Tag Archives: Leif Sorensen

English instructor Sean Waters viewing the eclipse

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has poems accepted at Poetry, New England Review, and Cincinnati Review.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher had a couple of lyric essays published during the summer break – “Family Cookbook” in Florida Review and “Flight” in Somos en escrito. He also and taught a few hybrid image and found text workshops at the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing Program and the VCFA Post Graduate Writing Conference. He’s glad to be back.
  • Camille Dungy’s new book of poems, Trophic Cascade, received a favorable reading in Harvard Review. http://harvardreview.org/?q=features/book-review/trophic-cascade
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow has six ghazals published in the most recent edition of the Denver Quarterly, under her publishing name ‘slp.’
  • In May Leif Sorensen gave a talk on his book in progress titled Worlds of Difference: Race, Ethnicity and Science Fiction at the invitation of the Sogang Institute of American Studies and the American Culture Program at Sogang University in Seoul, Republic of Korea. He also facilitated a special symposium for the American Cultural Studies Graduate Program at Sogang titled “Revisiting Octavia Butler’s Kindred in 2017″ that focused on Butler’s 1979 novel and Damian Duffy’s 2017 graphic adaptation of the novel.In August Leif presented a talk, “Vanishing Races and Endangered Species” that focuses on representations of endangered species in Native American fiction from the 1920s and 1930s at the Modernist Studies Association Conference in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.His 2016 essay “Region and Ethnicity on the Air,” published in the Summer 2016 issue of MELUS won an honorable mention for the Don D. Walker Prize sponsored by the Western Literature Association to honor the best essay published on western American literary studies.
  • Catie Young’s chapbook, What is Revealed When I Reveal it to You, will be published by dancing girl press in early 2018. During the summer, poems from Language Object and Stopgap appeared in Gramma and Ghost Proposal.
  • The Center for Literary Publishing, which produces Colorado Review and other publications, is featured in SOURCE, CSU’s news website.  CR editor Stephanie G’Schwind is assisted by English Department student interns, among them Chelsea Hansen and Kristen Macintyre, who are featured in a special story at http://source.colostate.edu/center-serves-hands-publishing-laboratory-students/.

 

English Department Office Hours 

The English Office hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. (closed during lunch, 12:00-1:00 p.m.).

 

Eddy 300 Computer Lab

Monday – Thursday 7:30 am – 7 pm
Friday – 7:30 am – 5 pm
Saturday 10 am – 2 pm
Sunday 10 am – 2pm

Writing Center Hours

Starting August 28

Eddy Hall, Room 23
Mon-Thurs: 10 am – 4 pm

Morgan Library, Room 171
Sun-Thurs: 6 pm – 8 pm

 

Fall 2017 Internships Available!

 Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students.

Please contact Cassandra Eddington, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Cassie.Eddington@colostate.edu for more information on these internships and how to apply.

 

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~from intern Joyce Bohling

What brought you to CSU? The short answer is that I got the job! The position I applied for (American literature with a specialization in multi-ethnic writing and a side interest in modernist studies) seemed to me like a perfect fit and I was happy that the screening committee was interested in my work.

What made you want to stay? Immediately before coming to CSU I taught at a highly selective private liberal arts college and I was actually relieved to return to a public institution since my pre-doctoral education took place in public universities and I am committed to the idea that education should be accessible to a broad range of students.

What do you enjoy most about your work? I love hearing how my students work with texts that I am passionate about and learning different ways to approach texts from them. I also really enjoy my research, sharing it with friends and colleagues at conferences and informal conversations, and thinking about ways to incorporate it into my classes.

Why are the Humanities important? Because they provide ways of thinking that are open to possibilities beyond the purely instrumental purposes (how will this make money, how can this be used) and that therefore often drive truly transformational changes in society.

What inspired you to pursue a degree in English, the Humanities? I began my educational career thinking that I would become an astrophysicist. During my freshman year in college I realized both that I was not as drawn to the topic as I had thought and that my rural high school had not prepared me for the advanced physics and math courses I was struggling with. During the following summer I worked on my parents’ farm and spent a large amount of my time reading (I particularly remember working through several Toni Morrison and Dostoyevsky novels). Sometime during this process I realized that there was a major where reading and thinking about what I was reading would be my primary job so I decided to try that.

What special project are you working on right now? Right now I’m in the middle of writing a book about race, ethnicity, and world building in 20th and 21st century science fiction.

What did you want to be when you were a kid? An astronomer.

What is your favorite thing to teach? Favorite thing about teaching? One of my favorite works of literature to teach is Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God. My favorite thing about teaching is seeing how texts change depending on who is reading them and what’s going on in the world around us.

What advice would you give to a student taking a class in the English department? Talk to your professors outside of the classroom. It’s the best way to drive your learning forward.

What’s the best advice you ever received? My dad, who dropped out of college, always encouraged me to be willing to be flexible instead of thinking that if my plan A didn’t work (studying astrophysics) then I should just quit.

What’s your favorite word? I don’t play favorites…

What are you currently reading? I always have multiple books going so the current list includes: Viet Than Nguyen’s recent novel The Sympathizer, an ethnography of the Runa people in Ecuador called How Forest’s Think by Eduardo Kohn, and, two novels for the classes I’m teaching: John Edgar Wideman’s Philadelphia Fire and Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being.

What don’t your colleagues know about you? How much time I spend talking to my cats.

What accomplishments are you most proud of? Publishing my first academic book last year was a milestone.

When you’re not working, what do you do? Visit with family and friends. I read for fun still and I also love cooking, listening to a wide range of music, and watching frequently awful TV and movies. I also play poker with a group of friends at a weekly game that I’ve been part of since I came to Fort Collins in 2009.

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Image by Jill Salahub -- 1 in 5 trees in Fort Collins are Ash. Other than Aspens, they are the most beautiful of all the trees in fall. Because of a pest on its way, the emerald ash borer, in about 5 years they could ALL be gone.

Fall Ash, image by Jill Salahub

  • On October 8 Leif Sorensen presented his paper “Constructing the Pulp Genre System” at the First Annual Pulp Studies Symposium hosted by James Madison University.
  • Joanna Doxey’s book of poetry, Plainspeak, WY, is now available for pre-order through Platypus Press (in the UK) here: http://platypuspress.co.uk/plainspeakwy.  The first twenty-five copies reserved will receive a letterpressed broadside from the book.

Courses

Trying to decide which classes to take next semester? Check out our updated course listings: http://english.colostate.edu/courses/

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THIS WEEKEND! The inaugural Fort Collins Books Fest: Brewin’ Up Books! is a FREE, one-day public literary festival bringing attention to the expansiveness of Fort Collins’ craft brewing culture through books and authors involved with beer, coffee, tea, and more. With over 40 speakers, readings, panels, and workshops, there is sure to be something for just about everyone. http://www.focobookfest.org/

 

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

 

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

 

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Lady Moon Meadow, image by Jill Salahub

Lady Moon Meadow, image by Jill Salahub

  • Tim Amidon and Michele Simmons (Miami University) gave a research talk titled “Negotiating ‘messy’ research context and design through adaptive research stances” at the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) Special Interest Group on the Design of Communication (SIGDOC) in Washington, D.C.  While at SIGDOC, Tim also participated in “Draw to communicate: How geometric shapes, blank pages, and crayons can improve your collaboration and creativity,” a workshop lead by Abigail Selzer, Kristen R. Moore, and Ashley Hardage (Texas Tech University). The workshop introduced participants to research and pedagogy in technical communication surrounding sketch-noting and incorporated hands on practice applying concepts such a geometric and visual metaphors to communication design problems.
  • Tim Amidon spoke as an invited panelist at the Faculty and Instructor Open Textbooks Workshop about his experiences adopting Doug Eyman’s Digital Rhetoric: Theory, Method, Practice, as an open textbook in CO402: Principles of Digital Rhetoric and Design. The event was hosted at the Morgan Library by Associate Professor and Open Education Resources Librarian Merinda McLure and Assistant Dean for Scholarly Communications and Collection Development Meg Brown-Sica.
  • Steven Schwartz’s story “The Theory of Everything” has just been published by Electric Literature on its Recommended Reading site. The story is from his newly released collection, Madagascar: New and Selected Storieshttps://electricliterature.com/the-theory-of-everything-by-steven-schwartz-52ad1978996f#.3okj44mzn
  • Bill Tremblay has received acceptances of two new poems, “Bukowski” and “The Sun’s Hands” at Cimarron Review for their Winter issue, 2016-17. Bill read with Jared Smith in Evergreen, CO, last Saturday evening. Besides the audience the reading was streamed out to 177 homes in the area. Bill will read in Laramie, WY, at the Night Heron Bookstore, Friday October 15, 7 pm. He is also scheduled to read with Joe Hutchison at the Innisfree in Boulder, 6 PM, October 20th. A reading-interview with Bill talking about Walks Along the Ditch will be broadcast and streamed from KBOO.fm Portland OR 11PM October 17. It will also be archived.
  • Andrew Mangan’s short story “Any Good Thing” has been accepted for publication by Zyzzyva. Andrew graduated from the MFA program in 2016. This is his first publication.
  • Thank you to everyone who helped to make PBK Visiting Scholar Nora Naranjo Morse’s campus visit a success.  A special thank you to Louann Reid, for her tireless support of this opportunity; Gloria Blumanhourst, who is, herself, a PBK member; she helped do all of the planning, and then she was called away to help with a family emergency; Patty Rettig, a PBK member alongside Gloria, who stepped in to help us with this event; Dean Ben Withers, also a PBK member, for his involvement in Nora’s campus visit; Colleen Timothy, who helped  with scheduling Dean Withers; Jill Salahub, our English department communications coordinator, who went above and beyond to help us to publicize this event; Sue Russell, one of our English department administrative professionals, who helped to organize the logistics of Nora’s visit; Sheila Dargon, another of our English department administrative professionals, who helped to publicize this event; Leif Sorensen, who hosted Nora in his Ethnic Literature in the United States class; Camille Dungy, who hosted Nora in her Literature of the Earth course; and Pam Coke, who served as faculty host. Thank you to everyone who attended any of the events while Nora was here.  Her visit was co-sponsored by Phi Beta Kappa and the CSU English department.

bookfest-_FINAL-273x300

The inaugural Fort Collins Books Fest: Brewin’ Up Books! is a FREE, one-day public literary festival bringing attention to the expansiveness of Fort Collins’ craft brewing culture through books and authors involved with beer, coffee, tea, and more. With over 40 speakers, readings, panels, and workshops, there is sure to be something for just about everyone.

The CSU English Department is a sponsor of this event. As part of our in-kind donation, we are asking for volunteers to help staff the day’s festivities. We need handlers to help make sure panelists are able to move comfortably between venues as well as people who can serve other necessary roles in helping to make sure the festival runs smoothly. If you are able to serve on a 2 to 5 hour volunteer shift on October 22, please write me Camille Dungy soon as possible. Conference organizers are hoping to schedule all the volunteers by the end of this week (October 7).  (Contact Camille Dungy at camille.dungy@colostate.edu). Volunteers will have access to a few backstage perks as well, so sign up soon so we can get you on those lists! http://www.focobookfest.org/

 

Cover of the latest edition

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Fort Collins Discovery Museum, image by Jill Salahub

Fort Collins Discovery Museum, image by Jill Salahub

  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s book of poems, gentlessness, has been named a finalist for the Colorado Book Award in Poetry.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s poem, “Endangered Species,” is up today at the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day site: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem-day
  • SueEllen Campbell and John Calderazzo spent the week of spring break at the University of Montana and in Missoula.  SueEllen read a personal essay and talked about dealing with the emotions raised by the idea of climate change and ran a workshop about teaching climate change in the humanities. John led a community writing workshop on the subject of health. Both were partly sponsored by the Health and Humanities Institute, and SueEllen was also sponsored by the department of English. SueEllen also interviewed faculty and students in the university’s climate change minor for a program review.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem “because it looked hotter that way” is a featured women’s month selection on Poets.org, the online archive for the Academy of American Poets, https://m.poets.org/poetsorg/womens-history-month
  • Roze Hentschell is attending the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America conference in New Orleans, for which she wrote a seminar paper, “Reimagining a New St. Paul’s Cathedral.”
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay “Austerity Behind Bars: The ‘Cost’ of Prison College Programs” appears in Composition in the Age of Austerity, a new collection edited by Anthony Scott and Nancy Welch (Utah State University Press).
  • Leif Sorensen presented a paper on pulp magazines as incubators for contemporary popular genre categories at the meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association in Boston.
  • Leif Sorensen’s book, Ethnic Modernism and the Making of US Literary Multiculturalism just came out from Palgrave Macmillan. The book focuses on the remarkable careers of four ethnic fiction writers: Younghill Kang, D’Arcy McNickle, Zora Neale Hurston, and Américo Paredes and shows how their works played a crucial role in the development of what we now call multiethnic literature in the US.
  • On April 2nd, Sasha Steensen will give a reading at the Ivy Writers Series, a bilingual reading series in Paris, France.
  • Neil Fitzpatrick’s story “The Future of Statues” is featured in the latest issue of A Public Space. He’ll be reading in Manhattan on April 6 with another Emerging Writer Fellow and their mentors. Here’s the link to the issue: http://apublicspace.org/magazine/issue_24. And the event: https://www.facebook.com/events/982453681849010/.

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computerlabhours

  • Tim Amidon and Mike Caggiano (Forestry) received funding from the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute for an interdisciplinary research project that seeks to learn how landowners, land managers, and emergency personnel in the Front Range understand the potential risks and benefits associated with Defensible Space migration efforts. The researchers have nearly completed their interviews, and will begin analysis of the data later this semester.
  • “Composing MOOCs: Conversations about Writing in Massive Open Online Courses,” a collaborative, scholarly webtext, appeared in the current issue of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, & Pedagogy. The webtext, created by Tim Amidon, Chris Andrews (McMurry University), Elkie Burnside (University of Findlay), D. Alexis Hart (Allegheny College), & Margaret M. Strain (University of Dayton), is structured like an interactive MOOC discussion board and offers insights from leading scholars within rhetoric and composition who have recently taught or designed massive open online courses in composition in local or national contexts. The webtext can be found at http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/20.1/interviews/amidon-et-al/index.html.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an essay on Moby-Dick up at the Boston Review: http://bostonreview.net/poetry/dan-beachy-quick-moby-dick
  • Pam Coke’s proposal entitled “What Are They Selling?  What Are We Buying?: Eating Disorders as Cultural Artifact” has been accepted for the international conference The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers due to take place June 23-24, 2016, at the Université du Maine in Le Mans, France.
  • Camille Dungy’s  poem “Frequently Asked Questions: #10” is featured in the October issue of Poetry, as well as on the journal’s podcast.
  • On October 1st, Roze Hentschell gave an invited lecture, “Church, Playhouse, Market, Home: The Cultural Geography of St. Paul’s Precinct,” at the Early Modern Center at UC Santa Barbara, where she had the good fortune to see two alumna from our MA program, Megan Palmer Browne (M.A. ’06) and Katie Adkison (M.A. ’14). Roze received her Ph.D. at UCSB in 1998.
  • EJ Levy’s essay “Of Liars” was published last month in After Montaigne: Contemporary Essayists Cover the Essays (2015), in which 28 contemporary essayists–from Philip Lopate to Maggie Nelson, Jared Walker to Wayne Koestenbaum, Lia Purpura to Vivian Gornick–“re-write” Montaigne’s topics, just out from University of Georgia Press.
  • Leif Sorensen attended the seventh conference of the Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present (ASAP) in Greenville, South Carolina from September 24-27. He presented two papers: “Constructing Punk Counterpublics: Neoliberalism and the Rise of Punk in Buenos Aires, Montevideo, and São Paulo” and “‘Always start with a big explosion’: Representing Violence in Post 9/11 Genre Fiction,” in panels on the aesthetics of punk rock and violence and globalization, respectively.
  • Sasha Steensen had five poems published in Northside Review. She was interviewed for the series 12 or 20 questions: http://robmclennan.blogspot.com/2015/09/12-or-20-second-series-questions-with_29.html?m=0
  • Cedar Brant had a poem accepted for publication in Black Ocean’s Handsome Journal.
  • Mandy Rose’s essay “Five” has received a nomination for Sundress Publications’ Best of the Net. Her poem, “Nom de Guerre” was accepted by University of Hell Press for an anthology to be published in Spring 2016. Mandy will also be a guest editor for the next issue of Scissors and Spackle, http://scissorsandspackle.net/submissions/, an ELJ Publications imprint. Submissions open October 1st and are read blind, so please consider sending your work!
  • Vauhini Vara has a story in the newly published O. Henry Prize Stories anthology.  The story, originally published in Tin House is called, I, Buffalo

Workshop

Professors Lynn Shutters and Matthew Cooperman will facilitate a professionalization workshop/brown-bag event entitled “Applying to PhD Programs” next Wednesday, October 7, from 12-1:30 in Aylesworth C108. It’s designed for our MA and MFA students who are considering going on to a PhD program. Shutters and Cooperman will cover many topics such as: researching programs and institutions of interest; entrance exams; the application process de-mystified; financial assistance; and online resources. It’s an invaluable seminar designed to help graduate students make their applications as strong and successful as possible.

 

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Poudre River at Lee Martinez Park, image by Jill Salahub

Poudre River at Lee Martinez Park, image by Jill Salahub

  • On Tuesday 2/24 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m., Tim Amidon will be facilitating a workshop titled “Demystifying Fair Use: Classrooms and the Affordances of Copyright for faculty, administrators, students, and curriculum designers as part of  the Association of Research Libraries “Fair Use Week.” Preregistration is appreciated but not required, and there are still spot left for those who wish to participate.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick is giving a talk at University of Illinois at Chicago titled “Quietness” this Friday.
  • The following interview with Camille Dungy appeared in this week’s Collegian, http://www.collegian.com/2015/02/qa-professor-camille-dungy-talks-african-american-nature-poetry-and-how-it-relates-to-writers-today/113263/
  • Leif Sorensen’s essay “Dubwise into the Future: Versioning Modernity in Nalo Hopkinson” is out in the most recent issue of African American Review. The essay is an analysis of two novels by an important figure in literary Afrofuturism (science-fictional writing by authors from the African diaspora).
  • Darcy Gabriel was accepted to present “Teaching with Visible Bodies in the Classroom: An Embodied Pedagogy” at the Inter-mountain Graduate Conference at Idaho State University, April 17-18 2015. I received funds from the English Professional Development Grant to be able to attend.

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Migrating geese take a break on Ingersoll Hall’s front lawn

Migrating geese take a break on Ingersoll Hall’s front lawn, image by Jill Salahub

  • Last week, TEFL/TESL faculty and students attended the Annual Co-TESOL Convention in Denver (November 14-15, 2014). Three student-led presentations were delivered at the convention: Angela Sharpe, Moriah Kent and Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker discussed the benefits of Using Corpora in the L2 Classroom; Kenshin Huang and Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker shared their insights on Engaging Asian Students in Classroom Interactions, and Reyila Hadeer and Victor Kuan presented a session on Teacher’s Support during Project-based Learning. Due to the generous support of INTO-CSU, 16 graduate students attended the convention this year.
  • Sarah Sloane gave two presentations, one at a roundtable and another on a featured panel at Writing on the Range, a conference held at University of Denver for college and university faculty from Colorado (and a couple from New Mexico) who do scholarship in the field of writing studies.Her roundtable participation included a discussion of state guidelines for advanced composition classes and a proposal for an advanced writing course that starts by reading Colorado prepper literature. Looking historically at the various permutations of prepper responses to a culture of fear as it has informed 1980s survivalist literature, 1990s prepper handbooks, and contemporary descriptions of potential disasters and 72-hour bug-out bags, students will examine the shaky evidence and rhetorical appeals embedded in YouTube videos, podcasts, social media, listserves like “Vegas Preppers,” and blogs about prepping. Students will then move from reading these flawed rhetorical constructions to composing their own well-supported arguments on a wide range of topics. Students will develop the rhetorical sensitivity and critical acumen necessary to compose within more typical rhetorical situations and Colorado contexts.Her featured panel presentation discussed the Colorado State University Composition Program, its location within local, regional, and state contexts, and our program’s collaborative efforts to bring state-of-the-art facilities to support critical analyses of websites, blogs, podcasts, prezis, and new notions of intellectual property, copyright, credibility, the material and the virtual, credibility, representation, and all the many forms, genres, and questions that digital systems, digital publics, and online social networks allow.
  • Leif Sorensen’s essay “Against the Post-Apocalyptic: Narrative Closure in Colson Whitehead’s Zone One,” on the most recent novel by MacArthur genius grant recipient Colson Whitehead is now available in the current issue of Contemporary Literature.Professor Sorensen also attended the annual meeting of the Modernist Studies Association in Pittsburgh in early November and presented a paper, “Fragmented Ancestors,” on the literary recoveries of Américo Paredes and D’Arcy McNickle.
  • Graduating English Education student Clint Pendley has accepted a position teaching seventh grade Literacy and English Language Development at Columbia Middle School in Aurora, CO. Congratulations, Clint!
  • Greyrock Review is now accepting submissions! Greyrock Review is an undergraduate anthology at Colorado State University. Submissions are open from October 6, 2014 to December 1, 2014 for original work in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual arts. Any undergraduate at CSU may submit their work at https://greyrockreview.submittable.com/submit for free and will be notified by December 15, 2014. Any questions may be sent to editor.csu@gmail.com

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Fall lingers at Ingersoll Hall, even as the first winter snow blows in. Image by Jill Salahub

Fall lingers at Ingersoll Hall, even as the first winter snow blows in. Image by Jill Salahub

  • John Calderazzo will soon give a talk about science communication at the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a workshop on historical documents from the 1920s New York State Training School for Girls at the Hudson Area Library in late October.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a critical paper on the popular Netflix series Orange is the New Black and women’s prison writing at the Western States Rhetoric and Literacy conference in Reno, NV in early November.
  • Sasha Steensen and Martin Corless-Smith interviewed one another for The Conversant. You can read the discussion here: http://theconversant.org/?p=8495.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore’s proposal “Reading the Dead Bodies on Bones” was accepted for presentation at the College of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Symposium with the theme “Constructing Humanity” at the University of Nevada-Reno in February. She adds, “They extended their proposal deadline to the 15th! I’d love company!”
  • On Saturday, November 1st, eleven English department faculty members helped award $14,000 in scholarship money at the CSU Senior Scholarship Day. In conjunction with the Admissions Office, Dan Beachy-Quick, Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker, Ellen Brinks, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Zach Hutchins, Tobi Jacobi, Ed Lessor, Sarah Sloane, and Leif Sorensen conducted writing workshops with and read timed essays from 91 Colorado high school seniors. We are thankful for their hard work!
  • On October 10-11th, undergraduate and graduate students from the CSU English department attended the Colorado Language Arts Society Regional Conference at the School of Mines in Golden, CO. Past NCTE@CSU President and current student teacher Tyler Arko served on two separate panels. Pam Coke moderated one of these panels, and she presented a second session with CSU alum Steven Ray Parker, who is now a full-time English teacher at Kinard Core Knowledge School in Fort Collins. Student attendees included current NCTE@CSU President Anton Gerth, NCTE@CSU Vice-President Belle Kraxberger, and NCTE@CSU member Jenna Franklin. Louann Reid and Antero Garcia attended as well; Antero will be a featured presenter at next year’s conference.
  • For English Department graduating undergraduates and MA graduate students: Thursday, November 13th, 3:30 – 5:00 p.m., Academic Village C141 (Engineering Hall). “Pursuing an MA or PhD in English: Everything You Wanted to Know.” This workshop will focus on the following: what advanced work in higher education entails; how to identify good graduate programs for your needs; what to expect from the application process and how to maximize your chances of success. After a presentation, faculty from various areas of English will be on hand to answer any questions you have and to speak personally about their own experiences.

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Flashback: Eddy courtyard, Fall 2013 (image by Jill Salahub)

Flashback: Eddy courtyard, Fall 2013 (image by Jill Salahub)

  • Leslee Becker’s story, “The Twilight Club,” has been accepted for publication in Alaska Quarterly Review. Another story, “If You Lived Here,” received an Honorable Mention in The New Millennium Fiction Contest.
  • John Calderazzo will give several science and literature talks at the south rim of the Grand Canyon, at the only public school in a U.S. national park. He will be in residence there for two weeks.
  • Sue Doe’s co-authored article with Psychology faculty member Karla Gingerich, Washington University (St. Louis) faculty member Julie Bugg, and several others, was recently published in Teaching of Psychology. It is titled “Active Processing via Write-to-Learn Assignments: Learning and Retention Benefits in Introductory Psychology.”
  • Leif Sorensen will present at the Latina(o)/Latin American Studies Scholars Colloquium at CSU on Monday September 22. His paper is titled “Region and Ethnicity on the Air: Reconstructing Américo Paredes’s Radio Career.” The event is part of a series of brown bag talks by CSU scholars working on topics in Latina(o)/Latin American Studies and it will take place in the Morgan Library Event Hall from noon until 1:00 p.m. Coffee and tea will be provided and the event is free and open to all.
  • Debby Thompson’s personal essay “Scavenger Love” was listed as a “notable” in the 2014 Best American Essays.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Purge Body” was accepted for publication in Mid American Review.
  • Maura Smith’s personal essay “Omphalos,” which was part of her 2012 Creative Nonfiction thesis and published in the Bellevue Literary Review, has been named a “Notable” in the 2014 Best American Essays list.

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