Tag Archives: Catie Young

Fog last week, snow this week, (image credit Colorado State University)

  • There’s a short interview with Dan Beachy-Quick up at the New England Review’s website about the poem they recently published, “Memory-Wax, Knowledge-Bird”: http://www.nereview.com/category/behind-the-byline/.
  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang (MFA ’07) recently gave three readings in Utah, courtesy of the Utah Humanities Book Festival, and its Director, Michael McLane (MFA ’08)-one at the Salt Lake City Public Library, one at the University of Utah, and one at Utah State, in Logan. Matthew’s long hybrid piece, “Difference Essay,” is out in the latest issue of Seattle Review.
  • On October 5, Camille Dungy was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award from Outdoor Afro. The organization “celebrates and inspires African American connections and leadership in nature.” The award recognizes Dungy’s continuing role as an environmental writer, editor, teacher and activist.

    On Saturday, October 7, Dungy took part in the Watershed Environmental Poetry Festival in Berkeley, CA, where she was featured along with writers such as Bob Hass, Maxine Hong Kingston, Tess Taylor and Maw Shein Win.

  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper entitled, “Dazzled by Lila: Telling Stories from the 1920s Hudson Training School for (Incorrigible) Girls” at the Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Dayton, OH.  She also led a “morning meeting” session with Dr. Wendy Hinshaw on incarcerated writing and feminist tactics for literacy activism.
  • Mike Palmquist led two workshops and presented the keynote address at the College Reading and Writing Conference at Valencia College in Orlando on September 22nd and 23rd.  Mike’s talk, “WAC and Critical Thinking: Enhancing Student Learning through Writing,” explored the connections between writing-across-the-curriculum and critical thinking.
  • Skyhorse, the publisher of the paperback and ebook editions of Dan Robinson’s 3rd novel, Death of a Century, is doing an October BookBub promotion for Death of a Century.  BookBub is an online ebook book club.  Give it a look, buy the ebook, write a rave review (or don’t buy the book and still write a rave review).
  • Several MFA and MA students from the English Department will be reading original work at the GradShow on Thursday, November 9 in the Grand Ballroom in Lory Student Center:

    – 9:50AM: Emma Hyche

    – 10AM: Katherine Indermaur

    – 10:10AM: Sam Killmeyer

    – 10:50AM: Michelle LaCrosse

    – 11AM: David Mucklow

    – 11:10AM: Zach Yanowitz

    – 11:20AM: Catie Young

  • Three translations by Mary Crow of Olga Orozco’s poems are featured in the current newsletter of the Academy of American Poets online. Her new translation of a poem by Roberto Juarroz will be part of an exhibit in Dublin at the Instituto Cervantes. Both poets are Argentine. The Orozco poems are from Crow’s book of Orozco translations, Engravings Torn from Insomnia, published by BOA. She also has two books of Juarroz translations: Roberto Juarroz: Recent Poems and Roberto Juarroz: Last Poems, both from White Pine. The latter book was a finalist for the Pen America translation award.
  • Aby Kaupang’s paired tribute poems to David Bowie and C.D. Wright, “Flame Falls As Falls The World Down” and “Sunlight Come Shining,” were accepted for publication by The Laurel Review in their upcoming issue.
  • Steven Schwartz’s essay “The Loneliest Moon” has been accepted for publication by The Missouri Review and will be published in the spring 2018 issue.

 

Zambia Study Abroad Program, Summer 2018.

Info Session Wednesday, October 18 at 4pm in LCS room 304.

 

Fort Collins Book Fest

Writings and Riffs celebrates books, poetry and music as a means of storytelling, self-expression and social conversation. The day-long event is free and open to the public, and will include presentations, panel discussions, writing workshops, author readings and book signings. The event takes place at venues throughout Old Town Fort Collins from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 21. The full schedule and more information is available at www.FoCoBookFest.org. Also read more on LibartsSOURCE.

 

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English instructor Sean Waters viewing the eclipse

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has poems accepted at Poetry, New England Review, and Cincinnati Review.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher had a couple of lyric essays published during the summer break – “Family Cookbook” in Florida Review and “Flight” in Somos en escrito. He also and taught a few hybrid image and found text workshops at the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program and the VCFA Post Graduate Writing Conference. He’s glad to be back.
  • Camille Dungy’s new book of poems, Trophic Cascade, received a favorable reading in Harvard Review. http://harvardreview.org/?q=features/book-review/trophic-cascade
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow has six ghazals published in the most recent edition of the Denver Quarterly, under her publishing name ‘slp.’
  • In May Leif Sorensen gave a talk on his book in progress titled Worlds of Difference: Race, Ethnicity and Science Fiction at the invitation of the Sogang Institute of American Studies and the American Culture Program at Sogang University in Seoul, Republic of Korea. He also facilitated a special symposium for the American Cultural Studies Graduate Program at Sogang titled “Revisiting Octavia Butler’s Kindred in 2017″ that focused on Butler’s 1979 novel and Damian Duffy’s 2017 graphic adaptation of the novel.In August Leif presented a talk, “Vanishing Races and Endangered Species” that focuses on representations of endangered species in Native American fiction from the 1920s and 1930s at the Modernist Studies Association Conference in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.His 2016 essay “Region and Ethnicity on the Air,” published in the Summer 2016 issue of MELUS won an honorable mention for the Don D. Walker Prize sponsored by the Western Literature Association to honor the best essay published on western American literary studies.
  • Catie Young’s chapbook, What is Revealed When I Reveal it to You, will be published by dancing girl press in early 2018. During the summer, poems from Language Object and Stopgap appeared in Gramma and Ghost Proposal.
  • The Center for Literary Publishing, which produces Colorado Review and other publications, is featured in SOURCE, CSU’s news website.  CR editor Stephanie G’Schwind is assisted by English Department student interns, among them Chelsea Hansen and Kristen Macintyre, who are featured in a special story at http://source.colostate.edu/center-serves-hands-publishing-laboratory-students/.

 

English Department Office Hours 

The English Office hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. (closed during lunch, 12:00-1:00 p.m.).

 

Eddy 300 Computer Lab

Monday – Thursday 7:30 am – 7 pm
Friday – 7:30 am – 5 pm
Saturday 10 am – 2 pm
Sunday 10 am – 2pm

Writing Center Hours

Starting August 28

Eddy Hall, Room 23
Mon-Thurs: 10 am – 4 pm

Morgan Library, Room 171
Sun-Thurs: 6 pm – 8 pm

 

Fall 2017 Internships Available!

 Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students.

Please contact Cassandra Eddington, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Cassie.Eddington@colostate.edu for more information on these internships and how to apply.

 

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Image by Jill Salahub

  • Next Wednesday, Doug Cloud will be giving a workshop for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) Sustainability Fellows titled “Talking Science with Conservative, Religious and Other Potentially Skeptical Audiences.”
  • Tobi Jacobi participated at the recent Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) through a panel presentation entitled, “Not “All Ellas”: Risking Exploitation in a Prison Public Memory Project,” and a preconference prison teaching workshop (“The Prison Next Door: What Types of Connections Do We Want to Cultivate?”).
  • Michael Knisely’s Boulder’s Rocky Ridge Music Academy photography exhibit runs through April, he will also showcase additional photographs as part of the Month of Photography exhibit at the ACE Storage gallery on north Broadway also in Boulder. A collaboration of poets and visual artist’s exhibit at the First Congregational Church at Broadway and Spruce Streets in Boulder will feature two of his poems. He will also be reading from his poetry work as part of a large poetry reading this Friday for the First Friday Arts event at the First Congregational Church, which runs from 6:30 – 8:00 this Friday evening.
  • Dan Robinson’s paper, The Second Battle of the Champagne & the Inexpressibility Topos, has been accepted for the XVIII International Hemingway Conference in Paris next summer.
  • Morgan Riedl (MA in CNF, 2017) has a piece up on Brevity’s blog.  It’s a hermit crab essay in the form of a workshop critique of Sean Spicer’s press conferences.  You can read it here: https://brevity.wordpress.com/2017/03/30/workshop-comments-for-sean-spicer/
  • Catie Young’s poem “Merrily Merrily M​errily Merrily” is in the new issue of The Volta: ​http://www.thevolta.org/twstbs-poem185-cyoung.html
  • On April 21, John Calderazzo will read an essay at the Sacred Mountains and Landscapes conference at The New School.  The essay will discuss a centuries-old agricultural ritual in the Peruvian Andes he attended in which Quechua people have recently changed their behavior because of the climate change induced shrinking of their glaciers.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) first book, Of Form & Gather, winner of the 2016 Andrès Montoya Poetry Prize, was released on February 28 from the University of Notre Dame Press. Of Form & Gather is listed as one of the “9 Outstanding Latino Books Recently Published by Independent and University Presses” by NBC News. Her manuscript Galaxy Inside Your Inadequately Small Heart was selected as a finalist in the 2017 Alice James Award and the 2017 Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry. Her poem “In all the pretty roam” was featured on Zòcalo Public Square on Friday, March 17 and her poem “Virgule” was selected by The Georgia Review for publication. Zamora read her poetry for the AKO Collective’s Day Without A Woman recognition event on March 8.
  • Kathleen Willard will be the BreckCreate Breckenridge Creative Arts Tin Shop Guest Artist in Residence for the month of April. In addition to working on her new poetry manuscript, she will give a poetry reading, conduct four poetry workshops, and host a community poetry reading. She hosts Open Studio Hours at the Tin Shop Thursday through Sunday to talk about poetry and share her process. The BreckCreate website has details of her events.

Checkout the English Department’s new lunch counter!  In response to our See Change 2 request for more common space for faculty and staff, we have put the west end of Eddy to work. Two lunch counters are open and ready to entice you out of your offices for lunch and conversation. We will devote the exhibit space above each counter to departmental work on diversity and inclusion for at least the first year.

  • The northwest corner launches this new “Counter Talk” space with an exhibit featuring the 1960 Greensboro lunch counter sit-in and additional images — including two from the Smithsonian’s 2010 50th anniversary celebration.  Look here for some interesting ways to incorporate such moments into your courses: http://americanhistory.si.edu/freedomandjustice.

Stay tuned: Jaime Jordan’s exhibit featuring a moment in her CO150 course will be added next week to the southwest counter.

 

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick has a group of essays from A Quiet Book in the new Copper Nickel.
  • On Saturday February 25th, Camille Dungy will be the Keynote Speaker at the Robinson Jeffers Society Annual Meeting at Occidental College. Her talk is titled: “The View From Hawk Tower Today: A Contemporary Environmental Poet Reflects on What Robinson Jeffers Has Meant to Her.” https://www.oxy.edu/oxy-arts/projects-exhibitions/visiting-artists
  • The opening reception for the CSU Art and Science exhibition is this coming Tuesday, Feb 21 from 4:30 to 6:30 pm at the Curfman gallery in the Lory Student Center. Beth Lechleitner’s collaborative poetry/visual art piece “Mettle” has been is included.  The show runs through March 24.
  • Dana Masden’s short story “Exercise, A Good Book, and a Cup of Tea” is published in the Fall 2016 issue of Third Coast.
  • Mary Ellen Sanger (Associate Director, Community Literacy Center) won second place in the North Street Book Prize contest for her book, “Blackbirds in the Pomegranate Tree: Stories from Ixcotel State Prison.” This account of her unjust imprisonment in Mexico centers on stories of solidarity and community with the women she met inside. https://winningwriters.com/past-winning-entries/blackbirds-in-the-pomegranate-tree
  • Alex Morrison’s short story, “Life Along the Fault Line,” is available in print in the Winter 2017 issue of The Cardiff Review. 
  • Catie Young’s poem “Hollow Bone” was recently published by Public Pool. You can read it here: http://www.publicpool.org/dope/cl-young/
  • Aby Kaupang was recently asked by the Lincoln Center and the Fort Collins Museum of Art to participate in the Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate exhibit by writing poems and reading them at the opening reception. Her poems can be found mounted in the lobby at FoCoMoA or online through Essay Press’ Radio Radio 11.8.16.
  • Steven Schwartz’s story “The Bad Guest” has been accepted by Ploughshares and will appear in the Winter 2017/18 issue.

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snOval, image by Colorado State University

snOval, image by Colorado State University

  • Aby Kaupang and Matthew Cooperman’s book NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified) was recently a finalist for the Essay Press Book Prize. Largely detailing the challenges and joys of raising their autistic daughter Maya, the book has been in progress for many years. A chapbook from that collection, Disorder 299.00, has just been released from Essay Press, and can be found at http://www.essaypress.org/ep-52/
  • Thanks to the amazing work of Shoaib Alam and Karen Montgomery Moore, Colorado Review now has 10,000 followers on Twitter.
  • Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala has been appointed to serve as Editor of the American Association for Applied Linguistics Newsletter.  She will serve a three-year term (2016-2019).  Fabiola is also currently serving in the Editorial Review Board for Volume 70 of The Reading Teacher (RT) for the 2015-2016 period. Fabiola’s latest 2015 publication is: Meeting the reading comprehension challenges of diverse English language learners in K-12:  Key contributions from reading research (pp. 147-164).  In M. Daniel & K. Mokhtari (Eds.), Research and instruction that makes a difference in English learners’success.  Lanham, MD: Roman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. Fabiola, together with Tony Maciejewsky (Department Head of Electrical and Computer Engineering at CSU), will be presenting the results of their investigation titled “Mental imagery experienced by both pathway and non-pathway graduate students in an engineering course at a US Research I institution” at the upcoming 2016 AAAL Conference in Orlando.
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poem, ghazal [16.], will be published in the spring edition of burntdistrict. You can find the journal at http://burntdistrict.org/
  • Mary Crow’s poetry is the subject (along with Karen Swenson’s) of a chapter in Marilyn Krysl’s Yes, There Will Be Singing, published in the University of Michigan series, Poets on Poetry.
  • Here’s James Work’s latest contribution to world literature. Publication expected in July. jameswork
  • Two of Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the newest issue of TriQuarterly Review. Her poem “In tuck” has also been selected for publication at The Cincinnati Review and her poem “& in wonder too,” first printed in Meridian, will be the poem of the day on Poetry Daily on February 11.
  • The English Department is pleased to award the following graduate students departmental funds for travel associated with professional activities. The department gave a total of $7,420 in award money to students this year. The grants ranged from $300-$750. Students will be traveling to conferences from Alaska to points eastward. Congratulations to all our students who are sharing their research and creative work in professional circles!
    Paul Binkley
    Denise Garrett
    Kelsey Hatley
    Abby Kerstetter
    John Koban
    Cole Konopka
    David Mucklow
    Kathleen Naughton
    Meghan Pipes
    Kylan Rice
    Lara Roberts
    John Whalen
    Meagan Wilson
    Catie Young

NCTE@CSU

On April 9th of this year we will be hosting our first conference.

“Literacy Through Popular Culture.”

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL

The conference theme is on research-based strategies for teaching literacy through popular culture. This theme engages students and teachers in embracing the rele-vance and power of popular culture—from comic books to teen novels to video-games— as a form of literacy in the classroom. Presentations and workshops should offer teachers concrete, actionable strategies that they can incorporate into their own language arts classrooms. We invite secondary (grades 6-12) language arts teachers and students, university professors and students, and other related profes-sionals to send in proposals for workshops or presentations.

DEADLINE: MARCH 7

Email proposal submissions to ncte@colostate.edu

We are very excited about this event and are working hard to make it an amazing and memorable one. Please visit the website for information: http://nctecsuconference2016.weebly.com

Show Up & Write

“show up & write” sessions started this week.  “show up & write” runs from February 1 to May 4, on Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays: 9-9:50 in Eddy 100 and 2-2:50 in Eddy 200. These drop-in writing sessions offer a regularly scheduled time in a communal, academic setting for writers to make progress on writing projects. Look for information in your mailbox to share with your students. And, “show up & write” regularly to see what you accomplish this semester!

 

Workshop Reminder: UD Composition

On February 16 from 5-7, in Eddy 4, we will offer the first installment of our series — “Sound Matters”. In this workshop we will discuss rationales for including multimodal elements in the composition course and work with sound recording equipment to produce a short piece using Audacity. More specifically, we will record vocal tracks using department equipment, gather and import music and sound effects, and mix these down into a finished audio version of a children’s story.  Faculty and graduate students from all areas are welcome to attend, but due to space limitations preference for attendees will go to those scheduled to teach UD Comp in upcoming semesters. Attendees should bring along a USB drive to save your creations. Snacks will be provided!

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