Tag Archives: Matthew Cooperman

Fog last week, snow this week, (image credit Colorado State University)

  • There’s a short interview with Dan Beachy-Quick up at the New England Review’s website about the poem they recently published, “Memory-Wax, Knowledge-Bird”: http://www.nereview.com/category/behind-the-byline/.
  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang (MFA ’07) recently gave three readings in Utah, courtesy of the Utah Humanities Book Festival, and its Director, Michael McLane (MFA ’08)-one at the Salt Lake City Public Library, one at the University of Utah, and one at Utah State, in Logan. Matthew’s long hybrid piece, “Difference Essay,” is out in the latest issue of Seattle Review.
  • On October 5, Camille Dungy was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award from Outdoor Afro. The organization “celebrates and inspires African American connections and leadership in nature.” The award recognizes Dungy’s continuing role as an environmental writer, editor, teacher and activist.

    On Saturday, October 7, Dungy took part in the Watershed Environmental Poetry Festival in Berkeley, CA, where she was featured along with writers such as Bob Hass, Maxine Hong Kingston, Tess Taylor and Maw Shein Win.

  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper entitled, “Dazzled by Lila: Telling Stories from the 1920s Hudson Training School for (Incorrigible) Girls” at the Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Dayton, OH.  She also led a “morning meeting” session with Dr. Wendy Hinshaw on incarcerated writing and feminist tactics for literacy activism.
  • Mike Palmquist led two workshops and presented the keynote address at the College Reading and Writing Conference at Valencia College in Orlando on September 22nd and 23rd.  Mike’s talk, “WAC and Critical Thinking: Enhancing Student Learning through Writing,” explored the connections between writing-across-the-curriculum and critical thinking.
  • Skyhorse, the publisher of the paperback and ebook editions of Dan Robinson’s 3rd novel, Death of a Century, is doing an October BookBub promotion for Death of a Century.  BookBub is an online ebook book club.  Give it a look, buy the ebook, write a rave review (or don’t buy the book and still write a rave review).
  • Several MFA and MA students from the English Department will be reading original work at the GradShow on Thursday, November 9 in the Grand Ballroom in Lory Student Center:

    – 9:50AM: Emma Hyche

    – 10AM: Katherine Indermaur

    – 10:10AM: Sam Killmeyer

    – 10:50AM: Michelle LaCrosse

    – 11AM: David Mucklow

    – 11:10AM: Zach Yanowitz

    – 11:20AM: Catie Young

  • Three translations by Mary Crow of Olga Orozco’s poems are featured in the current newsletter of the Academy of American Poets online. Her new translation of a poem by Roberto Juarroz will be part of an exhibit in Dublin at the Instituto Cervantes. Both poets are Argentine. The Orozco poems are from Crow’s book of Orozco translations, Engravings Torn from Insomnia, published by BOA. She also has two books of Juarroz translations: Roberto Juarroz: Recent Poems and Roberto Juarroz: Last Poems, both from White Pine. The latter book was a finalist for the Pen America translation award.
  • Aby Kaupang’s paired tribute poems to David Bowie and C.D. Wright, “Flame Falls As Falls The World Down” and “Sunlight Come Shining,” were accepted for publication by The Laurel Review in their upcoming issue.
  • Steven Schwartz’s essay “The Loneliest Moon” has been accepted for publication by The Missouri Review and will be published in the spring 2018 issue.

 

Zambia Study Abroad Program, Summer 2018.

Info Session Wednesday, October 18 at 4pm in LCS room 304.

 

Fort Collins Book Fest

Writings and Riffs celebrates books, poetry and music as a means of storytelling, self-expression and social conversation. The day-long event is free and open to the public, and will include presentations, panel discussions, writing workshops, author readings and book signings. The event takes place at venues throughout Old Town Fort Collins from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 21. The full schedule and more information is available at www.FoCoBookFest.org. Also read more on LibartsSOURCE.

 

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Group discusses the classic novel "Beloved" at Wolverine Letterpress & Publick House as part of Rekindle the Classics

Group discusses “Beloved” at Wolverine Letterpress & Publick House as part of Rekindle the Classics

  • On August 28, Pam Coke co-presented the paper “Examining Attrition in English Education: A Qualitative Study of the Impact of Preparation, Persistence, and Dispositions in Teacher Education” with Heidi Frederiksen and Ann Sebald of the CSU Center for Educator Preparation at the 19th International Conference on Education Studies in Paris, France. This research is part of a longitudinal qualitative study on why English Education students do/not stay in their education programs.  If you would like to learn more, you can view the abstract here: file:///C:/Users/pamel/AppData/Local/Packages/Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe/TempState/Downloads/abstract.pdf
  • Matthew Cooperman’s Spool received two very positive reviews in the past few months, one at Sugar House Review (scroll to second review) http://sugarhousereviews.blogspot.com and one at Mayday Magazine http://www.maydaymagazine.com/issue11reviewburzynskispool.php
  • Camille Dungy was the keynote speaker at the Kentucky Women Writers Conference on 9/15/17. https://womenwriters.as.uky.edu/
  • Sarah Green’s poem “Scar Stars” was selected as the winner of Ghost Proposal‘s Instagram contest, and appears in this month’s issue of Letterboxes.
  • Katherine Indermaur’s poem, “American Bison,” that was just published this morning, at Muse /A Journal: http://www.museajournal.com/2017/09/k-indermaur/
  • Meghan Pipe’s short story “Alternating Current” appears in the Fall/Winter 2017 issue of Nimrod. The story was an Honorable Mention for the Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction.
  • John Calderazzo will tell a story about hiking in the mountains of Bhutan as part of KUNC’s “The Great Outdoors” Live Storytelling Event at Wolverine Farm’s Publick House next Wednesday, September 20, starting at 6 p.m. Further details here: http://www.kunc.org/post/great-outdoors-live-storytelling-event John is also slated to run four workshops for City of Fort Collins’ Climate Action Plan employees on how to use stories to communicate science and environmental research to the public.
  • Ricki Ginsberg’s article, “Opportunities for Advocacy: Interrogating Multivoiced YAL’s Treatment of Denied Identities” was published in English Journal.
  • Four of Colorado Reviews essays made the Notables list in the Best American Essays 2017: CSU MFA Fiction (1992) alum Wendy Rawlings‘s “Portrait of a Family, Crooked and Straight,” Emily Strasser’s “Exposure,” Stephanie Harrison’s “What We Have Left,” and Rose Whitmore‘s “Witness.”
  • Todd Mitchell recently completed two Books for Change author visits to Colorado schools. He was at Dunn elementary last week, and Columbine Elementary School in Boulder this week, speaking with over 700 elementary school students, and giving interactive writing presentations with students and teachers to inspire literacy, creativity, and positive activism. Many thanks to all the kind souls who supported Books for Change, and helped make these visits possible. Todd Mitchell also participated in a YA and middle grade author tea party talk with the fabulous YA author Anna-Marie McLemore (author of Wild Beauty, The Weight of Feathers, and When the Moon Was Ours, a Stonewall Honor book) at Old Firehouse Books.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Tilting at Windmills,” was selected as a semi-finalist for the 2017 American Short Fiction Prize.
  • Mary Crow has had two poems, “Theory of the Angelic Figure” and “Theory of the Human Figure,” accepted for publication by 2river (Fall 2017).
  • Shoaib Alam has recently taken on the role of Chief of Staff at Teach For Bangladesh, a nonprofit based in Dhaka, his hometown. Alam spends his evening writing fiction and is currently hoping to draw the attention of American poets and writers to the ongoing Rohingya genocide currently engulfing Bangladesh. Please get in touch with him to learn more about this crisis. great–shoaibalam@outlook.com.

 

CSU to launch a Feminist Fight Club with Events & Book Signing on Sept 25

Feminist Fight Club author gives public talk

In keeping with the University mission to improve campus culture and climate around gender and make Colorado State University the best place for women to work and learn, CSU has joined with Feminist Fight Club author Jessica Bennett to establish the first campus chapter of the Feminist Fight Club on Monday, September 25th, 2017.

Purchase a copy of Feminist Fight Club and get it signed by Jessica Bennett!
Book sales and book signing will be available from 10:30-11:30am outside of Ballroom D in the Lory Student Center.

Fireside Chat on Challenging Subtle Sexism in the Workplace with author, Jessica Bennett
1:00-2:15 in Ballroom D of the Lory Student Center
(This event is free and open to the public; no registration required).

 

 

Symbols and History of Lynching in America

Symbols of Lynching event flyer

CLA along with the Departments of Communication Studies, Ethnic Studies, and History are working with BAACC and ACT to host a special event during the Diversity Symposium: Symbols and History of Lynching in America. The event is Wednesday, Sept. 27 from 5:30–7 p.m. in the LSC Theatre. It’s free to attend and contributes to the college’s thematic focus on diversity, inclusion, and free speech. Read more about the film and filmmakers here: http://www.aaihs.org/an-outrage-a-new-film-about-lynching-in-the-american-south/

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Fall Along the Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Matthew Cooperman’s hybrid work “Difference Essay” is out in the latest issue of Seattle Review. This summer spacecraftprojects featured poems from his “Precarity” series for its summer solstice launch. https://spacecraftproject.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/poems-from-the-precarity-series-by-matthew-cooperman1.pdf
  • Camille Dungy will read from her essay collection, Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood, and History, and from her newest book of poems, Trophic Cascade, at various venues this fall.  She’ll read at Prairie Lights Bookstore in Iowa City on September 7 and will give the Keynote address and read at the Kentucky Women Writers Conference at the University of Kentucky in Lexington on September 15.
  • Bill Tremblay served as poetry judge for the Wyoming Arts Council annual 2017 Creative Writing Fellowship program.  There were twenty-two [22] entries and well over 200 poems to evaluate. It was great fun and truly interesting.

 

TEFL/TESL Student Association Pot Luck

Friday, September 8th 5:00pm at City Park, join the TEFL/TESL student association for our fall potluck! Open to undergraduate and graduate students, our organization aims to promote linguistic and cultural diversity though awareness, to network with professionals locally and internationally, and to provide leaning and literacy outreach to the greater Fort Collins community. We will sponsor a variety of social and academic events throughout the academic year, starting with our potluck. Check us out on Ram Link to see our other events! Contact csu.tefl.tesl@gmail.com for more information or questions.

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Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

Click image for larger view

 

We’re Hiring!

 

CLC is looking for interns!

Internship with the Community Literacy Center (CLC)

Job Description:  The intern (junior, senior or grad student) will work with the Community Literacy Center faculty to design a set of literacy research and outreach projects.  Projects might include one or more of the following:

  • working with a faculty mentor to pilot community literacy programming such as creative writing mini-classes, workplace writing mentorships, or literacy tutoring experiences;
  • investigating current policy on a national and regional level in order to understand the politics of funding public education;
  • developing training materials for community-based literacy partnerships;
  • researching and writing grant proposals;
  • working directly with a community partner in order to understand a research question (e.g. what is the relationship between socio-economics and an extracurricular book club?);
  • researching and building the CLC webpage;
  • planning and facilitating a local literacy event (readings, workshops, etc.);

developing assessment tools in order to measure how literacy skills are advanced by a particular classroom approach or set of materials;

  • working with a mentor in the CLC office to gain experience with literacy program administration;
  • designing a research study and collecting primary data on existing literacy outreach programs; or
  • an alternative project designed by you.

Interns manage one community literacy workshop (weekly, 1.5 hours) and are responsible for transcribing writing, encouraging writers with written feedback, and managing a small team of volunteers.

Credit:  Interns can earn up to 6 credits for their work.

The application for an internship is online at https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/.  Please apply by May 5.

All independent internships must be approved by the English Department’s Internship Coordinator, Cassie.Eddington@colostate.edu.

Additional opportunity:  If you are interested in volunteer work with the CLC, go to https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/ for more information.

 

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As National Poetry Month comes to a close, we’d like to spend the final days focusing close to home, on our very own English department poets — Matthew Cooperman, Sasha Steensen, Dan Beachy-Quick, and Camille Dungy.

CSU professor Matthew Cooperman is the author of four chapbooks and five full-length books of poetry, including A Sacrificial Zinc (2001), DaZE (2006), Still: Of the Earth as the Ark which Does Not Move (2011), Imago for the Fallen World (2013), and his most recent, Spool (2015), which won the New Measure Prize.

Professor Cooperman did his undergraduate work at Colgate University in New York. He then went on to receive a master’s degree from the University of Colorado and a Ph.D. from Ohio University.

His work has received the Jovanovich Prize from the University of Colorado, the Utah Wilderness Society Prize, an Academy of American Poets INTRO Award, the Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize, the O. Marvin Lewis Award, and the Pavement Saw Chapbook Prize, among other honors.

In addition to teaching literature and poetry courses at Colorado State University, Cooperman is a founding editor of the literary journal Quarter After Eight and a co-poetry editor for the Colorado Review.

You can check out some of Matthew Cooperman’s poetry on his website. You also might want to read his recent faculty profile.

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CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

 

English Department Awards Reception TODAY!!!

Monday, 4-6pm in the LSC North Ballroom – Presentations at 4:30pm.

  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang recently gave a reading & talk at Colgate University in New York. Matthew has an essay up on Hart Crane at At Length on “the poem that won’t leave you alone.” http://atlengthmag.com/poetry/the-poem-that-wont-leave-you-alone/
  • On Saturday, April 29, 4pm, Old Firehouse Books, Dan Beachy-Quick, Matthew Cooperman and Bill Tremblay will read from their work as part of National Independent Bookstore Day, and the closing of National Poetry Month.
  • Roze Hentschell was invited to speak at The Senior Center in Fort Collins, where she spoke on “Shakespeare and the Sonnet Tradition.”
  • Jaime Jordan invites everyone to explore how she uses the Serial podcast to tackle unconscious bias in her CO150 class. Those interested can check out the display in the northwest corner of the 3rd floor at the “lunch counter.”
  • Todd Mitchell recently conducted a full day of fiction and poetry workshops with teens at Fort Collins High School, where they have several outstanding writers (who might hopefully come here). He also conducted virtual visits (via Skype) to high school and middle school students in southern Colorado.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore presented “Affect, Anxiety, and the Abject Corpse in A Study in Scarlet” at the Popular Culture Association/American Cultural Association conference in San Diego on April 15. This paper was advised by Ellen Brinks and Debby Thompson (for her master’s final project).
  • Rebecca Snow will give a brief talk along with other local authors at the Quid Novi book fair, April 27th, 6-9 pm. She can get CSU authors table space to display/sell their books as her guest for 1/2-price ($25.00) and free registration, up until the day of the event: https://www.quidnoviinnovations.com/Spring-Innovation/
  • Mary Crow has had four poems accepted for publication: “Theory” and “But You Came anyway” by New Madrid and “Taking the Heat” and “The Necessary Existence of the Old World” by The American Journal of Poetry.
  • The Writing Center and the English Department were well-represented at the Colorado and Wyoming Writing Tutors Conference. Here is a list of presenters and presentations:
    • Kiley Miller & Wendy-Anne Hamrick
      “Is that an effective question?”: Meaningful and Interactive Grammar Feedback in Multilingual Consultations
    • Leah White & Katherine Indermaur
      Mindfulness for Tutor Resilience
    • Shirley Coenen & Leslie Davis
      Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate and Graduate Student Writing Support
    • Jennifer Levin, Tiffany Akers, and Alina S. Lugo
      Strategies for Increasing Engagement in Tutoring Sessions
    • Sheri Anderson, Sue Doe, and Lisa Langstraat
      Student-Veterans in the Writing Center: Dispelling the Myths and Providing Genuine “Military Friendly” Support

English Department Career Event: Freelance Editing Panel

Please join us for a special panel on working in the world of freelance editing. Panelists Ann Diaz (M.A. 17) and Nathan DelaCastro (B.A. 15) will share their experiences working as freelance editors and making a living!

When: Friday, May 5, from 3:00 to 4:15pm
Where: Location TBA

More details and information are forthcoming, so stay tuned! Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, with any questions.

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  • Matthew Cooperman currently has new poems out in The Laurel Review and Saltfront, in print. Online, Mary: A Journal of New Writing, is featuring three of his poems at http://maryjournal.org/fall2016/?page_id=416
  • On Wednesday, April 5, Camille Dungy will present at the Newberry Library, Chicago as part of a panel in celebration of the centennial of poet and former US Poet Laureate Gwendolyn Brooks. As part of a citywide celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks marking the one-hundredth anniversary of her birth, the Newberry will gather poets, scholars, historians, and archivists to discuss the historical context of Brooks’ groundbreaking first book of poems, A Street in Bronzeville. Published in in August 1945—the same month that World War II ended—the collection expresses the rich complexities of life on Chicago’s South Side within the larger fight for democracy both at home and abroad. https://www.newberry.org/04052017-gwendolyn-brooks
  • Todd Mitchell attended and delivered a session on “Teaching Dystopian Fiction” at this year’s Colorado Teen Literature Conference in Denver.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Choose Your Own,” was accepted for publication in the next issue of Black Warrior Review.
  • Steven Schwartz’s Madagascar: New and Selected Stories is a finalist for the Colorado Book Award for Literary Fiction and the Foreword Review Award for Short Stories.
  • Rico Moore, MFA Summer 2011 (Poetry), has had four poems (“Immanence of Star,” “Three Lyrics Composed of Words from Seneca’s Epistle, ‘On the God within Us,’” “When Awakened at Night by the Quiet,” and “What You’ve Unearthed from the Past,” appear in the journal, LVNG, number 17, online at https://lvngmagazine.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/lvng17.pdf.In addition, Rico has been a freelance writer for the past two years with Boulder Weekly. He writes about plans through which the Colorado Department of Parks and Wildlife hopes to kill mountain lions and bears in the name of boosting mule deer populations. His articles include “Off target: are mountain lions and bears about to be killed for the sins of the oil and gas industry?,” “Update: Commission asked to delay killing of mountain lions and bears in the name of sound science,” and “CPW and the oil and gas industry can’t have it both ways.”  An update, published Thursday, deals with an injunction filed by WildEarth Guardians.  You can read these articles online at http://www.boulderweekly.com/author/ricomoore/.
  • On March 27 at a ceremony at the Tishman Auditorium in New York, Natalie Scenters-Zapico accepted the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry for her book The Verging Cities, published by the Center for Literary Publishing as part of the Mountain West Poetry Series.

Rekindle the Classics 

The next Rekindle the Classics discussion will be on Wednesday, April 12, 6:30-8:30 pm at Wolverine Farms Publick House. MFA student Lauren Matheny will lead a discussion of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary. Rekindle the Classics brings together CSU English faculty and graduate students and lovers of literature in the Fort Collins community. For more information, see http://blog.poudrelibraries.org/2017/01/rekindle-a-love-of-the-classics/

English Department Writing Contests

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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oval

Image by Paul L Dineen

  • SueEllen Campbell has three recent publications: “Making Climate Change Our Job,” the lead article in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, eds. Siperstein, Hall, and LeMenager, Routledge, 2017; the forward, “Sunrise, Celebration,” to Ellen Wohl, Rhythms of Change in Rocky Mountain National Park, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016; and “The White-tailed Ptarmigan,” an excerpt from Even Mountains Vanish, in The Rocky Mountain National Park Reader, ed. James H. Pickering, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016. She continues her work on the 100 Views of Climate Change website, http://changingclimates.colostate.edu, endeavoring to deal with a backlog of good new accessible sources of information of all kinds.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher just had a prose poem sequence accepted for the Manifest West anthology on “Women of the West.” The anthology is due out later this year.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, titled “Re-Writing a Discursive Practice: Atheist Adaptation of Coming Out Discourse” has been accepted for publication in Written Communication. It will be out this April.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s essay “Notes Toward a Poetics of Drought” is up at Omniverse right now. The essay, part of panel proceedings from a panel organized and chaired by Kristen George Bagdanov (MFA ’15), is a three-part series being run by Omniverse. You can find it here: http://omniverse.us/poetics-of-drought-matthew-cooperman/
  • From Sue Doe: “I am excited to announce a new online journal, Academic Labor:  Research and Artistry. ALRA is published by the Center for the Study of Academic Labor, a CSU center supported by President Tony Frank (see http://csal.colostate.edu/about/tony-franks-statement/) and Dean Ben Withers. We seek to provide perspectives from the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts on contingency, tenure and the future of higher education. Please consider submitting something for the inaugural issue, and please circulate the CFP to your colleagues and distribute it to disciplinary list-servs, journals, websites, discussion boards, etc. Note that the journal invites varied genres, including art.”
  • Todd Mitchell launched a new program today to encourage literacy, creativity, and caring for our earth by delivering free books and free author visits to underfunded schools in Colorado. If you want to learn more (or become a supporter), check out http://youcaring.com/Books4Change.
  • Todd Mitchell cover reveal. After years of writing and countless drafts. I’m finally able to share with you the cover for my new book. It’s coming out in August, 2017. Just in time for the new school year. I can’t wait to release this one into the wild, along with several new presentations for schools! Click to read early reviews, preorder a copy, and learn more about why I wrote this book.  lastpanther
  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Bellwethers: Shame and My Left Breast” is up at Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-83/
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the January 2017 issue of OmniVerse and other poems have recently been accepted in the Raleigh Review, Bellingham Review, and Sugar House Review. Her blogpost “Consideration of Self in Poetry: You & the Page” is up at North American Review, and a new interview with poems can be found online at HocTok.

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Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has been named one of “The Top Ten New Latino Writers to Watch (and Read) for 2017” by the by LatinoStories.com literary website. http://latinostories.com/Top_Ten_Lists/top_10_authors.htm. The recognition was based on feedback from editors, faculty, librarians and readers. Also, a section from his book, Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams, was just nominated for a 2017 Pushcart Prize from Autumn House Press. Lastly, a new essay, “Outline Toward an Essay on Ethnicity and Miracles,” from a collection in progress, was accepted for publication by the University of Alaska’s hybrid journal, Permafrost.
  • Matthew Cooperman is pleased to report that Aby Kaupang is recovering nicely from back surgery (a discectomy; three weeks now), feeling stronger each day and remembering the joy of walking. Matthew and Aby are also pleased to report that their long-running collaborative project NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified) has been accepted by Futurepoem, a NYC press. A portion of the manuscript appeared last year as an electronic chapbook called disorder 299.00, from Essay Press. It can be found here, http://www.essaypress.org/ep-52/ A recent review of that chapbook is now up at Rain Taxi, http://www.raintaxi.com/disorder-299-00/
  • Our own Camille Dungy will be reading the names at Commencement on Saturday, January 17 at 7:30 p.m. Several faculty are already coming to the ceremony, but please join them If you want to hear Camille and recognize the graduates from our department. Senior Tim Cuevas will carry in the English banner. Thank you, Tim and Camille!
  • Kudos to Nancy Henke and Beth Lechleitner, who led a third fantastic year of the Finals Friends extravaganza. With the extra time and effort they gave, faculty had something special to look forward to in their mailboxes this week last week of classes. If you participated, thank Beth and Nancy next time you see them for this bright, cheerful reminder of how much we enjoy and appreciate each other.
  • Mike Palmquist presented a talk on writing across the curriculum at Indiana University of Pennsylvania on November 9th. He followed the talk with a day-long workshop the following day.
  • Mary Crow’s translations of lines by Roberto Juarroz were published in “Versailles: Aesthetics of the Ephemeral” by Christine Buci-Glucksmann; July, 2016. Catalog for the Exhibit: Olafur Eliasson’s Waterfall. Versailles, France. (7 June – 30 Oct. 2016)

CSU Writing Center

The CSU Writing Center will have limited hours during finals week. We will be open Monday, December 12 and Tuesday, December 13 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in Eddy Hall, room 23. We will be closed during the break, and will reopen on Monday, January 23.

Eddy 300 Lab

The Eddy 300 Lab hours for finals week: Monday –Thursday 7:30-8:00pm

Friday 7:30-4:00pm. We will be closed for winter break from Saturday, December  17th  and return on Tuesday, January 17th.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

 

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~From English Department Communications Intern Beth Campbell

matthewc02

How would you describe you work in the English Department?
I teach mostly graduate courses, and every so often an undergraduate course. I usually teach creative writing, poetry, and ecopoetics.

What brought you to CSU?
I came to CSU in 2003. I grew up in California, but I came to the University of Colorado in Boulder for my undergraduate degree. I taught there for a bit and eventually my career led me here.

What do you enjoy most about your work?
I enjoy working with the students. You all have such intelligent and well-formed ideas and I like helping students reach their full potential.


Why are the Humanities important?

We need to be able to think for ourselves as well as become well-rounded individuals in today’s society. The Humanities help us express emotion and what our existence really is. That is what helps us define our own ideas and form our own opinions, and the Humanities are essential to that.

What inspired you to pursue a degree in English, the Humanities?

It’s very personal for me. I had great English teachers who inspired me and pushed me, and I wanted to pass on that gift. It goes back to why the Humanities are important. Literature and writing the portal to a complete understanding of the world. I wanted to help show students what a gift that can be.


What had the greatest influence on your career path?
Working with great teachers and students. It drives me to think about how I am living my life and how I can model a thinking life, where we are always learning and pushing forward to a new level of understanding.

You recently had a book of poetry published. How did that book come about?
It was actually started years ago when I married my wife, although I had no idea what it would become at the time. We were on our honeymoon, and I was running out of room in my notebook, so to save space, I started writing poems with just three words in a line so I could fit more on a page. Eventually that form became something to shape and play with. It took on a more formal measure as I kept writing in it. It has a kind of feral intensity, what with being so brief on each line. There is no room for extra useless words. It was all about compression, like how the architecture on the cover of the book is brief and compact, but still flowing and emotional. The topics are more domestic, since I was writing it as my family was growing and we were settling into our home. My daughter was born with severe medical issues, so for the first few years of her life, I wrote to escape. It makes you creative in times of distress. The book became my refuge and over time, it shaped itself. I’m pleased with out it turned out.

What did you want to be when you were a kid?
(laughs and smiles to himself) I wanted to be an astronomer. I thought it would be about looking at stars and planets, but then I found out it was all about math and numbers and equations. Writing has always been there in the background for me, though. It made sense when I decided to try that instead.

When you’re not working, what do you do?
I spend time with my family. I have two kids, and my beautiful wife is the Poet Laureate of Fort Collins, so we go out to readings and sometimes go hiking together. I like being outdoors. I also like cooking. I was a chef for a time, so I enjoy going back to that, even if it’s just for dinner.

What don’t your colleagues know about you?
They probably don’t know I was chef, or about my list of 14ners. I want to complete them all, but I’m only about halfway right now.

What is your favorite word and why?
Sublime. It’s a very misunderstood word. We think sublime means “beautiful” or “stunning,” but it really means “below ground.” It means that something is so terrible and beyond words that it practically has to be buried in the earth to escape it. Yet we never use it to mean that.

What is the one thing you dream of being able to accomplish in your tenure at Colorado State University?
I would like to continue the Creative Writing program here, maybe get more funding for it for we can allow it to grow to its full potential. I also want to see a greater community dialogue between not just the different departments, but also the different colleges as a whole. We are a great university, but we need each other to really grow.

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