Collection. (Image shared by the Morgan Library on Facebook last week).

  • On Thursday, February 9, the Community Literacy Center hosted Kay Adams, Founder and director of the Center for Journal Therapy in Denver as part of their spring SpeakOut! facilitator training event. Fourteen students, faculty, and community members participated in dialogue on writing through times of chaos.
  • Beth Lechleitner’s collaborative poetry/visual art piece “Mettle” has been accepted into the CSU Art and Science exhibition at the Curfman gallery.  The show opens Feb 21 and runs through March 24.
  • Todd Mitchell attended and presented two sessions at last weekend’s 50th Anniversary CCIRA Conference in Denver. One grimly packed session on “Teaching Dystopian Fiction,” and a second on “Using Writing Games to Develop Literacy and Creativity.”
  • Claire Boyles (second year MFA candidate in fiction) has been accepted to the Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference in fiction and awarded a Katharine Bakeless Nason scholarship to attend.
  • Bill Tremblay’s memoir on jazz “The Music While the Music Lasts” will appear in Brilliant Corners in the Summer, 2017, issue.
  • Slope Editions announced that Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) book, Instrument of Gaps, was selected for publication from their Fall 2016 Open Reading Period. Read more information on the Slope Editions news page. She also has a poem accepted in Beloit Poetry Journal, her poem “A long road never takes us” is out in the Winter 2017 edition of North American Review, and she participated in a Parlor Press reading in D.C. for AWP on Thursday, February 9.

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Image by Paul L Dineen

  • SueEllen Campbell has three recent publications: “Making Climate Change Our Job,” the lead article in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, eds. Siperstein, Hall, and LeMenager, Routledge, 2017; the forward, “Sunrise, Celebration,” to Ellen Wohl, Rhythms of Change in Rocky Mountain National Park, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016; and “The White-tailed Ptarmigan,” an excerpt from Even Mountains Vanish, in The Rocky Mountain National Park Reader, ed. James H. Pickering, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016. She continues her work on the 100 Views of Climate Change website, http://changingclimates.colostate.edu, endeavoring to deal with a backlog of good new accessible sources of information of all kinds.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher just had a prose poem sequence accepted for the Manifest West anthology on “Women of the West.” The anthology is due out later this year.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, titled “Re-Writing a Discursive Practice: Atheist Adaptation of Coming Out Discourse” has been accepted for publication in Written Communication. It will be out this April.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s essay “Notes Toward a Poetics of Drought” is up at Omniverse right now. The essay, part of panel proceedings from a panel organized and chaired by Kristen George Bagdanov (MFA ’15), is a three-part series being run by Omniverse. You can find it here: http://omniverse.us/poetics-of-drought-matthew-cooperman/
  • From Sue Doe: “I am excited to announce a new online journal, Academic Labor:  Research and Artistry. ALRA is published by the Center for the Study of Academic Labor, a CSU center supported by President Tony Frank (see http://csal.colostate.edu/about/tony-franks-statement/) and Dean Ben Withers. We seek to provide perspectives from the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts on contingency, tenure and the future of higher education. Please consider submitting something for the inaugural issue, and please circulate the CFP to your colleagues and distribute it to disciplinary list-servs, journals, websites, discussion boards, etc. Note that the journal invites varied genres, including art.”
  • Todd Mitchell launched a new program today to encourage literacy, creativity, and caring for our earth by delivering free books and free author visits to underfunded schools in Colorado. If you want to learn more (or become a supporter), check out http://youcaring.com/Books4Change.
  • Todd Mitchell cover reveal. After years of writing and countless drafts. I’m finally able to share with you the cover for my new book. It’s coming out in August, 2017. Just in time for the new school year. I can’t wait to release this one into the wild, along with several new presentations for schools! Click to read early reviews, preorder a copy, and learn more about why I wrote this book.  lastpanther
  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Bellwethers: Shame and My Left Breast” is up at Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-83/
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the January 2017 issue of OmniVerse and other poems have recently been accepted in the Raleigh Review, Bellingham Review, and Sugar House Review. Her blogpost “Consideration of Self in Poetry: You & the Page” is up at North American Review, and a new interview with poems can be found online at HocTok.

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  • On November 16 and 17, Camille Dungy spoke at the University of Arizona Poetry Center as part of their Climate Change & Poetry Series. “Starting in October 2016, the UA Poetry Center features eight world-class poets as they address what overlaps, contradictions, mutual challenges, and confluences the categories of Climate Change & Poetry share with each other; in a series of investigative readings, we hope to offer some answers, some questions, and some new ways of thinking. In this second installment of readings built around a common question, we wonder: what role does poetry have in envisioning, articulating, or challenging our ecological present? What role does poetry have in anticipating, shaping – or even creating – our future?” http://poetry.arizona.edu/climatechange
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s newest book, Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams, just received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews, whose editors also chose it as a “Kirkus’ Indie Books of the Month Selection” for January. https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/harrison-candelaria-fletcher/presentimiento/
  • Todd Mitchell spoke on the Author Panel last weekend at the Loveland Library Author Showcase. He also spoke with the IRS after they read one of his books (the IRS is the Poudre Library’s Interested Reader Society of teen readers. If you’re interested in finding engaged teen readers, contact the IRS. They’ll give you hope for our future).
  • In recent months, John Calderazzo has run science communication workshops for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability, the Graduate School, the College of Engineering, and the Office of the Vice President for Research. He continues to both volunteer and consult for the City of Fort Collins’ Climate Action Plan. John will also be the Guest Judge for the 2017 Waterston Desert Writing Prize. You can find out more about it here: http://www.writingranch.com/waterston-prize-for-desert-writers/
  • Bill Tremblay’s commentaries on drawings by Norman Olson will appear in Lummox #5, forthcoming 2017.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) second book, & in Open, Marvel, has been accepted by Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press for publication in 2017. She also has a new poem in Tupelo Quarterly, a poem in a special election issue of Tarpaulin Sky Magazine, a poem accepted at Mid-American Review where she was a runner up for the 2016 Fineline Competition, a new poem accepted in The New Guard where she was semi-finalist in the Knightville Poetry Contest, three poems in the newest issue of Witness Magazine, four poems available in the newest issue of West Branch featuring women and the avant-garde, and she is currently participating in the Tupelo 30/30 Project for the month of November.

 

2016 Graduate Showcase Awards

 

English Department Distinction In Creativity Award – The Distinction in Creativity award is presented in Collaboration by the Graduate School and Office of Vice President for Research. This award recognizes the passion and personal contributions of these talented graduate students, and honors their commitment and efforts in their area of work.

1st Place – Kelly Weber

2nd Place – Cedar Brant

 

College of Health and Human Sciences Excellence in Creativity

Alyson Welker

 

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Image by Ashley Alfirevic

Image by Ashley Alfirevic

  • Leslee Becker received the University’s Jack E. Cermak Award for Advising.
  • Stephanie G’Schwind is very proud to announce that Colorado Review will make a second Best American debut this year: Jonathan Franzen has selected “Namesake,” by Mason Stokes (Summer 2015 issue) for Best American Essays 2016. You can read the essay here: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/features/namesake/
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper entitled “The Challenges of Going Public with Archival Prison Materials” on a panel with other prison writing scholars at the recent CCCC meeting in Houston, TX.  She also led a learning circle at the pre-conference prison pedagogy and research workshop.
  • As co-chair of the Qualitative Research Subcommittee of the Standing Commission on the Status of Women Faculty, Lisa Langstraat wrote a Vice Provost of Research Quarterly Funding Grant proposal, “Qualitative Research on the Culture and Climate for Women Faculty at CSU.”  Our committee was awarded all requested funding which will allow for the expansion of current research efforts and summer funds for coding and analyzing data.  This data will inform policy regarding improving the culture and climate for women faculty at CSU as well as nation-wide Advance Grant development.
  • Shoaib Alam’s short story “Guildwood Village” has been accepted for the 2016 Tin House Summer Workshop. He will be at Reed College in Portland from July 10-17 and is looking forward to studying with Chinelo Okparanta.
  • CSU was well represented among this year’s winners of the AWP Intro Journals Award. Cedar Brant won for her poem, “Make Blood,” and Nathaniel Barron won for the first chapter from his novel-in-progress, From the Watchtower. Emily Ziffer received an honorable mention for her nonfiction essay, “Moving Forward, In Russian.” That’s three awards for CSU, the most of any program! All of the nominees will be on our Poster at the English Department Awards Reception.
  • Two TEFL/TESL students, Kathleen Hamel and Brian Doebbeling, successfully defended their portfolios on 4/15.
  • Felicia Zamora (MFA ’12) has four poems accepted in West Branch’s upcoming feature issue focusing on avant-garde contemporary women poets. Other poems have recently been accepted to Cutbank, The Adirondack Review, and Salt Hill.

 

Greyrock Review Release Party!!!

 The Greyrock Review Release Party will be held on, Thursday, April 28th  from 6-8 at Wolverine Farm’s Letterpress & Publick House on Willow.

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  • Mary Crow’s poetry has been translated for a literary magazine in Chile.  Nine poems from her latest book, Addicted to the Horizon, appear in both their original English and in Spanish translation in Aerea: Revista Hispanoamericana de Poesia, Numero 10, Segunda epoca 2016, with an introduction in Spanish by Francisco Leal. The translators were Silvia Soler-Gallego and Francisco Leal.
  • Sue Doe was an invited speaker for the College English Association’s Coffee on the Commons on April 2 at their annual conference in Denver. Her talk was entitled “University Centers as Partners for Change” and reported on the development of the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL), which promotes research and scholarship on the transformation of academic labor in higher education, including but not limited to scholarship on contingency and tenure.
  • Judy Doenges’ story “Privacy” will appear in the September issue of Guernica magazine.
  • Felicia Zamora (MFA ’12) won the Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize for her book Of Form & Gather, judged by New York poet, Edwin Torres. The manuscript will be published by the University of Notre Dame Press in 2017. Read more here http://letraslatinasblog.blogspot.com/.

 

Award Submission Deadline

Outstanding Undergraduate and Graduate Writing Award in Composition, Rhetoric, & Literacy Submission Deadline: Monday, April 11th, 5 pm. Find out more about how to submit here: Undergraduate Award and Graduate Award.

 

Immediate Need for a CSU Writing Project Intern!

SPRING 2016 INTERN ($500 stipend)

The CSU Writing Project is seeking an intern to assist with writing enrichment programs for elementary and secondary-aged students, including the Youth Science Civic Inquiry Project (YSCI) and on-campus summer writing workshops. YSCI is a partnership with the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery designed to provide low-income youth with access to science and literacy learning related to water use, quality, and equitable access. Duties would include publicity, event planning, clerical and logistical tasks, and data entry. Strong organization and communication skills, ability to meet deadlines, and willingness to work with youth are required. The intern must be available for May 7 YSCI event.

Hours: 30 hours total, so 5-6 hours per week for the remainder of the semester.

SUMMER 2016 INTERN ($800 stipend)

The CSU Writing Project is seeking an intern to assist with the summer institute for the Youth Science Civic Inquiry Project (YSCI) during the month of June. The YSCI institute is a partnership with the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery designed to provide low-income youth with access to science and literacy learning related to water use, quality, and equitable access. Duties would include event planning, clerical and logistical tasks, publicity for culminating event (a film festival in the museum’s Digital Dome theatre). Strong organization and communication skills and willingness to work with youth are required. Expertise in digital media is a plus.

Hours: June 13-25, for approximately 5 hrs. per day with some time to prepare ahead of the event.

To Apply: Please submit a resume and a brief paragraph expressing your interest and qualifications to: Cindy O’Donnell-Allen  at Cindy.Odonnell-Allen@colostate.edu.

 

Greyrock Review Release Party!!!

The Greyrock Review Release Party will be held on, Thursday, April 28th from 6-8 at Wolverine Farm’s Publishing.

 

MA or PhD Programs Professional Workshop

All students interested in applying to MA or PhD program in English a workshop will be held on Tuesday, April 12th from 3:00-4:00pm in Eddy 107, led by Pam Coke, Aparna Gollapudi and Roze Hentschell. Topics covered will be “Researching programs of interest, entrance exams, the application process, funding, and online resources.

 

Write That Book Workshop

 In this 3-part class, Laura Pritchett (author’s bio below), will share everything she wishes she’d known ahead of time about writing a book-length work.  Class 1 will focus on the basics:  thinking through your plot, your themes, your genre.  Class 2 will focus on the psychology of it all:  what prevents us starting or finishing a book?  How can we develop strategies to work with the demands that hold us back as writers, to absorb them into our creative process rather than avoid writing, or shut down, because of them?  Part 3 will focus in on the language:  motifs and metaphors and flat-out beautiful sentences.  We’ll be looking at some contemporary writers (of all genres) to guide us into creating more artful work.

Whether you’re just starting your book or working on revisions, this class will focus on important considerations for a book length work. Writers of all levels are welcome, although the class will likely be most useful for those who have already been envisioning /writing the book for a bit. The class is appropriate for fiction and nonfiction. A lot goes into the class, and you’ll be expected to do a lot too.  So be ready to work!

Cost:  Class limited to 8.  $160 for all three classes, approximately 10 hours of class.  Must sign up for all three classes.  Optional official night reading at the end (date to be determined).

Dates:  Sundays, May 15, 22, and 29, from 1-4 pm.

Location:  Publick House, 316 Willow Street

Teacher bio: Laura Pritchett began her writing journey with the short story collection Hell’s Bottom, Colorado, which won the PEN USA Award for Fiction and the Milkweed National Fiction Prize. This was followed by the novels Sky Bridge, Stars Go Blue, and Red Lightning, which garnered numerous other literary awards, including the High Plains Book Award and the WILLA. She then began work on edited anthologies, which include Pulse of the River, Home Land, and Going Green: True Tales from Gleaners, Scavengers, and Dumpster Divers. She also has a nonfiction book about bears entitled Great Colorado Bear Stories. She holds a PhD from Purdue University and an MA in English from CSU. More at www.laurapritchett.com

 

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snOval, image by Colorado State University

snOval, image by Colorado State University

  • Aby Kaupang and Matthew Cooperman’s book NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified) was recently a finalist for the Essay Press Book Prize. Largely detailing the challenges and joys of raising their autistic daughter Maya, the book has been in progress for many years. A chapbook from that collection, Disorder 299.00, has just been released from Essay Press, and can be found at http://www.essaypress.org/ep-52/
  • Thanks to the amazing work of Shoaib Alam and Karen Montgomery Moore, Colorado Review now has 10,000 followers on Twitter.
  • Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala has been appointed to serve as Editor of the American Association for Applied Linguistics Newsletter.  She will serve a three-year term (2016-2019).  Fabiola is also currently serving in the Editorial Review Board for Volume 70 of The Reading Teacher (RT) for the 2015-2016 period. Fabiola’s latest 2015 publication is: Meeting the reading comprehension challenges of diverse English language learners in K-12:  Key contributions from reading research (pp. 147-164).  In M. Daniel & K. Mokhtari (Eds.), Research and instruction that makes a difference in English learners’success.  Lanham, MD: Roman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. Fabiola, together with Tony Maciejewsky (Department Head of Electrical and Computer Engineering at CSU), will be presenting the results of their investigation titled “Mental imagery experienced by both pathway and non-pathway graduate students in an engineering course at a US Research I institution” at the upcoming 2016 AAAL Conference in Orlando.
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poem, ghazal [16.], will be published in the spring edition of burntdistrict. You can find the journal at http://burntdistrict.org/
  • Mary Crow’s poetry is the subject (along with Karen Swenson’s) of a chapter in Marilyn Krysl’s Yes, There Will Be Singing, published in the University of Michigan series, Poets on Poetry.
  • Here’s James Work’s latest contribution to world literature. Publication expected in July. jameswork
  • Two of Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the newest issue of TriQuarterly Review. Her poem “In tuck” has also been selected for publication at The Cincinnati Review and her poem “& in wonder too,” first printed in Meridian, will be the poem of the day on Poetry Daily on February 11.
  • The English Department is pleased to award the following graduate students departmental funds for travel associated with professional activities. The department gave a total of $7,420 in award money to students this year. The grants ranged from $300-$750. Students will be traveling to conferences from Alaska to points eastward. Congratulations to all our students who are sharing their research and creative work in professional circles!
    Paul Binkley
    Denise Garrett
    Kelsey Hatley
    Abby Kerstetter
    John Koban
    Cole Konopka
    David Mucklow
    Kathleen Naughton
    Meghan Pipes
    Kylan Rice
    Lara Roberts
    John Whalen
    Meagan Wilson
    Catie Young

NCTE@CSU

On April 9th of this year we will be hosting our first conference.

“Literacy Through Popular Culture.”

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL

The conference theme is on research-based strategies for teaching literacy through popular culture. This theme engages students and teachers in embracing the rele-vance and power of popular culture—from comic books to teen novels to video-games— as a form of literacy in the classroom. Presentations and workshops should offer teachers concrete, actionable strategies that they can incorporate into their own language arts classrooms. We invite secondary (grades 6-12) language arts teachers and students, university professors and students, and other related profes-sionals to send in proposals for workshops or presentations.

DEADLINE: MARCH 7

Email proposal submissions to ncte@colostate.edu

We are very excited about this event and are working hard to make it an amazing and memorable one. Please visit the website for information: http://nctecsuconference2016.weebly.com

Show Up & Write

“show up & write” sessions started this week.  “show up & write” runs from February 1 to May 4, on Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays: 9-9:50 in Eddy 100 and 2-2:50 in Eddy 200. These drop-in writing sessions offer a regularly scheduled time in a communal, academic setting for writers to make progress on writing projects. Look for information in your mailbox to share with your students. And, “show up & write” regularly to see what you accomplish this semester!

 

Workshop Reminder: UD Composition

On February 16 from 5-7, in Eddy 4, we will offer the first installment of our series — “Sound Matters”. In this workshop we will discuss rationales for including multimodal elements in the composition course and work with sound recording equipment to produce a short piece using Audacity. More specifically, we will record vocal tracks using department equipment, gather and import music and sound effects, and mix these down into a finished audio version of a children’s story.  Faculty and graduate students from all areas are welcome to attend, but due to space limitations preference for attendees will go to those scheduled to teach UD Comp in upcoming semesters. Attendees should bring along a USB drive to save your creations. Snacks will be provided!

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