Tag Archives: Karen Montgomery Moore

CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

 

English Department Awards Reception TODAY!!!

Monday, 4-6pm in the LSC North Ballroom – Presentations at 4:30pm.

  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang recently gave a reading & talk at Colgate University in New York. Matthew has an essay up on Hart Crane at At Length on “the poem that won’t leave you alone.” http://atlengthmag.com/poetry/the-poem-that-wont-leave-you-alone/
  • On Saturday, April 29, 4pm, Old Firehouse Books, Dan Beachy-Quick, Matthew Cooperman and Bill Tremblay will read from their work as part of National Independent Bookstore Day, and the closing of National Poetry Month.
  • Roze Hentschell was invited to speak at The Senior Center in Fort Collins, where she spoke on “Shakespeare and the Sonnet Tradition.”
  • Jaime Jordan invites everyone to explore how she uses the Serial podcast to tackle unconscious bias in her CO150 class. Those interested can check out the display in the northwest corner of the 3rd floor at the “lunch counter.”
  • Todd Mitchell recently conducted a full day of fiction and poetry workshops with teens at Fort Collins High School, where they have several outstanding writers (who might hopefully come here). He also conducted virtual visits (via Skype) to high school and middle school students in southern Colorado.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore presented “Affect, Anxiety, and the Abject Corpse in A Study in Scarlet” at the Popular Culture Association/American Cultural Association conference in San Diego on April 15. This paper was advised by Ellen Brinks and Debby Thompson (for her master’s final project).
  • Rebecca Snow will give a brief talk along with other local authors at the Quid Novi book fair, April 27th, 6-9 pm. She can get CSU authors table space to display/sell their books as her guest for 1/2-price ($25.00) and free registration, up until the day of the event: https://www.quidnoviinnovations.com/Spring-Innovation/
  • Mary Crow has had four poems accepted for publication: “Theory” and “But You Came anyway” by New Madrid and “Taking the Heat” and “The Necessary Existence of the Old World” by The American Journal of Poetry.
  • The Writing Center and the English Department were well-represented at the Colorado and Wyoming Writing Tutors Conference. Here is a list of presenters and presentations:
    • Kiley Miller & Wendy-Anne Hamrick
      “Is that an effective question?”: Meaningful and Interactive Grammar Feedback in Multilingual Consultations
    • Leah White & Katherine Indermaur
      Mindfulness for Tutor Resilience
    • Shirley Coenen & Leslie Davis
      Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate and Graduate Student Writing Support
    • Jennifer Levin, Tiffany Akers, and Alina S. Lugo
      Strategies for Increasing Engagement in Tutoring Sessions
    • Sheri Anderson, Sue Doe, and Lisa Langstraat
      Student-Veterans in the Writing Center: Dispelling the Myths and Providing Genuine “Military Friendly” Support

English Department Career Event: Freelance Editing Panel

Please join us for a special panel on working in the world of freelance editing. Panelists Ann Diaz (M.A. 17) and Nathan DelaCastro (B.A. 15) will share their experiences working as freelance editors and making a living!

When: Friday, May 5, from 3:00 to 4:15pm
Where: Location TBA

More details and information are forthcoming, so stay tuned! Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, with any questions.

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louislamour

  • Sue Doe’s chapter, “What Works and What Counts: Valuing the Affective in Non Tenure-Track Advocacy,” co-authored with Maria Maisto and Janelle Adsit, was just published in Contingency, Exploitation, and Solidarity: Labor and Action in English Composition. Edited by Seth Kahn, William B. Lalicker, and Amy Lynch-Biniek.
  • Darcy Gabriel has happily accepted a place in the University of Minnesota’s PhD program in Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication (RSTC) starting this fall.
  • SueEllen Campbell’s contribution to the post-election series “Letters to America” in Terrain.com appeared online last week at this link:  http://www.terrain.org/2017/guest-editorial/letter-to-america-campbell/.
  • The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico—published by the Center for Literary Publishing as part of its Mountain West Poetry Series—has been awarded the 2017 PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry. The award, for which the poet receives $5,000, is given in odd-numbered years and recognizes the high literary character of the published work to date of a new and emerging American poet of any age and the promise of further literary achievement. The book’s publishing team was Karen Montgomery Moore, Cedar Brant, Melissa Hohl, Katie Naughton, and Stephanie G’Schwind.
  • Airica Parker’s poem “Disjointed” appears in Central Michigan University’s Temenos: Skin Suits & Bare Bones online and in print. See it here for free on page 29: http://www.temenosjournal.com/current-edition.html
  • Mary Crow has had two poetry acceptances; “Beyond Tahrir” will be published by Hotel America and “Happiness Production Line” will be published by American Poetry Review.
  • Tirzah Goldenberg (MFA – Poetry, Summer 2013) has a recently published book of poetry, entitled Aleph, published by Verge Books.
  • Deanna Ludwin has been nominated for the 2017 Team Fort Collins Wellness & Prevention Lamplighter community service award.

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The Poudre River this morning (image by Jill Salahub)

The Poudre River (image by Jill Salahub)

  • On October 28th, Tim Amidon, Elizabeth Williams (Communication Studies), Kim Henry (Psychology), and Tiffany Lipsey (Health and Exercise Science) partnered with the Poudre Fire Authority to host a symposium on the intersections of work, knowledge, and safety in the fireservice. Over 70 fireservice leaders from as far away as Oakland, CA and Ontario, Canada participated in interactive, stakeholder conversations designed to help researchers and participants identify the types of human factors that impact firefighter occupational safety and health outcomes. Breakout sessions included discussions on wearable technologies and next generation PPE, post-traumatic stress, the impact of chronic stress, sleep deprivation, and diet on decision making and cognition, how blue-collar traditions and working class identity impact how firefighters value the types of labor they perform, and how the challenges of certifying skills and building learning organizations through training and education programs. The event was sponsored by PFA and Pre-Catalyst for Innovative Partnerships seed funding awarded to the research team by the Office of the Vice President for Research. Tim would also personally thank our student intern Tiffany Lingo and administrative gurus Sheila Dargon and Lilian Nugent for their support!
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an interview up on the Kenyon Review’s website with: http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/dan-beachy-quick/ and a group of linked essays at EuropeNow: http://www.europenowjournal.org/2016/11/30/sunlight-and-arrows-five-invocations-for-the-silent-muse/
  • John Calderazzo will be presenting a talk on “Climate Change and Quechua Ritual” at the Sacred Landscapes and Mountains conference at the China India Institute in New York City.  The talk is based on a trip he took to a glacier-fed basin in the Peruvian Andes. John will also be the judge for the 2017 Eugene V. Shea National Poetry Contest.
  • Sue Doe and Lisa Langstraat’s essay “Faculty Development Workshops with Student Vet Participants: Seizing the Induction Possibilities” will shortly appear in Reflections: Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning (Volume 16, Issue 2).
  • On November 18, just prior to the start of Fall Break, CO130 faculty welcomed around 75 international students to a Harvest Meal in the Whitaker Room.  It was crazy fun in there, particularly as faculty watered down the soup to make it stretch to meet the larger-than-expected crowd and as Cassie Eddington’s kimchi was pronounced “Superb!” by a Korean student. This event was the brainchild of Karen Montgomery Moore and was assisted by Cassie Eddington, Virginia Chaffee, Kristie Yelinek, Hannah Caballero, Leslie Davis, Sheila Dargon, and Sue Doe.  Thanks go to our Chair, Louann Reid, for her support for this very special and timely event. Thanks also to the front office staff who participated and strongly communicated the department’s support for the diverse students of CO130! Thanks as well to our amazing Eddy custodial staff who not only helped bring food from our cars to the third floor but stuck around late to help clean up the mess!
  • On Saturday, October 15th, the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) hosted its 47th Annual Regional Conference at Metro State University in Denver.  This year’s theme was “For the Love of Teaching: Reclaiming the Classroom.”  CLAS presented CSU’s English Professor Emeritus William McBride with the Legacy Award.  English Education graduate student Jenna (Franklin) Martin shared her presentation, titled “Intercultural Sensitivity in the Middle School Language Arts Classroom.”  Dr. Pam Coke gave a presentation with Cheryl Kula, a fourth grade teacher at St. John the Evangelist Catholic School in Loveland, titled “Hard to Learn, Hard to Teach: Using Problem-Based Strategies in the Classroom.”  A good conference was had by all.
  • On Saturday, November 12th, CSU welcomed high school seniors from around the country to campus to take part in Senior Scholarship Day. English department colleagues led students through a writing workshop, followed by a timed writing competition.  CSU Admissions offered scholarships to the top writers. Our English department team included Tony Becker, Doug Cloud, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Tobi Jacobi, Sarah Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, Catherine Ratliff, and fearless leader Ed Lessor. Thank you, team, for your hard work!
  • On Saturday, November 19th, Dr. Pam Coke presented her research at the National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention in Atlanta.  Her session, titled “Performing Adolescence on the Page and in the Classroom: Using Adolescents’ Literature to Advocate for Students’ Mental Health,” She helped participants examine critical questions for educators, including: Is it ethical to teach a text that I know can trigger forms of PTSD for students?  Is it irresponsible to avoid such issues in the classroom?  If and when I do teach these texts (and I believe it is irresponsible to omit controversial texts from our classrooms), what can I do to best advocate for the mental health and well-being of the students? The presentation sparked valuable conversation among attendees.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology,” published earlier this year in The Bellevue Literary Review, has been nominated for a Pushcart prize.

speakout

SpeakOut!

We have three SpeakOut Journal Launch events during finals week. We will be celebrating the publication of our Fall 2016 issue of the SpeakOut Journal with a reading by our participants and refreshments. Please contact Tobi Jacobi (tjacobi@colostate.edu) if you would like to attend the readings at the jail or community corrections. We’d love to see you there!

SpeakOut! Youth Groups: Monday, December 12 from 6:45 to 8:15pm at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House

SpeakOut! @ Community Corrections and Work Release: Wednesday, December 14 from 7:30 to 8:30pm at LCJ Administration Building

SpeakOut! Men & Women’s Groups @ Larimer County Jail: Thursday, December 15 from 6:30 to 8:00pm at the Larimer County Jail.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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  • The Center for Literary Publishing is delighted to announce that The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico, a 2015 Mountain West Poetry Series title, has won the Utah Book Award in Poetry. This is the second year in a row that a CLP title has won the award (last year it went to The Logan Notebooks, by Rebecca Lindenberg). Karen Montgomery Moore was the copyeditor; Cedar Brant, the proofreader; Katie Naughton, the typesetter; Melissa Hohl, the cover designer; and Stephanie G’Schwind and Donald Revell, the acquiring editors.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Quartzsite,” won second prize in Blue Mesa Review‘s 2016 Summer Contest, judged by Jensen Beach. The story will be published in Issue #34 this November.

Colloquium 

Please join us Thursday, October 27, 7:00 pm, at the home of Louann & David Reid, for the fall semester colloquium, at which we gather, with fine appetizers and drinks in hand, to enjoy one another’s company and hear about the work that our colleagues are doing. All department faculty and graduate students are invited.

Here’s a preview of the evening:

Doug Cloud will present some in-progress work on how speakers conceal animus toward marginalized groups in public discourse. He’ll show the results from an analysis of recent “bathroom bill” and transgender-rights discourse, to show how speakers are able to make prejudicial claims about transgender people indirectly. Understanding and revealing these techniques can help us be smarter consumers and producers of public rhetoric.

Kristina Quynn will talk about the phases of CSU Writes so far: where it started last year, where it currently is, and where she sees it going. She will touch on the reasons she started CSU Writes (including her own research agenda), the writing productivity research and models of women’s collectives that guide its vision, and some of the wonderful success stories of graduate students and faculty who have participated in CSU Writes organized retreats, workshops, and writing groups.

It’s always a fabulous event, so please treat yourself and make time in your calendar. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

 

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Image by Jill Salahub

Image by Jill Salahub

  • Antero Garcia has a new chapter titled “Teacher as Dungeon Master: Connected learning, democratic classrooms, and rolling for initiative” in the book The role-playing society: Essays on the cultural influence of RPGs (MacFarland).
  • Antero Garcia has been announced as a judge for the art and writing youth “Twist Fate” challenge. He will co-edit a collection of the entries to be published after the competition challenge ends. The deadline for entries is April 6th and more info can be found here: http://dmlhub.net/newsroom/media-releases/twist-fate/.
  • Sasha Steensen published five poems in the March/ April issue of Kenyon Review, two of which are featured online: http://www.kenyonreview.org/journal/marapr-2016/selections/sasha-steensen/  She was also interviewed for Kenyon Conversations.  You can read the interview here:  http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/sasha-steensen/ She will be reading at Mountain Fold bookstore in Colorado Springs at 7pm on March 19th.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore will be presenting “Affect, Anxiety, and the Abject Corpse in A Study in Scarlet” at the Popular Culture Association/American Cultural Association conference in Seattle on March 24. She was advised regarding this paper (her final graduate project) by Ellen Brinks and Debby Thompson, and she received NTTF professional development funding to support travel for this presentation.
  • Sean Waters published a cool piece about Seth Jansen and Poudre Valley Community Farms, which came out last week in Fort Collins’ Scene Magazine.  http://scenenoco.com/2016/03/02/poudre-valley-farms/
  • Davis Webster’s (an undergrad in creative writing) essay “Wyo.” was accepted for publication in Fourth Genre.
  • Embracing Community through Giving,” an article about Deanna Ludwin’s contributions to the English Department, is included in the February 27 issue of the College of Liberal Arts Newsletter. Jill Salahub is the article’s author. Deanna’s poem “Focus” was published in Fjords Review’s “Free Womens Edition.” (Go to fjordsreview.com and click on “Featured” then “Archives.”) Her article about attending a poetry workshop in France, “Opening the Senses in Southern France,” was included in volume 6, issue 1 of CSU’s Society of Senior Scholars Newsletter.
  • Edward Hamlin, winner of Colorado Review’s 2013 Nelligan Prize for Short Fiction, will read from his recently published collection Night in Erg Chebbi and Other Stories, winner of the Iowa Short Fiction Award and one of two finalists for this year’s Colorado Book Award (short story collection category), at Wolverine Farm’s Publick House Saturday April 16, 7:30 pm. (Please note: this event was rescheduled due to weather, and will take place at the same location on May 20, 7:30 pm).

 

Commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death this summer in E343: Shakespeare II with Dr. Roze Hentschell. Registration begins March 22nd.

Shakespeare flyer 1.0

 

Tools from the Workshop: Theory and “Hands On” Practice with Multimodal Engagement in UD Composition Courses Part II

The Upper Division Composition Professional Development Workshop Series is proud to present the second installment of our spring 2016 offerings: During the week of March 21st we will hold our second workshop: The Possibility of Actually Composing a Visual Argument  (Room and Time TBA after the Doodle Poll Results are In)

Come join us as we discuss a sprinkling of theory that connects visual argument with the course goals of CO 300. The bulk of the workshop will be devoted to a “hands on” exploration of the new Photoshop software that has been installed on the computers in Eddy 2 and 4. Help us explore this rich visual editing software and envision ways that it can be effectively utilized in the classroom. A nice takeaway from the workshop will be the production of a flyer to advertise one of your upcoming classes. (Never be caught unprepared when the call for a class flyer is issued!)

All are welcome to join.

Four great incentives:

  1. Conversation with your awesome peers
  2. Certificate of Completion for those pesky Evaluation files
  3. Intellectual Engagement
  4. Snacks!  

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snOval, image by Colorado State University

snOval, image by Colorado State University

  • Aby Kaupang and Matthew Cooperman’s book NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified) was recently a finalist for the Essay Press Book Prize. Largely detailing the challenges and joys of raising their autistic daughter Maya, the book has been in progress for many years. A chapbook from that collection, Disorder 299.00, has just been released from Essay Press, and can be found at http://www.essaypress.org/ep-52/
  • Thanks to the amazing work of Shoaib Alam and Karen Montgomery Moore, Colorado Review now has 10,000 followers on Twitter.
  • Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala has been appointed to serve as Editor of the American Association for Applied Linguistics Newsletter.  She will serve a three-year term (2016-2019).  Fabiola is also currently serving in the Editorial Review Board for Volume 70 of The Reading Teacher (RT) for the 2015-2016 period. Fabiola’s latest 2015 publication is: Meeting the reading comprehension challenges of diverse English language learners in K-12:  Key contributions from reading research (pp. 147-164).  In M. Daniel & K. Mokhtari (Eds.), Research and instruction that makes a difference in English learners’success.  Lanham, MD: Roman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. Fabiola, together with Tony Maciejewsky (Department Head of Electrical and Computer Engineering at CSU), will be presenting the results of their investigation titled “Mental imagery experienced by both pathway and non-pathway graduate students in an engineering course at a US Research I institution” at the upcoming 2016 AAAL Conference in Orlando.
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poem, ghazal [16.], will be published in the spring edition of burntdistrict. You can find the journal at http://burntdistrict.org/
  • Mary Crow’s poetry is the subject (along with Karen Swenson’s) of a chapter in Marilyn Krysl’s Yes, There Will Be Singing, published in the University of Michigan series, Poets on Poetry.
  • Here’s James Work’s latest contribution to world literature. Publication expected in July. jameswork
  • Two of Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the newest issue of TriQuarterly Review. Her poem “In tuck” has also been selected for publication at The Cincinnati Review and her poem “& in wonder too,” first printed in Meridian, will be the poem of the day on Poetry Daily on February 11.
  • The English Department is pleased to award the following graduate students departmental funds for travel associated with professional activities. The department gave a total of $7,420 in award money to students this year. The grants ranged from $300-$750. Students will be traveling to conferences from Alaska to points eastward. Congratulations to all our students who are sharing their research and creative work in professional circles!
    Paul Binkley
    Denise Garrett
    Kelsey Hatley
    Abby Kerstetter
    John Koban
    Cole Konopka
    David Mucklow
    Kathleen Naughton
    Meghan Pipes
    Kylan Rice
    Lara Roberts
    John Whalen
    Meagan Wilson
    Catie Young

NCTE@CSU

On April 9th of this year we will be hosting our first conference.

“Literacy Through Popular Culture.”

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL

The conference theme is on research-based strategies for teaching literacy through popular culture. This theme engages students and teachers in embracing the rele-vance and power of popular culture—from comic books to teen novels to video-games— as a form of literacy in the classroom. Presentations and workshops should offer teachers concrete, actionable strategies that they can incorporate into their own language arts classrooms. We invite secondary (grades 6-12) language arts teachers and students, university professors and students, and other related profes-sionals to send in proposals for workshops or presentations.

DEADLINE: MARCH 7

Email proposal submissions to ncte@colostate.edu

We are very excited about this event and are working hard to make it an amazing and memorable one. Please visit the website for information: http://nctecsuconference2016.weebly.com

Show Up & Write

“show up & write” sessions started this week.  “show up & write” runs from February 1 to May 4, on Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays: 9-9:50 in Eddy 100 and 2-2:50 in Eddy 200. These drop-in writing sessions offer a regularly scheduled time in a communal, academic setting for writers to make progress on writing projects. Look for information in your mailbox to share with your students. And, “show up & write” regularly to see what you accomplish this semester!

 

Workshop Reminder: UD Composition

On February 16 from 5-7, in Eddy 4, we will offer the first installment of our series — “Sound Matters”. In this workshop we will discuss rationales for including multimodal elements in the composition course and work with sound recording equipment to produce a short piece using Audacity. More specifically, we will record vocal tracks using department equipment, gather and import music and sound effects, and mix these down into a finished audio version of a children’s story.  Faculty and graduate students from all areas are welcome to attend, but due to space limitations preference for attendees will go to those scheduled to teach UD Comp in upcoming semesters. Attendees should bring along a USB drive to save your creations. Snacks will be provided!

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ZambiaSummer2016

  • 2016 Summer Education Abroad Program in Zambia. Information Session TODAY! 12:00 pm, LSC 308. Read more about it here: http://english.colostate.edu/2016/01/2016-summer-education-abroad-program-zambia/
  • On Saturday, January 23rd, Doug Cloud gave a talk on the rhetoric of atheism at the annual Fort Collins Skepticamp, a gathering of local atheists, humanists and agnostics.
  • Camille Dungy is featured and quoted in the LA Review of Books essay, “Toward a Wider View of ‘Nature Writing'” January 10, 2016. https://lareviewofbooks.org/essay/toward-a-wider-view-of-nature-writing
  • Abby Kerstetter’s proposal was accepted to present at the 2016 Alaska Native Studies Conference in Anchorage. She will be reading a selection of poems from her thesis project.
  • Ivy Scherbarth, a graduate student in the Creative Nonfiction program, will have her essay “Enchantment” published in the next issue of Taproot Magazine (Issue 17: Myth).
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s flash piece, “Mothers and Sons” has been accepted for publication in Cease Cows (101 words). Publication date is forthcoming!
  • The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico, published in March 2015 as part of the Mountain West Poetry Series by the Center for Literary Publishing, has been awarded the Great Lakes College Association’s New Writers Award. The book has also won the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies award for best poetry collection about a significant topic related to the Mexican-American and/or Chicana/o experience. And it is included in Poets & Writers’ annual Debut Poets feature — a “highlight of ten of the most compelling and inspiring first books of poetry published in 2015” — in the January/February 2016 issue. Karen Montgomery Moore, Katie Naughton, Melissa Hohl, and Cedar Brant were the editorial and production team.

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Karen Montgomery-Moore, Olivia Tracy, Will Winham, and Kim Daggett

Karen Montgomery-Moore, Olivia Tracy, Will Winham, and Kim Daggett,
four of the six Literature students who defended or will defend their projects in the academic year 2014-2015

The literature faculty and the department of English recently hosted the Literature MA Showcase, a celebration of literature graduate students who have defended or will be defending their MA projects and earning their MA in 2014-2015. This year, we gathered at the Wild Boar Cafe to hear remarks about their projects, to offer our congratulations, and to enjoy refreshments and spirited conversation. Friends, family, current students in various graduate concentrations, and even a prospective student visiting campus learned about the diverse topics and approaches that literature students have been researching and writing about.

Associate Professor Debby Thompson and Professor SueEllen Campbell talk with a student

Associate Professor Debby Thompson and Professor SueEllen Campbell talk with a student

litmashowcase02

Professor Roze Hentschell, Associate Professor Aparna Gollapudi, and Assistant Professor Zach Hutchins

Will Winham

Will Winham

Lynn Shutters, Kristen Mullen, and Meagan Wilson

Lynn Shutters, Kristen Mullen, and Meagan Wilson

Here are a few examples of projects completed by Literature students this year, from Kim Daggett, Karen Montgomery Moore, and Olivia Tracy, who all attended the event, and one from Amy Moore, who defended in Fall 2014 but wasn’t able to be at the showcase.

Kim Daggett’s project: “Moving Landscape: The Narrative of the Poudre River Trail through Time, Space, and Place.” She describes it this way:

In my paper I examine how the Poudre River Trail forms a narrative arc through landscape that influences the way we think about, understand, and interact with space. In my paper I examine trail design and how we can see these design choices as embedding space with certain cultural and social ideologies about landscape that are then translated to the trail walker. I also want to show how space becomes place through time, transforming into a site of personal and collective meaning. In order to illustrate this transition from space to place I decided to root my paper in a landscape that I am deeply familiar with, the Poudre River Trail. I used the frame of the Poudre Trail to describe my own experience of space becoming place and interwove moments of memoir to illustrate this transition. I also incorporated other’s stories to illustrate how the Poudre River Trail is a place of collective memories and narratives, highlighting that the story of the Trail cannot be told by only one person. My hope is that my project will encourage people to think differently about how they value landscape and space. I want to push people to see beyond landscapes as mere space and understand that almost anywhere has the power to become place.

Kim Daggett and Assistant Professor Leif Sorensen

Kim Daggett and Assistant Professor Leif Sorensen

Amy Moore’s project: “‘One little window’: Lamkin and the Horror of the Real.”

This paper explores the aspects of horror at work in the Scottish folk ballad Lamkin and how it relates to modern horror cinema using cinematic examples such as The Purge and Insidious. The research of Mikel J. Koven and Adam Ganz is used to examine the relationship between folklore and film in terms of both horror genre conventions and stylistic similarities. Folklorist John Widdowson’s research on bogey figures enables the connection of the titular character of Lamkin to the frightening figures that appear in both oral storytelling and modern horror films as well as to Sigmund Freud’s concepts of the uncanny and the return of the repressed as demonstrated in Freud’s own analysis of a bogey figure called the Sand-man from the E.T.A. Hoffmann story of the same name. Perhaps the most important piece of research connecting Lamkin to both bogey figures and the horror genre is folklorist John DeWitt Niles’s article “Lamkin: The Motivation of Horror,” which traces the ballad’s origins to the name-of the-helper tale-type, the master-builder legends, European devil lore, and foundation sacrifice. This paper expands on Niles’s argument, taking his claims further to show that, as the name of his article implies, Lamkin should indeed be classified as “horror.” In addition to Freud, this paper uses the work of psychoanalytic theorists Jacques Lacan, and Slavoj Žižek as a theoretical framework, including Lacan’s idea of the neighbor as inhuman “thing” and Žižek’s reworking of the Lacanian concept of the Real.

Karen Montgomery Moore’s project: “Affect, Anxiety, and the Abject Corpse in A Study in Scarlet.”

In my paper, I use theorists including Foucault, Julia Kristeva, and Sara Ahmed to interrogate the murder victim’s corpse in A Study in Scarlet. Narratively, the murder victim’s corpse is not merely the object of detection or forensic examination in A Study in Scarlet, but it is also the subject of the mystery, a centrality that mirrors how the victim’s body becomes crucial to Victorian England police investigations. Due to the corpse’s abject nature and uncertain meaning, it becomes a “contested site”, or occupies a liminal space onto which multiple societal anxieties are displaced. In seeking answers about the murder, characters work to determine the particular meaning of the corpse and reduce it to an object so as to diffuse its significant affective influence. Holmes positions himself toward the abject corpse and embraces its unclear meaning, whereas Watson becomes subject to it and the ever-present criminal threat to his person it represents. In rupturing the subject/object distinction, the corpse reveals the potential inability of authority figures to discipline criminal activities into the clear confines of the law. Though the mystery is solved, the abject presence of the corpse reveals social concerns about violent crime and the effectiveness of the police, concerns that cannot be so easily hidden again.

Olivia Tracy’s project: “Commerce and Commodity: ‘Imperial Madness’ and Desire for the Other in Angela Carter”

My project analyzes two works by Angela Carter: her radio play, “Come Unto These Yellow Sands,” (1979) an ‘artificial biography’ about the life and mental illness of Victorian painter Richard Dadd, and her short story “Overture and Incidental Music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (1985), an “overture,” or prefatory material, to the events of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, detailing the origins of the debate between Titania and Oberon as told from the point of view of the object and cause of the debate, the Indian Boy, whom Carter reimagines as “The Golden Herm.” Through close readings of both figures and landscape, I argue that Carter is utilizing a “self-conscious Orientalism” in these works, a term devised to encapsulate how Carter uses multiple perspective and pastiche to reveal the British imperial wish-fulfillment of commodification and exoticism of the Other. She does this, I argue, to ultimately reveal the “imperial madness” at the center of both of these cultural texts and the way in which this continued commodification of the Other is both a cause and result of this madness. Through the use of self-conscious Orientalism to reveal this imperial madness, Carter foregrounds and critiques the materialist, commercial aspects of the imperial capitalist project at the heart of the two original narratives and, ultimately, at the heart of the Thatcher government of Carter’s own period.

Congratulations to all! We are so proud.

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GradShow, a one-day conference showcasing Colorado State University’s graduate student research and creative work, will take place from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Feb. 25 in the Lory Student Center. More than 300 graduate students will be presenting their work from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., followed by presentations and a guest speaker. The GradShow is a one day graduate conference at CSU that provides an opportunity for graduate students to showcase their talents, connect with other graduate students, and enjoy the possibility of winning a cash award.

Alan Rudolph, vice president for research at CSU, will present the keynote, “Challenging Boundaries: Experiences and Opportunities in Interdisciplinary Creative Artistry and Scholarship” at 1:30 p.m. Following Rudolph, brief talks will be presented by John Simmons, founder of C3 Real Estate Solutions; Brian Ashe, director of business development at Riverside Technology Inc.; Corkie Odell, co-founder of Odell Brewing Company; Jeff Poore, president of Numerica; and Gino Campana, Fort Collins District 3 City Council member and founder and president of Bellisimo Inc.

Breakout sessions on the theme of “Expanding the Graduate Experience through Interdisciplinary and Innovative Approaches” will take place from 3 to 4 p.m. The sessions, led by guest panelists, will focus on creating and nurturing diverse teams from composition to integration and synergy.

Graduate presenters will also compete for cash awards, presented at a reception from 4-6 p.m. Awards will be given in the general two areas of “Great Minds in Research” and “Distinction in Creativity.” In addition, there will be awards for submissions in areas such as global impact, alumni and diversity/social justice. More than $9,000 will be awarded.

The Graduate Student Showcase will be held in the Grand Ballroom of the Lory Student Center on Wednesday, February 25 from 10:00 A.M. – 6:00 P.M. More specifically, the schedule is as follows:

10:00 A.M.:  Check-in for Graduate Student Presenters

10:30 A.M.:  Check-in for Judges

10:30 A.M. – 1:30 P.M.:  Poster Presentations, Artwork, and Performances

12:00 P.M. – 1:30 P.M.:  Lunch is Served

1:30 P.M. – 4:00 P.M.:  Connecting with Graduate Students, Faculty, and Community Partners. Presentations and Talks will be sponsored by the Vice President for Research.

4:00 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.: Awards Ceremony. Cash prizes and recognition to awardees. Light hors d’oeuvres and beverages.

The event is free and open to the campus and community.  For more information, read about the event in SOURCE, or visit gradshow.colostate.edu, or click here to view a PDF of the 2015 Showcase program.


We are so proud of the English department students whose work will be presented at the Showcase. Please consider showing your support for them by visiting the Showcase, talking with students about their projects, being in the audience for the creative and performing arts presentations between 11:00 am and 12:15 pm, attending the Awards Ceremony starting at 4:00 pm, and staying for the reception to congratulate and celebrate with the participants.

English department GradShow participants and their projects:

KRISTIN GEORGE BAGDANOV
Department: English, MFA Creative Writing

The Somatic Wager: Just as the mere naming of the Anthropocene has enabled productive discussions across academic fields, naming a new category of ecopoet­ics will encourage reflection on the role of poetry in the wider sphere of environmental communication. This category is the “anthropocenic lyric.” This lyric helps us cultivate an ecological self through form and content, enacting and professing methods of sustaining this self in the Anthropocene. My critical paper expands upon this lyric by looking at contemporary poets Bin Ramke, Juliana Spahr, and Brenda Hillman, while my collection of poems, “The Somatic Wager,” engages the an­thropocenic crisis formally and conceptually.

 

LARA ROBERTS
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Performing Identity Discomfort: Writers’ identities are delicate façades, constructed from essays, po­ems, and artist statements, and performed at conferences and readings. These are spaces where we can be comfortable in the accuracy of our own self-portrayals, but I am more interested in the spaces where our pieces are open to be read (and misread) by others. By recording myself reading aloud others’ works and inviting others to read mine, I hope to create a space of discomfort to explore the intersections between our own performances and others’ perceptions of us. Here, we might see a facet of ourselves that we have not before.

 

JESSICA HILL
Department: English, MA English/Creative Nonfiction

India’s Daughters: “India’s Daughters” discusses the fear of rape a woman encounters on her solo travels through India. She arrived three weeks after the world­wide media scandal of Jyoti Singh Pandey’s gang rape and subsequent death, and the author couldn’t let her story go as she made her way through the country as a solo, white, female traveler. It sheds light on the way media upholds Orientalistic ideals by covering rape in India differently than rape in the U.S., and how this shapes Americans’ in­herent fear of “other.” This essay is an excerpt from a memoir-in-essays titled, “The People We Meet.”

 

ABBY KERSTETTER
Department: English, MFA Creative Writing

She Took Her Power from the Water: In 1901, Michael Chabitnoy, an orphan and full-blooded Aleut, was sent to the Carlisle Indian School and subsequently married a non-na­tive, took a factory job, and settled in Pennsylvania, far removed from his Native Alaskan heritage. This body of poetry not only explores fam­ily history and the Aleut culture, but also incorporates personal and Native American myth and addresses questions of the relationship of culture, place, and the individual. Heavily influenced by research and documentary poetics, this work provides witness to and seeks under­standing of the Aleut people, the history of Native Americans, and his­torical acts of acculturation and appropriation.

 

CEDAR BRANT (Undergraduate Choice Award, Creative, 2nd Place)
Department: English, MFA Creative Writing

The Hidden Hinge: Mapping Memory and Myth through Poetry: Both science and poetry are organizational nets that I place over the er­ratic natural and emotional worlds and begin to track patterns, growth, and unlikely relationships. I explore the movement between external and internal experience of place, using landscape as a lens to the more difficult-to-access inner emotional world. I’m compelled by poems as a manifestation of memory and myth unearthed from the body, and as a subconscious compass that informs our actions. Using the tools of language and imagery of landscape, I seek to navigate the process of symbolic transformation through poetic storytelling.

 

PAUL BINKLEY
Department: English, MA English/English Education

Science Fiction and the STEM Fields: Interdisciplinary Education: The presenter outlines his work and research in designing a high-school-level English course aimed at using science fiction as a tool for interdisciplinary learning. Taking advantage of this unique and often marginalized form of literature can open new avenues for engaging students’ existing passions and hooking student interest into learning in the science fields. Based on ongoing and existing research, this hy­pothetical course is intended to support an interdisciplinary approach to both learning and teaching by using science fiction novels, informa­tional science writing, and critical theory to foster inquiry, language skills, and science proficiency in those students.

 

LESLIE DAVIS
Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL

Anti-Racist and Anti-Linguicist Action in the CSU Writing Center: This paper looks at the work done in the CSU Writing Center, and how racist or linguicist attitudes may manifest themselves in the interac­tions between consultants and students. While these attitudes may take the form of microaggressions, they may also show up covertly in staff discussions of working with English language learners (ELLs). While it is important to recognize the ways that we at the Writing Center may be perpetuating racist or linguicist attitudes during consultations, the CSU community as a whole must also be brought into the process of self-examination and reflection, specifically regarding academic writ­ing standards.

 

JENNA FRANKLIN
Department: English, MA English/English Education

Write OPEN: Developing Open- Mindedness in High School Youth: Being critically open-minded is essential to successfully collaborating cross-culturally in our increasingly globalized society and within the microcosm of multicultural school environments. I plan to experiment in pedagogy and praxis by asking if open-mindedness can be developed in high schoolers and result in increased cross-cultural understanding and civic activism. As a pilot project for developing future curriculum, I am proposing a 2-week summer course, called Write OPEN (Writing for Open Perspectives and Engagement Now), for 10-15 voluntary stu­dents at Rocky Mountain High School in Fort Collins, Colorado in the summer of 2015.

 

REYILA HADEER
Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL

How to Eat Well in Fort Collins?: The number of international students in the US is increasing sharply nowadays. International students are coming across different difficul­ties in terms of language, culture, daily life, relationship with others and so on. Among various difficulties, food is one of the major issues for international students. In this paper, I would like to design an ESP (En­glish for specific purpose) course for Chinese students in Fort Collins in order to help them eat well and live more smoothly in such a foreign city.

 

JONI HAYWARD
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Woman as Rebel: Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac: Throughout his career, Danish filmmaker Lars Von Trier has gained a reputation for his misogynist depiction of women in his films—and Nymphomaniac Volume I & II is no exception. The examination of fe­male characters in a medium as popular and widely consumed as film creates a dialogue about current trends in culture surrounding the treatment of women, and parallels well with a study of current feminist criticism. Looking specifically at Sara Ahmed’s feminist theory in her book The Promise of Happiness, one gains insight into current issues in feminist thought and how women are depicted in film.

 

EMILY LAPADURA
Department: English, MA English/Rhetoric/Composition

Reconstructing Social Futures: Current first-year composition (FYC) research proves many students write daily on digital platforms like social networking sites (SNS). As we move from a page to screen society, most SNS writing is visually ori­ented as students produce and consume digital photography. My study seeks to discover how designing and teaching an FYC class exploring SNS use develops students’ critical digital literacies. I applied a criti­cal approach to CSU’s FYC course by introducing students to ideology, and how social norms produced by systems of power can effect on their rhetorical choices when posting personal photos on popular SNS like Facebook and Instagram.

 

ANGELINA MAIO
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Immigration Policies and Human Consequences in Ana Castillo’s The Guardians: Ana Castillo’s The Guardians centers on a family who is occupying the space on the U.S.-Mexico border and having to occupy that space within given rules and regulations that protect the border. This project focuses on Gabo, a sixteen year old who crossed the U.S.-Mexico bor­der illegally. I argue that the character of Gabo serves as a critique and analysis of borders, spaces and policies.

 

KAREN MONTGOMERY MOORE
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Embodiment in Absence: Representation of Loss in the White Spaces: Carole Maso’s The Art Lover and HR Hegnauer’s Sir strategically use white space in order to represent the textually unmarked body of their subject. Such formatting is a deliberate choice which allows space to consider the physical body- whether a character or memory of a some­one known to the author- on the part of both the reader as well as the author. This space for consideration becomes temporal as well, by cre­ating a pause in the writing, and also works as a prompt: if this space is so empty, what (or who) should be here to fill it?

 

COURTNEY POLLARD
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Creating Public Literacy: Reading Text and Image in Broadside Ballads: This project is an exploration of how English broadside ballads of the seventeenth century are multimedia texts that create and propagate public literacy. The font, language, and literary devices used in the texts of ballads made them readable by people of varying textual literacy levels. Additionally, the text-image relations of ballads allowed illiter­ate audiences to become visually literate through “reading” the images of the ballads. Since broadside ballads were most accessible and most commonly read in the public sphere, they contributed to the creation of public forms of literacy.

 

OLIVIA TRACY
Department: English, MA English/Literature

“Rise up through the words”: Postcolonial Haitian Uncoverings of Anacaona : This work analyzes historical representations of Anacaona– Columbus’ Four Voyages, de Las Casas’ History of the Indies and A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies– and postcolonial representations– Jean Metellus’ play Anacaona, Danielle Legros Georges’ poem “Anaca­ona,” and Edwidge Danticat’s young adult novel Anacaona, Haiti, 1490. Through textual analysis of these works, I argue that these three post­colonial authors are bringing Anacaona’s narrative, obscured in many narratives of first contact, to the surface in order to posit the figure of Anacaona as new symbol of postcolonial Haitian identity, one that is grounded in place and a pre-Columbian origin.

 

JOHN WHALEN, ALHASSANE ALI DROUHAMANE, and NATE WILL (Undergraduate Choice Award, Research, 3rd place)
(John Whalen) Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL
(Alhassane Ali Drouhamane) Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL
(Nate Will) Department: English and Foreign Languages, MA English/TEFL/TESL and MA Languages, Literatures, and Culture/Spanish

The Utilization of Web-based Resources for Computer Assisted Vocabulary Learning: Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) plays an important role in the field of teaching English as a second language. However, in­creasing specialization within the field means that CALL resources are sometimes perceived as accessible only to specialized researchers. This presentation will outline a recent migration of CALL technologies into accessible, web-based platforms and discuss how three CALL websites in particular, Vocab Sushi, Storybird, and ESLVideo.com, can be incor­porated into an existing ESL classroom with minimal teacher training. An example syllabus will be modified for illustration, and the benefits to teachers and students will be discussed.

 

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image by Marc Levin

image by Marc Levin

Join us in congratulating the recipients of recent travel funding awards. We are so proud of their efforts and so happy they will be getting the opportunity to travel and share their work.

Graduate Student Travel Grant Awards:

Kristin George Bagdanov: Presenting “The Anthropocenic Lyric” at the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE) biennial conference in Moscow, Idaho

Mandi Casolo: presenting on “The Promise of Too Much Happiness: Alice Munro’s Undertaking of Contemporary Feminist Concerns in Literary Narrative” for the North American Review bicentennial conference, Cedar Falls, Iowa

Alhassane Ali Drouhamane: Presenting “Using CALL Websites to Enhance and Streamline L2 Vocabulary Learning” at the 46th Annual TESOL Convention in Toronto

Joni Hayward: presenting “Woman as Rebel: Depiction of Woman in Lars Von Trier’s Nymphomaniac Volume I & II” at the Image of the Rebel in Literature, Media and Society conference in Colorado Springs, CO

Moriah Kent: presenting “Exploring a Potential Vocabulary Gap Between the Lexical Proficiency of Advanced ELLs and the Lexical Requirements of First-Year University Readings,” American Association for Applied Linguistics and Association Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée 2015 Conference in Toronto, Ontario

Angelina Maio: Presenting “The Illegal Immigrant as Rebel: Immigration Policies and Human Consequences in Ana Castillo’s The Guardians” at the Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery Conference titled “The Image of the Rebel” in Pueblo, Colorado

Karen Montgomery Moore: presenting “Reading the Dead Bodies on Bones” at the University of Nevada, Reno’s College of Liberal Arts Graduate Symposium

Courtney Pollard: Presenting “Exploring Alternative Literacies: Reading English Broadside Ballads as Multimedia Texts” at the “Expanding Boundaries and Reconceptualizing Text” conference hosted by the University of South Florida English Graduate Student Association in Tampa, Florida

Kylan Rice: Presenting “Knotted Up in Place: Melville and the American Spatial Subject” at the Melville in a Global Context – The Tenth International Melville Conference in Tokyo

John Whalen: presenting “Using CALL Websites to Enhance and Streamline L2 Vocabulary Learning” at the 46th Annual TESOL Convention in Toronto

 

AWP Attendees with Funding:

With support from the office of the Vice President of Research, the College of Liberal Arts, the English Department, and the Center for Literary Publishing, the following graduate students will receive funding to attend the Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Minneapolis in April: Jayla Rae Ardelean, Kristin George Bagdanov, Cedar Brant, Neil FitzPatrick, Melissa Hohl, Anitra Ingham, Bryan Johnson, Andrew Mangan, John McDonough, Katie Naughton, Marie Turner, and Drew Webster.

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