Tag Archives: News of Note

  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s new book Of Silence & Song is officially published on December 12. It can be found here: https://milkweed.org/book/of-silence-and-song
  • On Friday 12/8, Doug Cloud held a workshop to the School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) Leadership Fellows titled “Communicating ‘Controversial’ Science with ‘Skeptical’ Audiences: Some Tools for Scientists.”
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher will be the featured nonfiction writer in the 2018 Rosenberry Writers’ Conference at the University of Northern Colorado on March 5-7 2018. A new experiment, “Identity Theft,” is also out in the latest issue of JuxtaProse http://www.juxtaprosemagazine.org/identity-theft-by-harrison-candelaria-fletcher/
  • Maurice Irvin’s short story “Scrape” has been nominated by Portland Review for consideration in The Best American Short Stories anthology.
  • Kiley Miller will be working with Semester at Sea in the upcoming Spring 2018 semester. She will be an Instructional Coordinator in Global Studies, the required course for all students to help them prepare to interact successfully within the variety of cultures encountered. She’ll be blogging her way through 10 countries, sharing her experiences in the classroom and on the ground at “Team Wiley Wanders.” Read and follow the blog here: https://teamwiley.blog/
  • Susan Harness (2006 MA in Anthropology, 2016 MA in English – Creative Nonfiction) has had her memoir, Bitterroot: A Salish Memoir of Transracial Adoption, accepted for publication by the University of Nebraska Press.  The book, to be released fall 2018, is a personal account of her experience as an American Indian transracial adoptee. University of Nebraska Press hopes Bitterroot will serve as a textbook for courses in history, anthropology, social work, ethnic studies, and literature courses that discuss social theory.  To learn more about Susan and her experience, read the article in CSU’s College of Liberal Arts Magazine, at https://magazine.libarts.colostate.edu/article/an-anthropological-search-for-belonging/.
  • If you asked Paul DeMaret’s fifth-grade self, he would tell you that he was going to be a marine biologist studying sharks. His obsession for sharks didn’t last, but Paul did find a new passion while at CSU: teaching. Read this article by Mary Ellen Sanger and Jill Salahub, “Uncharted Waters and an Unexpected Calling,” https://magazine.libarts.colostate.edu/article/uncharted-waters-csu-alumnus-follows-interest-in-english-and-discovers-unexpected-calling/ and check out the rest of the Winter 2017 issue of the College of Liberal Arts Magazine to see CLA alumni, students, and faculty tackle what it means to live a meaningful life.

 

College of Liberal Arts Award Winners 2017-18

CLA Distinction in Outreach Award: Todd Mitchell, Department of English

CLA Outstanding Service Award: Sue Doe, Department of English

Faculty Development Award, (The Faculty Development Fund supports annual awards for outstanding research and creative activity by tenured and tenure-track faculty in the College of Liberal Arts. The award is made in the form of summer salary stipend of $5000): Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker, Department of English, “Discipline-specific use of language patterns: The case of Engineering”

Creative & Performing Arts Scholarship 

Congratulations to the winners of the Creative & Performing Arts Scholarship!

 

Poetry

Paige Moses for her poems “The Lost King”, “He Who Has No Name”, “fin”

Kevin Enns for his poems “The Bear Snooze Berceuse”, “Storm Stroked”, “Existential Shoreside Thoughts”, “Bird Kind”, “Like Peach Gelato”

Sarah Danielle Cyr for her poems “Monogamous Haunting”, “Traveler”, “Seafood”, “Socratic Method”

Rosemary Alyce Pineau for her poems “Dei-ssection”, “Alison’s Wonderland” “Ophelia”, “To Hate the Things You Like”, “Like a Pimp”

Cole Gerome for his poems “Untitled”, “I’m so sorry”, “Mine is not a lover…”, “Ox”, “And so the last letter is erased…”

Hilary Pearce for her poems “Reasons”, “The Problem of Romance”, “American”

Megan Dunn for her poems “Pulse”, “Infinity”, “Divinity”

Caitlin Dendas for her poems “Autumnal Equinox”, “Clone’s Throne”, “Women’s March on Washington…”, “Needless Greed…” “I long for the day…”

Hannah Tani for her poems “Obsidian”, “Bone”, “Outcast”

Emma Kerr for her poems “River Rocks”, “Free Way”, “Tubercle”, “sh”, “Which Craft”

 

Fiction

Regan Goodrich for “Something May be Broken”

Julianne Enquist for “Our Restless Tides”

Hilary Pearce for “Sinatra Street”

 

Nonfiction

Colin Sheehan “Trans-22”

Hilary Pearce for “The October Thieves”

Meg Strauss for “Let Me Tell You a Story”

 

New URL for Library English Literature & Language Web site

 

The English page is now at this URL: https://libguides.colostate.edu/English

 

Please take note so URLs on your Spring syllabi are accurate. So for example:

Shakespeare: https://libguides.colostate.edu/English/shakespeare

Beat Writers: https://libguides.colostate.edu/English/beatwriters

Finding Literary Criticism in Books: https://libguides.colostate.edu/English/litcriticismbooks

Finding Literary Criticism in Journal Articles: https://libguides.colostate.edu/English/Criticisminjournals

Searching MLA Bibliography by Author: https://libguides.colostate.edu/English/MLAbyauthor

Searching MLA Bibliography by Subject: https://libguides.colostate.edu/English/MLAsubject

Writing and the Body: https://libguides.colostate.edu/English/writingbody

 

Does anyone have a desire for a new page? Ask your librarian: Naomi.Lederer@colostate.edu

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Camille Dungy’s Guidebook to Relative Strangers has made three exciting lists this fall, one of which was BookRiot’s 20 Great Essay Collections from 2017.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s Presentimiento has been selected by Kirkus Reviews as among “The Best Indie Books of 2017.” https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/harrison-candelaria-fletcher/presentimiento/ He also had a new lyric essay, “Identity Theft,” picked up by Juxatprose.
  • Leif Sorensen attended the Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present (ASAP) conference in Oakland, CA. He presented a paper titled “The Apocalypse Is an Inhuman Story” at on October 26 and participated in a seminar on George Saunders’s new, and Booker Prize winning, novel Lincoln in the Bardo on the 28th.
  • On October 19-20, 2017 NTTF faculty and GTAs were able to attend the TYCA Conference in Loveland thanks to funding provided by the English Department. Attendees provided the following comments on their experience.
Kelly Bradbury: “I walked away from the conference with some concrete ideas for ways to help students improve their writing, as well as a larger understanding of “the science of learning.” The information on “the science of learning” (from the keynote speaker) is relevant to my teaching, but also to my understanding of my own learning processes and those of my children.”
ChiaoFen Chang: “I’m glad that I can share my TYCA experience and I’m very appreciative that CSU can support us to join this kind of professional meetings. I think the advantages are the new teaching concepts and experience sharing among the lecturers and the audience.  I learned a lot.”
Katie Hoffman: “Thanks to funding provided by our department, the sessions were very engaging and practical, and she would be happy to share what she learned with other colleagues!”
Beth Lechleitner: “Was delighted to share collegial learning with CSU past stars Lindsay Lewan and Liz Jackson, neighbors who teach English at UNC and CU, and a former CO300 student (Natural Resources major) who is now teaching English in a Colorado community college and pursuing an MFA at the University of Alaska!”
Airica Parker: “I wish to thank Genesea Carter and Louann Reid for their support and care in making that possible. Carter really went above and beyond for NTTF and GTAs to provide this opportunity, which is a wonderful contribution that speaks beautifully of her arrival as a community member in her first semester at CSU.  “Digital Storytelling Meets Composition,” the keynote address from Doug Hesse, and “Service Learning in the Composition Classroom” were among the highlights enjoyed by Parker at the conference.”
  • Several MFA and MA students from the English Department will be reading original work at the GradShow on Thursday, November 9 in the Grand Ballroom in Lory Student Center: 9:50AM: Emma Hyche
    10AM: Katherine Indermaur
    10:10AM: Sam Killmeyer
    10:50AM: Michelle LaCrosse
    11AM: David Mucklow
    11:10AM: Zach Yanowitz
  • SueEllen Campbell and John Calderazzo will be conducting a science communication webinar for the American Geophysical Union on November 15. More recently, John has conducted two communicating-with-the-public workshops for the CSU College of Engineering and two for the City of Fort Collins’ Climate Action Plan employees.
  • Mary Crow has been awarded a residency by the MacDowell Colony for the Arts for next spring. She is currently at the Atlantic Center for the Arts.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

👻 CAMpire 👻, from the Colorado State University Facebook page

  • An essay of Dan Beachy-Quick’s, “Even,” about Marcel Duchamp and the underworld, won the 2017 Zone 3 price in nonfiction.
  • On October 20th, Kelly Bradbury served on the Editorial Roundtable at the Conference on Community Writing in Boulder. She also attended the TYCA-SW Conference in Loveland last week.
  • Matthew Cooperman has an essay on craft, “Day and Night: Time and Writing” up at the Ottawa Poetry Newsletter http://ottawapoetry.blogspot.com/2017/10/on-writing-141-matthew-cooperman.html . There’s a new review of Spool up at the new issue of Free Verse, as well, which also contains poetry by Dan Beachy-Quickhttps://english.chass.ncsu.edu/freeverse/Archives/2017/reviews/McKinney_Cooperman.html
  • Sue Doe participated in the Community Writing Conference in Boulder, presenting alongside former Rhet/Comp grad students Lydia Page, Sarah Austin, and Vani Kannan. The title of their session was “Sustaining Performative Interventions in Academic Labor: Theory and Practice.”
  • Tobi Jacobi and Mary Ellen Sanger presented “SpeakOut! Writers on Self-Publication: Reflections from Community Writing” and Michelle Curry presented “Dignifying Quieted Voices: The Role of Self-Publication in Community Writing from Jail” as part of a panel on self-publishing at the Conference on Community Writing on October 21, 2017.

 

 

ForkSocket will have a reading on Friday, November 3 @ 7:30 p.m. in the Wolverine Farm Letterpress and Publick House (316 Willow St.). Readers include Margaret Browne, Evan Senie, and Ally Eden.

Student Writing Group 

Do you have writing that needs to be workshopped by fellow writers? Do you want an informal environment of people who can help? My name is Kenna Castleberry, and I may be able to help you out. I’m hoping to start a student writing group (no more than 7 people) to meet up once a week or so and swap and discuss our writing. I’m flexible on timing as well as genres. If you have some work that needs to be workshopped, please contact me via email: kcastle@rams.colostate.edu. Thanks, fellow wordsmiths!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Image by Eric Salahub

  • Leslee Becker has been named a Finalist for the Pirate’s Alley Faulkner Award in Short Stories.
  • Doug Cloud’s co-authored essay, “How People Make Sense of Trump and Why It Matters for Racial Justice” has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Contemporary Rhetoric. It should be out in November or December.
  • A number of current and former English Dept faculty and students read at the Fort Collins Book Festival. John Calderazzo led a nonfiction workshop, Sue Ring deRossett led a fiction workshop,  and Sasha Steensen led a poetry workshop. The Poetry Lounge Reading featured Sue Ring deRossett, Bill Tremblay, Chloe Leisure, Khadijah Queen and Matthew Cooperman, at Wolverine Farm Publick House. The Listening Room fiction/nonfiction reading featured Leslee Becker, Christopher David Rosales, Blair Oliver and Junior Burke, at Wolverine Farm Publick House. And finally, the Deep Tracks Poetry reading featured Sasha Steensen, Kate Northrup, Lisa Zimmerman and Aby Kaupang, also at Wolverine Farm Publick House. More information on the festival can be found at https://www.focobookfest.org/schedule/
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poem “What we say” is published in the current issue of Bear Review. You can find it under her publishing name, slp.
  • Kristina Quynn’s co-edited collection of essays, Reading and Writing Experimental Texts: Critical Innovations, was released this week by Palgrave/Macmillan. The collection offers innovative approaches to contemporary literary criticism and includes feminist and queer readings of avant-garde twentieth- and twenty-first-century texts.  http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9783319583617
  • Last weekend James Rankin presented his paper titled “Sex, Punishment, and the Body Politic: Blood and Moral Agency in Measure for Measure” at the Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association’s conference in Spokane, WA.

 

 

Student Writing Group 

Do you have writing that needs to be workshopped by fellow writers? Do you want an informal environment of people who can help? My name is Kenna Castleberry, and I may be able to help you out. I’m hoping to start a student writing group (no more than 7 people) to meet up once a week or so and swap and discuss our writing. I’m flexible on timing as well as genres. If you have some work that needs to be workshopped, please contact me via email: kcastle@rams.colostate.edu. Thanks, fellow wordsmiths!

 

Campus Equity Week

 

CAMPUS EQUITY WEEK EVENTS!  OCTOBER 30 AND 31

Activities planned for Monday, October 30th include:

  • 9:40 am, “Chalk and Talk,” a student engagement activity on the plaza with ART100 students taking the role of the artist working in a public space with statements addressing “the importance of academic freedom in a democratic society.” GTAs from English will work with ART100 students to assist with statement construction which will be edited and chalked on the plaza adjacent to the Lory Student Center. CO150 students and their teachers will participate in reviewing, discussing, and responding to the chalk art.
  • 5:00 PM Directions Gallery, Visual Art Building, opening remarks for Honor the Precariat, art installation commenting on the role of NTTF at CSU.
  • 5:30 PM opening remarks in the Electronic Art Gallery, Visual Art Building for a monologue performance addressing issues of contingency.
  • The Center for the Study of Academic Labor will host a reception in the Visual Arts Building in conjunction with the 5:00 and 5:30 remarks.

Activities planned for Tuesday, October 31st at CSU to celebrate the national day of action include:

  • 12:00 noon – 1:00 PM, Morgan Library Events Hall. AAUP will host a Brown Bag Panel Discussion on NTTF issues, most likely focusing on questions and comments regarding the pending CoNTTF proposal. Participants include:
  • Rick Miranda (Provost)
  • Stephen Mumme (AAUP, Colorado)
  • Jenny Morse (CoNTTF Chair)
  • Mary Meyer (AAUP, CSU)
  • Tim Gallagher (Faculty Council, Chair)
  • Sue Doe (Faculty Council, Vice Chair)
  • 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM College of Liberal Arts Adjunct Faculty Committee will host an informational session about contingent issues (focus to be announced).

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fall morning on the Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • There’s an essay titled “Atlantis” from Dan Beachy- Quick’s forthcoming book, Of Silence and Song, just published at The New Orleans Review: http://www.neworleansreview.org/atlantis/.
  • Genesea Carter was a panelist on the panel “Composition, Curiosity & Technical-Major Students” at the Two-Year College English Association’s Midwest conference this past week in St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Sue Doe gave an invited plenary talk, “Cross-Ranks Activism in the Academic Labor Movement,” at the Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Dayton, OH, Oct 5.
  • The University of Georgia Press publishes Bruce Ronda’s The Fate of Transcendentalism.  Secularity, Materiality, and Human Flourishing in October.
  • Katherine Indermaur will read several original poems at the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research’s annual Boyer lecture on Thursday, October 26, 4-6PM, in the Long’s Peak Room of Lory Student Center.”

Fort Collins Book Festival: October 21

Find out more: https://www.focobookfest.org/

 

Greyrock Review is Taking Submissions!

 

 

Rekindle the Classics

The next Rekindle the Classics discussion will be on Wednesday, October 18, 6:30-8:30 pm at Wolverine Farms Publick House. MA student James Rankin will lead a discussion of Lovecraft’s Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories. Rekindle the Classics brings together CSU English faculty and graduate students and lovers of literature in the Fort Collins community.

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Fog last week, snow this week, (image credit Colorado State University)

  • There’s a short interview with Dan Beachy-Quick up at the New England Review’s website about the poem they recently published, “Memory-Wax, Knowledge-Bird”: http://www.nereview.com/category/behind-the-byline/.
  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang (MFA ’07) recently gave three readings in Utah, courtesy of the Utah Humanities Book Festival, and its Director, Michael McLane (MFA ’08)-one at the Salt Lake City Public Library, one at the University of Utah, and one at Utah State, in Logan. Matthew’s long hybrid piece, “Difference Essay,” is out in the latest issue of Seattle Review.
  • On October 5, Camille Dungy was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award from Outdoor Afro. The organization “celebrates and inspires African American connections and leadership in nature.” The award recognizes Dungy’s continuing role as an environmental writer, editor, teacher and activist.

    On Saturday, October 7, Dungy took part in the Watershed Environmental Poetry Festival in Berkeley, CA, where she was featured along with writers such as Bob Hass, Maxine Hong Kingston, Tess Taylor and Maw Shein Win.

  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper entitled, “Dazzled by Lila: Telling Stories from the 1920s Hudson Training School for (Incorrigible) Girls” at the Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Dayton, OH.  She also led a “morning meeting” session with Dr. Wendy Hinshaw on incarcerated writing and feminist tactics for literacy activism.
  • Mike Palmquist led two workshops and presented the keynote address at the College Reading and Writing Conference at Valencia College in Orlando on September 22nd and 23rd.  Mike’s talk, “WAC and Critical Thinking: Enhancing Student Learning through Writing,” explored the connections between writing-across-the-curriculum and critical thinking.
  • Skyhorse, the publisher of the paperback and ebook editions of Dan Robinson’s 3rd novel, Death of a Century, is doing an October BookBub promotion for Death of a Century.  BookBub is an online ebook book club.  Give it a look, buy the ebook, write a rave review (or don’t buy the book and still write a rave review).
  • Several MFA and MA students from the English Department will be reading original work at the GradShow on Thursday, November 9 in the Grand Ballroom in Lory Student Center:

    – 9:50AM: Emma Hyche

    – 10AM: Katherine Indermaur

    – 10:10AM: Sam Killmeyer

    – 10:50AM: Michelle LaCrosse

    – 11AM: David Mucklow

    – 11:10AM: Zach Yanowitz

    – 11:20AM: Catie Young

  • Three translations by Mary Crow of Olga Orozco’s poems are featured in the current newsletter of the Academy of American Poets online. Her new translation of a poem by Roberto Juarroz will be part of an exhibit in Dublin at the Instituto Cervantes. Both poets are Argentine. The Orozco poems are from Crow’s book of Orozco translations, Engravings Torn from Insomnia, published by BOA. She also has two books of Juarroz translations: Roberto Juarroz: Recent Poems and Roberto Juarroz: Last Poems, both from White Pine. The latter book was a finalist for the Pen America translation award.
  • Aby Kaupang’s paired tribute poems to David Bowie and C.D. Wright, “Flame Falls As Falls The World Down” and “Sunlight Come Shining,” were accepted for publication by The Laurel Review in their upcoming issue.
  • Steven Schwartz’s essay “The Loneliest Moon” has been accepted for publication by The Missouri Review and will be published in the spring 2018 issue.

 

Zambia Study Abroad Program, Summer 2018.

Info Session Wednesday, October 18 at 4pm in LCS room 304.

 

Fort Collins Book Fest

Writings and Riffs celebrates books, poetry and music as a means of storytelling, self-expression and social conversation. The day-long event is free and open to the public, and will include presentations, panel discussions, writing workshops, author readings and book signings. The event takes place at venues throughout Old Town Fort Collins from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 21. The full schedule and more information is available at www.FoCoBookFest.org. Also read more on LibartsSOURCE.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fall Along the Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Matthew Cooperman’s hybrid work “Difference Essay” is out in the latest issue of Seattle Review. This summer spacecraftprojects featured poems from his “Precarity” series for its summer solstice launch. https://spacecraftproject.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/poems-from-the-precarity-series-by-matthew-cooperman1.pdf
  • Camille Dungy will read from her essay collection, Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood, and History, and from her newest book of poems, Trophic Cascade, at various venues this fall.  She’ll read at Prairie Lights Bookstore in Iowa City on September 7 and will give the Keynote address and read at the Kentucky Women Writers Conference at the University of Kentucky in Lexington on September 15.
  • Bill Tremblay served as poetry judge for the Wyoming Arts Council annual 2017 Creative Writing Fellowship program.  There were twenty-two [22] entries and well over 200 poems to evaluate. It was great fun and truly interesting.

 

TEFL/TESL Student Association Pot Luck

Friday, September 8th 5:00pm at City Park, join the TEFL/TESL student association for our fall potluck! Open to undergraduate and graduate students, our organization aims to promote linguistic and cultural diversity though awareness, to network with professionals locally and internationally, and to provide leaning and literacy outreach to the greater Fort Collins community. We will sponsor a variety of social and academic events throughout the academic year, starting with our potluck. Check us out on Ram Link to see our other events! Contact csu.tefl.tesl@gmail.com for more information or questions.

Tags: , ,

Welcoming new English majors

  • Leslee Becker was named the 3rd-Place Winner of the Marguerite McGlinn Prize for Fiction, sponsored by Rosemont College/Philadelphia Stories & PS Books (“the POWER of Small”) for her short story, “The Grotto.”
  • The Community Literacy Center is happy to welcome six new interns for Fall 2017-Spring 2018. Interns who will develop research and outreach projects with the CLC while facilitating SpeakOut! workshops for youth and incarcerated adults are: Zoe Albrecht (Creative Writing/Fiction with minor in Sociology), Emmy Earsom (Psychology with minor in Spanish), Laney Flanagan (English), Kelly Kuhn (Criminal Psychopathology), Kelly Martin (graduate student, English Rhetoric/Composition), Shelby Spies (Human Development and Family Studies with minor in Business and English).
  • SpeakOut! is still seeking a few serious volunteers for this engaging work! Trainings on August 30 and September 1. Please contact clc@colostate.edu immediately with your application found here: https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/
  • A book launch party to celebrate the release of Todd Mitchell’s The Last Panther (Delacorte Press) took place August 25th at Everyday Joe’s Coffee House.
  • Emma Hyche’s poem “Field Trip to the Dead President’s House” was published in the Tampa Review over the summer!
  • This summer, Kelly Weber presented poetry in Detroit at the Twelfth ASLE Biennial Conference Rust/Resistance: Works of Recovery. She read as part of a panel considering rusting language/languaging rust, as well as participating in conversations around environmental crisis and recovery. https://www.asle.org/conference/biennial-conference/

 

Hope Behind Bars 

“Hope Behind Bars” is a musical presentation at Old Town Square on Saturday, August 26 from 4pm to 8pm, which highlights Blues music and other, from groups in the Larimer County Jail (LCJ). The Community Literacy Center and SpeakOut! will be present to represent the writing that comes from its programs in the LCJ. Stop by and send your friends to connect with these programs that do important creative work in our community.

Rekindle the Classics 

The next Rekindle the Classics discussion will be on Wednesday, September 13, 6:30-8:30 pm at Wolverine Farms Publick House. MFA student Kelly Weber will lead a discussion of Morrison’s Beloved. Rekindle the Classics brings together CSU English faculty and graduate students and lovers of literature in the Fort Collins community.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

English instructor Sean Waters viewing the eclipse

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has poems accepted at Poetry, New England Review, and Cincinnati Review.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher had a couple of lyric essays published during the summer break – “Family Cookbook” in Florida Review and “Flight” in Somos en escrito. He also and taught a few hybrid image and found text workshops at the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program and the VCFA Post Graduate Writing Conference. He’s glad to be back.
  • Camille Dungy’s new book of poems, Trophic Cascade, received a favorable reading in Harvard Review. http://harvardreview.org/?q=features/book-review/trophic-cascade
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow has six ghazals published in the most recent edition of the Denver Quarterly, under her publishing name ‘slp.’
  • In May Leif Sorensen gave a talk on his book in progress titled Worlds of Difference: Race, Ethnicity and Science Fiction at the invitation of the Sogang Institute of American Studies and the American Culture Program at Sogang University in Seoul, Republic of Korea. He also facilitated a special symposium for the American Cultural Studies Graduate Program at Sogang titled “Revisiting Octavia Butler’s Kindred in 2017″ that focused on Butler’s 1979 novel and Damian Duffy’s 2017 graphic adaptation of the novel.In August Leif presented a talk, “Vanishing Races and Endangered Species” that focuses on representations of endangered species in Native American fiction from the 1920s and 1930s at the Modernist Studies Association Conference in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.His 2016 essay “Region and Ethnicity on the Air,” published in the Summer 2016 issue of MELUS won an honorable mention for the Don D. Walker Prize sponsored by the Western Literature Association to honor the best essay published on western American literary studies.
  • Catie Young’s chapbook, What is Revealed When I Reveal it to You, will be published by dancing girl press in early 2018. During the summer, poems from Language Object and Stopgap appeared in Gramma and Ghost Proposal.
  • The Center for Literary Publishing, which produces Colorado Review and other publications, is featured in SOURCE, CSU’s news website.  CR editor Stephanie G’Schwind is assisted by English Department student interns, among them Chelsea Hansen and Kristen Macintyre, who are featured in a special story at http://source.colostate.edu/center-serves-hands-publishing-laboratory-students/.

 

English Department Office Hours 

The English Office hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. (closed during lunch, 12:00-1:00 p.m.).

 

Eddy 300 Computer Lab

Monday – Thursday 7:30 am – 7 pm
Friday – 7:30 am – 5 pm
Saturday 10 am – 2 pm
Sunday 10 am – 2pm

Writing Center Hours

Starting August 28

Eddy Hall, Room 23
Mon-Thurs: 10 am – 4 pm

Morgan Library, Room 171
Sun-Thurs: 6 pm – 8 pm

 

Fall 2017 Internships Available!

 Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students.

Please contact Cassandra Eddington, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Cassie.Eddington@colostate.edu for more information on these internships and how to apply.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

  • The Center for Literary Publishing’s latest nonfiction anthology, Beautiful Flesh: A Body of Essays, will officially release May 15. The production team was Cedar Brant, Dana Chellman, Cory Cotten-Potter, Michelle LaCrosse, Morgan Riedl, and Stephanie G’Schwind. The book is available from CLP’s distributor, the University Press of Colorado, or via Amazon, barnesandnoble.com, powells.com, and elsewhere.
  • Cassie Eddington’s manuscript if the garden was one of seven finalists in Kelsey Street Press’s 2017 FIRSTS! competition. Her poems will be featured on Kelsey Street Press’s blog.
  • Tobi Jacobi will deliver an invited lecture on jail volunteer training and self-care at the University of Sheffield’s workshop on the Volunteer Sector in Criminal Justice in early June in Sheffield, UK.  The workshop launches an international, multidisciplinary network of researchers, practitioners and policymakers working in the criminal justice voluntary sector led by scholars at the Universities of Cambridge and Sheffield.
  • Lauren Matheny’s short story, “The Dark”, won honorable mention (second place) in the Third Coast 2017 Fiction Contest, chosen by Desiree Cooper 🙂 Lauren says, “Don’t know if that’s worthy of the newsletter, but I’m super excited!!”
  • David Mucklow’s poem “Leaving Sediment” was published in the most recent issue of Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Kelly Weber has poems forthcoming or now appearing in Nebraska Poetry: A Sesquicentennial Anthology, The Flat Water Stirs: An Anthology of Emerging Nebraska Poets, Triggerfish, and Grasslimb.

Eddy 300 Lab
Summer Hours
May 15th– May, 19th, 2017
(Please stop by the English Department office
for access)
May 22nd-August 4th, 2017
10:00am-3:00pm

The Writing Center
Summer Hours
May 15th– August 3rd, 2017
10:00am-12:30pm
In Eddy Hall, Room 23
Online hours TBA

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,