Tag Archives: NCTE@CSU

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The National Council of Teachers of English at Colorado State University (NCTE@CSU) is a non-profit, student-run organization on campus for teacher education students of all content areas. As a professional organization NCTE@CSU provides its members with informative and education-based information through the form of monthly meetings, where they invite professionals in the education system, including student teachers, principals and other administrative staff, and seasoned teachers, to share their expertise with NCTE@CSU membership.

 

This organization is designed to:

  • Provide future educators with a real look into what teaching is like today
  • Assist in providing needed prior to applying for jobs
  • Expose you to new political and career knowledge beyond what you learn in your CSU courses

 

It’s a safe and great place for future educators to meet one another, ask questions, get answers, and network with education professionals in the surrounding districts!

 

We firmly believe that NCTE@CSU is first and foremost a community so. . .EVERYONE IS WELCOME!

  • NCTE@CSU is a FREE opportunity for all those to attend!
  • Dinner is also provided at no cost thanks to local sponsors! HELLO, FREE DINNER!!!
  • Though there are no requirements to be a member of NCTE@CSU, we will be doing community and fundraising events throughout the year! They are going to be fun!!!
  • NCTE@CSU is an organization that provides you with a ton of resources without taking up a ton of your time!
  • We meet on Wednesday evenings once a month from 6:00 pm-7:30 pm (It may end earlier).
  • That is only between 3 and 4 meetings a semester.
  • NCTE@CSU looks amazing on your resume!

 

NCTE@CSU President Emily Rice had this to say about the Meet & Greet session that took place September 7:

Our meet and greet went very well! We had an excellent turnout and a great mix of content areas. As you may or may not know, NCTE@CSU is an organization for pre-service teachers from all content areas, not just English. At the meet and greet we had English, Science (Biology), Art, History, and Early Childhood Education content area teachers.

We began by enjoying some yummy snacks and mingling with one another to learn about each other. Then we introduced our newest officers, talked about our upcoming meetings, fundraisers, and community and university outreach events. We turned this informational portion into an activity, which resulted in people getting fun prizes which were donated by the English Department, the School of Education, and the Center for Educator Preparation. Lastly, we all did a little social media activity where we all wrote on little word bubbles why we want to be teachers–we used the hashtag #WhyITeach. This activity came from the teachers2teachers website.

I think it’s most important for English majors of all majors to know that that they are welcome to come to our meetings if they are going to become educators, if they have children in schools, and/or if they are interested in education as a whole. We welcome everyone! We are a very friendly group of people who love it meet new people. We are always wanting to meet new faces in new content areas and passions.

We ultimately had about 20 people come to the meet and greet, but we just know there will be a higher turn out for the informational meetings which begin on Wednesday, September 21 at 6:00 PM in Eddy 106; our first meeting is on Hot Topic in Education — Before the Common Core, Charter Schools, and Education and the Election.

Upcoming NCTE@CSU Events

Hot Topix: “Before the Core;” “To Charter or Not to Charter;” “Ain’t No Party Like a Political Party: Education & the Election”
Pick two hot topics in education and take part in the conversation
Eddy 106
Wednesday, September 21 – 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Mock Interviews
Take part in a mock interview and learn all of the insider tips to resumes, interviews, and expectations. Note: a $5 deposit is required to partake in an interview. This deposit will be returned on the day of the Mock Interviews
Eddy 106
Wednesday, October 19 – 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

NCTE@CSU Mythbusters Presents: Learnings Styles: Fact or Flop?
Are learning styles a real thing or just a myth? Listen to a cognitive psychologists’ theory on learning styles, and learning and memory
Eddy 106
Wednesday, November 30 – 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Fundraising and Other NCTE@CSU Events

Airing of “Screenagers” and a Panel
LSC Theater
September 28, 2016
Time TBA
Sponsored by CSU School of Education & Mountain Sage Community Schools
SCREENAGERS probes into the vulnerable corners of family life, including the director’s own, and depicts messy struggles, over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. Through surprising insights from authors and brain scientists solutions emerge on how we can empower kids to best navigate the digital world.

Barnes and Noble Gift Wrapping and Book Talk
Fort Collins Barnes and Noble
Date and Times TBA (but anticipate early December)

2016-2017 NCTE@CSU Officers

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Emily Rice

President, Emily Rice: Emily is in her final year of the Master’s program in English Education; graduating in Spring 2017 She partakes in WWII living history, avidly keeps her fat cat happy (for fear of her hanger), is old enough to have gone to every Harry Potter midnight release, and loves spending time with friends!

 

 

 

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Mary Collins

Interim Vice President, Mary Collins: Mary is a senior English Education student with a minor in Anthropology due to graduate in May of 2017. She is a proud Hufflepuff who enjoys cozy coffee shops and crazy concerts. The Hamilton soundtrack always brings her bliss.

 

 

 

 

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Swally Yarrington

Secretary, Swally Yarrington: Swally is senior English Education and Creative Writing major, graduating in Fall of 2017. When not teaching or studying, he divides his time between writing, reading, day dreaming, and scavenging through used bookstores.

 

 

 

 

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Nate Sloat

Treasurer, Nate Sloat: Nate is a History and Economics major, and plans to graduate in the Spring of 2017. He is originally from the Seattle area and is a huge Seattle sports fan. Nate also enjoys cross country skiing and trail running.

 

 

 

 

Avery Jones

Avery Jones

Interim Marketing Coordinator, Avery Jones: Avery is a 3rd year English Education and Literature student, planning to graduate in the Spring of 2018. She loves playing tennis and being outside in sun. Furry friends and sing-along songs bring out Avery’s inner second-grader. Avery is a big supporter of the Oxford comma and Harry Potter.

 

 

 

 

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT US WITH QUESTIONS!

Faculty Sponsor and President Contact Information

Faculty Sponsor: Cindy O’Donnell-Allen, Cindy.Odonnell-Allen@colostate.edu
Current President: Emily Rice, rice.emilyc@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nctecsu
Snapchat: ncte_csu
Email: ncte@colostate.edu
Text reminders: Text @nctec to 81010

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Signs of spring

Signs of spring

  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s book of poems, gentlessness, was named a finalist for the Rilke Prize.
  • Matthew Cooperman recently gave a number of readings in North Carolina to support his new book. He’ll be reading at the University of Wyoming this Friday, March 4, 7pm. He also has new poems up at Word/for Word at http://www.wordforword.info/vol27/cooperman1.html
  • Sue Doe led a workshop for graduate students in the LEAP Program (Institute for Arts Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Advocacy) on Thursday evening, March 3. The focus of the workshop was on grassroots activism using Boalian theatre techniques.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Natural History” is in the newest issue of Boston Review (March/April 2016).
  • Kiley Miller’s grammar game, called “Translation, Please” will be published in the Spring 2016 edition of The Dangling Modifier, an “international newsletter by and for peer tutors in writing and produced in association with the National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW).”
  • Meagan Wilson is attending Northeastern’s graduate student conference, The Imaginary, this weekend, presenting “Remembering a New Past: Alice Notley’s Restorative Imagination,” adapted from her MA project on imagination.
  • March 7th is the deadline for proposals for for NCTE@CSU’s Literacy Through Popular Culture conference. See http://nctecsuconference2016.weebly.com for additional information.

 

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snOval, image by Colorado State University

snOval, image by Colorado State University

  • Aby Kaupang and Matthew Cooperman’s book NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified) was recently a finalist for the Essay Press Book Prize. Largely detailing the challenges and joys of raising their autistic daughter Maya, the book has been in progress for many years. A chapbook from that collection, Disorder 299.00, has just been released from Essay Press, and can be found at http://www.essaypress.org/ep-52/
  • Thanks to the amazing work of Shoaib Alam and Karen Montgomery Moore, Colorado Review now has 10,000 followers on Twitter.
  • Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala has been appointed to serve as Editor of the American Association for Applied Linguistics Newsletter.  She will serve a three-year term (2016-2019).  Fabiola is also currently serving in the Editorial Review Board for Volume 70 of The Reading Teacher (RT) for the 2015-2016 period. Fabiola’s latest 2015 publication is: Meeting the reading comprehension challenges of diverse English language learners in K-12:  Key contributions from reading research (pp. 147-164).  In M. Daniel & K. Mokhtari (Eds.), Research and instruction that makes a difference in English learners’success.  Lanham, MD: Roman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. Fabiola, together with Tony Maciejewsky (Department Head of Electrical and Computer Engineering at CSU), will be presenting the results of their investigation titled “Mental imagery experienced by both pathway and non-pathway graduate students in an engineering course at a US Research I institution” at the upcoming 2016 AAAL Conference in Orlando.
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poem, ghazal [16.], will be published in the spring edition of burntdistrict. You can find the journal at http://burntdistrict.org/
  • Mary Crow’s poetry is the subject (along with Karen Swenson’s) of a chapter in Marilyn Krysl’s Yes, There Will Be Singing, published in the University of Michigan series, Poets on Poetry.
  • Here’s James Work’s latest contribution to world literature. Publication expected in July. jameswork
  • Two of Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the newest issue of TriQuarterly Review. Her poem “In tuck” has also been selected for publication at The Cincinnati Review and her poem “& in wonder too,” first printed in Meridian, will be the poem of the day on Poetry Daily on February 11.
  • The English Department is pleased to award the following graduate students departmental funds for travel associated with professional activities. The department gave a total of $7,420 in award money to students this year. The grants ranged from $300-$750. Students will be traveling to conferences from Alaska to points eastward. Congratulations to all our students who are sharing their research and creative work in professional circles!
    Paul Binkley
    Denise Garrett
    Kelsey Hatley
    Abby Kerstetter
    John Koban
    Cole Konopka
    David Mucklow
    Kathleen Naughton
    Meghan Pipes
    Kylan Rice
    Lara Roberts
    John Whalen
    Meagan Wilson
    Catie Young

NCTE@CSU

On April 9th of this year we will be hosting our first conference.

“Literacy Through Popular Culture.”

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL

The conference theme is on research-based strategies for teaching literacy through popular culture. This theme engages students and teachers in embracing the rele-vance and power of popular culture—from comic books to teen novels to video-games— as a form of literacy in the classroom. Presentations and workshops should offer teachers concrete, actionable strategies that they can incorporate into their own language arts classrooms. We invite secondary (grades 6-12) language arts teachers and students, university professors and students, and other related profes-sionals to send in proposals for workshops or presentations.

DEADLINE: MARCH 7

Email proposal submissions to ncte@colostate.edu

We are very excited about this event and are working hard to make it an amazing and memorable one. Please visit the website for information: http://nctecsuconference2016.weebly.com

Show Up & Write

“show up & write” sessions started this week.  “show up & write” runs from February 1 to May 4, on Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays: 9-9:50 in Eddy 100 and 2-2:50 in Eddy 200. These drop-in writing sessions offer a regularly scheduled time in a communal, academic setting for writers to make progress on writing projects. Look for information in your mailbox to share with your students. And, “show up & write” regularly to see what you accomplish this semester!

 

Workshop Reminder: UD Composition

On February 16 from 5-7, in Eddy 4, we will offer the first installment of our series — “Sound Matters”. In this workshop we will discuss rationales for including multimodal elements in the composition course and work with sound recording equipment to produce a short piece using Audacity. More specifically, we will record vocal tracks using department equipment, gather and import music and sound effects, and mix these down into a finished audio version of a children’s story.  Faculty and graduate students from all areas are welcome to attend, but due to space limitations preference for attendees will go to those scheduled to teach UD Comp in upcoming semesters. Attendees should bring along a USB drive to save your creations. Snacks will be provided!

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The National Council of Teachers of English at Colorado State University (NCTE@CSU) is a non-profit, student-run organization on campus for teacher education students of all content areas. As a professional organization NCTE@CSU provides its members with informative and education-based information through the form of monthly meetings, where they invite professionals in the education system, including student teachers, principals and other administrative staff, and seasoned teachers, to share their expertise with NCTE@CSU membership.

The purposes of this organization are:

  • to create a community among future teachers of literacy;
  • to help develop professional attitudes, standards, and awareness of current issues within the profession through meetings, discussions, lectures, and publications. (e.g., electronic newsletters, journals, blogs, and professional speakers);
  • to encourage inquiry and research in literacy teaching;
  • to enhance ties between pre-service students and the professional education community; and
  • to engage in service projects supporting the above purposes.

 

This organization is designed to:

  • Provide future educators with a real look into what teaching is like today
  • Assist in providing needed prior to applying for jobs
  • Expose you to new political and career knowledge beyond what you learn in your CSU courses

 

It’s a safe and great place for future educators to meet one another, ask questions, get answers, and network with education professionals in the surrounding districts!

 

We firmly believe that NCTE@CSU is first and foremost a community so. . .EVERYONE IS WELCOME!

  • As of this semester NCTE@CSU is a FREE opportunity for all those to attend!
  • Dinner is also provided at no cost thanks to local sponsors! HELLO, FREE DINNER!!!
  • Though there are no requirements to be a member of NCTE@CSU, we will be doing community and fundraising events throughout the year! They are going to be fun!!!
  • NCTE@CSU is an organization that provides you with a ton of resources without taking up a ton of your time!
  • We meet on the third (or second) Thursday of each month from 5:30 pm-6:30 pm (It may end earlier).
  • That is only between 3 and 4 meetings a semester.
  • NCTE@CSU looks amazing on your resume!

 

Topics for upcoming meetings:

Monday, Feb 8th — Meet and Greet at The Haunted Game Cafe (3307 S College Ave, Fort Collins, CO 80525) 5:00 PM -?
Come spend some time with your fellow NCTE@CSU members and English Education friends at The Haunted Game Cafe! It’s a great time to meet new people, play some fun games, and drink some yummy coffee!

Monday, Feb 22nd — Resumes and Interviews 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Monday, Mar 7th — Conference Information, Proposal Reviewing/Selecting, and Elections 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Saturday, April 9th — Literacy Through Popular Culture Conference 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Find out more about the conference and how to submit a proposal here: http://nctecsuconference2016.weebly.com/

 

 

Check Us Out on Facebook! facebook.com/nctecsu

Email Us: ncte@colostate.edu

 

NCTE@CSU Officers

jennaJenna Franklin: President – Contact info: jenrosie@gmail.com MA English Education. Current GTA, teaching College Composition 150.“I joined NCTE@CSU because I am interested in improving my professional teaching knowledge and I want to make connections with professionals in the field. Last semester, I had the opportunity to attend the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) conference in Golden, CO with members of NCTE and Dr. Pam Coke. This was an incredibly fun and inspirational introduction into the world of teaching secondary English in Colorado, an experience every English teacher in Colorado should have!”

emilyrice02Emily Rice: Vice President
– MA English Education. Interests: Adolescent Literature, Writing, and classroom psychology.“I joined NCTE@CSU when I moved here from Minnesota in January 2014. I have learned so much in this year and a half of meetings, and I am so appreciative of the knowledge obtained. The speakers are so insightful into the world of education, and the members of the organization have become my friends, as well as a valuable resource for my professional development.”

jordanJordan Wright: Secretary
Morgan Bennett: Marketing Coordinator — BA in English with an emphasis in Education. “I joined NCTE initially to participate in the mock interviews (in the spring), after going to a few meetings though, I was hooked! Every meeting is full of interesting topics, riveting speakers, and of course, free food!” In Morgan’s spare time, she enjoys reading books, riding horses, rock climbing, and travelling. Her last trip abroad was with Dr. Brinks to teach children in Zambia
connor02Connor Sandelin: Treasurer – BA in English Education. “I became a member of NCTE so I could be a part of an organization that helps foster strong connections and relationships between individuals that are passionate about teaching and helping students reach their goals. This club has given me the opportunity to work with an amazing team and connect with a wonderful group of current and future teachers.” Connor loves to make and listen to music whenever he is not writing a paper or reading a book. He also enjoys hiking and camping if the weather permits.
pamPam Coke: Faculty Sponsor —  Contact info: Pamela.Coke@colostate.edu Pam was a member (and officer) of her NCTE student affiliate at the University of Iowa.Currently, Pam is in her 14th year at CSU, where she teaches courses in adolescents’ literature, teaching reading, and teaching methods. She is thrilled to be back in Eddy. Come visit her in her bright, shiny, new office in Eddy 323A. When Pam is not at CSU, she enjoys reading, running, biking, gardening, and cooking–as well as traveling. This past summer, she and her family spent two weeks touring England, Scotland, and France. Be sure to ask about her broomstick flying lessons at Alnwick Castle!

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Wednesday, December 9th: Book Fair at the Fort Collins Barnes and Noble, which will last all day. At 5:00PM there will be two guest authors — the English Department’s very own Todd Mitchell and Daniel Robinson — reading from their books, as well as a book signing.

If the book fair is mentioned on Wednesday at the time of purchase at B&N a portion of the sale (no additional purchase necessary) will go to NCTE@CSU. This fundraisers’ proceeds will be going to help host a miniature conference in Spring 2016.

NCTE Bookfair and Reading

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programoftheyear

  • The SpeakOut! writing program won the “Program of the Year” award last night at the Larimer County Jail volunteer awards banquet.  Congrats to the facilitators and writers!
  • Two of Dan Beachy-Quick’s  essays, “Heraclitean Thirst” and “Circles” are featured at the online journal Fogged Clarity: http://foggedclarity.com
  • Doug Cloud presented a paper titled “Coming Out Queer, Coming Out Atheist: Building Rhetorical Infrastructures for Marginalized Speakers” at the Conference on Community Writing in Boulder on October 14.
  • Next week, Doug Cloud will be leading a workshop on talking about difference in public and professional contexts for the oSTEM chapter at Colorado State University. oSTEM, which stands for “Out in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics,” aims to “identify, address, and advocate for the needs of LGBTQA students in the STEM fields.” The workshop will take place in Eddy 100 at 6:00PM on Wednesday, November 11.
  • Sue Doe presented at the recent, national Community Writing Conference in Boulder where she and former graduate students Vani Kannan, Lydia Page, and Sarah Austin presented a panel entitled “Conversations on Labor: Report on a Cross-Campus/Regional Organizing Approach Using Participatory  Theatre.”  In their presentation, Sue and her colleagues engaged in participatory methods during the panel itself, querying traditional panel models and demonstrating how engagement works for not only social justice efforts and community engagement but also for enlivening and deepening the meaning of conference presentations themselves.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented an interactive workshop focused on remixing archival documents from the 1920s NY Training School for Girls with contemporary justice reform efforts at the 10th biannual Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Tempe, AZ on Friday, Oct. 30, 2015.
  • EJ Levy’s short story “I, Spy” has been accepted for publication by The Missouri Review, where it will appear next spring.
  • EJ Levy also spoke at the NonfictionNow conference in Flagstaff, AZ, last week on the subject of women’s bodies, sex, and sexuality in writing nonfiction.
  • Mary Ellen Sanger, Tobi Jacobi and the Community Literacy Center are pleased to announce that we’ve been awarded a $1500 engaged scholarship grant from Campus Compact of the Mountain West.  The award will support an assessment project for the SpeakOut! writing workshops in Spring 2016.
  • Eleven of our English department faculty members will be working at this year’s Senior Scholarship Day on Saturday, November 14, 2015, 9:00-4:00 PM: Dan Beachy-Quick, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Kathryn Hulings, Tobi Jacobi, Ed Lessor, Tatiana Nekrasova Beker, Sarah Louise Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, and Lynn Shutters.  This committee has been developing writing prompts for a writing workshop and a writing competition for high-achieving Colorado high school seniors.  Thanks to all of them for their hard work!
  • Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub is leading two final workshops before the end of the year at Om Ananda Yoga. “Wild Writing, Crazy Wisdom: Yoga, Meditation, and Writing” on Saturday, November 28th, 1:30 – 5:30 pm, and “Wild Writing, Crazy Wisdom: Meditation and Writing” on Sunday, December 6th, 11:30 am – 1:30 pm. You can find out more about these workshops and preregister at http://omanandayoga.com/. She also teaches a weekly Hatha Yoga class at Om Ananda Yoga every Tuesday at 7 am and would love to see you there.
  • Meghan Pipe first-year MFA student (fiction) was awarded a residency at Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts in May 2016.
  • Garrett Marquez (English Education, Class of 2015) is working as a special education teacher at Alamosa High School.

Upcoming Events

Colloquium 

Please join us Thursday November 12, 7:00 pm for the second (and final) colloquium of the semester as we gather, with fine appetizers and drinks in hand, to enjoy one another’s company and hear about the work that our colleagues are doing. All department faculty and graduate students are invited.

Here’s a preview of the evening:

Drawing from an on-going scholarly webtext that is under production, Tim Amidon will share a variety of genre ecology maps and visualizations that have been created using D3 (a data visualization program). By leveraging these digital tools, Tim suggests, digital humanists might render visible the textual assemblages that are instantiated through and circulate amidst sites of production. He will discuss ways that such modeling and visualization might be leveraged pedagogically to not only support literacy learning but also to critique and reconstruct systems supported by discursive activity.

Zach Hutchins is the founder and editor in chief of TEAMS, a scholarly collective dedicated to transcribing the unread manuscript sermons of colonial and antebellum America. Those transcriptions are then coded and housed in a searchable database. Searching even the small collection of sermons currently transcribed and published by TEAMS suggests that opening up access to these texts will challenge foundational beliefs about the religious beliefs and experiences of the individuals who laid the groundwork for revolution and the new republic.

Jaime Jordan will discuss how she has used the podcast Serial in her comp class as an example of digital rhetoric and share some introductory research she’s done on the podcast as well as literary research using textual-analysis tools.

If you missed the last gathering, you really owe it to yourself to come to this one! A good time will be had by all.

 

NCTE Presents:  Standards-based Grading
November 12th, 2015, Eddy 5

Join NCTE@CSU for a discussion on Standard-based grading. We will be joined by local teachers to lead the conversation and end the evening with time for questions. As always, there will be free food and drinks.

Another exciting addition to the November meeting will be the officer elections. The positions of treasurer and secretary will be open.  If you are interested in running, please email an intent to run and statement as to why you are qualified for the position to both: pamela.coke@colostate.edu and ncte@colostate.edu by November 10th.

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nationaldayonwriting

NCTE’s Seventh Annual National Day on Writing is being celebrated today. The theme this year is #WhyIWrite. NCTE answers the question “Why a National Day on Writing?” this way:

In light of the significance of writing in our national life, to draw attention to the remarkable variety of writing we engage in, and to help writers from all walks of life recognize how important writing is to their lives, NCTE established October 20 as The National Day on Writing.  The National Day on Writing

  • points to the importance of writing instruction and practice at every grade level, for every student and in every subject area from preschool through university (see The Genteel Unteaching of America’s Poor),
  • emphasizes the lifelong process of learning to write and composing for different audiences, purposes, and occasions, and
  • encourages Americans to write and enjoy and learn from the writing of others.

This past week, NCTE@CSU held an event in honor of the National Day on Writing. They hosted a writing blackout for middle school, high school, and college students on campus. For 30 minutes, attendees and hosts sat quietly and focused on writing. NCTE@CSU provided snacks, beverages, and prompts, and attendees came prepared to share ideas and discuss writing. English Department Communications Intern Ashley Alfirevic attended the event and had this to share.

Quote from NCTE Beliefs about the Teaching of Writing, http://www.ncte.org/positions/statements/writingbeliefs

Quote from NCTE Beliefs about the Teaching of Writing, http://www.ncte.org/positions/statements/writingbeliefs

There’s nothing quite like sitting down with a group of writers fueled by coffee and ink, whether it’s in a Starbucks or the basement of Eddy Hall.  This past Thursday, NCTE@CSU helped to celebrate the National Day of Writing, providing inspiration, caffeine, and a hashtag. Pen-and-paper and doc-and-keyboard types both gathered together for an hour of writing and a little bit of musing, occasionally pausing to tweet:

 

 

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Some penned children’s stories on superhorses and alligators, others channeled Dr. Seuss, and others journaled in leather bound books they’ve had for years. Some said they prefer to write in little chunks, still others said once they start they can’t stop, either overcome by passion and vision or fear they’ll forget how their story is supposed to end.

Most said their urge to write started at a young age, encouraged by parents or teachers or publications in one of those Celebration of Young Poets books you had to pay $30 out-of-pocket for (they published one of my third grade poems about horses galloping through a field). Whether we looked back on our own early writings with nostalgia or a little bit of cringing (I do more of the latter), it served as a reminder that we are always growing and changing as writers. “You can find your voice, but there’s no mic drop when you’ve finally created the perfect piece,” commented Vice President Emily Rice.


If you’d like to find out more about the National Day on Writing, visit the NCTE website.

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Come join NCTE@CSU to celebrate the National Day of Writing! The theme this year is #WhyIWrite. We will be hosting a writing blackout for middle school, high school, and college students in honor of the National Day of Writing on campus. For 30 minutes, we will sit quietly without electronics and focus on writing.

NCTE@CSU will provide snacks, beverages, and prompts. Please come prepared to share ideas and discuss writing. We look forward to seeing you there!

October 15th, 2015, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Eddy 5 (In the basement of Eddy)

NCTE National Day of Writing

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English Department Communications Intern Ashley Alfirevic recently attended an NCTE@CSU event about Banned Books and had this to share.


Perhaps instead of Banned Books Week, we should call this Challenged Books Week. On Thursday’s NCTE@CSU Meeting, I learned about how often parents challenge books found in a library, a school, a publishing house, or even a Barnes & Noble.

Jeremy

Jeremy Wolfe

Thankfully, Jeremy Wolfe – a Community Business Development Manager from Barnes & Nobel and the guest speaker for the evening – informed us that however challenged they may be, Barnes & Noble (B&N) does not support attempts at censorship*. Their guiding principle at B&N is that they will offer a diverse and extensive selection, and they will continue to offer their customers freedom of choice. Their censorship policy says that while they do not personally endorse every book they sell, they do endorse their customers right to choose what they want buy.

If there is a demand for a book – and if it’s banned, there usually is – then B&N will continue to sell it. As a matter of fact, if a publisher formally recalls a book, copies usually fly off the shelves before the bookstore even gets the request. “All the conspiracy theorists want it,” Wolfe joked. Raina Telgemeier’s YA book Drama is one of the best selling novels in the store and ranks tenth on 2014’s Most Challenged list. Laughing, Wolfe remarked that, “Since we’re mainly focused on profits, we’re allowed to be a little insensitive to niche complaints.”

Jeremy Wolfe talks to NCTE@CSU at the Banned Books event

Jeremy Wolfe speaks at the NCTE@CSU at the Banned Books event

But here’s the confusing part: what’s the difference between being challenged and banned? And how does it keep the book from readers? It’s much harder to ban a book through the legal system of the United States, as it must be proven to cause real and significant cultural harm; only Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer and Allen Ginsberg’s Howl have been legally banned. It’s far easier to challenge a book on a per state or per community basis, restricting access to potential readers by changing availability or excluding it from schools and libraries. Most of the data collected is on books that have been challenged, since they cannot be banned nationwide.

Interestingly, books are most often challenged for sexually explicit material and least often for violence and homosexuality. Children’s sexual education books are often challenged on the grounds of child pornography for their illustrations. “It really reveals what bothers us as a culture,” Wolfe notes. “Often, the reasons books are challenged are two sides of the same coin.” For example, the top challenged book of 2014 – Sherman Alexi’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian – emphasizes in its classroom teaching guide that it promotes family values and multiculturalism, but it is most often challenged on the grounds of being anti-family and culturally insensitive. Speaking of cultural insensitivity, there’s another apparent trend in the numbers: Caucasian authors get a bit of “buffer time” compared to authors from diverse backgrounds. Alexi’s book was challenged in three years, whereas it took seven years for challenges to John Green’s Looking for Alaska.

Parents make almost 50% of challenges, with patrons accounting for 10% and administrators accounting for 9.5%. Librarians say that if can convince a parent to come in and discuss their problems with, say, Walter the Farting Dog, that’s half the battle. Most are able to have a dialogue and the challenges are dropped. However, if a parent progresses to a written complaint, the next step is often a rally for a public outcry.

No matter who is attempting to censor literature, whether it be a parent or administrator, both The Office of Intellectual Freedom and the NCTE offer resources to help librarians and teachers. Pam Coke, the Undergraduate Coordinator for English Education, pointed out that the NCTE even offers legal council for teachers dealing with challenges to classroom books.

“Banning books is a means of control. It’s all about power. Censorship is about fear,” Wolfe noted. “At the end of the day, it’s about trusting other people to hear information that they might disagree with.”

All statistics are from the Office of Intellectual Freedom. Please visit http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks for more information.

 

*Barnes & Noble has banned one book from their shelves: a how-to guide to for male pedophiles that arose during the advent of self-publishing.

To find out more about Banned Books Week, visit the official website.

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The National Council of Teachers of English at Colorado State University (NCTE@CSU) is a non-profit, student-run organization on campus for teacher education students of all content areas. As a professional organization NCTE@CSU provides its members with informative and education-based information through the form of monthly meetings, where they invite professionals in the education system, including student teachers, principals and other administrative staff, and seasoned teachers, to share their expertise with NCTE@CSU membership.

The purposes of this organization are:

  • to create a community among future teachers of literacy;
  • to help develop professional attitudes, standards, and awareness of current issues within the profession through meetings, discussions, lectures, and publications. (e.g., electronic newsletters, journals, blogs, and professional speakers);
  • to encourage inquiry and research in literacy teaching;
  • to enhance ties between pre-service students and the professional education community; and
  • to engage in service projects supporting the above purposes.

 

This organization is designed to:

  • Provide future educators with a real look into what teaching is like today
  • Assist in providing needed prior to applying for jobs
  • Expose you to new political and career knowledge beyond what you learn in your CSU courses

 

It’s a safe and great place for future educators to meet one another, ask questions, get answers, and network with education professionals in the surrounding districts!

 

We firmly believe that NCTE@CSU is first and foremost a community so. . .EVERYONE IS WELCOME!

  • As of this semester NCTE@CSU is a FREE opportunity for all those to attend!
  • Dinner is also provided at no cost thanks to local sponsors! HELLO, FREE DINNER!!!
  • Though there are no requirements to be a member of NCTE@CSU, we will be doing community and fundraising events throughout the year! They are going to be fun!!!
  • NCTE@CSU is an organization that provides you with a ton of resources without taking up a ton of your time!
  • We meet on the third (or second) Thursday of each month from 5:30 pm-6:30 pm (It may end earlier).
  • That is only between 3 and 4 meetings a semester.
  • NCTE@CSU looks amazing on your resume!

 

Topics for upcoming meetings:

Thursday, October 15th 5:30-6:30 pm

  • In Honor of National Day on Writing (October 20)
  • Speakers: Guest teachers from local school districts will share writing lessons of their own in a celebration of the NCTE National Day on Writing
  • Location: Eddy 5

Thursday, November 12th 5:30-6:30 pm

  • Standards Based Grading
  • Speakers: Local English language arts teachers will explain and demonstrate how they are using standards-based grading in their secondary classrooms
  • Location: Eddy 5

 

Check Us Out on Facebook! facebook.com/nctecsu

Email Us: ncte@colostate.edu

 

NCTE@CSU Officers

jennaJenna Franklin: President – Contact info: jenrosie@gmail.com MA English Education. Current GTA, teaching College Composition 150.“I joined NCTE@CSU because I am interested in improving my professional teaching knowledge and I want to make connections with professionals in the field. Last semester, I had the opportunity to attend the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) conference in Golden, CO with members of NCTE and Dr. Pam Coke. This was an incredibly fun and inspirational introduction into the world of teaching secondary English in Colorado, an experience every English teacher in Colorado should have!”
Emily Rice: Vice President – MA English Education. Interests: Adolescent Literature, Writing, and classroom psychology.“I joined NCTE@CSU when I moved here from Minnesota in January 2014. I have learned so much in this year and a half of meetings, and I am so appreciative of the knowledge obtained. The speakers are so insightful into the world of education, and the members of the organization have become my friends, as well as a valuable resource for my professional development.”
Paul Binkley: Secretary – MA in English Education with a focus in science fiction.“I’m excited to be a part of NCTE, because CSU’s branch has been a great professional development resource for pre-service teachers, and I hope to keep building on the work past officers have already contributed to the organization. Paul is a Fort Collins native and received a BA in English with an emphasis in creative writing from CSU in 2013.
Morgan Bennett: Marketing Coordinator — BA in English with an emphasis in Education. “I joined NCTE initially to participate in the mock interviews (in the spring), after going to a few meetings though, I was hooked! Every meeting is full of interesting topics, riveting speakers, and of course, free food!” In Morgan’s spare time, she enjoys reading books, riding horses, rock climbing, and travelling. Her last trip abroad was with Dr. Brinks to teach children in Zambia
Ian McCreary: Treasurer – Graduate student in English Education.“I am excited to be a part of NCTE because of the amazing people that I get to work with as a member and the experiences that I get attending meetings. There are not many clubs that offer so much applicable resources to members outside of networking.Outside of school and NCTE, Ian is an avid fisherman. Feel free to ask him what’s happening on the rover or if you want to go fishing one afternoon.
pamPam Coke: Faculty Sponsor —  Contact info: Pamela.Coke@colostate.edu Pam was a member (and officer) of her NCTE student affiliate at the University of Iowa.Currently, Pam is in her 14th year at CSU, where she teaches courses in adolescents’ literature, teaching reading, and teaching methods. She is thrilled to be back in Eddy. Come visit her in her bright, shiny, new office in Eddy 323A. When Pam is not at CSU, she enjoys reading, running, biking, gardening, and cooking–as well as traveling. This past summer, she and her family spent two weeks touring England, Scotland, and France. Be sure to ask about her broomstick flying lessons at Alnwick Castle!

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