Tag Archives: Tony Becker

CLA Dean Ben Withers opens the Spring 2017 CLA Awards Ceremony

Recently, the College of Liberal Arts (CLA) held their annual awards ceremony. Five members of the English department were honored. Sheila Dargon received the State Classified Award, Zach Hutchins and Kylan Rice were awarded for Excellence in Teaching, Tony Becker was presented with the Faculty Development Award, and Bruce Ronda was presented with the John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award.

When presenting the CLA State Classified Award to Shelia Dargon, Roze Hentschell said,

The College of Liberal Arts State Classified Award recognizes outstanding contributions and achievements by state classified employees. This year, the award goes to Sheila DArgon, who has been with the Department of English for the last 10 years. Sheila’s nomination letter celebrates her exemplary leadership in supporting faculty and students to ensure their success. She anticipates problems before they manifest, can handle a crisis with composure, and is a careful listener who guides students to make the best decisions about their academic careers and helps them feel welcome, comfortable and confident. She is the first point of contact for all students who come to the third floor of Eddy (thousands of students, since all Composition students come that way as well) and a fine example of the excellence of State Classified employees. Congratulations, Sheila!

CLA Dean Ben Withers presents Sheila Dargon her award

Sheila Dargon
Undergraduate Program Assistant

What brought you to CSU?

I moved to Fort Collins in 2005. My sister and her family had lived here for years and I needed to start over, so I came out here and started working for a temporary agency while applying for jobs everywhere! I remember when filling out the application for a job here at the University, that I really liked the energy of being on campus, and thought it would be a great place to work. I actually got the offer from the English department on the day I would have been hired by the company I was temping!

What’s your favorite thing about working in the English Department?

My favorite thing about working in the English department is that every day is different. Some days I see and speak to a lot of students and faculty, and the next, I am working on the computer.

What’s one thing you’d like students in the English Department to know about you?

I want English students to know that I’m here to help and really want them to succeed here at CSU.

What’s your secret? By which I mean: what makes you so good at keeping track of so much information and so many people?

I have no idea, I guess when you like what you do and the people you work with, it makes it easy.

CLA Dean Ben Withers presents Kylan Rice his Excellence in Teaching Award (GTA)

The Excellence in Teaching Award recognizes one outstanding teacher in each of the following categories: Tenured Faculty, Tenure-Track Faculty, Special & Temporary Faculty, Graduate Teaching Assistant.

CLA Dean Ben Withers presents Zach Hutchens his Excellence in Teaching Award

Zach Hutchins
Assistant Professor of English: Literature

Professor Zach Hutchins received the Excellence in Teaching Award for his hard work as a tenure track with the English Department since joining in 2013.

Associate Dean for Faculty and Graduate Studies Bruce Ronda introduced Hutchins’ award, calling him a “curricular innovator, brilliant scholar, dynamic classroom presenter, mentor and role-model” who is known for his “witty, relaxed and deeply informed teaching.”

From faculty to student support, Hutchins has made an impact within our own English Department. Bruce reminisced that his colleagues praised his “ease in front of the class “and his “invite interaction” coupled with “evident joy in teaching the class.”

But first person testimonials from his students speak louder than those. Bruce explained that these students “drew the attention of the Committee on the Liberal Arts.” One student said “Professor Hutchins is a no-brainer when it comes to being recognized as an excellent teacher in the College of Liberal Arts, and I’m all too happy to officially give him my personal seal of approval.”

This award will not slow Hutchins down. We were able to ask him a few questions about his time in the English Department and how he plans to continue doing what he’s doing.

 

What has been the most rewarding moment(s) at the English Department, or in Eddy?

I think my most rewarding moment here at CSU came in the spring of 2016, when students from my fall 2015 senior capstone course, “Your Success Story,” emailed me to say that assignments completed in the course had helped them secure the dream job they had targeted. I love to see student work find a second life, outside the classroom.

Do you plan on working on any projects this summer?

I’ve got too many projects this summer, but the most exciting is an essay on Herman Melville’s epic poem Clarel that will take me to London in June, for the International Melville Conference.

Who (or what) had the greatest influence on your career path?

Probably a high school teacher who was willing to talk books (and play chess!) with me after school—not just during class hours. He helped me see that literature mattered and that teacher/student interactions could be more meaningful than an exchange of paperwork.

In one word, how would you describe Eddy/the English department?

Energizing!

CLA Dean Withers presents Tony Becker with his Faculty Development Award

The Faculty Development Award, presented to Assistant Professor Tony Becker,provides support for outstanding research and/or creative activity, and is funded by participants in the Great Conversations Speaker Series.

Bruce Ronda with his John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award

Bruce Ronda
Associate Dean for Faculty and Graduate Studies

Bruce Ronda was presented the John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award, which recognizes faculty who have demonstrated exemplary accomplishments in all aspects of their professional responsibilities over an extended period of time. As he’ll be retiring this year, we took the opportunity to ask him a few more questions about his experience at CSU and what his plans are for after.

What will you miss most about working at CSU?

Despite its many challenges and difficulties, colleges and universities like Colorado State are still very special places.  They provide an opportunity to reflect, create, analyze, propose, and converse in company with people who are also committed to those tasks.  So I will miss spending my days in the midst of such a community of thoughtful people: students, faculty members, administrators, and support staff.

Now that you’ll be retired, what are your plans?

I have several plans for the near future, some of which will start happening even before June 30.  I’m working on two book projects, one a biography of early-mid twentieth-century American poet Stephen Vincent Benet, the other a biography of Robert Coles, child psychiatrist and cultural commentator.  Then, I’ll be away for two weeks at the end of May for a trip to Scotland.  After I truly retire, I plan to keep working on those book projects, travel to Cape Cod for our annual post-Labor Day week there, see my family in Michigan, Oklahoma, and California some more, work in the garden, and spend more time playing the piano. . . and the banjo!

What wisdom do you have to offer about working and/or studying at CSU?

Maybe the most important advice I’d give to students at CSU is to appreciate and work with the faculty. We have amazing faculty members in English, in Liberal Arts, and throughout the university, and all the ones I know are eager to talk with their students. So: cultivate your teachers, talk with them about your questions, ask about their research or creative work, see if you can serve as a grader or intern in some capacity. As for working at CSU, I’ve found that the most important relationships to nurture have been with support staff. They are the true historical memory of our departments and colleges and are truly important contributors to the teaching/learning and outreach mission of the university.

Why do you think it’s important to study the Humanities?

I want to include the social sciences, too, in my response. This is a hard question, because it goes in so many ways. I’ll limit myself to two big reasons: the first is to understand better our “moment” in time by understanding history, economics, politics, society, and forms of expression in the arts. We come into a world not of our own making, and it’s enormously important to understand the forces that made the world the way it is and how those forces are expressed. Knowing where our “moment” comes from empowers us to live in it and change it. The second is to grow in empathy. While we cannot live in another’s skin or experience, we can grow in appreciation of the vast diversity of life, human and more-than-human. Here the arts and humanities have particular value, since they present us with the lived experience of people very different from us, and yet also strangely recognizable. Empathy, I’d say, is strikingly missing from our political and social discourse these days.

What project/paper/book have you most enjoyed working on?

All my projects have provided moments of pleasure and satisfaction, as well as frustration and anxiety. In many ways, my most recent project, the book called The Fate of Transcendentalism, has given me the most satisfaction because it brings together so many of my interests explored over many years.

What course have you enjoyed teaching the most?

That’s another hard question to answer, since courses differ so much in content, students, and the whole “feeling” of the course. Several CSU courses come to mind: a graduate authors course on Faulkner and grad topics courses on Hawthorne and Stowe, American Transcendentalism, and Terrorism and the Novel, and this most recent course on pragmatism.

What was it like teaching the Pragmatism course as your last course at CSU?

While it’s true that I’ve been thinking about this course for a long time, and reading in and about pragmatism for an even longer time, teaching it, of course, was something else again. I had wonderful students from the MFA and the MA lit programs—thoughtful, articulate, interesting people doing their own work and thinking their own thoughts. Their comments illuminated the texts in ways I hadn’t anticipated, so that was a real gift. It’s equally true that I taught this last course in a very different political and cultural moment than the one in which I planned it. The entire course was inflected with our awareness of the changes brought about, and the forces unleashed, by the presidential election. I think the election made us read Emerson and James, Stein and Susan Howe, in different ways. That was painful, but good.

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The Poudre River this morning (image by Jill Salahub)

The Poudre River (image by Jill Salahub)

  • On October 28th, Tim Amidon, Elizabeth Williams (Communication Studies), Kim Henry (Psychology), and Tiffany Lipsey (Health and Exercise Science) partnered with the Poudre Fire Authority to host a symposium on the intersections of work, knowledge, and safety in the fireservice. Over 70 fireservice leaders from as far away as Oakland, CA and Ontario, Canada participated in interactive, stakeholder conversations designed to help researchers and participants identify the types of human factors that impact firefighter occupational safety and health outcomes. Breakout sessions included discussions on wearable technologies and next generation PPE, post-traumatic stress, the impact of chronic stress, sleep deprivation, and diet on decision making and cognition, how blue-collar traditions and working class identity impact how firefighters value the types of labor they perform, and how the challenges of certifying skills and building learning organizations through training and education programs. The event was sponsored by PFA and Pre-Catalyst for Innovative Partnerships seed funding awarded to the research team by the Office of the Vice President for Research. Tim would also personally thank our student intern Tiffany Lingo and administrative gurus Sheila Dargon and Lilian Nugent for their support!
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an interview up on the Kenyon Review’s website with: http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/dan-beachy-quick/ and a group of linked essays at EuropeNow: http://www.europenowjournal.org/2016/11/30/sunlight-and-arrows-five-invocations-for-the-silent-muse/
  • John Calderazzo will be presenting a talk on “Climate Change and Quechua Ritual” at the Sacred Landscapes and Mountains conference at the China India Institute in New York City.  The talk is based on a trip he took to a glacier-fed basin in the Peruvian Andes. John will also be the judge for the 2017 Eugene V. Shea National Poetry Contest.
  • Sue Doe and Lisa Langstraat’s essay “Faculty Development Workshops with Student Vet Participants: Seizing the Induction Possibilities” will shortly appear in Reflections: Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning (Volume 16, Issue 2).
  • On November 18, just prior to the start of Fall Break, CO130 faculty welcomed around 75 international students to a Harvest Meal in the Whitaker Room.  It was crazy fun in there, particularly as faculty watered down the soup to make it stretch to meet the larger-than-expected crowd and as Cassie Eddington’s kimchi was pronounced “Superb!” by a Korean student. This event was the brainchild of Karen Montgomery Moore and was assisted by Cassie Eddington, Virginia Chaffee, Kristie Yelinek, Hannah Caballero, Leslie Davis, Sheila Dargon, and Sue Doe.  Thanks go to our Chair, Louann Reid, for her support for this very special and timely event. Thanks also to the front office staff who participated and strongly communicated the department’s support for the diverse students of CO130! Thanks as well to our amazing Eddy custodial staff who not only helped bring food from our cars to the third floor but stuck around late to help clean up the mess!
  • On Saturday, October 15th, the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) hosted its 47th Annual Regional Conference at Metro State University in Denver.  This year’s theme was “For the Love of Teaching: Reclaiming the Classroom.”  CLAS presented CSU’s English Professor Emeritus William McBride with the Legacy Award.  English Education graduate student Jenna (Franklin) Martin shared her presentation, titled “Intercultural Sensitivity in the Middle School Language Arts Classroom.”  Dr. Pam Coke gave a presentation with Cheryl Kula, a fourth grade teacher at St. John the Evangelist Catholic School in Loveland, titled “Hard to Learn, Hard to Teach: Using Problem-Based Strategies in the Classroom.”  A good conference was had by all.
  • On Saturday, November 12th, CSU welcomed high school seniors from around the country to campus to take part in Senior Scholarship Day. English department colleagues led students through a writing workshop, followed by a timed writing competition.  CSU Admissions offered scholarships to the top writers. Our English department team included Tony Becker, Doug Cloud, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Tobi Jacobi, Sarah Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, Catherine Ratliff, and fearless leader Ed Lessor. Thank you, team, for your hard work!
  • On Saturday, November 19th, Dr. Pam Coke presented her research at the National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention in Atlanta.  Her session, titled “Performing Adolescence on the Page and in the Classroom: Using Adolescents’ Literature to Advocate for Students’ Mental Health,” She helped participants examine critical questions for educators, including: Is it ethical to teach a text that I know can trigger forms of PTSD for students?  Is it irresponsible to avoid such issues in the classroom?  If and when I do teach these texts (and I believe it is irresponsible to omit controversial texts from our classrooms), what can I do to best advocate for the mental health and well-being of the students? The presentation sparked valuable conversation among attendees.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology,” published earlier this year in The Bellevue Literary Review, has been nominated for a Pushcart prize.

speakout

SpeakOut!

We have three SpeakOut Journal Launch events during finals week. We will be celebrating the publication of our Fall 2016 issue of the SpeakOut Journal with a reading by our participants and refreshments. Please contact Tobi Jacobi (tjacobi@colostate.edu) if you would like to attend the readings at the jail or community corrections. We’d love to see you there!

SpeakOut! Youth Groups: Monday, December 12 from 6:45 to 8:15pm at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House

SpeakOut! @ Community Corrections and Work Release: Wednesday, December 14 from 7:30 to 8:30pm at LCJ Administration Building

SpeakOut! Men & Women’s Groups @ Larimer County Jail: Thursday, December 15 from 6:30 to 8:00pm at the Larimer County Jail.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Goodbye Summer, Hello Fall, image from Colorado State University.

“Goodbye Summer, Hello Fall,” image from Colorado State University Facebook page.

  • Tony Becker recently had an article, “L2 Students’ Performance on Listening Comprehension Items Targeting Local and Global Information,” published in the Journal of English for Academic Purposes. For those interested in reading the article, it is currently available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S147515851630042X.
  • Judy Doenges’ story “Promised Land” was listed in Other Distinguished Stories of 2015 in Best American Short Stories 2016.
  • Todd Mitchell presented two sessions last week at the 40th Rocky Mountain Chapter SCBWI Conference in Golden Colorado. He presented a session on endings, and a three-hour intensive on earning character transformations in young adult and middle grade fiction. He also got to hang out with some legendary young adult authors like the Newbery award winner Richard Peck, and Lin Oliver (the Founder of SCBWI, and the writer and producer of a bunch of TV shows and movies). Over the summer, Todd also served as guest faculty for the Antioch MFA Residency in Los Angeles.
  • Rebecca Snow’s review of Anthony Doerr’s novel All the Light We Cannot See: https://rebeccasnow.co/2016/09/13/doppelgangers-of-darkness-and-light/

 

Creative and Performing Arts Scholarship Competition in Creative Writing

 Deadline: Friday, October, 7, 2016 by 4:00pm 

  • The Creative Writing Program is conducting its annual university-wide creative writing competition for Creative & Performing Arts scholarships.
  • Students can submit multiple genres. Undergraduate submissions may include one or more of the following genres: three to five poems OR one short story OR one creative essay.
  • Awards are typically $500 per academic year in the form of tuition waivers; awards of $1,000 – $5,000 may be given for special merit.
  • Multiple awards are available.

 Submission Guidelines:

  • Students may submit 3 to 5 poems OR 1 short story OR 1 creative nonfiction essay (not an academic paper).
  • DO NOT PUT NAME OR ADDRESS ON THE MANUSCRIPT. Include only page numbers and title on manuscript.
  • Attach a cover letter stating name, address, phone number, CSU I.D. number (NOT ssn number), and genre.
  • Address manuscripts to: Professor Dan Beachy-Quick, Directory, Creative Writing Program, Eddy Hall, CSU. Campus Delivery 1773
  • Please be sure to either mail OR Hand-Deliver submissions to English Department mailbox in Eddy Hall by Friday, October 7, 2016 at 4:00pm.

Criteria for Award:

  • Must have a minimum 2.4 GPA.
  • Must be undergraduates (working on first bachelor’s degree)
  • Must be enrolled full-time (12+ credits).
  • Should be making satisfactory progress toward a degree, i.e., must have satisfactorily completed 75% of CSU courses attempted and must not have accumulated excessive credits. (See Office of Financial Aid for further details).
  • Must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident.

The Creative Writing Faculty cannot comment on the writing; manuscripts will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

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The trees in front of Eddy Hall are starting to get a few golden leaves. Fall is on its way! #greenandgoldforever

The trees in front of Eddy Hall are starting to get a few golden leaves. Fall is on its way! #greenandgoldforever

  • On June 23-24, 2016, Pam Coke participated in an international, interdisciplinary conference titled “The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers” in Le Mans, France.  Scholars from around the world, including South Africa, New Zealand, Austria, and the United States, gathered to share research and “to shed light on those cultural artifacts that target not only teenagers but an increasingly wider public – including television series, films, young adult novels, among others – and explore the images of teenagers.”  Pam presented her paper, “What Are They Selling? What Are We Buying?:  Eating Disorders as Cultural Artifacts,” where she shared findings from her qualitative research study examining how eating disorders have become an intricate part of the web of American behavior patterns, a way for teenagers to perform adolescence.
  • Over the summer, Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poetry manuscript was a finalist for the Ahsahta Sawtooth Prize. She also had 5 ghazals accepted for publication in Denver Quarterly. Sarah Pieplow would also like you to know that the GLBT Resource Center’s Safe Zone training is back! It’s fun! (And she is one of the trainers!) The purpose of Safe Zone is to reduce homophobia and heterosexism at CSU, thereby making our campuses a safer environment for all members of our community regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.  The Safe Zone program prepares members of the CSU community to serve as a resource on LGBTQ issues, and also strives to educate the organization about the Safe Zone program.  If you would like to better learn how to support students, faculty, and staff in the GLBTQQIA community (and figure out that acronym), these trainings can help you do that. To sign up for a training, go to http://www.glbtrc.colostate.edu/safe-zone. To ask more questions about what the heck this involves, go to Sarah.
  • Over the summer Dan Robinson gave a fiction reading, presented a paper, and moderated a round table discussion at the International Hemingway Conference in Oak Park, IL; He also had a couple of radio interviews on writing about and on the science and art of wildfire fighting.
  • Shoaib Alam received an Honorable Mention in the Glimmer Train May/June Short Story Award for New Writers contest.
  • This summer, Felicia Zamora (’12 MFA) has two poems in the newest issue of Poetry Northwest, was interviewed on the Indiana Review website as runner-up to the 2015 1/2K Prize, had poems accepted to Witness Magazine and Michigan Quarterly Review, was a finalist for the 46er Prize with The Adirondack Review where three poems are featured, and her second chapbook, Imbibe {et alia} here, was released from Dancing Girl Press.
  • Leslee Becker received the 1st-place Award in the 2016 Moondance Film Festival’s Short Story category. She also had stories accepted by Carolina Quarterly and Fifth Wednesday, and was awarded a writing fellowship/residency at the Anne LaBastille Foundation in the Adirondacks.
  • Ellen Brinks gave a plenary talk in early July at the University of London, Birkberk College, on the forgotten geographies of the transnational fairy tale in late 19th- and early 20thC fin-de-siecle literary culture.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s long piece “Difference Essay” was accepted recently by Seattle Review. This summer he gave two readings in California, at the Sacramento Poetry Center, and Poetry Flash/Moe’s Books, Berkeley. He and Aby Kaupang will be reading at Mountain Folds, in Colorado Springs, Sept 24. Two upcoming readings Matthew and Aby suggest for your radar. First, hosted by Cole Konopka and Sam Killmeyer for the Fork Socket series, September 14, Julie Carr, Amaranth Borsuk and Sam Killmeyer, 7:30 pm, The Forge. Second, for EveryEye, Sept. 21, Susan Briante and other luminaries, tea.
  • Sue Doe’s article, “Stories and Explanations in the Introductory Calculus Classroom: A Study of WTL as a Teaching and Learning Intervention” which was co-authored with Mary Pilgrim, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Director of the Calculus Center, was accepted this week for publication in the The WAC Journal.  
  • Beth Lechleitner will read a few of her poems at a community reading in celebration of autumn.  The event is from 1 to 3 on Sunday, September 18 at the Loveland Museum and Gallery on Lincoln in downtown Loveland.
  • Dana Masden’s poem “The Missing” appears in the Fall Issue of the Adirondack Review.
  • In two weeks, Airica Parker will be a featured reader and workshop leader at a regional poetry retreat hosted by Wendy Videlock in Palisade, Colorado. All are welcome to attend: tickets available through: http://coloradawendy.wixsite.com/mysite
  • Barbara Sebek kicked off sabbatical with some research in London at the Guildhall Library and the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum.  Sebek’s paper, “Temporal and Geographical Mash-Ups in Jonson and Shakespeare” was part of a seminar “Of an Age: Shakespeare and Periodization” at the World Shakespeare Congress, which convened in Stratford-upon-Avon and London in July and August.  In addition to seeing five plays in seven nights by Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Jonson at the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Globe, she met the British Sign Language interpreter for Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, visited the British Library’s stunning “Shakespeare in Ten Acts” exhibition, and saw the Royal College of Physicians exhibition of the library of alchemist/scholar/global navigation promoter John Dee, regarded as one of the inspirations for Shakespeare’s Prospero.
  • Rebecca Snow’s poem “Sestina for Adjuncts” is in the current issue of Rattle: http://www.rattle.com/print/50s/i53/
  • The Contractor, a historical western by James Work, professor emeritus, is now available in hardcover from FiveStar Publishing. The reviews have been unanimously positive, and the publisher has submitted The Contractor as a nominee for the Spur Award from the Western Writers of America. Prof. Work’s next western, The Grub Rider, Number 8 in the Keystone Ranch series, will be published by FiveStar in April of 2017.
  • Lots and lots of good news from Tim Amidon, who had a very busy summer:
    • In May, Tim Amidon presented a research talk at Computers & Writing in Rochester, New York on the ethics of disclosing geospatial knowledge through Instagram titled “#nolandmarks: technorhetorics, watersheds, & de/coloniality.”
    • In May, Tim Amidon led a mentoring roundtable at the Graduate Research Network, a one day workshop for graduate students concentrating in computers, writing, and digital rhetoric at Computers & Writing in Rochester, New York.
    • In May, Tim Amidon was appointed to the faculty of the Colorado School of Public Health in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health.
    • Tim Amidon traveled to Heifei, China, with a delegation from the Natural Resources Ecology Lab (NREL) to envision how the composition program might best support English language learners from Anhui Agricultural University who will be coming to CSU as part of a 2X2 program.
    • In May, Tim Amidon helped to coordinate (and, participated in) an exciting two-day professional development workshop lead by UD Composition Admins Ed Lessor and James Roller. Participants spent time working with digital composing tools such as cameras, audio recorders, as well as photo, audio, and video editing software, and theorized how pedagogies and assignments can scaffold multimodal literacy learning in their Upper Division composition courses.
    • In June, Tim Amidon and W. Michele Simmons (Miami University, Oxford, OH) had a peer-reviewed paper on research methodology in community based research accepted in the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on the Design of Communication. Tim and Michele will give a research talk on their paper at SIGDOC ’16 and the paper will be published in the proceedings thereafter.
    • In June, Tim Amidon spoke at and participated in a one-day workshop hosted by an interdisciplinary research team and lead by Dr. A. R. Ravishankara to envision a National Smoke Warning System. Stakeholders from the EPA, US Forest Service, CDC and researchers discussed challenges and opportunities associated with attempting to design and implement a warning system that could effectively alert publics to the health and safety risks associated with wildfire.
    • In June, Tim Amidon gave short-workshop on ethnographic and naturalistic field-based research methods for exploring and writing about place for students affiliated with an exchange program between CSU and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk, Russia) led by Dr. Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker and Dr. Tony Becker.
    • In August, Tim Amidon participated in a one-day educator institute at InWorks in Denver hosted by Hypothes.is, a web-based annotation tool that allows students to tag, comment, and offer meta-level commentary on any web-based content. Participants from both secondary and post-secondary levels envisioned and shared ways of utilizing the tool to support learning in their courses. Dr. Jaime Jordan was one of the leaders of the excellent workshop.
    • In August, Tim Amidon was invited by Dr. Lori Peek to consult on the design of a digital survey-instrument that FEMA is developing to help U.S. property owners, businesses, and government actors conduct cost-benefit analyses about the value of building or re-engineering structures to meet performance-based engineering standards for seismic activity.
    • In August, Tim Amidon participated in components of the weeklong graduate teaching assistant orientation organized and led by Composition Admins Nancy Henke, Amanda Memoli, Kristina Yelinek, Hannah Caballero and Composition Director, Dr. Sue Doe.

 

Readings

Essayist, Memoirist, and CSU Fiction alumnus Steven Church will give a reading of his work. The reading takes place in the Lory Student Center, Long Peaks Room 302 on Thursday, September 8 at 7:30pm. The reading is free and open to the public. Steven Church is the author of The Guinness Book of Me: a Memoir of Record, Theoretical Killings: Essays and Accidents, The Day After The Day After: My Atomic Angst, Ultrasonic: Essays and a forthcoming fifth book of nonfiction, One with the Tiger: Sublime and Violent Encounters between Humans and Animals, which will be released in Fall 2016 by Soft Skull Press.

On Thursday, September 14 poets Julie Carr, Amaranth Borsuk, and MFA student, Sam Killmeyer will give a reading of their work. The reading will take place at the Forge Publick House, located at: Back Alley, 232 Walnut St., Fort Collins CO, 80524.

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The English Department Non-Tenure Track Faculty (NTTF) Committee does all kinds of good work. One good thing is their newsletter “In Addition…News from the English Department’s NTTF Committee.” One of the features of the newsletter, which is sent monthly to NTTF in the department, is a faculty profile, which they’ve agreed to let us share on the blog.

Hannah Aldine

What name do you prefer to go by? Where are you located on campus?

Hannah Aldine – Ingersoll SE 259 (but only for one more month!)

What courses do you teach at CSU? What (if any) courses have you taught before?

I’m teaching CO300 and CO150-ESL this semester, and I also teach CO150 and CO130.

What are the greatest strengths that you bring to teaching composition?

I think my dynamic teaching approach helps me to be flexible and willing to constantly re-invent my courses. I try to be a conscientious teacher who constantly adapts to what students need and want in a writing class. I like to implement new assignments each semester, and right now I’m integrating multimodal assignments which develop technological literacy for students because I think this is a skill that will benefit them outside of the course. I also use research to inform my teaching practices, so I conduct classroom-based research to elicit student feedback on major course changes that I make.

What makes teaching composition to ESL students unique from teaching it to non- ESL students?

In my experience, ESL students are generally more motivated and care a lot about doing well. They often bring a lot of enthusiasm, and I find that I’ve raised my standards for native speakers’ writing because I’ve received such strong texts from my ESL students. I think many of them do well because they routinely use office hours, and I suspect that they read their feedback more as well than their American counterparts.

What song best describes your work ethic?

At this point in the semester, the first song that comes to mind is “Just Keep Swimming” from Finding Nemo. Earlier in the semester it’d probably be “[wo]Man in the Mirror” by Michael Jackson.

(Thank you to Tony Becker for interviewing Hannah.)

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Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

News

  • EJ Levy was a Visiting Writer at Wabash College in Indiana on February 12-13, 2015. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize in both fiction and nonfiction and will be a Fellow at the Aspen Summer Words conference this June.
  • Todd Mitchell was recently interviewed by The Denver Post for a piece on ghost stories published on 2/15. He also did an interview for the Northern Colorado Writer’s Podcast that’s now available, he did a reading that will air on KRFC next Tuesday, and (in an odd turn) he’s quoted in an article on YA post-apocalyptic fiction that will go out next week in Stylist Magazine (a U.K. magazine with a circulation of over 400,000). For a link to any of these articles, interviews, or podcasts, please visit www.ToddMitchellBooks.com.
  • Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker and Tony Becker will deliver a paper presentation titled, “Project-Based Learning in ESL Classrooms: Planning Goals and Outcomes,” at the 2015 TESOL Convention (http://www.tesol.org/convention2015) held on 25-28 March 2015 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Debra Lewis was invited to present a small collection of poetry at Sigma Tau Delta’s national convention over spring break (coming up in a couple of weeks). Sigma Tau Delta is the English Department’s Honors Society. She is the only representative from CSU. Read more about Debra in our “Student Success Stories” series.

Events

  • Creative Professionals Panel, GenFKD presents a moderated panel of Fort Collins professionals discussing ways to monetize creative and artistic passions — Stephanie G’Schwind, editor at The Colorado Review, and Todd Simmons, founder of Wolverine Farm Publishing, and Dulcie Willis, Fort Collins theater producer, and Booger, First Friday poetry slam host. Tuesday, March 3rd at 7:30pm, Clark C238.
  • Spring 2015 Reading Series – Kyle Dargan – Poetry -7:30pm CSU Art Museum University Center for the Arts. Free and open to the public.
  • Grant Writing Workshop for English department graduate students: Grant writing is a terrific skill to acquire, though it’s unnecessarily shrouded in mystery. Not only can it be a means to locate or secure funding for your own projects, but prospective employers would love to know that you have an interest and/or experience in grant writing. We’d like to demystify grant writing for you with a workshop on Monday, March 9, from 1-2 pm, in Lory Student Center 324. Two accomplished grant writers are leading the workshop, and they’re looking forward to introducing you to the world of grant writing: Tobi Jacobi is an English faculty member in the Rhetoric and Composition Program and director of the Center for Community Literacy, and Stephanie G’Schwind is the Director of the Center for Literary Publishing here at CSU, which publishes the nationally renowned Colorado Review. Tobi and Stephanie are looking forward to sharing their expertise with you and answering all your questions.

Submissions

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards: The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 12th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies. Applicants must be registered graduate or undergraduate English majors.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 27, 2015.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies. Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages. Shorter papers are welcome. Only one submission is allowed per student.

Submission deadline is Monday April 6, 2015, at 5:00 p.m. Please submit TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear. Include with your essay a separate cover letter with your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, university ID number, and title of your essay. Also indicate the course for which the essay was written (if it was composed for a course) and the professor who taught the course. Indicate whether you are an undergraduate or graduate student at CSU. Address your cover letter to: Professor Aparna Gollapudi, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773. Cover letter and submissions can be dropped off at the Behavioral Sciences Building, Room A104.

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Things are blooming at Eddy Hall

Things are blooming at Eddy Hall, image by Jill Salahub

  • There’s a review of various work Dan Beachy-Quick has written at Pleiades: http://www.ucmo.edu/pleiades/news/Tayson.html, and a short essay about the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary, “The Fragile Bow: On Imagination and Atrocity” is published at Ghost Proposal: http://www.ghostproposal.com/issue4/danbeachyquick.php
  • Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker and Tony Becker will be presenting their topic, Evaluating a Project-Based Activity: Moving from Theory to Practice at the K-12 and University Level (Integrating STEM Content and Foreign Language Education), on April 19th at the 2014 Symposium on Languages for Specific Purposes in Boulder, CO.
  • Lisa Langstraat, Sue Doe, Emily Morgan, Nancy Henke, and Vani Kannan presented a roundtable at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, 4C’s, on March 21. The presentation focused on the CO150 course reader, The Ethics of Higher Education, and a research study conducted in the fall on the potential effects of curriculum and curricular intervention on student, faculty, and public attitudes toward academic labor issues. Maria Maisto, President and Executive Director of the New Faculty Majority, was respondent.
  • The latest issue of AWP Writer’s Chronicle includes a feature interview on Camille Dungy.
  • Last weekend, Roze Hentschell participated in a seminar at the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in St. Louis. She presented new work, “Paul’s Boys: Actors, Choristers, Students, and Children in St. Paul’s Cathedral Precinct,” which is part of her book-in-progress.
  • Airica Parker’s poetry will appear in CALYX Vol. 28, No. 2.

Upcoming Events of Interest

  • April 21, 2014: Literature MA Showcase at Cranknstein, 215B N. College Avenue. Monday, 4:00-7:00pm – Remarks and presentations start at 4:45 pm.
  • April 24, 2014: Reading Series – Robert Hass & Brenda Hillman (Poetry), Thursday, 7:30pm North Ballroom in the Lory Student Center.
  • April 27, 2014: Slamogadro Poetry Slam – Avogadro’s Number will be hosting a Poetry Slam on the final Sunday of every month, April 27th is the first one. 7:00pm signup 7:30 start – All are welcome.
  • May 1, 2014: Reading Series – Kaelyn Riley & Ben Findlay MFA Thesis Reading (Poetry & Fiction), Thursday, 7:30pm University Art Museum.

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tonybecker02

Dr. Anthony Becker is a Assistant Professor in the English Department, where he teaches courses within the TEFL/TESL program and coordinating workshops for the newly-established INTO initiative at Colorado State University. He holds Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in Applied Linguistics from Northern Arizona University and Georgia State University, and an undergraduate degree in Psychology from Millersville University of Pennsylvania. His current teaching/research focuses on second language assessment, research methods in applied linguistics, and meta-cognitive aspects of writing.

Outside of academia, Anthony enjoys being outdoors and spending time with his wife, their son, and a very vocal cat. He is excited to be in Fort Collins and is looking forward to contributing to the great learning environment at CSU.


Faculty Profile: Anthony Becker
~by Brianna Wilkins

What brought you to CSU?

A U-Haul truck [laughs]. But I worked in [Washington] DC for a testing company, both me and my wife; we worked in the same office too. One day she asked me if I saw the posting for this job at CSU, but I wasn’t interested in looking for another job at that time. She was like, “Look you need to apply.”  So first I read the job description, and was like wow, this seems like it was written for me. I submitted my application, did the phone interview, and then finally came out here. Everything just felt very natural, and it seemed easy to adjust to this department; it just seemed like it was meant to be. When I got the call that I was hired I didn’t hesitate; I knew that I really wanted to come here.

tony with his wife and son

Anthony with his wife and son

What do you enjoy most about your work?

I’d be crazy not to say that I enjoy working with students. Although at times it can be really frustrating because I’m really jazzed and excited about what I’m teaching, and sometimes you just hear crickets, and students are sometimes checking their phones. You think you have a great lesson, but they think otherwise. But it’s great when they (the students) start making connections between things, or when you see that they’re very excited about learning, and genuinely want to know more and begin asking questions. Not just questions like, “Is this going to be on the test?” but questions that challenge the both of you to think and stimulate your mind.

What’s your most favorite class to teach at CSU?

My most favorite is Assessment (E634); it’s a graduate class, and I’m teaching it this semester. For me it’s my background. I’m very passionate about it, and it’s the most interesting because it combines aspects of language learning and math. To me it’s kind of fun, but a lot of students come to my office and get nervous and ask if they need tutoring help because of the math, but I enjoy it because we work through that stuff, and by the end they realize that it’s not so bad.

What advice would you give students taking classes in the English department?

It’s not as boring as you might think. As a student I thought that some English classes were boring, but I really think that the faculty here are incredibly passionate about what they teach; if you come with the mindset that you can learn something, you’ll come out with some new knowledge and insight. I’d just tell them to come with an open mindset, and come prepared to learn.

Tony hiking with his son

Anthony hiking with his son

What’s the best advice that you’ve ever received?

As a child my parents got a divorce, and I became a bit of a troublemaker. My fifth grade teacher noticed some problems, took me aside, and told me that I was trying too hard to fit in; he told me to just be myself. At first I was just like yeah whatever, but that advice has always resonated with me, and I’ve always kept that close to my heart.

What might the English faculty not know about you?

I’m uncomfortable around people in costumes or mascot outfits. When I was younger my parents got someone to dress up in a chicken costume for my birthday, and I cried the whole time. Since that point I don’t like when people dress up, and when I can’t see their face, especially around Halloween; it just makes me very uncomfortable.

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