Tag Archives: Stephanie G’Schwind

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  • Sue Doe’s chapter, “What Works and What Counts: Valuing the Affective in Non Tenure-Track Advocacy,” co-authored with Maria Maisto and Janelle Adsit, was just published in Contingency, Exploitation, and Solidarity: Labor and Action in English Composition. Edited by Seth Kahn, William B. Lalicker, and Amy Lynch-Biniek.
  • Darcy Gabriel has happily accepted a place in the University of Minnesota’s PhD program in Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication (RSTC) starting this fall.
  • SueEllen Campbell’s contribution to the post-election series “Letters to America” in Terrain.com appeared online last week at this link:  http://www.terrain.org/2017/guest-editorial/letter-to-america-campbell/.
  • The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico—published by the Center for Literary Publishing as part of its Mountain West Poetry Series—has been awarded the 2017 PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry. The award, for which the poet receives $5,000, is given in odd-numbered years and recognizes the high literary character of the published work to date of a new and emerging American poet of any age and the promise of further literary achievement. The book’s publishing team was Karen Montgomery Moore, Cedar Brant, Melissa Hohl, Katie Naughton, and Stephanie G’Schwind.
  • Airica Parker’s poem “Disjointed” appears in Central Michigan University’s Temenos: Skin Suits & Bare Bones online and in print. See it here for free on page 29: http://www.temenosjournal.com/current-edition.html
  • Mary Crow has had two poetry acceptances; “Beyond Tahrir” will be published by Hotel America and “Happiness Production Line” will be published by American Poetry Review.
  • Tirzah Goldenberg (MFA – Poetry, Summer 2013) has a recently published book of poetry, entitled Aleph, published by Verge Books.
  • Deanna Ludwin has been nominated for the 2017 Team Fort Collins Wellness & Prevention Lamplighter community service award.

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~from English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub

After a brief hiatus, the English department Colloquium has returned. For those of you who don’t know, colloquium is an event where we gather, with fine appetizers and drinks in hand, to enjoy one another’s company and hear about the work that our colleagues are doing. All department faculty and graduate students are welcome, and the event is typically held at the home of Louann and David Reid.

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As promised, department faculty and graduate students gathered with fine appetizers and drinks in hand.

After a bit of socializing, typically two faculty present their work, with a discussion following each presentation. Stephanie G’Schwind, Director of the Center for Literary Publishing, facilitates the event — everything from helping to make plates of snacks and welcoming people as they arrive, to introducing the speakers and facilitating the discussion. As anyone who has read an issue of the Colorado Review already knows, she’s a master at bringing voices together, engaging an audience, and keeping things organized as well as beautifully presented.

For this most recent colloquium, the presenters were Assistant Professor Doug Cloud and English Instructor Kristina Quynn.

Doug Cloud presented his in-progress work on how speakers conceal animus toward marginalized groups in public discourse. He shared the results from an analysis of recent “bathroom bill” and transgender-rights discourse, to show how speakers are able to make prejudicial claims about transgender people indirectly. He proposes that understanding and revealing these techniques can help us be smarter consumers and producers of public rhetoric.

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Before starting, there was a short lesson from department chair Louann Reid on how to adjust the new leather couch for maximum comfort, which led to an interesting fact you might not know about Doug Cloud — he worked at an IKEA during graduate school. “I used to sell couches and that’s a good couch.”

Once we all got settled, Doug started by saying “I’ll jump right in, like I do with most things — eyes closed, head first.” The title of his talk was, “An Incitement to Essentialism: Recent Conservative and Religious Rhetorics on Transgender Rights and Their Implications.” He said that we often see two sides of an issue as needing to fight each other or remain locked in some sort of opposition until someone “wins,” when actually we could see such engagements as a drug and a bacterial strain or two fencers might approach each other — each on their own “side” but not needing to be at war. Rather they can dance with each other and adapt. “Movements and counter-movements influence one another’s rhetoric.”

Doug considered examples of the rhetoric in petitions written by six different conservative organizations, crafted in response to three events that brought transgender identities into the national spotlight in the past year: HB2 in North Carolina, the bathroom policy at Target, and Obama’s letter to schools about the issue. It was in part a fascinating look at the many ways we try to define gender, and what our definitions reveal about what we value and believe. While Doug admitted, “It’s hard to nail down the effect of any rhetoric or discourse, even tougher to predict what impact it will have,” working with this issue and writing about it is his way of “staying on the bus.” A good discussion followed, and it’s probably safe to say we didn’t answer all the questions involved with this complex issue that night.

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Kristina Quynn talked about the phases of CSU Writes so far: where it started last year, where it currently is, and where she sees it going. She touched on the reasons she started CSU Writes (including her own research agenda), the writing productivity research and models of women’s collectives that guide its vision, and some of the wonderful success stories of graduate students and faculty who have participated in CSU Writes organized retreats, workshops, and writing groups.

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Kristina’s original search was a personal one, “I was looking for a writing group for myself to support my own work.” Her search led to starting CSU Writes, originally funded through a grant awarded to her by The Ripple Effect. Although the writing productivity research and models of women’s collectives guided her vision of the project, she knew it couldn’t just be for women, that it should be open to everyone — all genders, graduate students and faculty, undergraduates and staff. The project began with Writing Groups, Drop In writing sessions (Show Up & Write), and workshops.

Kristina learned some things early on in the project, about what was needed and by whom, and more importantly about who the project might best serve. She realized that the project should focus on purely academic writing, and refocused the program to support the needs of academic writers (Faculty and Graduate Students) writing projects with the goal of either publication or degree completion. Last year, the project worked with 277 writers, fostered 36 writing groups, held 16 workshops on the 4 topic that writers struggle with most (space, time, energy, and style), had 126 Show Up & Write sessions, and invited one guest speaker. Kristina also published an essay in an edited collection, had another accepted for the MLA Approaches to Teaching Series, had 3 conference paper proposals accepted at MSA & MLA, and has recently finished work co-editing a collection on experimental literature and criticism soon to be coming out at Palgrave Press, thus meeting her original personal goal for the project.

CSU Writes had writing retreats for graduate students that were very popular. Almost too popular. There were 30 spots and after the first few days the first retreat was open for registration, there were 65 applications, and Kristina had to contact me to take down the website submission form. Students who attended practiced writing a lot in healthy, sustainable writing sessions as a writing community. One of the most popular aspects of the retreat was Professor (now Emeritus) John Calderazzo’s session on capturing audience through storytelling.

One of the surprises of the retreats, and of the program in general, is that large numbers of international students who are looking for help for their writing as English Language Learners, that there’s a real need there, but CSU Writes offers support primarily for writing productivity, which isn’t exactly the right fit for student seeking ESL/ELL support.

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Kristina describes what she does facilitating writing groups as being the Match.com for academic writers at CSU. She confessed she even used wedding planning software to help her match writers together into workable writing groups. “There’s a lot of romance involved,” she joked. The primary way she matches people is through their schedules, stated interests, and the length of the project they are working on, but admits that whether their writing group will work out over the long-haul or not is another matter — “Chemistry is more of a mystery.”

During the discussion, John Calderazzo asked her, “how do you measure success?” Kristina answered:

  • Are graduate students experiencing speedier time to degree?
  • Can participants see an overall improvement in the writing?
  • Are participating writers feeling more comfortable and content with their writing practice?

She also suggested that measuring success by tying it to grant money is a bad idea.

Kristina talked about what seems to be at the heart of the struggles of academic writers, and what in turn points to the solutions: space for writing, time to write, maintaining momentum and energy. She suggested that accountability to a group and some practical skills, like using the Pomodoro Technique (which Catherine Ratliff introduced at the graduate student writing retreats), and separating drafting from editing, are some of the benefits of CSU Writes. She also asserted that “binge writing is bad” and suggests “writers are putting off large writing projects to the last minute.” She closed with stating, “I suspect that a lot of the crankiness on campus has to do with a lack of writing.”

It was a great event, and a good time was had by all. Stay tuned for information on next semester’s colloquium, and we hope to see you there.

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  • The Center for Literary Publishing is delighted to announce that The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico, a 2015 Mountain West Poetry Series title, has won the Utah Book Award in Poetry. This is the second year in a row that a CLP title has won the award (last year it went to The Logan Notebooks, by Rebecca Lindenberg). Karen Montgomery Moore was the copyeditor; Cedar Brant, the proofreader; Katie Naughton, the typesetter; Melissa Hohl, the cover designer; and Stephanie G’Schwind and Donald Revell, the acquiring editors.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Quartzsite,” won second prize in Blue Mesa Review‘s 2016 Summer Contest, judged by Jensen Beach. The story will be published in Issue #34 this November.

Colloquium 

Please join us Thursday, October 27, 7:00 pm, at the home of Louann & David Reid, for the fall semester colloquium, at which we gather, with fine appetizers and drinks in hand, to enjoy one another’s company and hear about the work that our colleagues are doing. All department faculty and graduate students are invited.

Here’s a preview of the evening:

Doug Cloud will present some in-progress work on how speakers conceal animus toward marginalized groups in public discourse. He’ll show the results from an analysis of recent “bathroom bill” and transgender-rights discourse, to show how speakers are able to make prejudicial claims about transgender people indirectly. Understanding and revealing these techniques can help us be smarter consumers and producers of public rhetoric.

Kristina Quynn will talk about the phases of CSU Writes so far: where it started last year, where it currently is, and where she sees it going. She will touch on the reasons she started CSU Writes (including her own research agenda), the writing productivity research and models of women’s collectives that guide its vision, and some of the wonderful success stories of graduate students and faculty who have participated in CSU Writes organized retreats, workshops, and writing groups.

It’s always a fabulous event, so please treat yourself and make time in your calendar. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

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Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

 

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Colorado State University Center for Literary Publishing Director Stephanie G'Schwind talks with an intern about a project, April 2013. Image by CSU Photography.

Colorado State University Center for Literary Publishing Director Stephanie G’Schwind talks with an intern about a project, April 2013. Image by CSU Photography.

Congratulations to the Center for Literary Publishing (CLP) and the director Stephanie G’Schwind for receiving this prestigious honor!

Programs are awarded this designation because they have achieved great distinction and set a standard for excellence in research, teaching, and service that may serve as a model for programs throughout the institution and externally. Thus, the Program of Research and Scholarly Excellence (PRSE) designation will provide enhanced visibility and enable advocacy in the context of the larger research and training missions of CSU. An annual graduate fellowship allocation from the Graduate School will accompany the PRSE designation. Additional funds will be made available to PRSE-designated programs through an annual Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR) competition mechanism.

Stephanie G’Schwind, the Center’s director and Editor in Chief of Colorado Review, applied for this honor, and we are very proud that her hard work and dedication to the Center have been recognized by CSU. Home of Colorado Review, the Colorado Prize for Poetry, the Nelligan Prize for Short Fiction, and the Mountain West Poetry Series, the Center for Literary Publishing’s mission is two-fold: to publish contemporary short fiction, poetry, and nonfiction and to offer graduate students the opportunities to learn about and participate in literary publishing through a professional internship. The Center was established in 1992 and is housed in the English Department at Colorado State University.

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Image by Ashley Alfirevic

Image by Ashley Alfirevic

  • Leslee Becker received the University’s Jack E. Cermak Award for Advising.
  • Stephanie G’Schwind is very proud to announce that Colorado Review will make a second Best American debut this year: Jonathan Franzen has selected “Namesake,” by Mason Stokes (Summer 2015 issue) for Best American Essays 2016. You can read the essay here: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/features/namesake/
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper entitled “The Challenges of Going Public with Archival Prison Materials” on a panel with other prison writing scholars at the recent CCCC meeting in Houston, TX.  She also led a learning circle at the pre-conference prison pedagogy and research workshop.
  • As co-chair of the Qualitative Research Subcommittee of the Standing Commission on the Status of Women Faculty, Lisa Langstraat wrote a Vice Provost of Research Quarterly Funding Grant proposal, “Qualitative Research on the Culture and Climate for Women Faculty at CSU.”  Our committee was awarded all requested funding which will allow for the expansion of current research efforts and summer funds for coding and analyzing data.  This data will inform policy regarding improving the culture and climate for women faculty at CSU as well as nation-wide Advance Grant development.
  • Shoaib Alam’s short story “Guildwood Village” has been accepted for the 2016 Tin House Summer Workshop. He will be at Reed College in Portland from July 10-17 and is looking forward to studying with Chinelo Okparanta.
  • CSU was well represented among this year’s winners of the AWP Intro Journals Award. Cedar Brant won for her poem, “Make Blood,” and Nathaniel Barron won for the first chapter from his novel-in-progress, From the Watchtower. Emily Ziffer received an honorable mention for her nonfiction essay, “Moving Forward, In Russian.” That’s three awards for CSU, the most of any program! All of the nominees will be on our Poster at the English Department Awards Reception.
  • Two TEFL/TESL students, Kathleen Hamel and Brian Doebbeling, successfully defended their portfolios on 4/15.
  • Felicia Zamora (MFA ’12) has four poems accepted in West Branch’s upcoming feature issue focusing on avant-garde contemporary women poets. Other poems have recently been accepted to Cutbank, The Adirondack Review, and Salt Hill.

 

Greyrock Review Release Party!!!

 The Greyrock Review Release Party will be held on, Thursday, April 28th  from 6-8 at Wolverine Farm’s Letterpress & Publick House on Willow.

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Image by Colorado State University

Image by Colorado State University

  • There’s a review of Dan Beachy-Quick’s book of poems, gentlessness, up at Rain Taxi: http://www.raintaxi.com/gentlessness/
  • Antero Garcia reflected on Teacher Professional Development and Loss, Trauma, and Empathy for DMLcentral. You can read his post here: http://dmlcentral.net/loss-trauma-and-the-digital-language-of-empathy-in-schools/
  • Antero Garcia wrote a blog post for the Compose Our World research project funded by Lucas Educational Research. You can read his George Clinton-quoting post here: http://composeourworld.org/blog/2015/11/13/we-do-this-this-is-what-we-do/
  • Stephanie G’Schwind presented on a panel, “The View from the Slush Pile,” at the NonfictioNow conference in Flagstaff, Arizona, last month.
  • Cindy O’Donnell-Allen and Antero Garcia were featured guests on the NWP Radio program to discuss their new book, Pose, Wobble, Flow: A Culturally Proactive Approach to Literacy Instruction. The archived broadcast is available here: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/nwp_radio.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “The Four Stages of Cancer,” published in Upstreet, was listed as a “notable” in Best American Essays 2015.
  • Airica Parker’s poem “Form” will appear in the Winter 2015 issue of The Nature of the West: Camas.
  • Beth Stoneburner has an essay up at xoJane.com on rape and justice. Link is:
    http://www.xojane.com/issues/confronting-my-rapist-taught-me-about-justice
  • MA and MFA students showed out in full force at the Graduate Student Showcase on Wednesday, November 11th. Their posters and presentations revealed the diversity and depth of the creativity and scholarship in this department. They even garnered prizes to boot. We want to call attention and thank all the participants in the Showcase from English, and give a special shout-out to those who won awards for their work. The participants were, in alphabetical order, Alhassane Ali Drouhamane, Paul Binkley, Cedar Brant, Lindsay Brookshier, Leslie Davis, Annette Gabriel, Kathleen Hamel, Kelsey Hatley, Melissa Hohl, Abby Kerstetter, Samantha Killmeyer, Kaitlyn Mainhart, John McDonough, Kristen Mullen, Kathleen Naughton, Courtney Pollard, Sarahbeth Stoneburner, John Whalen, Michelle Wilk, and Meagan Wilson. The prizewinners were: Melissa Hohl (College of Liberal Arts Award), Abby Kerstetter (Distinction in Creativity Award) and John Whalen (Great Minds in Research Award).
  • Melissa Hohl was awarded Highest Achievement in Performing Arts from the College of Liberal Arts at the Graduate Student Showcase.
  • Abby Kerstetter was awarded 2nd Place in the category of Distinction in Creativity at the Graduate Student Showcase.
  • John Whalen was awarded 2nd place in “Great Minds in Research” for his project entitled “Which Reporting Verbs Characterize Successful Academic Writing?” at the Graduate Student Showcase.

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    John Whalen at the Graduate Student Showcase

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Considering doing an internship in the fall? As the spring semester winds down it can difficult to think about anything but finishing up course work, completing finals, and the promise of summer break. Even so, students may find themselves considering internships for the fall semester. The Center for Literary Publishing (CLP) Internship Program is one option for graduate students. CLP interns serve as first and second readers for the nearly nine thousand manuscripts of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction that Colorado Review receives every year. Interns also have opportunities to copyedit, proofread, and typeset; learn about book & magazine design, production, and management; gain proficiency in current industry software (InDesign, PhotoShop, Illustrator, FileMaker, WordPress, and Submittable); participate in social media campaigns; and assist in grantwriting.

logoCLP Director Stephanie G’Schwind recently answered a few questions for us about the CLP internship. Established in 1992 and housed in the English Department at Colorado State University, home of Colorado Review, the Colorado Prize for Poetry, the Nelligan Prize for Short Fiction, the Series in Contemporary Fiction, and Bonfire Press, the Center for Literary Publishing’s mission is two-fold: to publish contemporary short fiction, poetry, and nonfiction and to offer graduate students opportunities to learn about and participate in literary publishing through a professional internship.

Colorado State University Center for Literary Publishing Director Stephanie G'Schwind talks with an intern about a project, April 2013. Image by CSU Photography.

Colorado State University Center for Literary Publishing Director Stephanie G’Schwind talks with an intern about a project, April 2013. Image by CSU Photography.

How does one apply for an internship at the CLP? The internship is available to graduate students in any concentration in the English Department. [Learn more in this Center for Literary Publishing Internship Program brochure (PDF)].

What are the benefits of this internship? Interns will learn the basics of how publishing works: from selecting to editing, producing, and making content available in book/magazine/digital form. These skills are critical for anyone who hopes to work in the publishing field, but they are also transferrable to a number of other professions as well—particularly as workers are expected to wear multiple hats (for example, the nonprofit membership director who is also responsible for producing a digital newsletter). Interns learn to use current industry-standard software (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, FileMaker, Submittable, and WordPress) and have the opportunity to practice their application. Writers will get behind-the-scenes experience at a literary magazine and small press; they’ll learn what makes a successful submission and, I hope, gain confidence in sending out their own work.

What can one expect from this internship? Interns can expect to read a LOT of submissions (fiction, poetry, nonfiction), to engage in discussions about writing and publishing as real issues arise in the office, to learn to love The Chicago Manual of Style, to distinguish an en dash from an em dash, to collaborate with others as they edit and design a book, to search for fresh art for the cover of the next issue of Colorado Review, to write a blog post for our website, to edit a book review, to read the latest issue of Poets & Writers, to come to understand Colorado Review’s place in the larger literary landscape.

What advice do you have for a graduate student wanting to apply, wanting to do an internship with the CLP? Spend some time on our website, read some of the content we’ve posted online, and get a sense of what we’re about, then get in touch with me if you want to be part of what we’re doing.


Coming next week: We’ll hear more about this internship and the CLP from some of the current CLP interns and Colorado Review Managing Editor Drew Webster.

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image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

  • Spring Break at CSU begins Saturday, March 14 and ends Sunday, March 22.
  • Next week, Tim Amidon will be traveling to Tampa, Florida to attend the Conference on College Composition and Communication. While at CCCCs, he will be leading the annual meeting of CCCC Intellectual Property (IP) Caucus, attending a meeting of the CCCC (IP) Committee, chairing a roundtable discussion of IP luminaries that includes a representative of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, and presenting a talk during a roundtable entitled “Researching Extracurricular Literacies through Interdisciplinary Practices. Follow the conference virtually with hashtag #4c15; follow activity related to the CCCC IP Caucus by following #4cIP and/or #ask4cIP.
  • From March 10-12 Camille Dungy was the Aetna Writer in Residency at the University of Connecticut where she gave a poetry reading, visited classes, and conducted several tutorials.
  • From March 13-15 Camille Dungy was a presenter at the Geography of Hope: Women and the Land.  “The biennial Geography of Hope Conference brings together leading writers and activists in the coastal village of Point Reyes Station for a three-day feast of readings, discussions, and activities to inspire and deepen an understanding of the relationships between people and place.”  Presenters: M. Kat Anderson; Camille Dungy; Gretel Ehrlich; Carolyn Finney; Susan Griffin; Robert Hass; Brenda Hillman; Wendy Johnson; Robin Wall Kimmerer; Kathleen Dean Moore; Melissa K. Nelson; Ann Pancake; Claire Peaslee; Rhiannon; Kim Stanley Robinson; Lauret Savoy; Rebecca Solnit, Priscilla Ybarra.
  • Antero Garcia has a co-authored study on “Race to the White House” featured on the recently launched Civic Media Project Website. His work is featured in the Play & Creativity section found here: http://civicmediaproject.org/works/civic-media-project/playandcreativity
  • EJ Levy was a visiting writer at Hope College and Albion College in Michigan from March 3-6.
  • Man in the Moon: Essays on Fathers & Fatherhood (Center for Literary Publishing, Stephanie G’Schwind, ed.) has been named a finalist for Foreword Reviews’ Indiefab Book of the Year Award in the anthology category. Winners will be announced at the end of June at the American Library Association’s annual conference. maninthemoon

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards – Submissions due by April 6th

 

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 12th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies. Applicants must be registered graduate or undergraduate English majors.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 27, 2015.

 

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies. Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages. Shorter papers are welcome. Only one submission is allowed per student.

 

Submission deadline is Monday April 6, 2015, at 5:00 p.m.

Please submit TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear. Include with your essay a separate cover letter with your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, university ID number, and title of your essay. Also indicate the course for which the essay was written (if it was composed for a course) and the professor who taught the course. Indicate whether you are an undergraduate or graduate student at CSU. Address your cover letter to: Professor Aparna Gollapudi, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773. Cover letter and submissions can be dropped off at the Behavioral Sciences Building, Room A104.

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Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

News

  • EJ Levy was a Visiting Writer at Wabash College in Indiana on February 12-13, 2015. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize in both fiction and nonfiction and will be a Fellow at the Aspen Summer Words conference this June.
  • Todd Mitchell was recently interviewed by The Denver Post for a piece on ghost stories published on 2/15. He also did an interview for the Northern Colorado Writer’s Podcast that’s now available, he did a reading that will air on KRFC next Tuesday, and (in an odd turn) he’s quoted in an article on YA post-apocalyptic fiction that will go out next week in Stylist Magazine (a U.K. magazine with a circulation of over 400,000). For a link to any of these articles, interviews, or podcasts, please visit www.ToddMitchellBooks.com.
  • Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker and Tony Becker will deliver a paper presentation titled, “Project-Based Learning in ESL Classrooms: Planning Goals and Outcomes,” at the 2015 TESOL Convention (http://www.tesol.org/convention2015) held on 25-28 March 2015 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Debra Lewis was invited to present a small collection of poetry at Sigma Tau Delta’s national convention over spring break (coming up in a couple of weeks). Sigma Tau Delta is the English Department’s Honors Society. She is the only representative from CSU. Read more about Debra in our “Student Success Stories” series.

Events

  • Creative Professionals Panel, GenFKD presents a moderated panel of Fort Collins professionals discussing ways to monetize creative and artistic passions — Stephanie G’Schwind, editor at The Colorado Review, and Todd Simmons, founder of Wolverine Farm Publishing, and Dulcie Willis, Fort Collins theater producer, and Booger, First Friday poetry slam host. Tuesday, March 3rd at 7:30pm, Clark C238.
  • Spring 2015 Reading Series – Kyle Dargan – Poetry -7:30pm CSU Art Museum University Center for the Arts. Free and open to the public.
  • Grant Writing Workshop for English department graduate students: Grant writing is a terrific skill to acquire, though it’s unnecessarily shrouded in mystery. Not only can it be a means to locate or secure funding for your own projects, but prospective employers would love to know that you have an interest and/or experience in grant writing. We’d like to demystify grant writing for you with a workshop on Monday, March 9, from 1-2 pm, in Lory Student Center 324. Two accomplished grant writers are leading the workshop, and they’re looking forward to introducing you to the world of grant writing: Tobi Jacobi is an English faculty member in the Rhetoric and Composition Program and director of the Center for Community Literacy, and Stephanie G’Schwind is the Director of the Center for Literary Publishing here at CSU, which publishes the nationally renowned Colorado Review. Tobi and Stephanie are looking forward to sharing their expertise with you and answering all your questions.

Submissions

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards: The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 12th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies. Applicants must be registered graduate or undergraduate English majors.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 27, 2015.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies. Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages. Shorter papers are welcome. Only one submission is allowed per student.

Submission deadline is Monday April 6, 2015, at 5:00 p.m. Please submit TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear. Include with your essay a separate cover letter with your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, university ID number, and title of your essay. Also indicate the course for which the essay was written (if it was composed for a course) and the professor who taught the course. Indicate whether you are an undergraduate or graduate student at CSU. Address your cover letter to: Professor Aparna Gollapudi, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773. Cover letter and submissions can be dropped off at the Behavioral Sciences Building, Room A104.

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Colorado Review Spring 2015 issue, cover design by Abby Kerstetter

Colorado Review Spring 2015 issue, to be published in March. Cover design by Abby Kerstetter

The Center for Literary Publishing has received matching funds from the Vice President of Research, the College of Liberal Arts, and the English Department to provide travel funding for twelve CLP interns — Jayla Rae Ardelean, Kristin George Bagdanov, Cedar Brant, Neil FitzPatrick, Melissa Hohl, Anitra Ingham, Bryan Johnson, Andrew Mangan, John McDonough, Katie Naughton, Marie Turner, and Drew Webster — to attend the annual Association of Writers and Writing Programs in Minneapolis, April 9-11, 2015.

Students will represent the Center and Colorado Review in the conference exhibit hall; interact with CLP/CR authors; meet both CSU alumni and potential students; attend panels on writing, publishing, and pedagogy; and have the opportunity to attend readings by such literary icons as Louise Erdrich, Charles Baxter, T. C. Boyle, and Alice McDermott, among many others.

The Center was also awarded a $15,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts for 2015. The grant will support the publication of two new titles in the Center’s Mountain West Poetry Series: The Verging Cities, by Utah poet Natalie Scenters-Zapico, and A Lamp Brighter than Foxfire, by Nevada poet Andrew S. Nicholson. Designed, typeset, and copyedited by CLP interns, the books will be published in April and November, respectively, and distributed to the trade by the University Press of Colorado. The grant additionally funds the production costs and author payments for the Spring 2015 issue of Colorado Review, to be published in March.

Cover design by Melissa Hohl

Cover design by Melissa Hohl

Cover design by Abby Kerstetter

Cover design by Abby Kerstetter

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