Tag Archives: Beth Lechleitner

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has a group of essays from A Quiet Book in the new Copper Nickel.
  • On Saturday February 25th, Camille Dungy will be the Keynote Speaker at the Robinson Jeffers Society Annual Meeting at Occidental College. Her talk is titled: “The View From Hawk Tower Today: A Contemporary Environmental Poet Reflects on What Robinson Jeffers Has Meant to Her.” https://www.oxy.edu/oxy-arts/projects-exhibitions/visiting-artists
  • The opening reception for the CSU Art and Science exhibition is this coming Tuesday, Feb 21 from 4:30 to 6:30 pm at the Curfman gallery in the Lory Student Center. Beth Lechleitner’s collaborative poetry/visual art piece “Mettle” has been is included.  The show runs through March 24.
  • Dana Masden’s short story “Exercise, A Good Book, and a Cup of Tea” is published in the Fall 2016 issue of Third Coast.
  • Mary Ellen Sanger (Associate Director, Community Literacy Center) won second place in the North Street Book Prize contest for her book, “Blackbirds in the Pomegranate Tree: Stories from Ixcotel State Prison.” This account of her unjust imprisonment in Mexico centers on stories of solidarity and community with the women she met inside. https://winningwriters.com/past-winning-entries/blackbirds-in-the-pomegranate-tree
  • Alex Morrison’s short story, “Life Along the Fault Line,” is available in print in the Winter 2017 issue of The Cardiff Review. 
  • Catie Young’s poem “Hollow Bone” was recently published by Public Pool. You can read it here: http://www.publicpool.org/dope/cl-young/
  • Aby Kaupang was recently asked by the Lincoln Center and the Fort Collins Museum of Art to participate in the Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate exhibit by writing poems and reading them at the opening reception. Her poems can be found mounted in the lobby at FoCoMoA or online through Essay Press’ Radio Radio 11.8.16.
  • Steven Schwartz’s story “The Bad Guest” has been accepted by Ploughshares and will appear in the Winter 2017/18 issue.

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'Old School' research in the library. Remember catalog cards? 1975. University Historic Photograph Collection

‘Old School’ research in the library. Remember card catalogs? 1975. University Historic Photograph Collection. (Image shared by the Morgan Library on Facebook last week).

  • On Thursday, February 9, the Community Literacy Center hosted Kay Adams, Founder and director of the Center for Journal Therapy in Denver as part of their spring SpeakOut! facilitator training event. Fourteen students, faculty, and community members participated in dialogue on writing through times of chaos.
  • Beth Lechleitner’s collaborative poetry/visual art piece “Mettle” has been accepted into the CSU Art and Science exhibition at the Curfman gallery.  The show opens Feb 21 and runs through March 24.
  • Todd Mitchell attended and presented two sessions at last weekend’s 50th Anniversary CCIRA Conference in Denver. One grimly packed session on “Teaching Dystopian Fiction,” and a second on “Using Writing Games to Develop Literacy and Creativity.”
  • Claire Boyles (second year MFA candidate in fiction) has been accepted to the Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference in fiction and awarded a Katharine Bakeless Nason scholarship to attend.
  • Bill Tremblay’s memoir on jazz “The Music While the Music Lasts” will appear in Brilliant Corners in the Summer, 2017, issue.
  • Slope Editions announced that Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) book, Instrument of Gaps, was selected for publication from their Fall 2016 Open Reading Period. Read more information on the Slope Editions news page. She also has a poem accepted in Beloit Poetry Journal, her poem “A long road never takes us” is out in the Winter 2017 edition of North American Review, and she participated in a Parlor Press reading in D.C. for AWP on Thursday, February 9.

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Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has been named one of “The Top Ten New Latino Writers to Watch (and Read) for 2017” by the by LatinoStories.com literary website. http://latinostories.com/Top_Ten_Lists/top_10_authors.htm. The recognition was based on feedback from editors, faculty, librarians and readers. Also, a section from his book, Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams, was just nominated for a 2017 Pushcart Prize from Autumn House Press. Lastly, a new essay, “Outline Toward an Essay on Ethnicity and Miracles,” from a collection in progress, was accepted for publication by the University of Alaska’s hybrid journal, Permafrost.
  • Matthew Cooperman is pleased to report that Aby Kaupang is recovering nicely from back surgery (a discectomy; three weeks now), feeling stronger each day and remembering the joy of walking. Matthew and Aby are also pleased to report that their long-running collaborative project NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified) has been accepted by Futurepoem, a NYC press. A portion of the manuscript appeared last year as an electronic chapbook called disorder 299.00, from Essay Press. It can be found here, http://www.essaypress.org/ep-52/ A recent review of that chapbook is now up at Rain Taxi, http://www.raintaxi.com/disorder-299-00/
  • Our own Camille Dungy will be reading the names at Commencement on Saturday, January 17 at 7:30 p.m. Several faculty are already coming to the ceremony, but please join them If you want to hear Camille and recognize the graduates from our department. Senior Tim Cuevas will carry in the English banner. Thank you, Tim and Camille!
  • Kudos to Nancy Henke and Beth Lechleitner, who led a third fantastic year of the Finals Friends extravaganza. With the extra time and effort they gave, faculty had something special to look forward to in their mailboxes this week last week of classes. If you participated, thank Beth and Nancy next time you see them for this bright, cheerful reminder of how much we enjoy and appreciate each other.
  • Mike Palmquist presented a talk on writing across the curriculum at Indiana University of Pennsylvania on November 9th. He followed the talk with a day-long workshop the following day.
  • Mary Crow’s translations of lines by Roberto Juarroz were published in “Versailles: Aesthetics of the Ephemeral” by Christine Buci-Glucksmann; July, 2016. Catalog for the Exhibit: Olafur Eliasson’s Waterfall. Versailles, France. (7 June – 30 Oct. 2016)

CSU Writing Center

The CSU Writing Center will have limited hours during finals week. We will be open Monday, December 12 and Tuesday, December 13 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in Eddy Hall, room 23. We will be closed during the break, and will reopen on Monday, January 23.

Eddy 300 Lab

The Eddy 300 Lab hours for finals week: Monday –Thursday 7:30-8:00pm

Friday 7:30-4:00pm. We will be closed for winter break from Saturday, December  17th  and return on Tuesday, January 17th.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

 

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jam

Jam
For Bev McQuinn

A decade gone, responding to my plea for thinning,
you dug canes with vigor,
creating welcomed roominess in my raspberry forest
and seeding a small grove of your own.

Every summer since then, you have blessed me with jam.

Including this one,
after which, very shortly,
you went:
your gut filled with an unwelcomed meal of cells.

We brought you food (without small seeds, please).
But, too suddenly, you were away.

The day I learned of it,
I found, in the refrigerator at work,
this year’s ruby gift of your labor.

This is the task you left to us:
eating the small-seeded sweetness
from the jar of your absence.

–E.A. Lechleitner
August 31, 2016

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The trees in front of Eddy Hall are starting to get a few golden leaves. Fall is on its way! #greenandgoldforever

The trees in front of Eddy Hall are starting to get a few golden leaves. Fall is on its way! #greenandgoldforever

  • On June 23-24, 2016, Pam Coke participated in an international, interdisciplinary conference titled “The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers” in Le Mans, France.  Scholars from around the world, including South Africa, New Zealand, Austria, and the United States, gathered to share research and “to shed light on those cultural artifacts that target not only teenagers but an increasingly wider public – including television series, films, young adult novels, among others – and explore the images of teenagers.”  Pam presented her paper, “What Are They Selling? What Are We Buying?:  Eating Disorders as Cultural Artifacts,” where she shared findings from her qualitative research study examining how eating disorders have become an intricate part of the web of American behavior patterns, a way for teenagers to perform adolescence.
  • Over the summer, Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poetry manuscript was a finalist for the Ahsahta Sawtooth Prize. She also had 5 ghazals accepted for publication in Denver Quarterly. Sarah Pieplow would also like you to know that the GLBT Resource Center’s Safe Zone training is back! It’s fun! (And she is one of the trainers!) The purpose of Safe Zone is to reduce homophobia and heterosexism at CSU, thereby making our campuses a safer environment for all members of our community regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.  The Safe Zone program prepares members of the CSU community to serve as a resource on LGBTQ issues, and also strives to educate the organization about the Safe Zone program.  If you would like to better learn how to support students, faculty, and staff in the GLBTQQIA community (and figure out that acronym), these trainings can help you do that. To sign up for a training, go to http://www.glbtrc.colostate.edu/safe-zone. To ask more questions about what the heck this involves, go to Sarah.
  • Over the summer Dan Robinson gave a fiction reading, presented a paper, and moderated a round table discussion at the International Hemingway Conference in Oak Park, IL; He also had a couple of radio interviews on writing about and on the science and art of wildfire fighting.
  • Shoaib Alam received an Honorable Mention in the Glimmer Train May/June Short Story Award for New Writers contest.
  • This summer, Felicia Zamora (’12 MFA) has two poems in the newest issue of Poetry Northwest, was interviewed on the Indiana Review website as runner-up to the 2015 1/2K Prize, had poems accepted to Witness Magazine and Michigan Quarterly Review, was a finalist for the 46er Prize with The Adirondack Review where three poems are featured, and her second chapbook, Imbibe {et alia} here, was released from Dancing Girl Press.
  • Leslee Becker received the 1st-place Award in the 2016 Moondance Film Festival’s Short Story category. She also had stories accepted by Carolina Quarterly and Fifth Wednesday, and was awarded a writing fellowship/residency at the Anne LaBastille Foundation in the Adirondacks.
  • Ellen Brinks gave a plenary talk in early July at the University of London, Birkberk College, on the forgotten geographies of the transnational fairy tale in late 19th- and early 20thC fin-de-siecle literary culture.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s long piece “Difference Essay” was accepted recently by Seattle Review. This summer he gave two readings in California, at the Sacramento Poetry Center, and Poetry Flash/Moe’s Books, Berkeley. He and Aby Kaupang will be reading at Mountain Folds, in Colorado Springs, Sept 24. Two upcoming readings Matthew and Aby suggest for your radar. First, hosted by Cole Konopka and Sam Killmeyer for the Fork Socket series, September 14, Julie Carr, Amaranth Borsuk and Sam Killmeyer, 7:30 pm, The Forge. Second, for EveryEye, Sept. 21, Susan Briante and other luminaries, tea.
  • Sue Doe’s article, “Stories and Explanations in the Introductory Calculus Classroom: A Study of WTL as a Teaching and Learning Intervention” which was co-authored with Mary Pilgrim, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Director of the Calculus Center, was accepted this week for publication in the The WAC Journal.  
  • Beth Lechleitner will read a few of her poems at a community reading in celebration of autumn.  The event is from 1 to 3 on Sunday, September 18 at the Loveland Museum and Gallery on Lincoln in downtown Loveland.
  • Dana Masden’s poem “The Missing” appears in the Fall Issue of the Adirondack Review.
  • In two weeks, Airica Parker will be a featured reader and workshop leader at a regional poetry retreat hosted by Wendy Videlock in Palisade, Colorado. All are welcome to attend: tickets available through: http://coloradawendy.wixsite.com/mysite
  • Barbara Sebek kicked off sabbatical with some research in London at the Guildhall Library and the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum.  Sebek’s paper, “Temporal and Geographical Mash-Ups in Jonson and Shakespeare” was part of a seminar “Of an Age: Shakespeare and Periodization” at the World Shakespeare Congress, which convened in Stratford-upon-Avon and London in July and August.  In addition to seeing five plays in seven nights by Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Jonson at the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Globe, she met the British Sign Language interpreter for Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, visited the British Library’s stunning “Shakespeare in Ten Acts” exhibition, and saw the Royal College of Physicians exhibition of the library of alchemist/scholar/global navigation promoter John Dee, regarded as one of the inspirations for Shakespeare’s Prospero.
  • Rebecca Snow’s poem “Sestina for Adjuncts” is in the current issue of Rattle: http://www.rattle.com/print/50s/i53/
  • The Contractor, a historical western by James Work, professor emeritus, is now available in hardcover from FiveStar Publishing. The reviews have been unanimously positive, and the publisher has submitted The Contractor as a nominee for the Spur Award from the Western Writers of America. Prof. Work’s next western, The Grub Rider, Number 8 in the Keystone Ranch series, will be published by FiveStar in April of 2017.
  • Lots and lots of good news from Tim Amidon, who had a very busy summer:
    • In May, Tim Amidon presented a research talk at Computers & Writing in Rochester, New York on the ethics of disclosing geospatial knowledge through Instagram titled “#nolandmarks: technorhetorics, watersheds, & de/coloniality.”
    • In May, Tim Amidon led a mentoring roundtable at the Graduate Research Network, a one day workshop for graduate students concentrating in computers, writing, and digital rhetoric at Computers & Writing in Rochester, New York.
    • In May, Tim Amidon was appointed to the faculty of the Colorado School of Public Health in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health.
    • Tim Amidon traveled to Heifei, China, with a delegation from the Natural Resources Ecology Lab (NREL) to envision how the composition program might best support English language learners from Anhui Agricultural University who will be coming to CSU as part of a 2X2 program.
    • In May, Tim Amidon helped to coordinate (and, participated in) an exciting two-day professional development workshop lead by UD Composition Admins Ed Lessor and James Roller. Participants spent time working with digital composing tools such as cameras, audio recorders, as well as photo, audio, and video editing software, and theorized how pedagogies and assignments can scaffold multimodal literacy learning in their Upper Division composition courses.
    • In June, Tim Amidon and W. Michele Simmons (Miami University, Oxford, OH) had a peer-reviewed paper on research methodology in community based research accepted in the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on the Design of Communication. Tim and Michele will give a research talk on their paper at SIGDOC ’16 and the paper will be published in the proceedings thereafter.
    • In June, Tim Amidon spoke at and participated in a one-day workshop hosted by an interdisciplinary research team and lead by Dr. A. R. Ravishankara to envision a National Smoke Warning System. Stakeholders from the EPA, US Forest Service, CDC and researchers discussed challenges and opportunities associated with attempting to design and implement a warning system that could effectively alert publics to the health and safety risks associated with wildfire.
    • In June, Tim Amidon gave short-workshop on ethnographic and naturalistic field-based research methods for exploring and writing about place for students affiliated with an exchange program between CSU and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk, Russia) led by Dr. Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker and Dr. Tony Becker.
    • In August, Tim Amidon participated in a one-day educator institute at InWorks in Denver hosted by Hypothes.is, a web-based annotation tool that allows students to tag, comment, and offer meta-level commentary on any web-based content. Participants from both secondary and post-secondary levels envisioned and shared ways of utilizing the tool to support learning in their courses. Dr. Jaime Jordan was one of the leaders of the excellent workshop.
    • In August, Tim Amidon was invited by Dr. Lori Peek to consult on the design of a digital survey-instrument that FEMA is developing to help U.S. property owners, businesses, and government actors conduct cost-benefit analyses about the value of building or re-engineering structures to meet performance-based engineering standards for seismic activity.
    • In August, Tim Amidon participated in components of the weeklong graduate teaching assistant orientation organized and led by Composition Admins Nancy Henke, Amanda Memoli, Kristina Yelinek, Hannah Caballero and Composition Director, Dr. Sue Doe.

 

Readings

Essayist, Memoirist, and CSU Fiction alumnus Steven Church will give a reading of his work. The reading takes place in the Lory Student Center, Long Peaks Room 302 on Thursday, September 8 at 7:30pm. The reading is free and open to the public. Steven Church is the author of The Guinness Book of Me: a Memoir of Record, Theoretical Killings: Essays and Accidents, The Day After The Day After: My Atomic Angst, Ultrasonic: Essays and a forthcoming fifth book of nonfiction, One with the Tiger: Sublime and Violent Encounters between Humans and Animals, which will be released in Fall 2016 by Soft Skull Press.

On Thursday, September 14 poets Julie Carr, Amaranth Borsuk, and MFA student, Sam Killmeyer will give a reading of their work. The reading will take place at the Forge Publick House, located at: Back Alley, 232 Walnut St., Fort Collins CO, 80524.

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image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

Did you know that Eddy Hall is undergoing a remodel? It will begin soon and take about 16 months. This week, they put up one panel of the new facade on the south side of the building (see above image), and half of the third floor is packing their things into boxes to be temporarily moved into other locations while the work takes place. The English Department main offices will move over to the Behavioral Sciences Building, Rooms 104-112, (the phone number will remain the same). Stay tuned!

Today is the last of Spring 2014 classes! Good luck to everyone on finals, as well as final papers and projects, teachers and students, and a special wish for the best of luck to our graduating seniors.

  • Libby James (MA English ’71) is a local and national running legend who lives here in Fort Collins. She is featured in this great story on ESPNW, Libby was also featured recently in an article in the Denver Post, “Libby James, 75, ready for Colorado Running Hall of Fame.”
  • Leslee Becker’s story, “The Bonaventure,” has been accepted for publication in The Vermont Literary Review.
  • Two of Camille Dungy’s poems were translated into French and published in a special section of Siècle 21: Littèrature & Société edited by Marilyn Hacker.
  • EJ Levy will judge Tupelo Quarterly’s Open Prose Contest (Prize $1,000): May 27, 2014, deadline. For additional information, see: https://tupeloquarterly.submittable.com/submit/29128  EJ’s essay “Bread” appears in the current issue of The Normal School. EJ’s short-short story “Talk to Her” appeared in Kenyon Review online in April.
    https://www.kenyonreview.org/kr-online-issue/2014-spring/selections/e-j-levy-342846/
  • Sasha Steensen’s new book House of Deer is now out with Fence Books: http://www.fenceportal.org/?page_id=5195. She has several new poems out in the latest issue of Jubilat, and next week she leaves for a week-long reading tour on the east coast.
  • Beth Lechleitner’s mezzo-soprano daughter, Kate Mathews, will be presenting Copland’s settings of 12 Emily Dickinson poems on June 7, at 7:30 p.m. at the Magnolia Music Studio (210 W. Magnolia, Corner of Magnolia and Mason). Tickets available at: http://emilydickinson.brownpapertickets.com/ To learn more about Kate, visit her website:  http://www.katemathews.com/
  • Man in the Moon: Essays on Fathers & Fatherhood, published by the Center for Literary Publishing and distributed by the University Press of Colorado, is now available (www.upcolorado.com or amazon.com). The anthology features essays selected from several literary magazines and includes work by our own Debby Thompson and Dan Beachy-Quick, plus many other fine writers.
  • The University of Nebraska Press, observing that they consider it a “lasting contribution to Western literature,” recently released a Bison Books paperback edition of David Mogen’s memoir, Honyocker Dreams, Montana Memories (2011).

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