Tag Archives: News of Note

  • The Center for Literary Publishing’s latest nonfiction anthology, Beautiful Flesh: A Body of Essays, will officially release May 15. The production team was Cedar Brant, Dana Chellman, Cory Cotten-Potter, Michelle LaCrosse, Morgan Riedl, and Stephanie G’Schwind. The book is available from CLP’s distributor, the University Press of Colorado, or via Amazon, barnesandnoble.com, powells.com, and elsewhere.
  • Cassie Eddington’s manuscript if the garden was one of seven finalists in Kelsey Street Press’s 2017 FIRSTS! competition. Her poems will be featured on Kelsey Street Press’s blog.
  • Tobi Jacobi will deliver an invited lecture on jail volunteer training and self-care at the University of Sheffield’s workshop on the Volunteer Sector in Criminal Justice in early June in Sheffield, UK.  The workshop launches an international, multidisciplinary network of researchers, practitioners and policymakers working in the criminal justice voluntary sector led by scholars at the Universities of Cambridge and Sheffield.
  • Lauren Matheny’s short story, “The Dark”, won honorable mention (second place) in the Third Coast 2017 Fiction Contest, chosen by Desiree Cooper 🙂 Lauren says, “Don’t know if that’s worthy of the newsletter, but I’m super excited!!”
  • David Mucklow’s poem “Leaving Sediment” was published in the most recent issue of Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Kelly Weber has poems forthcoming or now appearing in Nebraska Poetry: A Sesquicentennial Anthology, The Flat Water Stirs: An Anthology of Emerging Nebraska Poets, Triggerfish, and Grasslimb.

Eddy 300 Lab
Summer Hours
May 15th– May, 19th, 2017
(Please stop by the English Department office
for access)
May 22nd-August 4th, 2017
10:00am-3:00pm

The Writing Center
Summer Hours
May 15th– August 3rd, 2017
10:00am-12:30pm
In Eddy Hall, Room 23
Online hours TBA

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A great time was had by all at Bruce Ronda’s retirement celebration

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has a lyric essay, “Family Cookbook,” accepted by Florida Review. It’s part of a new collection exploring mixed-ness and in-between-ness.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Natural History,” was awarded a Pushcart Prize and will be played published in the Best of the Small Presses anthology.
  • Joanna Doxey has a poem in the latest edition of the Denver Quarterly (51.3).
  • Jaime Jordan’s Digital Humanities class (E280) has created a blog showcasing some of the digital projects they’ve worked on this semester.  Check it out at https://exploredhblog.wordpress.com!
  • Second year MFA student Claire Boyles had an essay, “Failing at Important Things: A Parallel History,” place as a runner-up in Vela Magazine’s nonfiction contest, judged by Claire Vaye Watkins. The essay is live on the site: http://velamag.com/failing-at-important-thingsa-parallel-history/
  • Cedar Brant won the Academy of American Poet’s Prize for CSU.
  • David Mucklow was accepted and offered a scholarship to attend the Squaw Valley Community of Writers Poetry Workshop this summer, and will be attending at the end of June. A few weeks ago, his poem, “where Deer Creek dies into the Gallatin,” was published on Daily Gramma. You can find it on their site here – http://gramma.press/
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s flash story, “A Bunny’s Kidnapping” has been accepted for publication at “Gone Lawn.”
  • Come celebrate the new 2017 Fort Collins Poet Laureate (our very own Felicia Zamora!) on Sunday, May 7 from 6-8 PM at Wolverine Farm Publick House! Enjoy readings from Felicia Zamora (MFA alumnae), John Calderazzo (professor of English Emeritus), and Michelle Deschenes (MFA alumnae). For more information, please see the event calendar listing or Facebook event page.

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Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

Click image for larger view

 

We’re Hiring!

 

CLC is looking for interns!

Internship with the Community Literacy Center (CLC)

Job Description:  The intern (junior, senior or grad student) will work with the Community Literacy Center faculty to design a set of literacy research and outreach projects.  Projects might include one or more of the following:

  • working with a faculty mentor to pilot community literacy programming such as creative writing mini-classes, workplace writing mentorships, or literacy tutoring experiences;
  • investigating current policy on a national and regional level in order to understand the politics of funding public education;
  • developing training materials for community-based literacy partnerships;
  • researching and writing grant proposals;
  • working directly with a community partner in order to understand a research question (e.g. what is the relationship between socio-economics and an extracurricular book club?);
  • researching and building the CLC webpage;
  • planning and facilitating a local literacy event (readings, workshops, etc.);

developing assessment tools in order to measure how literacy skills are advanced by a particular classroom approach or set of materials;

  • working with a mentor in the CLC office to gain experience with literacy program administration;
  • designing a research study and collecting primary data on existing literacy outreach programs; or
  • an alternative project designed by you.

Interns manage one community literacy workshop (weekly, 1.5 hours) and are responsible for transcribing writing, encouraging writers with written feedback, and managing a small team of volunteers.

Credit:  Interns can earn up to 6 credits for their work.

The application for an internship is online at https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/.  Please apply by May 5.

All independent internships must be approved by the English Department’s Internship Coordinator, Cassie.Eddington@colostate.edu.

Additional opportunity:  If you are interested in volunteer work with the CLC, go to https://csuclc.wordpress.com/intern-resources/ for more information.

 

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CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

 

English Department Awards Reception TODAY!!!

Monday, 4-6pm in the LSC North Ballroom – Presentations at 4:30pm.

  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang recently gave a reading & talk at Colgate University in New York. Matthew has an essay up on Hart Crane at At Length on “the poem that won’t leave you alone.” http://atlengthmag.com/poetry/the-poem-that-wont-leave-you-alone/
  • On Saturday, April 29, 4pm, Old Firehouse Books, Dan Beachy-Quick, Matthew Cooperman and Bill Tremblay will read from their work as part of National Independent Bookstore Day, and the closing of National Poetry Month.
  • Roze Hentschell was invited to speak at The Senior Center in Fort Collins, where she spoke on “Shakespeare and the Sonnet Tradition.”
  • Jaime Jordan invites everyone to explore how she uses the Serial podcast to tackle unconscious bias in her CO150 class. Those interested can check out the display in the northwest corner of the 3rd floor at the “lunch counter.”
  • Todd Mitchell recently conducted a full day of fiction and poetry workshops with teens at Fort Collins High School, where they have several outstanding writers (who might hopefully come here). He also conducted virtual visits (via Skype) to high school and middle school students in southern Colorado.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore presented “Affect, Anxiety, and the Abject Corpse in A Study in Scarlet” at the Popular Culture Association/American Cultural Association conference in San Diego on April 15. This paper was advised by Ellen Brinks and Debby Thompson (for her master’s final project).
  • Rebecca Snow will give a brief talk along with other local authors at the Quid Novi book fair, April 27th, 6-9 pm. She can get CSU authors table space to display/sell their books as her guest for 1/2-price ($25.00) and free registration, up until the day of the event: https://www.quidnoviinnovations.com/Spring-Innovation/
  • Mary Crow has had four poems accepted for publication: “Theory” and “But You Came anyway” by New Madrid and “Taking the Heat” and “The Necessary Existence of the Old World” by The American Journal of Poetry.
  • The Writing Center and the English Department were well-represented at the Colorado and Wyoming Writing Tutors Conference. Here is a list of presenters and presentations:
    • Kiley Miller & Wendy-Anne Hamrick
      “Is that an effective question?”: Meaningful and Interactive Grammar Feedback in Multilingual Consultations
    • Leah White & Katherine Indermaur
      Mindfulness for Tutor Resilience
    • Shirley Coenen & Leslie Davis
      Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate and Graduate Student Writing Support
    • Jennifer Levin, Tiffany Akers, and Alina S. Lugo
      Strategies for Increasing Engagement in Tutoring Sessions
    • Sheri Anderson, Sue Doe, and Lisa Langstraat
      Student-Veterans in the Writing Center: Dispelling the Myths and Providing Genuine “Military Friendly” Support

English Department Career Event: Freelance Editing Panel

Please join us for a special panel on working in the world of freelance editing. Panelists Ann Diaz (M.A. 17) and Nathan DelaCastro (B.A. 15) will share their experiences working as freelance editors and making a living!

When: Friday, May 5, from 3:00 to 4:15pm
Where: Location TBA

More details and information are forthcoming, so stay tuned! Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, with any questions.

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Today, April 17, is National Haiku Day (image by Jill Salahub)

  • The Crisis & Creativity Workgroup, comprised of writers, artists, scientists, and community members, has had a proposal exploring species extinction through poetry/art awarded a grant from the School of Environmental Sustainability — Dan Beachy-Quick and Cedar Brant are principal investigators with this project. More information can be found here: http://source.colostate.edu/school-global-environmental-sustainability-announces-global-challenges-research-teams-resident-fellow-awards/
  • Roze Hentschell attended the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in Atlanta, April 6-8, where she discussed her paper, “John Marston at Paul’s,” an examination of Marston’s plays written for the boy actors at St. Paul’s Cathedral in the early seventeenth century.
  • EJ Levy was interviewed as part of her recent visit to UMass-Lowell; the interview appears here: https://www.uml.edu/News/stories/2017/EJ-Levy.aspx
  • Dan Robinson’s third novel, Death of a Century, will be re-released in paperback next week.  Of the novel, The Manhattan Review of Books wrote, Robinson “deals with the main character’s shellshock with a great deal of care and sympathy, while paralleling the brutality of the world off the battlefield. This is a book not to be missed; it is a mystery, thriller, historical drama in one package,” and Publisher’s Weekly wrote, “Robinson’s atmospheric tale of betrayal and revenge paints a passionate picture of the Lost Generation…”
  • Barbara Sebek contributed a paper, “Archy’s Afterlives: Temporal Mash-ups During Times of Crisis,” to a seminar at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  The paper discusses the traces left by King James’s court jester, Archibald Armstrong.
  • One of Maurice Irvin’s MFA thesis stories was accepted for publication in Portland Review‘s upcoming Spring Issue.
  • Kylan Rice will be pursuing a PhD in English Literature at UNC Chapel Hill in the fall.
  • What Goes Down” by Kayann Short (BA 81, MA 88) has just been published in Rooted: The Best New Arboreal Nonfiction (Outpost19). Her flash fiction story “When It Was Lost” will appear in the spring issue of Dash.
  • Over the past year, we have lost quite a few members of our English department family.  Each year, CSU hosts a Rams Remember Rams Service.  Here are the details: Our campus community is invited to a candlelight ceremony Monday, April 17, 5 p.m. honoring CSU students, faculty, staff, and retirees who passed away this academic year.  The 15-minute ceremony will be held on the north steps of the Administration Building and will include a reading of the names – along with time for silent reflection. The Danforth Chapel will be open until 6 p.m. as a quiet place for personal contemplation.

CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

Reading

New York City author Deborah Clearman and CLC’s Mary Ellen Sanger read from their books on life “south of the border” at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House on Thursday, 4/20 at 8pm. Deborah writes evocative stories of Guatemalan realities, and Mary Ellen writes of the women she met when unjustly imprisoned in Mexico. There will be wine and beautiful cookies!

TEFL/TESL Advocacy Week 

On behalf of the TEFL/TESL Student Association, we are proud to promote our yearly event, Advocacy Week!

This week helps us achieve our central goals of promoting intercultural, linguistic, and literacy awareness in the community. To give back to the community, we have chosen to run a bookdrive for the Larimer County Jail. Bring in used or new paperback books to stock their shelves! Donation boxes can be found in the English Department office and around campus.

To engage the larger community, this week will feature presentations from Dr. Sue Doe, Dr. Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala, Dr. Kristina Quynn, the TEFL/TESL MA cohort, and TEFL/TESL alumni, focusing primarily on L2 and interdisciplinary writing. Find more details in the “2017 Advocacy Week Schedule” flyer.

Click to see a larger version

Lastly, we are excited to welcome our keynote speaker, Dr. Eli Hinkel to present “Teaching and Learning Vocabulary for Academic Writing” on Friday afternoon. Dr. Hinkel comes to us with over thirty years of experience and multiple publications which have influenced her work with ELL writers.

This year’s guest speaker

We look forward to hosting you at another successful and engaging Advocacy Week!

The Human Library 

The Fort Collins Rotaract Club will be hosting an event on Friday, April 21 from 4:30-8p.m called the Human Library.

The Human Library is a concept created in Copenhagen 17 years ago in order to establish a safe conversational space, where the people are the books. A “Living Book” is someone who represents various backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences. Books challenge prejudice and help connect people through respectful conversation with those who come to borrow them as “readers”. Each Book has a title that relates to their experiences, backgrounds, and/or identity. However, we challenge people to not judge a book by its cover and come with an open mind!

Conversations during the event are offered for 5-15 minutes, depending on what questions the reader has for the Living Book. Checking out a Book is a first come, first serve basis so people can come and go as they please.

Come engage in the conversation! If you would like to participate in an event that creates an atmosphere of storytelling, promotes community building, and celebrates differences then we would love to see you there.

Some featured Living Books include:

My Life in 2 Bathrooms
Muslim Citizen
Chief of Police

CSU Location: Lory Student Center Cherokee Park
Event Contact Name: Lisa Evans
Event Contact Email: levans2@rams.colostate.edu
Event Contact Phone: 9704818230
Audience: Alumni, Community, Faculty, Retiree / Emeritus Faculty, Staff, Student, Youth, Other
Cost: Free!

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Image by Jill Salahub

  • Next Wednesday, Doug Cloud will be giving a workshop for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) Sustainability Fellows titled “Talking Science with Conservative, Religious and Other Potentially Skeptical Audiences.”
  • Tobi Jacobi participated at the recent Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) through a panel presentation entitled, “Not “All Ellas”: Risking Exploitation in a Prison Public Memory Project,” and a preconference prison teaching workshop (“The Prison Next Door: What Types of Connections Do We Want to Cultivate?”).
  • Michael Knisely’s Boulder’s Rocky Ridge Music Academy photography exhibit runs through April, he will also showcase additional photographs as part of the Month of Photography exhibit at the ACE Storage gallery on north Broadway also in Boulder. A collaboration of poets and visual artist’s exhibit at the First Congregational Church at Broadway and Spruce Streets in Boulder will feature two of his poems. He will also be reading from his poetry work as part of a large poetry reading this Friday for the First Friday Arts event at the First Congregational Church, which runs from 6:30 – 8:00 this Friday evening.
  • Dan Robinson’s paper, The Second Battle of the Champagne & the Inexpressibility Topos, has been accepted for the XVIII International Hemingway Conference in Paris next summer.
  • Morgan Riedl (MA in CNF, 2017) has a piece up on Brevity’s blog.  It’s a hermit crab essay in the form of a workshop critique of Sean Spicer’s press conferences.  You can read it here: https://brevity.wordpress.com/2017/03/30/workshop-comments-for-sean-spicer/
  • Catie Young’s poem “Merrily Merrily M​errily Merrily” is in the new issue of The Volta: ​http://www.thevolta.org/twstbs-poem185-cyoung.html
  • On April 21, John Calderazzo will read an essay at the Sacred Mountains and Landscapes conference at The New School.  The essay will discuss a centuries-old agricultural ritual in the Peruvian Andes he attended in which Quechua people have recently changed their behavior because of the climate change induced shrinking of their glaciers.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) first book, Of Form & Gather, winner of the 2016 Andrès Montoya Poetry Prize, was released on February 28 from the University of Notre Dame Press. Of Form & Gather is listed as one of the “9 Outstanding Latino Books Recently Published by Independent and University Presses” by NBC News. Her manuscript Galaxy Inside Your Inadequately Small Heart was selected as a finalist in the 2017 Alice James Award and the 2017 Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry. Her poem “In all the pretty roam” was featured on Zòcalo Public Square on Friday, March 17 and her poem “Virgule” was selected by The Georgia Review for publication. Zamora read her poetry for the AKO Collective’s Day Without A Woman recognition event on March 8.
  • Kathleen Willard will be the BreckCreate Breckenridge Creative Arts Tin Shop Guest Artist in Residence for the month of April. In addition to working on her new poetry manuscript, she will give a poetry reading, conduct four poetry workshops, and host a community poetry reading. She hosts Open Studio Hours at the Tin Shop Thursday through Sunday to talk about poetry and share her process. The BreckCreate website has details of her events.

Checkout the English Department’s new lunch counter!  In response to our See Change 2 request for more common space for faculty and staff, we have put the west end of Eddy to work. Two lunch counters are open and ready to entice you out of your offices for lunch and conversation. We will devote the exhibit space above each counter to departmental work on diversity and inclusion for at least the first year.

  • The northwest corner launches this new “Counter Talk” space with an exhibit featuring the 1960 Greensboro lunch counter sit-in and additional images — including two from the Smithsonian’s 2010 50th anniversary celebration.  Look here for some interesting ways to incorporate such moments into your courses: http://americanhistory.si.edu/freedomandjustice.

Stay tuned: Jaime Jordan’s exhibit featuring a moment in her CO150 course will be added next week to the southwest counter.

 

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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  • Matthew Cooperman currently has new poems out in The Laurel Review and Saltfront, in print. Online, Mary: A Journal of New Writing, is featuring three of his poems at http://maryjournal.org/fall2016/?page_id=416
  • On Wednesday, April 5, Camille Dungy will present at the Newberry Library, Chicago as part of a panel in celebration of the centennial of poet and former US Poet Laureate Gwendolyn Brooks. As part of a citywide celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks marking the one-hundredth anniversary of her birth, the Newberry will gather poets, scholars, historians, and archivists to discuss the historical context of Brooks’ groundbreaking first book of poems, A Street in Bronzeville. Published in in August 1945—the same month that World War II ended—the collection expresses the rich complexities of life on Chicago’s South Side within the larger fight for democracy both at home and abroad. https://www.newberry.org/04052017-gwendolyn-brooks
  • Todd Mitchell attended and delivered a session on “Teaching Dystopian Fiction” at this year’s Colorado Teen Literature Conference in Denver.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Choose Your Own,” was accepted for publication in the next issue of Black Warrior Review.
  • Steven Schwartz’s Madagascar: New and Selected Stories is a finalist for the Colorado Book Award for Literary Fiction and the Foreword Review Award for Short Stories.
  • Rico Moore, MFA Summer 2011 (Poetry), has had four poems (“Immanence of Star,” “Three Lyrics Composed of Words from Seneca’s Epistle, ‘On the God within Us,’” “When Awakened at Night by the Quiet,” and “What You’ve Unearthed from the Past,” appear in the journal, LVNG, number 17, online at https://lvngmagazine.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/lvng17.pdf.In addition, Rico has been a freelance writer for the past two years with Boulder Weekly. He writes about plans through which the Colorado Department of Parks and Wildlife hopes to kill mountain lions and bears in the name of boosting mule deer populations. His articles include “Off target: are mountain lions and bears about to be killed for the sins of the oil and gas industry?,” “Update: Commission asked to delay killing of mountain lions and bears in the name of sound science,” and “CPW and the oil and gas industry can’t have it both ways.”  An update, published Thursday, deals with an injunction filed by WildEarth Guardians.  You can read these articles online at http://www.boulderweekly.com/author/ricomoore/.
  • On March 27 at a ceremony at the Tishman Auditorium in New York, Natalie Scenters-Zapico accepted the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry for her book The Verging Cities, published by the Center for Literary Publishing as part of the Mountain West Poetry Series.

Rekindle the Classics 

The next Rekindle the Classics discussion will be on Wednesday, April 12, 6:30-8:30 pm at Wolverine Farms Publick House. MFA student Lauren Matheny will lead a discussion of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary. Rekindle the Classics brings together CSU English faculty and graduate students and lovers of literature in the Fort Collins community. For more information, see http://blog.poudrelibraries.org/2017/01/rekindle-a-love-of-the-classics/

English Department Writing Contests

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Recently, Tim Amidon presented research at two concurrent conferences in Portland: the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (ATTW) and the Conference on College Composition and Communication. At ATTW, Battalion Chief Randy Callahan of Poudre Fire Authority joined Tim to speak about the ongoing community based research projects that they have been undertaking in partnership.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s flash piece, “Dawn,” was named as a finalist in The Best Small Fictions 2017 by guest judge Amy Hempel. “Dawn” was nominated by the editors of Eleven Eleven.
  • EJ Levy’s hybrid essay, “Natural World,” appears in the most recent issue of Passages North. She will be Visiting Writing at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell on March 22-23, 2017.
  • Sasha Steensen’s chapbook, Thirty-Three Hendes was a finalist for the Tupelo Sunken Gardens chapbook contest. It will be published by Dancing Girl Press this summer.
  • Michael Knisely has a photography exhibit going on in Boulder through April at the Rocky Ridge School of Music in the Lucky’s Market shopping center at Broadway and Spruce. These are performance art photos from when he was the University of Nebraska Dance Dept.’s photographer, plus a few old concert photos (Peter, Paul, and Mary, and Bruce Springsteen).
  • Dana Chellman’s essay “How to Get to Heaven from Colorado” is a winner for the AWP Intro Journals Project, and it is being published in Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Jennifer Stetson-Strange, Spring 2017 MA candidate in TEFL/TESL, has been offered an opportunity related to her final project, “Needs Analysis and Curriculum Development for Occupational ESP: English for hotel workers.”  Over the past nine months she dedicated over 80 hours to conducting a thorough needs analysis, compiling and analyzing specific language needs of L2 (second language) learners in order to develop a curriculum for workers in the hospitality industry and specifically housekeepers at a local hotel.

    Jenny observed more than 20 participants who worked in the housekeeping department of a local hotel in Northern Colorado.  She found it a rewarding experience to be a part of this project, including building key relationships with participants at the hotel.  At her final defense in March, the majority of the housekeeping staff attended as well as the general manager of the hotel, filling the defense room with 35-40 people.  Jenny was overwhelmed by the attendance and thankful they all were there because, as she writes, “The entire project was about them!”

    Currently, the general manager would like Jenny to implement the curriculum as soon as possible.  She will be teaching the staff once a week until she graduates.  This summer, she hopes to continue teaching the housekeeping staff twice a week.  Her future goal is to implement this program at different hotels and restaurants in Northern Colorado.

  • Mary Crow has had eight poems from her collection Addicted to the Horizon translated into Spanish by Silvia Soler-Gallego and Francisco Leal and published in AEREA: Revista Hispanoamericana de Poesia along with the English originals. This literary magazine is a joint publication of the University of Georgia and the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute.
  • James Work’s novel The Contractor was voted First Finalist in the annual Spur Award competition of Western Writers of America. His first novel of a projected series of “cozy” mysteries has been accepted by FiveStar Publishing. The title is Unmentionable Murders and the main character of the series is a RMNP ranger in the 1920s. Lots of gangsters, flappers, bootleg hooch and, of course, mysterious murder.
  • Cedar Brant has a sculpture in the CSU Art and Science Exhibition in the Curfman Gallery in Lory Student Center.  http://source.colostate.edu/celebrate-creativity-csus-art-science-exhibition-march-24/

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  • In the new issue of Writer’s Chronicle there’s an essay on erasure poetry that considers Dan Beachy-Quick’s chapbook Shields & Shards & Stitches & Songs.
  • Sue Doe’s article, coauthored with Erik Juergensmeyer of Fort Lewis College, “Owning Curriculum: Megafoundations, the State, and Writing Programs” was just published in the new collection from Peter Lang Publishers called Fighting Academic Repression: Resistance, Reclaiming, Organizing, and Black Lives Matter in Education.
  • EJ Levy’s hybrid essay, “Natural World,” appears in the most recent issue of Passages North. She will be Visiting Writing at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell on March 22-23, 2017.
  • Claire Boyles’s story, “Chickens, 2019” has been accepted by The Kenyon Review.
  • Sheila Dargon, Administrative Assistant in the English Department, has been chosen to receive the inaugural College of Liberal Arts State Classified Award. The award recognizes meritorious and outstanding achievement in job skills and service to the college by State Classified employees. In addition to a monetary award, she will receive a plaque and public recognition at the spring CLA faculty/staff meeting which will be held on Tuesday, April 11th, 2017. In his congratulatory letter to Sheila, Dean Withers commends her for her “truly remarkable achievement.”  Thanks to all faculty and staff who contributed their enthusiastic comments for Sheila’s nomination.

Food Student Essay Contest 2016/2017 

CO150 Faculty: If you’re using the FOOD reader, please encourage your best students to submit essays for the Food essay contest! (Click on image for larger version).

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 14th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies.  Undergraduate applicants must be registered English majors or minors; essays from graduate applicants should have been written for a graduate-level class at CSU.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 24, 2017.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies.  Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages.  Shorter papers are welcome.  Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility: (1)  Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept. (2)  Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 3, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. 

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover sheet with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minor, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your essays and cover sheet to: Professor Zach Hutchins, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773.  Submissions can also be dropped off at the English Department Office on the third floor of Eddy.

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Sunset on the Oval, image by Colorado State University

  • Dan Beachy-Quick had a conversation with Alex at Wolverine Farms that is now this podcast: http://www.wolverinefarm.org/matter-podcast/
  • Sue Doe and Mike Palmquist presented a workshop on writing across the curriculum to the faculty at CSU Pueblo last Thursday. They enjoyed the drive south and the conversation in both directions, but didn’t have a lot of good things to say about the snow, ice, and parking-lot conditions on I-25 south of Denver.
  • A Release Party for new poetry collections by Camille Dungy with Eleni Sikelianos and Julie Carr at Old Firehouse Books was held Sunday, March 5. 4-5:30 pm.
  • Kristina Quynn chaired a panel on innovative literary criticism at the Literature and Culture Since 1900 Conference at the University of Louisville last week.  Her paper, “Good Writers, Bad Selfies,” explored avant-garde, self-reflexive literary portraits in the work of Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, Anaïs Nin, and Kristjana Gunnars.
  • Caleb Gonzalez’s travel essay “One Ticket, Twenty Euros” that he wrote for Sarah’s Sloane’s CNF Workshop last semester was published in InTravel Magazine this week! http://www.intravelmag.com/intravel/interest/one-ticket-twenty-euros-pamplona-at-the-running-of-the-bulls 

Food Student Essay Contest 2016/2017 

CO150 Faculty: If you’re using the FOOD reader, please encourage your best students to submit essays for the Food essay contest!

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 14th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies.  Undergraduate applicants must be registered English majors or minors; essays from graduate applicants should have been written for a graduate-level class at CSU.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 24, 2017.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies.  Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages.  Shorter papers are welcome.  Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility: (1)  Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept. (2)  Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 3, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. 

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover sheet with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minor, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your essays and cover sheet to: Professor Zach Hutchins, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773.  Submissions can also be dropped off at the English Department Office on the third floor of Eddy.

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