Tag Archives: News of Note

Fall morning on the Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • There’s an essay titled “Atlantis” from Dan Beachy- Quick’s forthcoming book, Of Silence and Song, just published at The New Orleans Review: http://www.neworleansreview.org/atlantis/.
  • Genesea Carter was a panelist on the panel “Composition, Curiosity & Technical-Major Students” at the Two-Year College English Association’s Midwest conference this past week in St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Sue Doe gave an invited plenary talk, “Cross-Ranks Activism in the Academic Labor Movement,” at the Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Dayton, OH, Oct 5.
  • The University of Georgia Press publishes Bruce Ronda’s The Fate of Transcendentalism.  Secularity, Materiality, and Human Flourishing in October.
  • Katherine Indermaur will read several original poems at the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research’s annual Boyer lecture on Thursday, October 26, 4-6PM, in the Long’s Peak Room of Lory Student Center.”

Fort Collins Book Festival: October 21

Find out more: https://www.focobookfest.org/

 

Greyrock Review is Taking Submissions!

 

 

Rekindle the Classics

The next Rekindle the Classics discussion will be on Wednesday, October 18, 6:30-8:30 pm at Wolverine Farms Publick House. MA student James Rankin will lead a discussion of Lovecraft’s Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories. Rekindle the Classics brings together CSU English faculty and graduate students and lovers of literature in the Fort Collins community.

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Fog last week, snow this week, (image credit Colorado State University)

  • There’s a short interview with Dan Beachy-Quick up at the New England Review’s website about the poem they recently published, “Memory-Wax, Knowledge-Bird”: http://www.nereview.com/category/behind-the-byline/.
  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang (MFA ’07) recently gave three readings in Utah, courtesy of the Utah Humanities Book Festival, and its Director, Michael McLane (MFA ’08)-one at the Salt Lake City Public Library, one at the University of Utah, and one at Utah State, in Logan. Matthew’s long hybrid piece, “Difference Essay,” is out in the latest issue of Seattle Review.
  • On October 5, Camille Dungy was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award from Outdoor Afro. The organization “celebrates and inspires African American connections and leadership in nature.” The award recognizes Dungy’s continuing role as an environmental writer, editor, teacher and activist.

    On Saturday, October 7, Dungy took part in the Watershed Environmental Poetry Festival in Berkeley, CA, where she was featured along with writers such as Bob Hass, Maxine Hong Kingston, Tess Taylor and Maw Shein Win.

  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper entitled, “Dazzled by Lila: Telling Stories from the 1920s Hudson Training School for (Incorrigible) Girls” at the Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Dayton, OH.  She also led a “morning meeting” session with Dr. Wendy Hinshaw on incarcerated writing and feminist tactics for literacy activism.
  • Mike Palmquist led two workshops and presented the keynote address at the College Reading and Writing Conference at Valencia College in Orlando on September 22nd and 23rd.  Mike’s talk, “WAC and Critical Thinking: Enhancing Student Learning through Writing,” explored the connections between writing-across-the-curriculum and critical thinking.
  • Skyhorse, the publisher of the paperback and ebook editions of Dan Robinson’s 3rd novel, Death of a Century, is doing an October BookBub promotion for Death of a Century.  BookBub is an online ebook book club.  Give it a look, buy the ebook, write a rave review (or don’t buy the book and still write a rave review).
  • Several MFA and MA students from the English Department will be reading original work at the GradShow on Thursday, November 9 in the Grand Ballroom in Lory Student Center:

    – 9:50AM: Emma Hyche

    – 10AM: Katherine Indermaur

    – 10:10AM: Sam Killmeyer

    – 10:50AM: Michelle LaCrosse

    – 11AM: David Mucklow

    – 11:10AM: Zach Yanowitz

    – 11:20AM: Catie Young

  • Three translations by Mary Crow of Olga Orozco’s poems are featured in the current newsletter of the Academy of American Poets online. Her new translation of a poem by Roberto Juarroz will be part of an exhibit in Dublin at the Instituto Cervantes. Both poets are Argentine. The Orozco poems are from Crow’s book of Orozco translations, Engravings Torn from Insomnia, published by BOA. She also has two books of Juarroz translations: Roberto Juarroz: Recent Poems and Roberto Juarroz: Last Poems, both from White Pine. The latter book was a finalist for the Pen America translation award.
  • Aby Kaupang’s paired tribute poems to David Bowie and C.D. Wright, “Flame Falls As Falls The World Down” and “Sunlight Come Shining,” were accepted for publication by The Laurel Review in their upcoming issue.
  • Steven Schwartz’s essay “The Loneliest Moon” has been accepted for publication by The Missouri Review and will be published in the spring 2018 issue.

 

Zambia Study Abroad Program, Summer 2018.

Info Session Wednesday, October 18 at 4pm in LCS room 304.

 

Fort Collins Book Fest

Writings and Riffs celebrates books, poetry and music as a means of storytelling, self-expression and social conversation. The day-long event is free and open to the public, and will include presentations, panel discussions, writing workshops, author readings and book signings. The event takes place at venues throughout Old Town Fort Collins from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 21. The full schedule and more information is available at www.FoCoBookFest.org. Also read more on LibartsSOURCE.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fall Along the Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Matthew Cooperman’s hybrid work “Difference Essay” is out in the latest issue of Seattle Review. This summer spacecraftprojects featured poems from his “Precarity” series for its summer solstice launch. https://spacecraftproject.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/poems-from-the-precarity-series-by-matthew-cooperman1.pdf
  • Camille Dungy will read from her essay collection, Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood, and History, and from her newest book of poems, Trophic Cascade, at various venues this fall.  She’ll read at Prairie Lights Bookstore in Iowa City on September 7 and will give the Keynote address and read at the Kentucky Women Writers Conference at the University of Kentucky in Lexington on September 15.
  • Bill Tremblay served as poetry judge for the Wyoming Arts Council annual 2017 Creative Writing Fellowship program.  There were twenty-two [22] entries and well over 200 poems to evaluate. It was great fun and truly interesting.

 

TEFL/TESL Student Association Pot Luck

Friday, September 8th 5:00pm at City Park, join the TEFL/TESL student association for our fall potluck! Open to undergraduate and graduate students, our organization aims to promote linguistic and cultural diversity though awareness, to network with professionals locally and internationally, and to provide leaning and literacy outreach to the greater Fort Collins community. We will sponsor a variety of social and academic events throughout the academic year, starting with our potluck. Check us out on Ram Link to see our other events! Contact csu.tefl.tesl@gmail.com for more information or questions.

Tags: , ,

Welcoming new English majors

  • Leslee Becker was named the 3rd-Place Winner of the Marguerite McGlinn Prize for Fiction, sponsored by Rosemont College/Philadelphia Stories & PS Books (“the POWER of Small”) for her short story, “The Grotto.”
  • The Community Literacy Center is happy to welcome six new interns for Fall 2017-Spring 2018. Interns who will develop research and outreach projects with the CLC while facilitating SpeakOut! workshops for youth and incarcerated adults are: Zoe Albrecht (Creative Writing/Fiction with minor in Sociology), Emmy Earsom (Psychology with minor in Spanish), Laney Flanagan (English), Kelly Kuhn (Criminal Psychopathology), Kelly Martin (graduate student, English Rhetoric/Composition), Shelby Spies (Human Development and Family Studies with minor in Business and English).
  • SpeakOut! is still seeking a few serious volunteers for this engaging work! Trainings on August 30 and September 1. Please contact clc@colostate.edu immediately with your application found here: https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/
  • A book launch party to celebrate the release of Todd Mitchell’s The Last Panther (Delacorte Press) took place August 25th at Everyday Joe’s Coffee House.
  • Emma Hyche’s poem “Field Trip to the Dead President’s House” was published in the Tampa Review over the summer!
  • This summer, Kelly Weber presented poetry in Detroit at the Twelfth ASLE Biennial Conference Rust/Resistance: Works of Recovery. She read as part of a panel considering rusting language/languaging rust, as well as participating in conversations around environmental crisis and recovery. https://www.asle.org/conference/biennial-conference/

 

Hope Behind Bars 

“Hope Behind Bars” is a musical presentation at Old Town Square on Saturday, August 26 from 4pm to 8pm, which highlights Blues music and other, from groups in the Larimer County Jail (LCJ). The Community Literacy Center and SpeakOut! will be present to represent the writing that comes from its programs in the LCJ. Stop by and send your friends to connect with these programs that do important creative work in our community.

Rekindle the Classics 

The next Rekindle the Classics discussion will be on Wednesday, September 13, 6:30-8:30 pm at Wolverine Farms Publick House. MFA student Kelly Weber will lead a discussion of Morrison’s Beloved. Rekindle the Classics brings together CSU English faculty and graduate students and lovers of literature in the Fort Collins community.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

English instructor Sean Waters viewing the eclipse

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has poems accepted at Poetry, New England Review, and Cincinnati Review.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher had a couple of lyric essays published during the summer break – “Family Cookbook” in Florida Review and “Flight” in Somos en escrito. He also and taught a few hybrid image and found text workshops at the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program and the VCFA Post Graduate Writing Conference. He’s glad to be back.
  • Camille Dungy’s new book of poems, Trophic Cascade, received a favorable reading in Harvard Review. http://harvardreview.org/?q=features/book-review/trophic-cascade
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow has six ghazals published in the most recent edition of the Denver Quarterly, under her publishing name ‘slp.’
  • In May Leif Sorensen gave a talk on his book in progress titled Worlds of Difference: Race, Ethnicity and Science Fiction at the invitation of the Sogang Institute of American Studies and the American Culture Program at Sogang University in Seoul, Republic of Korea. He also facilitated a special symposium for the American Cultural Studies Graduate Program at Sogang titled “Revisiting Octavia Butler’s Kindred in 2017″ that focused on Butler’s 1979 novel and Damian Duffy’s 2017 graphic adaptation of the novel.In August Leif presented a talk, “Vanishing Races and Endangered Species” that focuses on representations of endangered species in Native American fiction from the 1920s and 1930s at the Modernist Studies Association Conference in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.His 2016 essay “Region and Ethnicity on the Air,” published in the Summer 2016 issue of MELUS won an honorable mention for the Don D. Walker Prize sponsored by the Western Literature Association to honor the best essay published on western American literary studies.
  • Catie Young’s chapbook, What is Revealed When I Reveal it to You, will be published by dancing girl press in early 2018. During the summer, poems from Language Object and Stopgap appeared in Gramma and Ghost Proposal.
  • The Center for Literary Publishing, which produces Colorado Review and other publications, is featured in SOURCE, CSU’s news website.  CR editor Stephanie G’Schwind is assisted by English Department student interns, among them Chelsea Hansen and Kristen Macintyre, who are featured in a special story at http://source.colostate.edu/center-serves-hands-publishing-laboratory-students/.

 

English Department Office Hours 

The English Office hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. (closed during lunch, 12:00-1:00 p.m.).

 

Eddy 300 Computer Lab

Monday – Thursday 7:30 am – 7 pm
Friday – 7:30 am – 5 pm
Saturday 10 am – 2 pm
Sunday 10 am – 2pm

Writing Center Hours

Starting August 28

Eddy Hall, Room 23
Mon-Thurs: 10 am – 4 pm

Morgan Library, Room 171
Sun-Thurs: 6 pm – 8 pm

 

Fall 2017 Internships Available!

 Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students.

Please contact Cassandra Eddington, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Cassie.Eddington@colostate.edu for more information on these internships and how to apply.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

  • The Center for Literary Publishing’s latest nonfiction anthology, Beautiful Flesh: A Body of Essays, will officially release May 15. The production team was Cedar Brant, Dana Chellman, Cory Cotten-Potter, Michelle LaCrosse, Morgan Riedl, and Stephanie G’Schwind. The book is available from CLP’s distributor, the University Press of Colorado, or via Amazon, barnesandnoble.com, powells.com, and elsewhere.
  • Cassie Eddington’s manuscript if the garden was one of seven finalists in Kelsey Street Press’s 2017 FIRSTS! competition. Her poems will be featured on Kelsey Street Press’s blog.
  • Tobi Jacobi will deliver an invited lecture on jail volunteer training and self-care at the University of Sheffield’s workshop on the Volunteer Sector in Criminal Justice in early June in Sheffield, UK.  The workshop launches an international, multidisciplinary network of researchers, practitioners and policymakers working in the criminal justice voluntary sector led by scholars at the Universities of Cambridge and Sheffield.
  • Lauren Matheny’s short story, “The Dark”, won honorable mention (second place) in the Third Coast 2017 Fiction Contest, chosen by Desiree Cooper 🙂 Lauren says, “Don’t know if that’s worthy of the newsletter, but I’m super excited!!”
  • David Mucklow’s poem “Leaving Sediment” was published in the most recent issue of Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Kelly Weber has poems forthcoming or now appearing in Nebraska Poetry: A Sesquicentennial Anthology, The Flat Water Stirs: An Anthology of Emerging Nebraska Poets, Triggerfish, and Grasslimb.

Eddy 300 Lab
Summer Hours
May 15th– May, 19th, 2017
(Please stop by the English Department office
for access)
May 22nd-August 4th, 2017
10:00am-3:00pm

The Writing Center
Summer Hours
May 15th– August 3rd, 2017
10:00am-12:30pm
In Eddy Hall, Room 23
Online hours TBA

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

A great time was had by all at Bruce Ronda’s retirement celebration

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has a lyric essay, “Family Cookbook,” accepted by Florida Review. It’s part of a new collection exploring mixed-ness and in-between-ness.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Natural History,” was awarded a Pushcart Prize and will be played published in the Best of the Small Presses anthology.
  • Joanna Doxey has a poem in the latest edition of the Denver Quarterly (51.3).
  • Jaime Jordan’s Digital Humanities class (E280) has created a blog showcasing some of the digital projects they’ve worked on this semester.  Check it out at https://exploredhblog.wordpress.com!
  • Second year MFA student Claire Boyles had an essay, “Failing at Important Things: A Parallel History,” place as a runner-up in Vela Magazine’s nonfiction contest, judged by Claire Vaye Watkins. The essay is live on the site: http://velamag.com/failing-at-important-thingsa-parallel-history/
  • Cedar Brant won the Academy of American Poet’s Prize for CSU.
  • David Mucklow was accepted and offered a scholarship to attend the Squaw Valley Community of Writers Poetry Workshop this summer, and will be attending at the end of June. A few weeks ago, his poem, “where Deer Creek dies into the Gallatin,” was published on Daily Gramma. You can find it on their site here – http://gramma.press/
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s flash story, “A Bunny’s Kidnapping” has been accepted for publication at “Gone Lawn.”
  • Come celebrate the new 2017 Fort Collins Poet Laureate (our very own Felicia Zamora!) on Sunday, May 7 from 6-8 PM at Wolverine Farm Publick House! Enjoy readings from Felicia Zamora (MFA alumnae), John Calderazzo (professor of English Emeritus), and Michelle Deschenes (MFA alumnae). For more information, please see the event calendar listing or Facebook event page.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

Click image for larger view

 

We’re Hiring!

 

CLC is looking for interns!

Internship with the Community Literacy Center (CLC)

Job Description:  The intern (junior, senior or grad student) will work with the Community Literacy Center faculty to design a set of literacy research and outreach projects.  Projects might include one or more of the following:

  • working with a faculty mentor to pilot community literacy programming such as creative writing mini-classes, workplace writing mentorships, or literacy tutoring experiences;
  • investigating current policy on a national and regional level in order to understand the politics of funding public education;
  • developing training materials for community-based literacy partnerships;
  • researching and writing grant proposals;
  • working directly with a community partner in order to understand a research question (e.g. what is the relationship between socio-economics and an extracurricular book club?);
  • researching and building the CLC webpage;
  • planning and facilitating a local literacy event (readings, workshops, etc.);

developing assessment tools in order to measure how literacy skills are advanced by a particular classroom approach or set of materials;

  • working with a mentor in the CLC office to gain experience with literacy program administration;
  • designing a research study and collecting primary data on existing literacy outreach programs; or
  • an alternative project designed by you.

Interns manage one community literacy workshop (weekly, 1.5 hours) and are responsible for transcribing writing, encouraging writers with written feedback, and managing a small team of volunteers.

Credit:  Interns can earn up to 6 credits for their work.

The application for an internship is online at https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/.  Please apply by May 5.

All independent internships must be approved by the English Department’s Internship Coordinator, Cassie.Eddington@colostate.edu.

Additional opportunity:  If you are interested in volunteer work with the CLC, go to https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/ for more information.

 

Tags: , , ,

CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

 

English Department Awards Reception TODAY!!!

Monday, 4-6pm in the LSC North Ballroom – Presentations at 4:30pm.

  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang recently gave a reading & talk at Colgate University in New York. Matthew has an essay up on Hart Crane at At Length on “the poem that won’t leave you alone.” http://atlengthmag.com/poetry/the-poem-that-wont-leave-you-alone/
  • On Saturday, April 29, 4pm, Old Firehouse Books, Dan Beachy-Quick, Matthew Cooperman and Bill Tremblay will read from their work as part of National Independent Bookstore Day, and the closing of National Poetry Month.
  • Roze Hentschell was invited to speak at The Senior Center in Fort Collins, where she spoke on “Shakespeare and the Sonnet Tradition.”
  • Jaime Jordan invites everyone to explore how she uses the Serial podcast to tackle unconscious bias in her CO150 class. Those interested can check out the display in the northwest corner of the 3rd floor at the “lunch counter.”
  • Todd Mitchell recently conducted a full day of fiction and poetry workshops with teens at Fort Collins High School, where they have several outstanding writers (who might hopefully come here). He also conducted virtual visits (via Skype) to high school and middle school students in southern Colorado.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore presented “Affect, Anxiety, and the Abject Corpse in A Study in Scarlet” at the Popular Culture Association/American Cultural Association conference in San Diego on April 15. This paper was advised by Ellen Brinks and Debby Thompson (for her master’s final project).
  • Rebecca Snow will give a brief talk along with other local authors at the Quid Novi book fair, April 27th, 6-9 pm. She can get CSU authors table space to display/sell their books as her guest for 1/2-price ($25.00) and free registration, up until the day of the event: https://www.quidnoviinnovations.com/Spring-Innovation/
  • Mary Crow has had four poems accepted for publication: “Theory” and “But You Came anyway” by New Madrid and “Taking the Heat” and “The Necessary Existence of the Old World” by The American Journal of Poetry.
  • The Writing Center and the English Department were well-represented at the Colorado and Wyoming Writing Tutors Conference. Here is a list of presenters and presentations:
    • Kiley Miller & Wendy-Anne Hamrick
      “Is that an effective question?”: Meaningful and Interactive Grammar Feedback in Multilingual Consultations
    • Leah White & Katherine Indermaur
      Mindfulness for Tutor Resilience
    • Shirley Coenen & Leslie Davis
      Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate and Graduate Student Writing Support
    • Jennifer Levin, Tiffany Akers, and Alina S. Lugo
      Strategies for Increasing Engagement in Tutoring Sessions
    • Sheri Anderson, Sue Doe, and Lisa Langstraat
      Student-Veterans in the Writing Center: Dispelling the Myths and Providing Genuine “Military Friendly” Support

English Department Career Event: Freelance Editing Panel

Please join us for a special panel on working in the world of freelance editing. Panelists Ann Diaz (M.A. 17) and Nathan DelaCastro (B.A. 15) will share their experiences working as freelance editors and making a living!

When: Friday, May 5, from 3:00 to 4:15pm
Where: Location TBA

More details and information are forthcoming, so stay tuned! Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, with any questions.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Today, April 17, is National Haiku Day (image by Jill Salahub)

  • The Crisis & Creativity Workgroup, comprised of writers, artists, scientists, and community members, has had a proposal exploring species extinction through poetry/art awarded a grant from the School of Environmental Sustainability — Dan Beachy-Quick and Cedar Brant are principal investigators with this project. More information can be found here: http://source.colostate.edu/school-global-environmental-sustainability-announces-global-challenges-research-teams-resident-fellow-awards/
  • Roze Hentschell attended the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in Atlanta, April 6-8, where she discussed her paper, “John Marston at Paul’s,” an examination of Marston’s plays written for the boy actors at St. Paul’s Cathedral in the early seventeenth century.
  • EJ Levy was interviewed as part of her recent visit to UMass-Lowell; the interview appears here: https://www.uml.edu/News/stories/2017/EJ-Levy.aspx
  • Dan Robinson’s third novel, Death of a Century, will be re-released in paperback next week.  Of the novel, The Manhattan Review of Books wrote, Robinson “deals with the main character’s shellshock with a great deal of care and sympathy, while paralleling the brutality of the world off the battlefield. This is a book not to be missed; it is a mystery, thriller, historical drama in one package,” and Publisher’s Weekly wrote, “Robinson’s atmospheric tale of betrayal and revenge paints a passionate picture of the Lost Generation…”
  • Barbara Sebek contributed a paper, “Archy’s Afterlives: Temporal Mash-ups During Times of Crisis,” to a seminar at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  The paper discusses the traces left by King James’s court jester, Archibald Armstrong.
  • One of Maurice Irvin’s MFA thesis stories was accepted for publication in Portland Review‘s upcoming Spring Issue.
  • Kylan Rice will be pursuing a PhD in English Literature at UNC Chapel Hill in the fall.
  • What Goes Down” by Kayann Short (BA 81, MA 88) has just been published in Rooted: The Best New Arboreal Nonfiction (Outpost19). Her flash fiction story “When It Was Lost” will appear in the spring issue of Dash.
  • Over the past year, we have lost quite a few members of our English department family.  Each year, CSU hosts a Rams Remember Rams Service.  Here are the details: Our campus community is invited to a candlelight ceremony Monday, April 17, 5 p.m. honoring CSU students, faculty, staff, and retirees who passed away this academic year.  The 15-minute ceremony will be held on the north steps of the Administration Building and will include a reading of the names – along with time for silent reflection. The Danforth Chapel will be open until 6 p.m. as a quiet place for personal contemplation.

CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

Reading

New York City author Deborah Clearman and CLC’s Mary Ellen Sanger read from their books on life “south of the border” at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House on Thursday, 4/20 at 8pm. Deborah writes evocative stories of Guatemalan realities, and Mary Ellen writes of the women she met when unjustly imprisoned in Mexico. There will be wine and beautiful cookies!

TEFL/TESL Advocacy Week 

On behalf of the TEFL/TESL Student Association, we are proud to promote our yearly event, Advocacy Week!

This week helps us achieve our central goals of promoting intercultural, linguistic, and literacy awareness in the community. To give back to the community, we have chosen to run a bookdrive for the Larimer County Jail. Bring in used or new paperback books to stock their shelves! Donation boxes can be found in the English Department office and around campus.

To engage the larger community, this week will feature presentations from Dr. Sue Doe, Dr. Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala, Dr. Kristina Quynn, the TEFL/TESL MA cohort, and TEFL/TESL alumni, focusing primarily on L2 and interdisciplinary writing. Find more details in the “2017 Advocacy Week Schedule” flyer.

Click to see a larger version

Lastly, we are excited to welcome our keynote speaker, Dr. Eli Hinkel to present “Teaching and Learning Vocabulary for Academic Writing” on Friday afternoon. Dr. Hinkel comes to us with over thirty years of experience and multiple publications which have influenced her work with ELL writers.

This year’s guest speaker

We look forward to hosting you at another successful and engaging Advocacy Week!

The Human Library 

The Fort Collins Rotaract Club will be hosting an event on Friday, April 21 from 4:30-8p.m called the Human Library.

The Human Library is a concept created in Copenhagen 17 years ago in order to establish a safe conversational space, where the people are the books. A “Living Book” is someone who represents various backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences. Books challenge prejudice and help connect people through respectful conversation with those who come to borrow them as “readers”. Each Book has a title that relates to their experiences, backgrounds, and/or identity. However, we challenge people to not judge a book by its cover and come with an open mind!

Conversations during the event are offered for 5-15 minutes, depending on what questions the reader has for the Living Book. Checking out a Book is a first come, first serve basis so people can come and go as they please.

Come engage in the conversation! If you would like to participate in an event that creates an atmosphere of storytelling, promotes community building, and celebrates differences then we would love to see you there.

Some featured Living Books include:

My Life in 2 Bathrooms
Muslim Citizen
Chief of Police

CSU Location: Lory Student Center Cherokee Park
Event Contact Name: Lisa Evans
Event Contact Email: levans2@rams.colostate.edu
Event Contact Phone: 9704818230
Audience: Alumni, Community, Faculty, Retiree / Emeritus Faculty, Staff, Student, Youth, Other
Cost: Free!

Tags: , , , , , , , ,