Tag Archives: Dan Robinson

Today, April 17, is National Haiku Day (image by Jill Salahub)

  • The Crisis & Creativity Workgroup, comprised of writers, artists, scientists, and community members, has had a proposal exploring species extinction through poetry/art awarded a grant from the School of Environmental Sustainability — Dan Beachy-Quick and Cedar Brant are principal investigators with this project. More information can be found here: http://source.colostate.edu/school-global-environmental-sustainability-announces-global-challenges-research-teams-resident-fellow-awards/
  • Roze Hentschell attended the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in Atlanta, April 6-8, where she discussed her paper, “John Marston at Paul’s,” an examination of Marston’s plays written for the boy actors at St. Paul’s Cathedral in the early seventeenth century.
  • EJ Levy was interviewed as part of her recent visit to UMass-Lowell; the interview appears here: https://www.uml.edu/News/stories/2017/EJ-Levy.aspx
  • Dan Robinson’s third novel, Death of a Century, will be re-released in paperback next week.  Of the novel, The Manhattan Review of Books wrote, Robinson “deals with the main character’s shellshock with a great deal of care and sympathy, while paralleling the brutality of the world off the battlefield. This is a book not to be missed; it is a mystery, thriller, historical drama in one package,” and Publisher’s Weekly wrote, “Robinson’s atmospheric tale of betrayal and revenge paints a passionate picture of the Lost Generation…”
  • Barbara Sebek contributed a paper, “Archy’s Afterlives: Temporal Mash-ups During Times of Crisis,” to a seminar at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  The paper discusses the traces left by King James’s court jester, Archibald Armstrong.
  • One of Maurice Irvin’s MFA thesis stories was accepted for publication in Portland Review‘s upcoming Spring Issue.
  • Kylan Rice will be pursuing a PhD in English Literature at UNC Chapel Hill in the fall.
  • What Goes Down” by Kayann Short (BA 81, MA 88) has just been published in Rooted: The Best New Arboreal Nonfiction (Outpost19). Her flash fiction story “When It Was Lost” will appear in the spring issue of Dash.
  • Over the past year, we have lost quite a few members of our English department family.  Each year, CSU hosts a Rams Remember Rams Service.  Here are the details: Our campus community is invited to a candlelight ceremony Monday, April 17, 5 p.m. honoring CSU students, faculty, staff, and retirees who passed away this academic year.  The 15-minute ceremony will be held on the north steps of the Administration Building and will include a reading of the names – along with time for silent reflection. The Danforth Chapel will be open until 6 p.m. as a quiet place for personal contemplation.

CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

Reading

New York City author Deborah Clearman and CLC’s Mary Ellen Sanger read from their books on life “south of the border” at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House on Thursday, 4/20 at 8pm. Deborah writes evocative stories of Guatemalan realities, and Mary Ellen writes of the women she met when unjustly imprisoned in Mexico. There will be wine and beautiful cookies!

TEFL/TESL Advocacy Week 

On behalf of the TEFL/TESL Student Association, we are proud to promote our yearly event, Advocacy Week!

This week helps us achieve our central goals of promoting intercultural, linguistic, and literacy awareness in the community. To give back to the community, we have chosen to run a bookdrive for the Larimer County Jail. Bring in used or new paperback books to stock their shelves! Donation boxes can be found in the English Department office and around campus.

To engage the larger community, this week will feature presentations from Dr. Sue Doe, Dr. Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala, Dr. Kristina Quynn, the TEFL/TESL MA cohort, and TEFL/TESL alumni, focusing primarily on L2 and interdisciplinary writing. Find more details in the “2017 Advocacy Week Schedule” flyer.

Click to see a larger version

Lastly, we are excited to welcome our keynote speaker, Dr. Eli Hinkel to present “Teaching and Learning Vocabulary for Academic Writing” on Friday afternoon. Dr. Hinkel comes to us with over thirty years of experience and multiple publications which have influenced her work with ELL writers.

This year’s guest speaker

We look forward to hosting you at another successful and engaging Advocacy Week!

The Human Library 

The Fort Collins Rotaract Club will be hosting an event on Friday, April 21 from 4:30-8p.m called the Human Library.

The Human Library is a concept created in Copenhagen 17 years ago in order to establish a safe conversational space, where the people are the books. A “Living Book” is someone who represents various backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences. Books challenge prejudice and help connect people through respectful conversation with those who come to borrow them as “readers”. Each Book has a title that relates to their experiences, backgrounds, and/or identity. However, we challenge people to not judge a book by its cover and come with an open mind!

Conversations during the event are offered for 5-15 minutes, depending on what questions the reader has for the Living Book. Checking out a Book is a first come, first serve basis so people can come and go as they please.

Come engage in the conversation! If you would like to participate in an event that creates an atmosphere of storytelling, promotes community building, and celebrates differences then we would love to see you there.

Some featured Living Books include:

My Life in 2 Bathrooms
Muslim Citizen
Chief of Police

CSU Location: Lory Student Center Cherokee Park
Event Contact Name: Lisa Evans
Event Contact Email: levans2@rams.colostate.edu
Event Contact Phone: 9704818230
Audience: Alumni, Community, Faculty, Retiree / Emeritus Faculty, Staff, Student, Youth, Other
Cost: Free!

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Image by Jill Salahub

  • Next Wednesday, Doug Cloud will be giving a workshop for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) Sustainability Fellows titled “Talking Science with Conservative, Religious and Other Potentially Skeptical Audiences.”
  • Tobi Jacobi participated at the recent Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) through a panel presentation entitled, “Not “All Ellas”: Risking Exploitation in a Prison Public Memory Project,” and a preconference prison teaching workshop (“The Prison Next Door: What Types of Connections Do We Want to Cultivate?”).
  • Michael Knisely’s Boulder’s Rocky Ridge Music Academy photography exhibit runs through April, he will also showcase additional photographs as part of the Month of Photography exhibit at the ACE Storage gallery on north Broadway also in Boulder. A collaboration of poets and visual artist’s exhibit at the First Congregational Church at Broadway and Spruce Streets in Boulder will feature two of his poems. He will also be reading from his poetry work as part of a large poetry reading this Friday for the First Friday Arts event at the First Congregational Church, which runs from 6:30 – 8:00 this Friday evening.
  • Dan Robinson’s paper, The Second Battle of the Champagne & the Inexpressibility Topos, has been accepted for the XVIII International Hemingway Conference in Paris next summer.
  • Morgan Riedl (MA in CNF, 2017) has a piece up on Brevity’s blog.  It’s a hermit crab essay in the form of a workshop critique of Sean Spicer’s press conferences.  You can read it here: https://brevity.wordpress.com/2017/03/30/workshop-comments-for-sean-spicer/
  • Catie Young’s poem “Merrily Merrily M​errily Merrily” is in the new issue of The Volta: ​http://www.thevolta.org/twstbs-poem185-cyoung.html
  • On April 21, John Calderazzo will read an essay at the Sacred Mountains and Landscapes conference at The New School.  The essay will discuss a centuries-old agricultural ritual in the Peruvian Andes he attended in which Quechua people have recently changed their behavior because of the climate change induced shrinking of their glaciers.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) first book, Of Form & Gather, winner of the 2016 Andrès Montoya Poetry Prize, was released on February 28 from the University of Notre Dame Press. Of Form & Gather is listed as one of the “9 Outstanding Latino Books Recently Published by Independent and University Presses” by NBC News. Her manuscript Galaxy Inside Your Inadequately Small Heart was selected as a finalist in the 2017 Alice James Award and the 2017 Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry. Her poem “In all the pretty roam” was featured on Zòcalo Public Square on Friday, March 17 and her poem “Virgule” was selected by The Georgia Review for publication. Zamora read her poetry for the AKO Collective’s Day Without A Woman recognition event on March 8.
  • Kathleen Willard will be the BreckCreate Breckenridge Creative Arts Tin Shop Guest Artist in Residence for the month of April. In addition to working on her new poetry manuscript, she will give a poetry reading, conduct four poetry workshops, and host a community poetry reading. She hosts Open Studio Hours at the Tin Shop Thursday through Sunday to talk about poetry and share her process. The BreckCreate website has details of her events.

Checkout the English Department’s new lunch counter!  In response to our See Change 2 request for more common space for faculty and staff, we have put the west end of Eddy to work. Two lunch counters are open and ready to entice you out of your offices for lunch and conversation. We will devote the exhibit space above each counter to departmental work on diversity and inclusion for at least the first year.

  • The northwest corner launches this new “Counter Talk” space with an exhibit featuring the 1960 Greensboro lunch counter sit-in and additional images — including two from the Smithsonian’s 2010 50th anniversary celebration.  Look here for some interesting ways to incorporate such moments into your courses: http://americanhistory.si.edu/freedomandjustice.

Stay tuned: Jaime Jordan’s exhibit featuring a moment in her CO150 course will be added next week to the southwest counter.

 

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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Have a happy & safe #Halloween weekend, State 👻🎃Remember, Rams take care of Rams. #ColoradoState 📷: @aleora2013

A photo posted by Colorado State University (@coloradostateuniversity) on

  • Skyhorse Press will re-release Dan Robinson’s latest novel, Death of a Century, in paperback in April 2017.  If people didn’t purchase it in its glorious hardback edition, they can now purchase it in its cheaper (altho no less glorious) paperback form — same cover but a slight change to the ending.
  • A short story from Shoaib Alam’s master’s thesis titled “Guildwood Village” was a finalist in Glimmer Train’s July/August Fiction Open. He wrote the first draft for Steven Schwartz‘s fiction workshop and revised subsequent versions with help from Leslee Becker, E.J. Levy, and Alexandra Bernasek.
  • Claire Boyles’ short story, “Ledgers,” received second place in the Short Story Award for New Writers contest from the Masters Review. It is published on their site at the following link: https://mastersreview.com/new-voices/ledgers-by-claire-boyles/
  • Joanna Doxey’s poem “Guidebook to Landscape: The Border” is in the current issue of Tinderbox Poetry Journal, here – http://tinderboxpoetry.com/
  • Mandy Rose’s “On Car Accidents and Second Wives” was cited in Christian Exoo’s pedagogical piece, “Using CNF to Teach the Realities of Intimate Partner Violence to First Responders: An Annotated Bibliography,” published in Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies, issue 3.1.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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The trees in front of Eddy Hall are starting to get a few golden leaves. Fall is on its way! #greenandgoldforever

The trees in front of Eddy Hall are starting to get a few golden leaves. Fall is on its way! #greenandgoldforever

  • On June 23-24, 2016, Pam Coke participated in an international, interdisciplinary conference titled “The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers” in Le Mans, France.  Scholars from around the world, including South Africa, New Zealand, Austria, and the United States, gathered to share research and “to shed light on those cultural artifacts that target not only teenagers but an increasingly wider public – including television series, films, young adult novels, among others – and explore the images of teenagers.”  Pam presented her paper, “What Are They Selling? What Are We Buying?:  Eating Disorders as Cultural Artifacts,” where she shared findings from her qualitative research study examining how eating disorders have become an intricate part of the web of American behavior patterns, a way for teenagers to perform adolescence.
  • Over the summer, Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poetry manuscript was a finalist for the Ahsahta Sawtooth Prize. She also had 5 ghazals accepted for publication in Denver Quarterly. Sarah Pieplow would also like you to know that the GLBT Resource Center’s Safe Zone training is back! It’s fun! (And she is one of the trainers!) The purpose of Safe Zone is to reduce homophobia and heterosexism at CSU, thereby making our campuses a safer environment for all members of our community regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.  The Safe Zone program prepares members of the CSU community to serve as a resource on LGBTQ issues, and also strives to educate the organization about the Safe Zone program.  If you would like to better learn how to support students, faculty, and staff in the GLBTQQIA community (and figure out that acronym), these trainings can help you do that. To sign up for a training, go to http://www.glbtrc.colostate.edu/safe-zone. To ask more questions about what the heck this involves, go to Sarah.
  • Over the summer Dan Robinson gave a fiction reading, presented a paper, and moderated a round table discussion at the International Hemingway Conference in Oak Park, IL; He also had a couple of radio interviews on writing about and on the science and art of wildfire fighting.
  • Shoaib Alam received an Honorable Mention in the Glimmer Train May/June Short Story Award for New Writers contest.
  • This summer, Felicia Zamora (’12 MFA) has two poems in the newest issue of Poetry Northwest, was interviewed on the Indiana Review website as runner-up to the 2015 1/2K Prize, had poems accepted to Witness Magazine and Michigan Quarterly Review, was a finalist for the 46er Prize with The Adirondack Review where three poems are featured, and her second chapbook, Imbibe {et alia} here, was released from Dancing Girl Press.
  • Leslee Becker received the 1st-place Award in the 2016 Moondance Film Festival’s Short Story category. She also had stories accepted by Carolina Quarterly and Fifth Wednesday, and was awarded a writing fellowship/residency at the Anne LaBastille Foundation in the Adirondacks.
  • Ellen Brinks gave a plenary talk in early July at the University of London, Birkberk College, on the forgotten geographies of the transnational fairy tale in late 19th- and early 20thC fin-de-siecle literary culture.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s long piece “Difference Essay” was accepted recently by Seattle Review. This summer he gave two readings in California, at the Sacramento Poetry Center, and Poetry Flash/Moe’s Books, Berkeley. He and Aby Kaupang will be reading at Mountain Folds, in Colorado Springs, Sept 24. Two upcoming readings Matthew and Aby suggest for your radar. First, hosted by Cole Konopka and Sam Killmeyer for the Fork Socket series, September 14, Julie Carr, Amaranth Borsuk and Sam Killmeyer, 7:30 pm, The Forge. Second, for EveryEye, Sept. 21, Susan Briante and other luminaries, tea.
  • Sue Doe’s article, “Stories and Explanations in the Introductory Calculus Classroom: A Study of WTL as a Teaching and Learning Intervention” which was co-authored with Mary Pilgrim, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Director of the Calculus Center, was accepted this week for publication in the The WAC Journal.  
  • Beth Lechleitner will read a few of her poems at a community reading in celebration of autumn.  The event is from 1 to 3 on Sunday, September 18 at the Loveland Museum and Gallery on Lincoln in downtown Loveland.
  • Dana Masden’s poem “The Missing” appears in the Fall Issue of the Adirondack Review.
  • In two weeks, Airica Parker will be a featured reader and workshop leader at a regional poetry retreat hosted by Wendy Videlock in Palisade, Colorado. All are welcome to attend: tickets available through: http://coloradawendy.wixsite.com/mysite
  • Barbara Sebek kicked off sabbatical with some research in London at the Guildhall Library and the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum.  Sebek’s paper, “Temporal and Geographical Mash-Ups in Jonson and Shakespeare” was part of a seminar “Of an Age: Shakespeare and Periodization” at the World Shakespeare Congress, which convened in Stratford-upon-Avon and London in July and August.  In addition to seeing five plays in seven nights by Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Jonson at the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Globe, she met the British Sign Language interpreter for Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, visited the British Library’s stunning “Shakespeare in Ten Acts” exhibition, and saw the Royal College of Physicians exhibition of the library of alchemist/scholar/global navigation promoter John Dee, regarded as one of the inspirations for Shakespeare’s Prospero.
  • Rebecca Snow’s poem “Sestina for Adjuncts” is in the current issue of Rattle: http://www.rattle.com/print/50s/i53/
  • The Contractor, a historical western by James Work, professor emeritus, is now available in hardcover from FiveStar Publishing. The reviews have been unanimously positive, and the publisher has submitted The Contractor as a nominee for the Spur Award from the Western Writers of America. Prof. Work’s next western, The Grub Rider, Number 8 in the Keystone Ranch series, will be published by FiveStar in April of 2017.
  • Lots and lots of good news from Tim Amidon, who had a very busy summer:
    • In May, Tim Amidon presented a research talk at Computers & Writing in Rochester, New York on the ethics of disclosing geospatial knowledge through Instagram titled “#nolandmarks: technorhetorics, watersheds, & de/coloniality.”
    • In May, Tim Amidon led a mentoring roundtable at the Graduate Research Network, a one day workshop for graduate students concentrating in computers, writing, and digital rhetoric at Computers & Writing in Rochester, New York.
    • In May, Tim Amidon was appointed to the faculty of the Colorado School of Public Health in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health.
    • Tim Amidon traveled to Heifei, China, with a delegation from the Natural Resources Ecology Lab (NREL) to envision how the composition program might best support English language learners from Anhui Agricultural University who will be coming to CSU as part of a 2X2 program.
    • In May, Tim Amidon helped to coordinate (and, participated in) an exciting two-day professional development workshop lead by UD Composition Admins Ed Lessor and James Roller. Participants spent time working with digital composing tools such as cameras, audio recorders, as well as photo, audio, and video editing software, and theorized how pedagogies and assignments can scaffold multimodal literacy learning in their Upper Division composition courses.
    • In June, Tim Amidon and W. Michele Simmons (Miami University, Oxford, OH) had a peer-reviewed paper on research methodology in community based research accepted in the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on the Design of Communication. Tim and Michele will give a research talk on their paper at SIGDOC ’16 and the paper will be published in the proceedings thereafter.
    • In June, Tim Amidon spoke at and participated in a one-day workshop hosted by an interdisciplinary research team and lead by Dr. A. R. Ravishankara to envision a National Smoke Warning System. Stakeholders from the EPA, US Forest Service, CDC and researchers discussed challenges and opportunities associated with attempting to design and implement a warning system that could effectively alert publics to the health and safety risks associated with wildfire.
    • In June, Tim Amidon gave short-workshop on ethnographic and naturalistic field-based research methods for exploring and writing about place for students affiliated with an exchange program between CSU and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk, Russia) led by Dr. Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker and Dr. Tony Becker.
    • In August, Tim Amidon participated in a one-day educator institute at InWorks in Denver hosted by Hypothes.is, a web-based annotation tool that allows students to tag, comment, and offer meta-level commentary on any web-based content. Participants from both secondary and post-secondary levels envisioned and shared ways of utilizing the tool to support learning in their courses. Dr. Jaime Jordan was one of the leaders of the excellent workshop.
    • In August, Tim Amidon was invited by Dr. Lori Peek to consult on the design of a digital survey-instrument that FEMA is developing to help U.S. property owners, businesses, and government actors conduct cost-benefit analyses about the value of building or re-engineering structures to meet performance-based engineering standards for seismic activity.
    • In August, Tim Amidon participated in components of the weeklong graduate teaching assistant orientation organized and led by Composition Admins Nancy Henke, Amanda Memoli, Kristina Yelinek, Hannah Caballero and Composition Director, Dr. Sue Doe.

 

Readings

Essayist, Memoirist, and CSU Fiction alumnus Steven Church will give a reading of his work. The reading takes place in the Lory Student Center, Long Peaks Room 302 on Thursday, September 8 at 7:30pm. The reading is free and open to the public. Steven Church is the author of The Guinness Book of Me: a Memoir of Record, Theoretical Killings: Essays and Accidents, The Day After The Day After: My Atomic Angst, Ultrasonic: Essays and a forthcoming fifth book of nonfiction, One with the Tiger: Sublime and Violent Encounters between Humans and Animals, which will be released in Fall 2016 by Soft Skull Press.

On Thursday, September 14 poets Julie Carr, Amaranth Borsuk, and MFA student, Sam Killmeyer will give a reading of their work. The reading will take place at the Forge Publick House, located at: Back Alley, 232 Walnut St., Fort Collins CO, 80524.

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Wednesday, December 9th: Book Fair at the Fort Collins Barnes and Noble, which will last all day. At 5:00PM there will be two guest authors — the English Department’s very own Todd Mitchell and Daniel Robinson — reading from their books, as well as a book signing.

If the book fair is mentioned on Wednesday at the time of purchase at B&N a portion of the sale (no additional purchase necessary) will go to NCTE@CSU. This fundraisers’ proceeds will be going to help host a miniature conference in Spring 2016.

NCTE Bookfair and Reading

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Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • John Calderazzo has accepted an invitation to join the Fort Collins Climate Action Plan communication team.  The City’s plan is widely regarded as among the strongest in the nation.This week, John conducted a story-telling workshop for CSU’s External Relations Team.  He also moderated part of a panel at the Foothills Unitarian Church on The Moral Imperative for Climate Action.
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay, “‘A Tangle of Circumstance’: Life in the Early Years of the NYS Training School for Girls in Hudson,’ appears in the Fall 2015 issue of the Columbia County History & Heritage Magazine.
  • Barbara Sebek attended a conference on Appropriation in an Age of Global Shakespeare in Athens, Georgia.  She presented a paper, “Blurring Binaries in Frank McGuinness’s Mutabilitie (1997).”
  • A review of Dan Robinson’s novel, Death of a Century, in the Manhattan Book Review concluded with this admonition: “This is a book not to be missed.”
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s story, “The Next Step” (1721 words) has accepted for publication in the upcoming issue of Gravel Magazine.
  • Adam Mackie, English Education graduate and former composition instructor at Colorado State University, promised he’d stay in touch with the English Department at CSU. Adam recently has accepted a full-time English language arts position in his hometown of Anchorage, Alaska. Starting in January 2016, Adam will teach classic mythology and American literature at West Anchorage High School. Adam also published a set of poems with BlazeVOX in Western New York that he’d like to share with everyone: http://blazevox.org/index.php/journal/

 

TONIGHT: Grand Opening – Wolverine Farm Publishing – come celebrate the new Letterpress & Publick House on from 8-11pm. Listen to the beautiful words of  Poet Laureate (and CSU alumna) Aby Kaupang and the fabulous sounds of Souvenir Thread.

 

Reminder: Deadline for Greyrock Review submissions is December 9th. Visit greyrockreview.colostate.edu to submit.

 

December 1st: Scholarship online application opens.  The application for all scholarships in the English department is online at www.ramweb.colostate.edu. Sign in using your eID and select the CSU Scholarship Application link.

 

Spring 2016 Internships Available!

Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students. Please note that the list is likely to grow with more opportunities, so stay tuned!

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SPRING:

  • Publishing/Editorial Internships:
    • Editorial Interns, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
    • Publishing Assistant Internship (2 positions), Bailiwick Press (Ft. Collins)
    • Publication Assistant, Wolverine Farm Publishing Co. & Bookstore (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing/Editorial Internships (several positions), The Borgen Project (remote)

 

  • Educational Internships:
    • Grading Assistant, NCTE@CSU with Poudre High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing Coach and Grader, NCTE@CSU, Fort Collins High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Adult ESL Teacher, Global Refugee Center (Greeley, CO)

 

  • Non-Profit/Communications Internships:
    • Social Media and Communications Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)
    • Communications Intern (paid), Otter Products (Ft. Collins, CO)

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Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu  for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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The cake for the Homecoming open house was delicious

The cake for the Homecoming open house was delicious, and eventually it was all gone

  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Openings: Into Our Vertical Cosmos,” was released by Essay Press as a digital chapbook.  She thought of titling the essay “What Not to do on Sabbatical,” in case that piques your interest.  You can read the essay here:  http://www.essaypress.org/ep-40/
  • Skyhorse Press has released Dan Robinson’s first novel, After the Fire, in paperback, so those who didn’t buy it in the first go round can find it now.  When it was first published in hardback, Wildland Firefighter Magazine said that it contained “some of the best stuff ever written about [fire] crews,” Bloomsbury Review wrote that it “engages you with a kind of terrible beauty,” and Booklist called it “a fine debut.”
  • Courtney Polland’s proposal “Playing with Pastoral: Socio-Economic and Geographic Relations in Herrick’s Hesperides” has been accepted to the Graduate Student Showcase, November 11.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s, MFA (Fiction) 420 word flash-fiction piece, entitled “Love and Reefer” has been accepted for publication in Straylight Literary Magazine.
  • Meagan Wilson’s proposal “Mere Imagination: Mind & Material” was accepted to the Graduate Student Showcase, November 11. She’ll present from 11-12:30.

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image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

  • The French edition of EJ Levy’s story collection, Love, In Theory (Editions Rivages, 2015) received excellent reviews in Le Monde, Le Figaro, Elle, and Le Journal Dimanche this summer, and was the featured title in Paris Vogue in August, for which EJ was photographed by fashion photographer/ filmmaker Andrew Dosumnu. She read with novelist Celeste Ng at Ashland University in July.
  • Dana Masden’s short essay “For the Love of Groceries” will appear in the next issue of Fort Collins Magazine.
  • Todd Mitchell’s fourth novel, Species, a middle-grade book that involves giant sea turtles, climate refugees, and mystical encounters with the last living Florida panther, will be published in Winter/Spring 2017 by Delacorte Press (an imprint of Random House).
  • In an article on new books about World War I as well as a review of Dan Robinson’s novel, the Historical Novels Society wrote, “The lessons of World War I are as relevant today as they were one hundred years ago and when we read novels like Death of a Century, we are reminded poignantly of these lessons.” The full article/review can be accessed on historicalnovelsociety.org or on the board outside Dan’s office. Also, Dan will present a paper on Ernest Hemingway’s In Our Time and moderate a panel on the story “Indian Camp” at the 17th Biennial International Hemingway Conference in Oak Park next July.
  • Bill Tremblay’s adaptation of Aaron A. Abeyta’s novel, RISE, DO NOT BE AFRAID [Ghost Road Press, 2003] is a finalist in the Moondance International Film Festival’s screenplay competition for feature films.
  • Kayann Short’s essay, “Soil vs Dirt: A Reverie on Getting Down to Earth,” appears in Dirt: A Love Story, edited by Barbara K Richardson and published by University Press of New England.

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by Communications Intern Ashley Alfirevic

dansbookcover

The comfortable blue armchair in the middle of the Children’s Section at Old Firehouse Books felt like a stark contrast to the reading about to start. Compared to the bright soothing covers on the shelves, the sleek new book jacket of Dr. Robinson’s new novel Death of a Century depicts a gargoyle solemnly watching over a foggy Parisian morning. In between small talk with fellow English students in the audience, I wondered if Dr. Robinson’s own writing would sound like the novels assigned for his “American Prose Since 1900” course that I took with him the fall before. If it did, it would be compelling, fluid, and violent (recalling our disturbing end to the course with Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian).

Though his novel already gave off a decidedly noir vibe, Robinson himself stood before the audience in an open, relaxed manner. With cowboy boots and a classically western appearance, he already looks not quite a part of this century, something he later confirmed when someone asked a question about the setting of his book. “I like the direct world of the twenties and thirties,” he said as he pulled out an ornate pocket watch. “This is how I tell time. I don’t like cell phones.”

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A fellow CSU colleague introduced Robinson, commenting on his history of firefighting both literally – flying helicopters over western wildfires – and figuratively – managing to teach and grade students while producing three novels to date. Used to working under pressure, Dr. Robinson defines himself as a “sprint writer.” Being a full-time professor doesn’t leave much time for long-distance writing, not allowing a day or even a few hours at a time to do the work of writing. “I just sit down and get a couple hundred words on the page,” he stated casually. While some of the writers in the room were left in awe of this notion, these moments – some 2,000 hours of moments, to be exact – add up to more than two years of his life.

Before starting, Dr. Robinson explained that each epigraph in Death of a Century comes from the hours of research he conducted for the novel. “Write what you know about versus what you know… it’s about the essences of life,” he mused before quoting Warren G. Harding: “America’s present need is not heroics, but healing… Let’s get out of the fevered delirium of war.”

With that, he continued into the first pages of the book. Stoic protagonist Joe Henry is a veteran and newspaper writer, reporting on World War I battles with a removed sense of scientific observation in order to distance himself from his own painful flashbacks and nightmares. After finding his best friend and fellow veteran Gresham murdered in his home, Joe must flee to Paris when he becomes the prime suspect in the investigation. He must discover who is behind the murders and why they’ve chosen Gresham… and stolen his manuscript.

As he read about, “The rain, steady and loud, [in] feathered rivulets of water down his windshield” (Robinson 9) with the same lilt he read passages of Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon or Hemingway’s “Big Two-Hearted River” to our class, I had to remind myself that this was not (at least, not yet) a classic of the canon. Although, Robinson mentioned, several canon members from the Lost Generation do make cameos in Century. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound, and Ernest Hemmingway (and his notorious missing valise) all make appearances, though he pointed out that, “the story is not about them.”

The passages selected for the reading previewed a novel full of intrigue, an exploration of the human consciousness rather than a whodunit. “It’s more about the reasons why, not the murder itself,” Robinson comments. Yet despite the thrilling plot line, the glamour of noir, and a prose rooted in classical modernism, I had one simple question on my mind: “When you were teaching our class, you mentioned that your editor wanted to change two words in the text that you made up. Did you get to keep the words?”

He chuckled, “There are now four words. I figured if Faulkner can make up words, so can I.”

And so, with that mystery solved, it was time to delve into the thriller that is Robinson’s Death of a Century: A Novel of the Lost Generation.

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The new front of Eddy Hall

The new front of Eddy Hall

Welcome to Fall Semester!

  • Harvard Review has taken 3 of Dan Beachy-Quick’s poems, and The Nation has accepted one. A suite of short essays from A Quiet Book will also be appearing in the next Mississippi Review.
  • Leslee Becker’s “Terrier,” a story that originally appeared in The Kenyon Review, has been published by Redux. Leslee’s story collection, The Little Gentleman, received the Runner-Up Award from Snake Nation Press, and was named a Finalist for the Hudson Prize from Black Lawrence Press.
  • Matthew Cooperman has had new poems accepted by Word/for Word and Ampersand Review. In June, he attended the ASLE Conference at the University of Idaho, where he presented a paper, “Whether Underground: Notes Toward a Larimer County Almanac.” Work from that project has been accepted for publication in Big Oil: An Anthology of Global Warming, forthcoming from BlazeVox.
  • Over the summer Camille Dungy published a creative nonfiction essay in the Virginia Quarterly Review (“Inherent Risk, or What I Know About Investment”), another essay in the New England Review (“A Shade North of Ordinary”) and a poem in Orion (“Frequently Asked Questions: 6″)
  •  Airica Parker was privileged to reconnect with Wendy Videlock, Art Goodtimes, David Rothman, Uche Ogbuji, and a small group of other Coloradan thinkers, writers, and community leaders for a retreat in Breckenridge this summer. Also, one of her short poems appears in the current issue of Fungi magazine, Vol. 8 No.2. Speaking of short poems, an invitation: Airica edits an online community, Postcard Poems (https://www.facebook.com/postcardpoems), and she would love to feature some CSU poets, Airica.Parker@colostate.edu.
  • Dan Robinson will be reading from his newly released novel, Death of a Century, at Old Firehouse Books on Wednesday, September 2, at 6:00 PM.
  • Sasha Steensen’s fourth book of poetry, Gatherest, was accepted for publication with Ahshata Press.  West Branch published seven poems from her ongoing project, Hendes, in their Spring/ Summer issue.  An interview conducted with Joshua Marie Wilkinson was published in The Letter Machine Book of Interviews.  “Poems for Lent” was published in the anthology A Book of Uncommon Prayer.  “In Quiet,” a collaboration with Elizabeth Robinson, published recently in Likestarlings, can be read here: http://www.likestarlings.com/poems/elizabeth-robinson-sasha-steensen1/
  • Inspired by themes from Bill Tremblay’s novel, THE JUNE RISE, the Fort Collins Chamber Music Society will perform an original musical piece written on commission by Glenn Cortese, conductor of the Greeley Philharmonic. Briana Sprecher-Kinneer will read selections from the book under the title “The Story of Antoine Janis and First Elk Woman.” The performance will be at the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, 9:15 PM, in the Digital Dome [2nd floor] on Thursday, August 27, 2015. The concert is funded by Fort Fund, the Griffin Foundation, and Marilyn Cockburn. Musicians: Liz Telling, (oboe), Lola Kern, (violin), Amber Johnson, (cello), Ben Durfee, (viola), Madeline Greeb, (piano), Cille Lutsch, (flute), and Briana Sprecher-Kinneer, (voice).
  • James Work has signed a contract with FiveStar Publishing to publish his novel THE CONTRACTOR, based on a murder that took place during the construction of the Union Pacific railroad through Wyoming. FiveStar has also accepted the manuscript of a novel titled THE GRUB RIDER, which will be published as #6 in the Keystone Ranch series. Each novel in the series is based upon a segment of the King Arthur tales. THE GRUB RIDER, set in Wyoming, uses the narrative of Sir Gareth, one of King Arthur’s nephews, on his first heroic quest.

English Department Office Hours

 The English Office hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. (closed during lunch, 12:00-1:00 p.m.).

The Writing Center, Fall Hours – beginning August 31st
Monday-Thursday, Eddy Room 25
10-4pm
Friday -10-1pm (online consultations only)
Morgan Library
Sunday-Thursday – 6-8pm

Eddy 300 Computer Lab
Monday – Friday 7:30-10pm
Saturday 8-6pm
Sunday 10-6pm

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