Tag Archives: Bill Tremblay

Image by Eric Salahub

  • Leslee Becker has been named a Finalist for the Pirate’s Alley Faulkner Award in Short Stories.
  • Doug Cloud’s co-authored essay, “How People Make Sense of Trump and Why It Matters for Racial Justice” has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Contemporary Rhetoric. It should be out in November or December.
  • A number of current and former English Dept faculty and students read at the Fort Collins Book Festival. John Calderazzo led a nonfiction workshop, Sue Ring deRossett led a fiction workshop,  and Sasha Steensen led a poetry workshop. The Poetry Lounge Reading featured Sue Ring deRossett, Bill Tremblay, Chloe Leisure, Khadijah Queen and Matthew Cooperman, at Wolverine Farm Publick House. The Listening Room fiction/nonfiction reading featured Leslee Becker, Christopher David Rosales, Blair Oliver and Junior Burke, at Wolverine Farm Publick House. And finally, the Deep Tracks Poetry reading featured Sasha Steensen, Kate Northrup, Lisa Zimmerman and Aby Kaupang, also at Wolverine Farm Publick House. More information on the festival can be found at https://www.focobookfest.org/schedule/
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poem “What we say” is published in the current issue of Bear Review. You can find it under her publishing name, slp.
  • Kristina Quynn’s co-edited collection of essays, Reading and Writing Experimental Texts: Critical Innovations, was released this week by Palgrave/Macmillan. The collection offers innovative approaches to contemporary literary criticism and includes feminist and queer readings of avant-garde twentieth- and twenty-first-century texts.  http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9783319583617
  • Last weekend James Rankin presented his paper titled “Sex, Punishment, and the Body Politic: Blood and Moral Agency in Measure for Measure” at the Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association’s conference in Spokane, WA.

 

 

Student Writing Group 

Do you have writing that needs to be workshopped by fellow writers? Do you want an informal environment of people who can help? My name is Kenna Castleberry, and I may be able to help you out. I’m hoping to start a student writing group (no more than 7 people) to meet up once a week or so and swap and discuss our writing. I’m flexible on timing as well as genres. If you have some work that needs to be workshopped, please contact me via email: kcastle@rams.colostate.edu. Thanks, fellow wordsmiths!

 

Campus Equity Week

 

CAMPUS EQUITY WEEK EVENTS!  OCTOBER 30 AND 31

Activities planned for Monday, October 30th include:

  • 9:40 am, “Chalk and Talk,” a student engagement activity on the plaza with ART100 students taking the role of the artist working in a public space with statements addressing “the importance of academic freedom in a democratic society.” GTAs from English will work with ART100 students to assist with statement construction which will be edited and chalked on the plaza adjacent to the Lory Student Center. CO150 students and their teachers will participate in reviewing, discussing, and responding to the chalk art.
  • 5:00 PM Directions Gallery, Visual Art Building, opening remarks for Honor the Precariat, art installation commenting on the role of NTTF at CSU.
  • 5:30 PM opening remarks in the Electronic Art Gallery, Visual Art Building for a monologue performance addressing issues of contingency.
  • The Center for the Study of Academic Labor will host a reception in the Visual Arts Building in conjunction with the 5:00 and 5:30 remarks.

Activities planned for Tuesday, October 31st at CSU to celebrate the national day of action include:

  • 12:00 noon – 1:00 PM, Morgan Library Events Hall. AAUP will host a Brown Bag Panel Discussion on NTTF issues, most likely focusing on questions and comments regarding the pending CoNTTF proposal. Participants include:
  • Rick Miranda (Provost)
  • Stephen Mumme (AAUP, Colorado)
  • Jenny Morse (CoNTTF Chair)
  • Mary Meyer (AAUP, CSU)
  • Tim Gallagher (Faculty Council, Chair)
  • Sue Doe (Faculty Council, Vice Chair)
  • 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM College of Liberal Arts Adjunct Faculty Committee will host an informational session about contingent issues (focus to be announced).

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CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

 

English Department Awards Reception TODAY!!!

Monday, 4-6pm in the LSC North Ballroom – Presentations at 4:30pm.

  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang recently gave a reading & talk at Colgate University in New York. Matthew has an essay up on Hart Crane at At Length on “the poem that won’t leave you alone.” http://atlengthmag.com/poetry/the-poem-that-wont-leave-you-alone/
  • On Saturday, April 29, 4pm, Old Firehouse Books, Dan Beachy-Quick, Matthew Cooperman and Bill Tremblay will read from their work as part of National Independent Bookstore Day, and the closing of National Poetry Month.
  • Roze Hentschell was invited to speak at The Senior Center in Fort Collins, where she spoke on “Shakespeare and the Sonnet Tradition.”
  • Jaime Jordan invites everyone to explore how she uses the Serial podcast to tackle unconscious bias in her CO150 class. Those interested can check out the display in the northwest corner of the 3rd floor at the “lunch counter.”
  • Todd Mitchell recently conducted a full day of fiction and poetry workshops with teens at Fort Collins High School, where they have several outstanding writers (who might hopefully come here). He also conducted virtual visits (via Skype) to high school and middle school students in southern Colorado.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore presented “Affect, Anxiety, and the Abject Corpse in A Study in Scarlet” at the Popular Culture Association/American Cultural Association conference in San Diego on April 15. This paper was advised by Ellen Brinks and Debby Thompson (for her master’s final project).
  • Rebecca Snow will give a brief talk along with other local authors at the Quid Novi book fair, April 27th, 6-9 pm. She can get CSU authors table space to display/sell their books as her guest for 1/2-price ($25.00) and free registration, up until the day of the event: https://www.quidnoviinnovations.com/Spring-Innovation/
  • Mary Crow has had four poems accepted for publication: “Theory” and “But You Came anyway” by New Madrid and “Taking the Heat” and “The Necessary Existence of the Old World” by The American Journal of Poetry.
  • The Writing Center and the English Department were well-represented at the Colorado and Wyoming Writing Tutors Conference. Here is a list of presenters and presentations:
    • Kiley Miller & Wendy-Anne Hamrick
      “Is that an effective question?”: Meaningful and Interactive Grammar Feedback in Multilingual Consultations
    • Leah White & Katherine Indermaur
      Mindfulness for Tutor Resilience
    • Shirley Coenen & Leslie Davis
      Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate and Graduate Student Writing Support
    • Jennifer Levin, Tiffany Akers, and Alina S. Lugo
      Strategies for Increasing Engagement in Tutoring Sessions
    • Sheri Anderson, Sue Doe, and Lisa Langstraat
      Student-Veterans in the Writing Center: Dispelling the Myths and Providing Genuine “Military Friendly” Support

English Department Career Event: Freelance Editing Panel

Please join us for a special panel on working in the world of freelance editing. Panelists Ann Diaz (M.A. 17) and Nathan DelaCastro (B.A. 15) will share their experiences working as freelance editors and making a living!

When: Friday, May 5, from 3:00 to 4:15pm
Where: Location TBA

More details and information are forthcoming, so stay tuned! Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, with any questions.

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'Old School' research in the library. Remember catalog cards? 1975. University Historic Photograph Collection

‘Old School’ research in the library. Remember card catalogs? 1975. University Historic Photograph Collection. (Image shared by the Morgan Library on Facebook last week).

  • On Thursday, February 9, the Community Literacy Center hosted Kay Adams, Founder and director of the Center for Journal Therapy in Denver as part of their spring SpeakOut! facilitator training event. Fourteen students, faculty, and community members participated in dialogue on writing through times of chaos.
  • Beth Lechleitner’s collaborative poetry/visual art piece “Mettle” has been accepted into the CSU Art and Science exhibition at the Curfman gallery.  The show opens Feb 21 and runs through March 24.
  • Todd Mitchell attended and presented two sessions at last weekend’s 50th Anniversary CCIRA Conference in Denver. One grimly packed session on “Teaching Dystopian Fiction,” and a second on “Using Writing Games to Develop Literacy and Creativity.”
  • Claire Boyles (second year MFA candidate in fiction) has been accepted to the Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference in fiction and awarded a Katharine Bakeless Nason scholarship to attend.
  • Bill Tremblay’s memoir on jazz “The Music While the Music Lasts” will appear in Brilliant Corners in the Summer, 2017, issue.
  • Slope Editions announced that Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) book, Instrument of Gaps, was selected for publication from their Fall 2016 Open Reading Period. Read more information on the Slope Editions news page. She also has a poem accepted in Beloit Poetry Journal, her poem “A long road never takes us” is out in the Winter 2017 edition of North American Review, and she participated in a Parlor Press reading in D.C. for AWP on Thursday, February 9.

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Happy New Year!

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has a set of poems and set of essays nominated for a Pushcart Prize.
  • Roze Hentschell, currently serving as Interim Associate Dean in the College of Liberal Arts, emceeed the College of Liberal Arts Fall commencement, Saturday December 17th at 5:00 p.m. If you couldn’t be there in person, check out the webcast archives and watch our wonderful graduates receive their diplomas: http://commencement.colostate.edu/webcast-archives/
  • Congratulations to the 2016-17 CLC interns, Dominique Garnett, Alina Lugo, Sarah Von Nostrand, and Shelley Curry and Associate director, Mary Ellen Sanger on successfully designing and facilitating six SpeakOut writing workshops. Three evening journal launch parties were held. Watch for the winter copy in January.
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay on curating community writing and social action in jail appears in the forthcoming issue of the Community Literacy Journal.
  • Bill Tremblay has a poem entitled “November 9, 2016,” coming out in the next issue of TRUCK magazine.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s “Song of Rachel” has been accepted for publication at The Molotov Cocktail.

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  • On November 16 and 17, Camille Dungy spoke at the University of Arizona Poetry Center as part of their Climate Change & Poetry Series. “Starting in October 2016, the UA Poetry Center features eight world-class poets as they address what overlaps, contradictions, mutual challenges, and confluences the categories of Climate Change & Poetry share with each other; in a series of investigative readings, we hope to offer some answers, some questions, and some new ways of thinking. In this second installment of readings built around a common question, we wonder: what role does poetry have in envisioning, articulating, or challenging our ecological present? What role does poetry have in anticipating, shaping – or even creating – our future?” http://poetry.arizona.edu/climatechange
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s newest book, Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams, just received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews, whose editors also chose it as a “Kirkus’ Indie Books of the Month Selection” for January. https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/harrison-candelaria-fletcher/presentimiento/
  • Todd Mitchell spoke on the Author Panel last weekend at the Loveland Library Author Showcase. He also spoke with the IRS after they read one of his books (the IRS is the Poudre Library’s Interested Reader Society of teen readers. If you’re interested in finding engaged teen readers, contact the IRS. They’ll give you hope for our future).
  • In recent months, John Calderazzo has run science communication workshops for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability, the Graduate School, the College of Engineering, and the Office of the Vice President for Research. He continues to both volunteer and consult for the City of Fort Collins’ Climate Action Plan. John will also be the Guest Judge for the 2017 Waterston Desert Writing Prize. You can find out more about it here: http://www.writingranch.com/waterston-prize-for-desert-writers/
  • Bill Tremblay’s commentaries on drawings by Norman Olson will appear in Lummox #5, forthcoming 2017.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) second book, & in Open, Marvel, has been accepted by Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press for publication in 2017. She also has a new poem in Tupelo Quarterly, a poem in a special election issue of Tarpaulin Sky Magazine, a poem accepted at Mid-American Review where she was a runner up for the 2016 Fineline Competition, a new poem accepted in The New Guard where she was semi-finalist in the Knightville Poetry Contest, three poems in the newest issue of Witness Magazine, four poems available in the newest issue of West Branch featuring women and the avant-garde, and she is currently participating in the Tupelo 30/30 Project for the month of November.

 

2016 Graduate Showcase Awards

 

English Department Distinction In Creativity Award – The Distinction in Creativity award is presented in Collaboration by the Graduate School and Office of Vice President for Research. This award recognizes the passion and personal contributions of these talented graduate students, and honors their commitment and efforts in their area of work.

1st Place – Kelly Weber

2nd Place – Cedar Brant

 

College of Health and Human Sciences Excellence in Creativity

Alyson Welker

 

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has new poems in The Literary Review, American Poetry Review, and a long lyric in the Kenyon Review which can be read here: http://www.kenyonreview.org/journal/novdec-2016/selections/dan-beachy-quick/
  • Dr. Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala (English/INTO CSU) and Dr. Maite Correa (LLC) will be presenting the following paper at the annual meeting of them American Association for Applied Linguistics this coming March 2017 in Portland, Oregon: “Evaluating Pathway Program Effectiveness at an English Language Center in the Era of Public-Private Partnerships in US Higher Education.”
  • Bill Tremblay has been asked by a book club at the Boulder Bookstore to read from and answer questions about Walks Along the Ditch, Tuesday evening, November 15.
  • Take a peek to see what’s new at the Community Literacy Center with SpeakOut! http://pub.lucidpress.com/cfbccb5f-512a-47fc-b172-87674d4e6bfb/

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Lady Moon Meadow, image by Jill Salahub

Lady Moon Meadow, image by Jill Salahub

  • Tim Amidon and Michele Simmons (Miami University) gave a research talk titled “Negotiating ‘messy’ research context and design through adaptive research stances” at the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) Special Interest Group on the Design of Communication (SIGDOC) in Washington, D.C.  While at SIGDOC, Tim also participated in “Draw to communicate: How geometric shapes, blank pages, and crayons can improve your collaboration and creativity,” a workshop lead by Abigail Selzer, Kristen R. Moore, and Ashley Hardage (Texas Tech University). The workshop introduced participants to research and pedagogy in technical communication surrounding sketch-noting and incorporated hands on practice applying concepts such a geometric and visual metaphors to communication design problems.
  • Tim Amidon spoke as an invited panelist at the Faculty and Instructor Open Textbooks Workshop about his experiences adopting Doug Eyman’s Digital Rhetoric: Theory, Method, Practice, as an open textbook in CO402: Principles of Digital Rhetoric and Design. The event was hosted at the Morgan Library by Associate Professor and Open Education Resources Librarian Merinda McLure and Assistant Dean for Scholarly Communications and Collection Development Meg Brown-Sica.
  • Steven Schwartz’s story “The Theory of Everything” has just been published by Electric Literature on its Recommended Reading site. The story is from his newly released collection, Madagascar: New and Selected Storieshttps://electricliterature.com/the-theory-of-everything-by-steven-schwartz-52ad1978996f#.3okj44mzn
  • Bill Tremblay has received acceptances of two new poems, “Bukowski” and “The Sun’s Hands” at Cimarron Review for their Winter issue, 2016-17. Bill read with Jared Smith in Evergreen, CO, last Saturday evening. Besides the audience the reading was streamed out to 177 homes in the area. Bill will read in Laramie, WY, at the Night Heron Bookstore, Friday October 15, 7 pm. He is also scheduled to read with Joe Hutchison at the Innisfree in Boulder, 6 PM, October 20th. A reading-interview with Bill talking about Walks Along the Ditch will be broadcast and streamed from KBOO.fm Portland OR 11PM October 17. It will also be archived.
  • Andrew Mangan’s short story “Any Good Thing” has been accepted for publication by Zyzzyva. Andrew graduated from the MFA program in 2016. This is his first publication.
  • Thank you to everyone who helped to make PBK Visiting Scholar Nora Naranjo Morse’s campus visit a success.  A special thank you to Louann Reid, for her tireless support of this opportunity; Gloria Blumanhourst, who is, herself, a PBK member; she helped do all of the planning, and then she was called away to help with a family emergency; Patty Rettig, a PBK member alongside Gloria, who stepped in to help us with this event; Dean Ben Withers, also a PBK member, for his involvement in Nora’s campus visit; Colleen Timothy, who helped  with scheduling Dean Withers; Jill Salahub, our English department communications coordinator, who went above and beyond to help us to publicize this event; Sue Russell, one of our English department administrative professionals, who helped to organize the logistics of Nora’s visit; Sheila Dargon, another of our English department administrative professionals, who helped to publicize this event; Leif Sorensen, who hosted Nora in his Ethnic Literature in the United States class; Camille Dungy, who hosted Nora in her Literature of the Earth course; and Pam Coke, who served as faculty host. Thank you to everyone who attended any of the events while Nora was here.  Her visit was co-sponsored by Phi Beta Kappa and the CSU English department.

bookfest-_FINAL-273x300

The inaugural Fort Collins Books Fest: Brewin’ Up Books! is a FREE, one-day public literary festival bringing attention to the expansiveness of Fort Collins’ craft brewing culture through books and authors involved with beer, coffee, tea, and more. With over 40 speakers, readings, panels, and workshops, there is sure to be something for just about everyone.

The CSU English Department is a sponsor of this event. As part of our in-kind donation, we are asking for volunteers to help staff the day’s festivities. We need handlers to help make sure panelists are able to move comfortably between venues as well as people who can serve other necessary roles in helping to make sure the festival runs smoothly. If you are able to serve on a 2 to 5 hour volunteer shift on October 22, please write me Camille Dungy soon as possible. Conference organizers are hoping to schedule all the volunteers by the end of this week (October 7).  (Contact Camille Dungy at camille.dungy@colostate.edu). Volunteers will have access to a few backstage perks as well, so sign up soon so we can get you on those lists! http://www.focobookfest.org/

 

Cover of the latest edition

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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  • Camille Dungy’s poems have been published in two new anthologies: Of Poetry & Protest: From Emmett Till to Trayvon Martin. (W.W. Norton) and Read America(s): An Anthology (Locked Horn Press). Camille will be a member of the faculty of the Napa Valley Writer’s Conference this summer. The other conference faculty will be Brenda Hillman, Brian Teare, Major Jackson. Applications are still being accepted for remaining spots: http://www.napawritersconference.org/attend-the-conference/apply/
  • Todd Mitchell presented a master class on Earning The Transformation at this year’s Northern Colorado Writer’s Conference last weekend.
  • Neil FitzPatrick was awarded a 2016-2017 fiction Fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Fellowships last from October – May, and Fellows receive a live/work space and a stipend.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s “The Story of A Starry Night” has been accepted for publication in Crab Fat Magazine.
  • Kiley Miller and Michelle Wilk presented last Saturday at the Colorado Wyoming Writing Tutors Conference in Denver. Their presentation was titled, “Power Dynamics: Navigating the Needs and Demands of the Writing Center.”
  • Bill Tremblay will do a reading on Thursday, May 5, at the Wolverine Publick House and Letterpress, 316 Willow St, Ft. Collins, from his just-published book, Walks Along the Ditch: Poems, starting at 8:00 PM.
  • From Publishers Lunch, Fiction: Debut … “Devin Murphy’s (MFA, Fiction ’09) The Boat Runner, the story of a wealthy Dutch family, industrious owners of a lightbulb factory in a small town, whose world is upended over the course of four years during the WWII Nazi occupation; we follow the youngest son through the forests of France, the stormy beaches of England, and deep within the secret missions of the German Navy, as he is confronted with the moral dilemma that will change his life forever—a novel that explores the human cost of war and questions what national borders really mean when weighed against a single human heart, pitched as reminiscent of All the Light We Cannot See and Cold Mountain, to Laura Brown at Harper Perennial, for publication in Fall 2017, by Rayhane Sanders at Lippincott Massie McQuilkin (World English).”
  • Mandy Rose reviewed Lynn Pederson’s book, The Nomenclature of Small Things, for the April issue of Stirring: A Literary Collection. The review can be found here: http://www.sundresspublications.com/stirring/

English Department Internship Opportunity

Reading

 

Please join the Department of English and the Creative Writing program at the University of Denver to hear the internationally renowned poet, Raúl Zurita.

When: Monday, May 9th / 7pm
Where: The University of Denver
Sturm Hall / Room 454

Raúl Zurita is one of Latin America’s most celebrated and controversial poets. After Augusto Pinochet’s 1973 US-supported military coup that ousted Salvador Allende’s democratically elected government, Zurita’s poetry sought to register the violence and atrocities committed against the Chilean people and the corruption of the Spanish language. During the dictatorship that lasted from 1973 to 1990, Zurita published a trilogy of books (Purgatory, Anteparadise, and The New Life), wrote poems in the sky above New York City, bulldozed poems in the Chilean desert, and helped to form the art collective “Colectivo de Accion de Arte” that used performance as an act of political resistance. Of his early poetry, C.D. Wright has written: “Under the eyes of church and dictatorship, he began to write and publish his poetry, juxtaposing secular and sacred, ruled and unruled. With a mysterious admixture of logic and logos, Christian Symbols, brain scans, graphics, and a medical report, Zurita expanded the formal repertoire of his language, of poetic materials, pushing back against the ugly vapidity of rule by force.”

Zurita was awarded the Chilean National Prize for Literature, a scholarship from the Guggenheim Foundation, and he has held poetry readings at numerous American universities including Harvard, Yale, Stanford and Berkeley. His books in English translation include Anteparadise (translated by Jack Schmitt), Purgatory (translated by Anna Deeny), INRI (translated by William Rowe) and Song for His Disappeared Love (translated by Daniel Borzutzky). He lives in Chile.

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  • On Friday, February 5th, Pam Coke gave two invited presentations at the Colorado Council International Reading Association (CCIRA):  “Teaching as Close Reading: Igniting a Sense of Wonder about Why I Teach” and “If I Stay: Developing a Plan for Keeping a Sense of Wonder about Why I Teach.”  Dr. Coke was thrilled to have the opportunity to reconnect with several CSU English department graduates who are currently teaching in schools in Colorado and Nebraska, including Nick Bonnet, Dakota Davis-Powers, Marissa Kast, Marie Paul, and Emily Schlehuber.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s “Carousel” has been accepted for publication online in Flash Fiction Magazine on March 19th.
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “My City,” accepted for publication by Blue Moon Literary and Art Review.
  • Bill Tremblay’s latest book, Walks Along the Ditch: Poems, will be published in early April, 2016, by Lynx House Press.

CO301B, Writing in the Sciences, Information Session

During this one hour session, Dr. Sue Doe and Christina Sutton will capture what the Writing in the Sciences course is here at CSU. The following will be described:

  • history of CO301B
  • rhetoric in science communication
  • campus interest in science communication
  • rigors of the course

If you feel you might be interested in teaching CO301B in the future, you will want to come hear about this exciting course.

You have the opportunity to attend on either Wednesday, March 9th at 2:00 P.M. OR Thursday, March 10th at 2:00 P.M. We will meet in the Whitaker Room.

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 13th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies. Applicants must be registered graduate or undergraduate English majors or minors.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 25, 2016.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies. Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages. Shorter papers are welcome. Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility:     (1) Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept.

(2) Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 4, 2016, at 5:00 p.m.

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover letter with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minoring in English, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your cover letter to: Professor Aparna Gollapudi, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773. Cover letter and submissions can be dropped off at the English Department Office in Eddy Bldg.

 

Tools from the Workshop: Theory and “Hands On” Practice with Multimodal Engagement in UD Composition Courses Part II

The Upper Division Composition Professional Development Workshop Series is proud to present the second installment of our spring 2016 offerings: During the week of March 21st we will hold our second workshop: The Possibility of Actually Composing a Visual Argument (Days and times to be determined by a coming Doodle poll!)

Come join us as we discuss a sprinkling of theory that connects visual argument with the course goals of CO 300. The bulk of the workshop will be devoted to a “hands on” exploration of the new Photoshop software that has been installed on the computers in Eddy 2 and 4. Help us explore this rich visual editing software and envision ways that it can be effectively utilized in the classroom. A nice takeaway from the workshop will be the production of a flyer to advertise one of your upcoming classes. (Never be caught unprepared when the call for a class flyer is issued!)

All are welcome to join.

Four great incentives:

  1. Conversation with your awesome peers
  2. Certificate of Completion for those pesky Evaluation files
  3. Intellectual Engagement
  4. Snacks!

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image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s essay, “Thinking as Burial Practice,” is up at Wave Composition: http://www.wavecomposition.com/
  • A profile and interview with John Calderazzo on nature writing is forthcoming in Whole Terrain magazine. John will soon be doing nonfiction writing talks and workshops at Colorado Mesa University and the Wyoming Writers Conference in Sheridan.John has also conducted a number of science communication workshops for CSU faculty and graduate students through SoGES, the Department of Atmospheric Science, and the Office of the Vice President of Research.  This week he will do a talk on story-telling and science communication at a conference of Antarctic Researchers at Sylvan Dale Ranch.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Frequently Asked Questions: #9,” is featured on the Academy of American Poets’ webpage, poets.org.
  • Bruce Ronda’s essay “’Picking the World to Pieces’: Little Women and Secularization” appears in Critical Insights: Little Women, Gregory Eiselein and Anne K. Phillips, eds. Ipswich, MA: Salem Press, 2015, 54-66.
  • Stewart Moore’s short essay, “Patience,” was just published in the fall edition of The Flyfish Journal.
  • Bill Tremblay’s narrative, “To Cynthia from the City of Love,” will be forthcoming in Ginosko Literary Journal sometime before the end of 2015.
  • Summer Whisman earned her MA in Rhet Comp in 2011 and was diagnosed with ALS in spring of 2012.  She has written an unpublished memoir about living with ALS called Pillowflipping my Way Through ALS and Oregon Public Broadcasting recently did an hour-long interview with her about her manuscript and experiences with the disease.  The audio of the interview and a short video are available at OPB’s website:  http://www.opb.org/news/series/at-home/at-home-with-als/

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