Tag Archives: Sue Doe

  • In the new issue of Writer’s Chronicle there’s an essay on erasure poetry that considers Dan Beachy-Quick’s chapbook Shields & Shards & Stitches & Songs.
  • Sue Doe’s article, coauthored with Erik Juergensmeyer of Fort Lewis College, “Owning Curriculum: Megafoundations, the State, and Writing Programs” was just published in the new collection from Peter Lang Publishers called Fighting Academic Repression: Resistance, Reclaiming, Organizing, and Black Lives Matter in Education.
  • EJ Levy’s hybrid essay, “Natural World,” appears in the most recent issue of Passages North. She will be Visiting Writing at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell on March 22-23, 2017.
  • Claire Boyles’s story, “Chickens, 2019” has been accepted by The Kenyon Review.
  • Sheila Dargon, Administrative Assistant in the English Department, has been chosen to receive the inaugural College of Liberal Arts State Classified Award. The award recognizes meritorious and outstanding achievement in job skills and service to the college by State Classified employees. In addition to a monetary award, she will receive a plaque and public recognition at the spring CLA faculty/staff meeting which will be held on Tuesday, April 11th, 2017. In his congratulatory letter to Sheila, Dean Withers commends her for her “truly remarkable achievement.”  Thanks to all faculty and staff who contributed their enthusiastic comments for Sheila’s nomination.

Food Student Essay Contest 2016/2017 

CO150 Faculty: If you’re using the FOOD reader, please encourage your best students to submit essays for the Food essay contest! (Click on image for larger version).

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 14th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies.  Undergraduate applicants must be registered English majors or minors; essays from graduate applicants should have been written for a graduate-level class at CSU.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 24, 2017.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies.  Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages.  Shorter papers are welcome.  Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility: (1)  Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept. (2)  Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 3, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. 

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover sheet with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minor, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your essays and cover sheet to: Professor Zach Hutchins, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773.  Submissions can also be dropped off at the English Department Office on the third floor of Eddy.

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Sunset on the Oval, image by Colorado State University

  • Dan Beachy-Quick had a conversation with Alex at Wolverine Farms that is now this podcast: http://www.wolverinefarm.org/matter-podcast/
  • Sue Doe and Mike Palmquist presented a workshop on writing across the curriculum to the faculty at CSU Pueblo last Thursday. They enjoyed the drive south and the conversation in both directions, but didn’t have a lot of good things to say about the snow, ice, and parking-lot conditions on I-25 south of Denver.
  • A Release Party for new poetry collections by Camille Dungy with Eleni Sikelianos and Julie Carr at Old Firehouse Books was held Sunday, March 5. 4-5:30 pm.
  • Kristina Quynn chaired a panel on innovative literary criticism at the Literature and Culture Since 1900 Conference at the University of Louisville last week.  Her paper, “Good Writers, Bad Selfies,” explored avant-garde, self-reflexive literary portraits in the work of Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, Anaïs Nin, and Kristjana Gunnars.
  • Caleb Gonzalez’s travel essay “One Ticket, Twenty Euros” that he wrote for Sarah’s Sloane’s CNF Workshop last semester was published in InTravel Magazine this week! http://www.intravelmag.com/intravel/interest/one-ticket-twenty-euros-pamplona-at-the-running-of-the-bulls 

Food Student Essay Contest 2016/2017 

CO150 Faculty: If you’re using the FOOD reader, please encourage your best students to submit essays for the Food essay contest!

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 14th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies.  Undergraduate applicants must be registered English majors or minors; essays from graduate applicants should have been written for a graduate-level class at CSU.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 24, 2017.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies.  Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages.  Shorter papers are welcome.  Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility: (1)  Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept. (2)  Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 3, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. 

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover sheet with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minor, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your essays and cover sheet to: Professor Zach Hutchins, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773.  Submissions can also be dropped off at the English Department Office on the third floor of Eddy.

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CSU Students (only) completing CO150 in good standing during the 2016/2017 Academic Year, in sections addressing the course topic of “food,” are eligible to participate in this essay contest, (only one entry per student).

Please submit the following to participate:

  • A researched (source-based) argumentative essay or a photo essay with accompanying Rhetorical Analysis (A4 or A5) done for CO150 on the topic of food.
  • Submit entries to sue.doe@colostate.edu, and foodcontestCSU@gmail.com.
  • Submit all entries electronically to the above email addresses. When submitting essays, please use the email subject line: Food Contest Entry 2016/2017 so your entry will be easily identified.

With your essay, please submit:

  • A letter of transmittal that explains your audience and purpose for the text you’re submitting and your willingness to be included among contestants and willingness to be published in the next reader.
  • A letter of support from your CO150 instructor, verifying the essay’s completion in CO150 and your completion of the course in good standing (passing with a C or better).
  • Reliable contact information for you so that we may reach you after the end of the semester/school year.

All submissions, with accompanying documents, need to be submitted electronically by May 22nd, 2017. Winners will be announced in late May or early June 2017.

Awards: Winners will receive awards of $125 (1st place), $75 (2nd place) and $50 (3rd place) AND publication of your award winning essay in the next CO150 reader. Public readings during the 2017/2018 school year may also be possible.

csu_food_poster-final

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louislamour

  • Sue Doe’s chapter, “What Works and What Counts: Valuing the Affective in Non Tenure-Track Advocacy,” co-authored with Maria Maisto and Janelle Adsit, was just published in Contingency, Exploitation, and Solidarity: Labor and Action in English Composition. Edited by Seth Kahn, William B. Lalicker, and Amy Lynch-Biniek.
  • Darcy Gabriel has happily accepted a place in the University of Minnesota’s PhD program in Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication (RSTC) starting this fall.
  • SueEllen Campbell’s contribution to the post-election series “Letters to America” in Terrain.com appeared online last week at this link:  http://www.terrain.org/2017/guest-editorial/letter-to-america-campbell/.
  • The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico—published by the Center for Literary Publishing as part of its Mountain West Poetry Series—has been awarded the 2017 PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry. The award, for which the poet receives $5,000, is given in odd-numbered years and recognizes the high literary character of the published work to date of a new and emerging American poet of any age and the promise of further literary achievement. The book’s publishing team was Karen Montgomery Moore, Cedar Brant, Melissa Hohl, Katie Naughton, and Stephanie G’Schwind.
  • Airica Parker’s poem “Disjointed” appears in Central Michigan University’s Temenos: Skin Suits & Bare Bones online and in print. See it here for free on page 29: http://www.temenosjournal.com/current-edition.html
  • Mary Crow has had two poetry acceptances; “Beyond Tahrir” will be published by Hotel America and “Happiness Production Line” will be published by American Poetry Review.
  • Tirzah Goldenberg (MFA – Poetry, Summer 2013) has a recently published book of poetry, entitled Aleph, published by Verge Books.
  • Deanna Ludwin has been nominated for the 2017 Team Fort Collins Wellness & Prevention Lamplighter community service award.

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oval

Image by Paul L Dineen

  • SueEllen Campbell has three recent publications: “Making Climate Change Our Job,” the lead article in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, eds. Siperstein, Hall, and LeMenager, Routledge, 2017; the forward, “Sunrise, Celebration,” to Ellen Wohl, Rhythms of Change in Rocky Mountain National Park, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016; and “The White-tailed Ptarmigan,” an excerpt from Even Mountains Vanish, in The Rocky Mountain National Park Reader, ed. James H. Pickering, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016. She continues her work on the 100 Views of Climate Change website, http://changingclimates.colostate.edu, endeavoring to deal with a backlog of good new accessible sources of information of all kinds.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher just had a prose poem sequence accepted for the Manifest West anthology on “Women of the West.” The anthology is due out later this year.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, titled “Re-Writing a Discursive Practice: Atheist Adaptation of Coming Out Discourse” has been accepted for publication in Written Communication. It will be out this April.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s essay “Notes Toward a Poetics of Drought” is up at Omniverse right now. The essay, part of panel proceedings from a panel organized and chaired by Kristen George Bagdanov (MFA ’15), is a three-part series being run by Omniverse. You can find it here: http://omniverse.us/poetics-of-drought-matthew-cooperman/
  • From Sue Doe: “I am excited to announce a new online journal, Academic Labor:  Research and Artistry. ALRA is published by the Center for the Study of Academic Labor, a CSU center supported by President Tony Frank (see http://csal.colostate.edu/about/tony-franks-statement/) and Dean Ben Withers. We seek to provide perspectives from the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts on contingency, tenure and the future of higher education. Please consider submitting something for the inaugural issue, and please circulate the CFP to your colleagues and distribute it to disciplinary list-servs, journals, websites, discussion boards, etc. Note that the journal invites varied genres, including art.”
  • Todd Mitchell launched a new program today to encourage literacy, creativity, and caring for our earth by delivering free books and free author visits to underfunded schools in Colorado. If you want to learn more (or become a supporter), check out http://youcaring.com/Books4Change.
  • Todd Mitchell cover reveal. After years of writing and countless drafts. I’m finally able to share with you the cover for my new book. It’s coming out in August, 2017. Just in time for the new school year. I can’t wait to release this one into the wild, along with several new presentations for schools! Click to read early reviews, preorder a copy, and learn more about why I wrote this book.  lastpanther
  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Bellwethers: Shame and My Left Breast” is up at Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-83/
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the January 2017 issue of OmniVerse and other poems have recently been accepted in the Raleigh Review, Bellingham Review, and Sugar House Review. Her blogpost “Consideration of Self in Poetry: You & the Page” is up at North American Review, and a new interview with poems can be found online at HocTok.

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CSU Ethnic Studies Assistant Professor Ray Black gave the charge to the marchers in Old Town for the MLK Day March.

CSU Ethnic Studies Assistant Professor Ray Black gave the charge to the marchers in Old Town for the MLK Day March, (image source: SOURCE).

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher had a couple of lyric essays accepted for publication over the break: “Coyote Crossword” in Permafrost and “Conjugation” in Uproot. He was also profiled in High Country News http://www.hcn.org/articles/harrison-candelaria-fletcher-uncommon-westerner
  • Sue Doe’s co-authored article with Mary Pilgrim and Jessica Gehrtz, “Stories and Explanations in the Introductory Calculus Classroom: A Study of WLT as a Teaching and Learning Intervention,” Volume 27 of The WAC Journal, is now viewable at: http://wac.colostate.edu/journal/vol27/doe.pdf
  • Camille Dungy is included on a list of 11 Poets Every 20-Something Should Be Reading. “Coming so close to a recent decidedly not-20-something birthday, I am deeply gratified to have made this list on Bustle.com.” https://www.bustle.com/p/11-poets-every-20-something-should-be-reading-28280
  • The Community Literacy Center welcomes Shelley Curry, Sarah van Nostrand, Lizzy Temte, and Alina Lugo as spring 2017 interns.
  • Kristina Quynn presented in two sessions at the 2017 Modern Language Association Conference in Philadelphia. She presented on “Engaged Reading and Criticism” in a special session about “Feminism, Pedagogy, and the New Modernist Studies.” This session and presentation connects with the MLA Teaching Approaches collection on Modernist Women’s Writing, which is forthcoming 2018. Kristina also organized and presented on a panel about “Narratives of Contingency: Unsettling Trends in the New Academic Novel.” Her paper was titled, “Mimetic Drudgery, Magic Realism, and the New Academic Novel.”
  • Shoaib Alam’s short story “Wonderland” from his master’s thesis will appear in May/June issue of The Kenyon Review’s KROnline. Alam is back in his hometown, Dhaka, Bangladesh, working with the Teach For All network partner there, Teach For Bangladesh, on partnership development.

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The Poudre River this morning (image by Jill Salahub)

The Poudre River (image by Jill Salahub)

  • On October 28th, Tim Amidon, Elizabeth Williams (Communication Studies), Kim Henry (Psychology), and Tiffany Lipsey (Health and Exercise Science) partnered with the Poudre Fire Authority to host a symposium on the intersections of work, knowledge, and safety in the fireservice. Over 70 fireservice leaders from as far away as Oakland, CA and Ontario, Canada participated in interactive, stakeholder conversations designed to help researchers and participants identify the types of human factors that impact firefighter occupational safety and health outcomes. Breakout sessions included discussions on wearable technologies and next generation PPE, post-traumatic stress, the impact of chronic stress, sleep deprivation, and diet on decision making and cognition, how blue-collar traditions and working class identity impact how firefighters value the types of labor they perform, and how the challenges of certifying skills and building learning organizations through training and education programs. The event was sponsored by PFA and Pre-Catalyst for Innovative Partnerships seed funding awarded to the research team by the Office of the Vice President for Research. Tim would also personally thank our student intern Tiffany Lingo and administrative gurus Sheila Dargon and Lilian Nugent for their support!
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an interview up on the Kenyon Review’s website with: http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/dan-beachy-quick/ and a group of linked essays at EuropeNow: http://www.europenowjournal.org/2016/11/30/sunlight-and-arrows-five-invocations-for-the-silent-muse/
  • John Calderazzo will be presenting a talk on “Climate Change and Quechua Ritual” at the Sacred Landscapes and Mountains conference at the China India Institute in New York City.  The talk is based on a trip he took to a glacier-fed basin in the Peruvian Andes. John will also be the judge for the 2017 Eugene V. Shea National Poetry Contest.
  • Sue Doe and Lisa Langstraat’s essay “Faculty Development Workshops with Student Vet Participants: Seizing the Induction Possibilities” will shortly appear in Reflections: Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning (Volume 16, Issue 2).
  • On November 18, just prior to the start of Fall Break, CO130 faculty welcomed around 75 international students to a Harvest Meal in the Whitaker Room.  It was crazy fun in there, particularly as faculty watered down the soup to make it stretch to meet the larger-than-expected crowd and as Cassie Eddington’s kimchi was pronounced “Superb!” by a Korean student. This event was the brainchild of Karen Montgomery Moore and was assisted by Cassie Eddington, Virginia Chaffee, Kristie Yelinek, Hannah Caballero, Leslie Davis, Sheila Dargon, and Sue Doe.  Thanks go to our Chair, Louann Reid, for her support for this very special and timely event. Thanks also to the front office staff who participated and strongly communicated the department’s support for the diverse students of CO130! Thanks as well to our amazing Eddy custodial staff who not only helped bring food from our cars to the third floor but stuck around late to help clean up the mess!
  • On Saturday, October 15th, the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) hosted its 47th Annual Regional Conference at Metro State University in Denver.  This year’s theme was “For the Love of Teaching: Reclaiming the Classroom.”  CLAS presented CSU’s English Professor Emeritus William McBride with the Legacy Award.  English Education graduate student Jenna (Franklin) Martin shared her presentation, titled “Intercultural Sensitivity in the Middle School Language Arts Classroom.”  Dr. Pam Coke gave a presentation with Cheryl Kula, a fourth grade teacher at St. John the Evangelist Catholic School in Loveland, titled “Hard to Learn, Hard to Teach: Using Problem-Based Strategies in the Classroom.”  A good conference was had by all.
  • On Saturday, November 12th, CSU welcomed high school seniors from around the country to campus to take part in Senior Scholarship Day. English department colleagues led students through a writing workshop, followed by a timed writing competition.  CSU Admissions offered scholarships to the top writers. Our English department team included Tony Becker, Doug Cloud, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Tobi Jacobi, Sarah Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, Catherine Ratliff, and fearless leader Ed Lessor. Thank you, team, for your hard work!
  • On Saturday, November 19th, Dr. Pam Coke presented her research at the National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention in Atlanta.  Her session, titled “Performing Adolescence on the Page and in the Classroom: Using Adolescents’ Literature to Advocate for Students’ Mental Health,” She helped participants examine critical questions for educators, including: Is it ethical to teach a text that I know can trigger forms of PTSD for students?  Is it irresponsible to avoid such issues in the classroom?  If and when I do teach these texts (and I believe it is irresponsible to omit controversial texts from our classrooms), what can I do to best advocate for the mental health and well-being of the students? The presentation sparked valuable conversation among attendees.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology,” published earlier this year in The Bellevue Literary Review, has been nominated for a Pushcart prize.

speakout

SpeakOut!

We have three SpeakOut Journal Launch events during finals week. We will be celebrating the publication of our Fall 2016 issue of the SpeakOut Journal with a reading by our participants and refreshments. Please contact Tobi Jacobi (tjacobi@colostate.edu) if you would like to attend the readings at the jail or community corrections. We’d love to see you there!

SpeakOut! Youth Groups: Monday, December 12 from 6:45 to 8:15pm at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House

SpeakOut! @ Community Corrections and Work Release: Wednesday, December 14 from 7:30 to 8:30pm at LCJ Administration Building

SpeakOut! Men & Women’s Groups @ Larimer County Jail: Thursday, December 15 from 6:30 to 8:00pm at the Larimer County Jail.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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The trees in front of Eddy Hall are starting to get a few golden leaves. Fall is on its way! #greenandgoldforever

The trees in front of Eddy Hall are starting to get a few golden leaves. Fall is on its way! #greenandgoldforever

  • On June 23-24, 2016, Pam Coke participated in an international, interdisciplinary conference titled “The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers” in Le Mans, France.  Scholars from around the world, including South Africa, New Zealand, Austria, and the United States, gathered to share research and “to shed light on those cultural artifacts that target not only teenagers but an increasingly wider public – including television series, films, young adult novels, among others – and explore the images of teenagers.”  Pam presented her paper, “What Are They Selling? What Are We Buying?:  Eating Disorders as Cultural Artifacts,” where she shared findings from her qualitative research study examining how eating disorders have become an intricate part of the web of American behavior patterns, a way for teenagers to perform adolescence.
  • Over the summer, Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poetry manuscript was a finalist for the Ahsahta Sawtooth Prize. She also had 5 ghazals accepted for publication in Denver Quarterly. Sarah Pieplow would also like you to know that the GLBT Resource Center’s Safe Zone training is back! It’s fun! (And she is one of the trainers!) The purpose of Safe Zone is to reduce homophobia and heterosexism at CSU, thereby making our campuses a safer environment for all members of our community regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.  The Safe Zone program prepares members of the CSU community to serve as a resource on LGBTQ issues, and also strives to educate the organization about the Safe Zone program.  If you would like to better learn how to support students, faculty, and staff in the GLBTQQIA community (and figure out that acronym), these trainings can help you do that. To sign up for a training, go to http://www.glbtrc.colostate.edu/safe-zone. To ask more questions about what the heck this involves, go to Sarah.
  • Over the summer Dan Robinson gave a fiction reading, presented a paper, and moderated a round table discussion at the International Hemingway Conference in Oak Park, IL; He also had a couple of radio interviews on writing about and on the science and art of wildfire fighting.
  • Shoaib Alam received an Honorable Mention in the Glimmer Train May/June Short Story Award for New Writers contest.
  • This summer, Felicia Zamora (’12 MFA) has two poems in the newest issue of Poetry Northwest, was interviewed on the Indiana Review website as runner-up to the 2015 1/2K Prize, had poems accepted to Witness Magazine and Michigan Quarterly Review, was a finalist for the 46er Prize with The Adirondack Review where three poems are featured, and her second chapbook, Imbibe {et alia} here, was released from Dancing Girl Press.
  • Leslee Becker received the 1st-place Award in the 2016 Moondance Film Festival’s Short Story category. She also had stories accepted by Carolina Quarterly and Fifth Wednesday, and was awarded a writing fellowship/residency at the Anne LaBastille Foundation in the Adirondacks.
  • Ellen Brinks gave a plenary talk in early July at the University of London, Birkberk College, on the forgotten geographies of the transnational fairy tale in late 19th- and early 20thC fin-de-siecle literary culture.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s long piece “Difference Essay” was accepted recently by Seattle Review. This summer he gave two readings in California, at the Sacramento Poetry Center, and Poetry Flash/Moe’s Books, Berkeley. He and Aby Kaupang will be reading at Mountain Folds, in Colorado Springs, Sept 24. Two upcoming readings Matthew and Aby suggest for your radar. First, hosted by Cole Konopka and Sam Killmeyer for the Fork Socket series, September 14, Julie Carr, Amaranth Borsuk and Sam Killmeyer, 7:30 pm, The Forge. Second, for EveryEye, Sept. 21, Susan Briante and other luminaries, tea.
  • Sue Doe’s article, “Stories and Explanations in the Introductory Calculus Classroom: A Study of WTL as a Teaching and Learning Intervention” which was co-authored with Mary Pilgrim, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Director of the Calculus Center, was accepted this week for publication in the The WAC Journal.  
  • Beth Lechleitner will read a few of her poems at a community reading in celebration of autumn.  The event is from 1 to 3 on Sunday, September 18 at the Loveland Museum and Gallery on Lincoln in downtown Loveland.
  • Dana Masden’s poem “The Missing” appears in the Fall Issue of the Adirondack Review.
  • In two weeks, Airica Parker will be a featured reader and workshop leader at a regional poetry retreat hosted by Wendy Videlock in Palisade, Colorado. All are welcome to attend: tickets available through: http://coloradawendy.wixsite.com/mysite
  • Barbara Sebek kicked off sabbatical with some research in London at the Guildhall Library and the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum.  Sebek’s paper, “Temporal and Geographical Mash-Ups in Jonson and Shakespeare” was part of a seminar “Of an Age: Shakespeare and Periodization” at the World Shakespeare Congress, which convened in Stratford-upon-Avon and London in July and August.  In addition to seeing five plays in seven nights by Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Jonson at the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Globe, she met the British Sign Language interpreter for Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, visited the British Library’s stunning “Shakespeare in Ten Acts” exhibition, and saw the Royal College of Physicians exhibition of the library of alchemist/scholar/global navigation promoter John Dee, regarded as one of the inspirations for Shakespeare’s Prospero.
  • Rebecca Snow’s poem “Sestina for Adjuncts” is in the current issue of Rattle: http://www.rattle.com/print/50s/i53/
  • The Contractor, a historical western by James Work, professor emeritus, is now available in hardcover from FiveStar Publishing. The reviews have been unanimously positive, and the publisher has submitted The Contractor as a nominee for the Spur Award from the Western Writers of America. Prof. Work’s next western, The Grub Rider, Number 8 in the Keystone Ranch series, will be published by FiveStar in April of 2017.
  • Lots and lots of good news from Tim Amidon, who had a very busy summer:
    • In May, Tim Amidon presented a research talk at Computers & Writing in Rochester, New York on the ethics of disclosing geospatial knowledge through Instagram titled “#nolandmarks: technorhetorics, watersheds, & de/coloniality.”
    • In May, Tim Amidon led a mentoring roundtable at the Graduate Research Network, a one day workshop for graduate students concentrating in computers, writing, and digital rhetoric at Computers & Writing in Rochester, New York.
    • In May, Tim Amidon was appointed to the faculty of the Colorado School of Public Health in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health.
    • Tim Amidon traveled to Heifei, China, with a delegation from the Natural Resources Ecology Lab (NREL) to envision how the composition program might best support English language learners from Anhui Agricultural University who will be coming to CSU as part of a 2X2 program.
    • In May, Tim Amidon helped to coordinate (and, participated in) an exciting two-day professional development workshop lead by UD Composition Admins Ed Lessor and James Roller. Participants spent time working with digital composing tools such as cameras, audio recorders, as well as photo, audio, and video editing software, and theorized how pedagogies and assignments can scaffold multimodal literacy learning in their Upper Division composition courses.
    • In June, Tim Amidon and W. Michele Simmons (Miami University, Oxford, OH) had a peer-reviewed paper on research methodology in community based research accepted in the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on the Design of Communication. Tim and Michele will give a research talk on their paper at SIGDOC ’16 and the paper will be published in the proceedings thereafter.
    • In June, Tim Amidon spoke at and participated in a one-day workshop hosted by an interdisciplinary research team and lead by Dr. A. R. Ravishankara to envision a National Smoke Warning System. Stakeholders from the EPA, US Forest Service, CDC and researchers discussed challenges and opportunities associated with attempting to design and implement a warning system that could effectively alert publics to the health and safety risks associated with wildfire.
    • In June, Tim Amidon gave short-workshop on ethnographic and naturalistic field-based research methods for exploring and writing about place for students affiliated with an exchange program between CSU and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk, Russia) led by Dr. Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker and Dr. Tony Becker.
    • In August, Tim Amidon participated in a one-day educator institute at InWorks in Denver hosted by Hypothes.is, a web-based annotation tool that allows students to tag, comment, and offer meta-level commentary on any web-based content. Participants from both secondary and post-secondary levels envisioned and shared ways of utilizing the tool to support learning in their courses. Dr. Jaime Jordan was one of the leaders of the excellent workshop.
    • In August, Tim Amidon was invited by Dr. Lori Peek to consult on the design of a digital survey-instrument that FEMA is developing to help U.S. property owners, businesses, and government actors conduct cost-benefit analyses about the value of building or re-engineering structures to meet performance-based engineering standards for seismic activity.
    • In August, Tim Amidon participated in components of the weeklong graduate teaching assistant orientation organized and led by Composition Admins Nancy Henke, Amanda Memoli, Kristina Yelinek, Hannah Caballero and Composition Director, Dr. Sue Doe.

 

Readings

Essayist, Memoirist, and CSU Fiction alumnus Steven Church will give a reading of his work. The reading takes place in the Lory Student Center, Long Peaks Room 302 on Thursday, September 8 at 7:30pm. The reading is free and open to the public. Steven Church is the author of The Guinness Book of Me: a Memoir of Record, Theoretical Killings: Essays and Accidents, The Day After The Day After: My Atomic Angst, Ultrasonic: Essays and a forthcoming fifth book of nonfiction, One with the Tiger: Sublime and Violent Encounters between Humans and Animals, which will be released in Fall 2016 by Soft Skull Press.

On Thursday, September 14 poets Julie Carr, Amaranth Borsuk, and MFA student, Sam Killmeyer will give a reading of their work. The reading will take place at the Forge Publick House, located at: Back Alley, 232 Walnut St., Fort Collins CO, 80524.

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick will be on Colorado Matters on the Denver NPR station on May 11.
  • Ellen Brinks has been invited to give a plenary talk at the conference “Forgotten Geographies in the Fin de Siècle, 1880-1920,” at Birkbeck College, University of London, in early July.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, “Talking Climate Change Across Difference” has been accepted for publication in a special issue of Reflections focused on “Sustainable Communities and Environmental Communication.” The issue will be out this fall.
  • Roze Hentschell will be leading a group of 10 CSU Honors Program students to study in Oxford, England. From late May through June, the students will take her 3 credit class, “Shakespeare in Oxford,” and they will take field trips to Bath, Windsor, Stratford-upon-Avon, and London. The students will also take a 3 credit independent tutorial with an Oxford professor in their field of study.
  • A short story from Colorado Review, “Midterm,” by Leslie Johnson (Spring 2015), has been selected for the 2017 Pushcart Prize anthology. You can read the story here: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/features/midterm/
  • The Community Literacy Center received a $5000 grant from the Bohemian Pharos Fund in support of the youth SpeakOut writing workshops.
  • Tobi Jacobi and Lara Roberts’s essay, “Developing Self-Care Strategies for Volunteers in a Prison Writing Program” appears in the new edited collection, The Volunteer Sector in Prisons: Encouraging Institutional and Personal Change (May 2016).
  • Larissa Willkomm’s research poster on a collaborative writing project on women, jail, and addiction won a 3rd place service learning prize at the recent CSU CURC competition.  Larissa completed this project as part of her CLC internship and work with SpeakOut.

    Larissa presenting her work at the recent CURC

    Larissa presenting her work at the recent CURC

  • Dana Masden’s short story “Exercise, a Good Book, and a Cup of Tea” will be published in an upcoming issue of Third Coast.
  • Kristina Quynn’s essay “My Brother, My….” is part of the just published collection of personal essays from 2Leaf Press on white privilege and whiteness in America.  The collection, What Does It Mean to Be White In America, includes an introduction by Debby White and an afterword by Tara Betts. While not light summer reading, it could be useful to those teaching about race in America.  You can find more information at: http://whiteinamerica.org
  • The following group presented a panel at the April 29 Writing on the Range Conference at the University of Denver, where Cheryl Ball was the featured speaker: Tim Amidon, Hannah Caballero, Doug Cloud, Sue Doe, Ed Lessor, Amanda Memoli, and James Roller. The group focused on examples, challenges, questions, and opportunities associated with integrating multimodality into writing. The presentation was entitled:”A Case of Wishful Thinking?  Our Plans for an Integrated and Coordinated Multimodal Curriculum.”
  • Mary Crow will take part in a public reception and reading for artworks inspired by poems May 19 in Loveland at Artworks, 6:30 p.m., 310 N. Railroad Ave. (Hwy 287 to 3rd, then R a block). She will read her poem. “Dear X,” and the artwork it inspired will be part of the exhibit.
  • “Food for Bears” by Kayann Short (BA 81; MA 88), an essay about the 2015 Front Range food collapse, appears in the latest issue of the environmental literary magazine, The Hopper.
  • Kathleen Willard’s (MFA, poetry Spring 2004) poetry chapbook Cirque & Sky won Middle Creek Publishing & Audio’s Fledge Chapbook Contest. Her book is a series of pastorals and anti-pastorals that “attunes its lyric eye to local ecological crises” (Dan Beachy-Quick)  & evokes “a periodic table of agitation over the continued plunder of Colorado and by extension the world.” (John Calderazzo). Her book is available online at Middle Creek Publishing and Audio, and Amazon.

    Kathleen Willard gave a reading with other Middle Creek Publishing & Audio poets in Pueblo, Colorado as part of the Earth Day Celebration sponsored by Colorado State University at Pueblo and the Sierra Club on April 23rd at Songbird Cellars, a local winery.

    She is also speaking at the Colorado Creative Industry Summit at Carbondale, Colorado on May 5th. In her presentation “Thinking Outside the Book”, she will share how receiving a Colorado Creative Industry Career Advancement Grant shifted her thinking about publishing poetry, how by using some basic business practices increased her poetry readership, and led her to pursue alternative spaces for her poetry, such as art galleries, community newspapers, installations, & the Denver Botanic Gardens CSA Art Share Project. While still wildly interested in the traditional modes of book publication, she would like to increase chance encounters that the public may have with poetry outside the book.

    She is also curating with Todd Simmons of Wolverine Farm and Publishing, a Food Truck Reading Series at Wolverine Farm Letterpress this summer, which is being supported by New Belgium Brewing Company.

    The Fort Collins Book Launch for Cirque & Sky will be June 21st, Midsummer’s Eve at Wolverine Letterpress.

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  • Mary Crow’s poetry has been translated for a literary magazine in Chile.  Nine poems from her latest book, Addicted to the Horizon, appear in both their original English and in Spanish translation in Aerea: Revista Hispanoamericana de Poesia, Numero 10, Segunda epoca 2016, with an introduction in Spanish by Francisco Leal. The translators were Silvia Soler-Gallego and Francisco Leal.
  • Sue Doe was an invited speaker for the College English Association’s Coffee on the Commons on April 2 at their annual conference in Denver. Her talk was entitled “University Centers as Partners for Change” and reported on the development of the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL), which promotes research and scholarship on the transformation of academic labor in higher education, including but not limited to scholarship on contingency and tenure.
  • Judy Doenges’ story “Privacy” will appear in the September issue of Guernica magazine.
  • Felicia Zamora (MFA ’12) won the Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize for her book Of Form & Gather, judged by New York poet, Edwin Torres. The manuscript will be published by the University of Notre Dame Press in 2017. Read more here http://letraslatinasblog.blogspot.com/.

 

Award Submission Deadline

Outstanding Undergraduate and Graduate Writing Award in Composition, Rhetoric, & Literacy Submission Deadline: Monday, April 11th, 5 pm. Find out more about how to submit here: Undergraduate Award and Graduate Award.

 

Immediate Need for a CSU Writing Project Intern!

SPRING 2016 INTERN ($500 stipend)

The CSU Writing Project is seeking an intern to assist with writing enrichment programs for elementary and secondary-aged students, including the Youth Science Civic Inquiry Project (YSCI) and on-campus summer writing workshops. YSCI is a partnership with the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery designed to provide low-income youth with access to science and literacy learning related to water use, quality, and equitable access. Duties would include publicity, event planning, clerical and logistical tasks, and data entry. Strong organization and communication skills, ability to meet deadlines, and willingness to work with youth are required. The intern must be available for May 7 YSCI event.

Hours: 30 hours total, so 5-6 hours per week for the remainder of the semester.

SUMMER 2016 INTERN ($800 stipend)

The CSU Writing Project is seeking an intern to assist with the summer institute for the Youth Science Civic Inquiry Project (YSCI) during the month of June. The YSCI institute is a partnership with the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery designed to provide low-income youth with access to science and literacy learning related to water use, quality, and equitable access. Duties would include event planning, clerical and logistical tasks, publicity for culminating event (a film festival in the museum’s Digital Dome theatre). Strong organization and communication skills and willingness to work with youth are required. Expertise in digital media is a plus.

Hours: June 13-25, for approximately 5 hrs. per day with some time to prepare ahead of the event.

To Apply: Please submit a resume and a brief paragraph expressing your interest and qualifications to: Cindy O’Donnell-Allen  at Cindy.Odonnell-Allen@colostate.edu.

 

Greyrock Review Release Party!!!

The Greyrock Review Release Party will be held on, Thursday, April 28th from 6-8 at Wolverine Farm’s Publishing.

 

MA or PhD Programs Professional Workshop

All students interested in applying to MA or PhD program in English a workshop will be held on Tuesday, April 12th from 3:00-4:00pm in Eddy 107, led by Pam Coke, Aparna Gollapudi and Roze Hentschell. Topics covered will be “Researching programs of interest, entrance exams, the application process, funding, and online resources.

 

Write That Book Workshop

 In this 3-part class, Laura Pritchett (author’s bio below), will share everything she wishes she’d known ahead of time about writing a book-length work.  Class 1 will focus on the basics:  thinking through your plot, your themes, your genre.  Class 2 will focus on the psychology of it all:  what prevents us starting or finishing a book?  How can we develop strategies to work with the demands that hold us back as writers, to absorb them into our creative process rather than avoid writing, or shut down, because of them?  Part 3 will focus in on the language:  motifs and metaphors and flat-out beautiful sentences.  We’ll be looking at some contemporary writers (of all genres) to guide us into creating more artful work.

Whether you’re just starting your book or working on revisions, this class will focus on important considerations for a book length work. Writers of all levels are welcome, although the class will likely be most useful for those who have already been envisioning /writing the book for a bit. The class is appropriate for fiction and nonfiction. A lot goes into the class, and you’ll be expected to do a lot too.  So be ready to work!

Cost:  Class limited to 8.  $160 for all three classes, approximately 10 hours of class.  Must sign up for all three classes.  Optional official night reading at the end (date to be determined).

Dates:  Sundays, May 15, 22, and 29, from 1-4 pm.

Location:  Publick House, 316 Willow Street

Teacher bio: Laura Pritchett began her writing journey with the short story collection Hell’s Bottom, Colorado, which won the PEN USA Award for Fiction and the Milkweed National Fiction Prize. This was followed by the novels Sky Bridge, Stars Go Blue, and Red Lightning, which garnered numerous other literary awards, including the High Plains Book Award and the WILLA. She then began work on edited anthologies, which include Pulse of the River, Home Land, and Going Green: True Tales from Gleaners, Scavengers, and Dumpster Divers. She also has a nonfiction book about bears entitled Great Colorado Bear Stories. She holds a PhD from Purdue University and an MA in English from CSU. More at www.laurapritchett.com

 

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