Tag Archives: News of Note

Today, April 17, is National Haiku Day (image by Jill Salahub)

  • The Crisis & Creativity Workgroup, comprised of writers, artists, scientists, and community members, has had a proposal exploring species extinction through poetry/art awarded a grant from the School of Environmental Sustainability — Dan Beachy-Quick and Cedar Brant are principal investigators with this project. More information can be found here: http://source.colostate.edu/school-global-environmental-sustainability-announces-global-challenges-research-teams-resident-fellow-awards/
  • Roze Hentschell attended the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in Atlanta, April 6-8, where she discussed her paper, “John Marston at Paul’s,” an examination of Marston’s plays written for the boy actors at St. Paul’s Cathedral in the early seventeenth century.
  • EJ Levy was interviewed as part of her recent visit to UMass-Lowell; the interview appears here: https://www.uml.edu/News/stories/2017/EJ-Levy.aspx
  • Dan Robinson’s third novel, Death of a Century, will be re-released in paperback next week.  Of the novel, The Manhattan Review of Books wrote, Robinson “deals with the main character’s shellshock with a great deal of care and sympathy, while paralleling the brutality of the world off the battlefield. This is a book not to be missed; it is a mystery, thriller, historical drama in one package,” and Publisher’s Weekly wrote, “Robinson’s atmospheric tale of betrayal and revenge paints a passionate picture of the Lost Generation…”
  • Barbara Sebek contributed a paper, “Archy’s Afterlives: Temporal Mash-ups During Times of Crisis,” to a seminar at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  The paper discusses the traces left by King James’s court jester, Archibald Armstrong.
  • One of Maurice Irvin’s MFA thesis stories was accepted for publication in Portland Review‘s upcoming Spring Issue.
  • Kylan Rice will be pursuing a PhD in English Literature at UNC Chapel Hill in the fall.
  • What Goes Down” by Kayann Short (BA 81, MA 88) has just been published in Rooted: The Best New Arboreal Nonfiction (Outpost19). Her flash fiction story “When It Was Lost” will appear in the spring issue of Dash.
  • Over the past year, we have lost quite a few members of our English department family.  Each year, CSU hosts a Rams Remember Rams Service.  Here are the details: Our campus community is invited to a candlelight ceremony Monday, April 17, 5 p.m. honoring CSU students, faculty, staff, and retirees who passed away this academic year.  The 15-minute ceremony will be held on the north steps of the Administration Building and will include a reading of the names – along with time for silent reflection. The Danforth Chapel will be open until 6 p.m. as a quiet place for personal contemplation.

CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

Reading

New York City author Deborah Clearman and CLC’s Mary Ellen Sanger read from their books on life “south of the border” at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House on Thursday, 4/20 at 8pm. Deborah writes evocative stories of Guatemalan realities, and Mary Ellen writes of the women she met when unjustly imprisoned in Mexico. There will be wine and beautiful cookies!

TEFL/TESL Advocacy Week 

On behalf of the TEFL/TESL Student Association, we are proud to promote our yearly event, Advocacy Week!

This week helps us achieve our central goals of promoting intercultural, linguistic, and literacy awareness in the community. To give back to the community, we have chosen to run a bookdrive for the Larimer County Jail. Bring in used or new paperback books to stock their shelves! Donation boxes can be found in the English Department office and around campus.

To engage the larger community, this week will feature presentations from Dr. Sue Doe, Dr. Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala, Dr. Kristina Quynn, the TEFL/TESL MA cohort, and TEFL/TESL alumni, focusing primarily on L2 and interdisciplinary writing. Find more details in the “2017 Advocacy Week Schedule” flyer.

Click to see a larger version

Lastly, we are excited to welcome our keynote speaker, Dr. Eli Hinkel to present “Teaching and Learning Vocabulary for Academic Writing” on Friday afternoon. Dr. Hinkel comes to us with over thirty years of experience and multiple publications which have influenced her work with ELL writers.

This year’s guest speaker

We look forward to hosting you at another successful and engaging Advocacy Week!

The Human Library 

The Fort Collins Rotaract Club will be hosting an event on Friday, April 21 from 4:30-8p.m called the Human Library.

The Human Library is a concept created in Copenhagen 17 years ago in order to establish a safe conversational space, where the people are the books. A “Living Book” is someone who represents various backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences. Books challenge prejudice and help connect people through respectful conversation with those who come to borrow them as “readers”. Each Book has a title that relates to their experiences, backgrounds, and/or identity. However, we challenge people to not judge a book by its cover and come with an open mind!

Conversations during the event are offered for 5-15 minutes, depending on what questions the reader has for the Living Book. Checking out a Book is a first come, first serve basis so people can come and go as they please.

Come engage in the conversation! If you would like to participate in an event that creates an atmosphere of storytelling, promotes community building, and celebrates differences then we would love to see you there.

Some featured Living Books include:

My Life in 2 Bathrooms
Muslim Citizen
Chief of Police

CSU Location: Lory Student Center Cherokee Park
Event Contact Name: Lisa Evans
Event Contact Email: levans2@rams.colostate.edu
Event Contact Phone: 9704818230
Audience: Alumni, Community, Faculty, Retiree / Emeritus Faculty, Staff, Student, Youth, Other
Cost: Free!

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Image by Jill Salahub

  • Next Wednesday, Doug Cloud will be giving a workshop for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) Sustainability Fellows titled “Talking Science with Conservative, Religious and Other Potentially Skeptical Audiences.”
  • Tobi Jacobi participated at the recent Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) through a panel presentation entitled, “Not “All Ellas”: Risking Exploitation in a Prison Public Memory Project,” and a preconference prison teaching workshop (“The Prison Next Door: What Types of Connections Do We Want to Cultivate?”).
  • Michael Knisely’s Boulder’s Rocky Ridge Music Academy photography exhibit runs through April, he will also showcase additional photographs as part of the Month of Photography exhibit at the ACE Storage gallery on north Broadway also in Boulder. A collaboration of poets and visual artist’s exhibit at the First Congregational Church at Broadway and Spruce Streets in Boulder will feature two of his poems. He will also be reading from his poetry work as part of a large poetry reading this Friday for the First Friday Arts event at the First Congregational Church, which runs from 6:30 – 8:00 this Friday evening.
  • Dan Robinson’s paper, The Second Battle of the Champagne & the Inexpressibility Topos, has been accepted for the XVIII International Hemingway Conference in Paris next summer.
  • Morgan Riedl (MA in CNF, 2017) has a piece up on Brevity’s blog.  It’s a hermit crab essay in the form of a workshop critique of Sean Spicer’s press conferences.  You can read it here: https://brevity.wordpress.com/2017/03/30/workshop-comments-for-sean-spicer/
  • Catie Young’s poem “Merrily Merrily M​errily Merrily” is in the new issue of The Volta: ​http://www.thevolta.org/twstbs-poem185-cyoung.html
  • On April 21, John Calderazzo will read an essay at the Sacred Mountains and Landscapes conference at The New School.  The essay will discuss a centuries-old agricultural ritual in the Peruvian Andes he attended in which Quechua people have recently changed their behavior because of the climate change induced shrinking of their glaciers.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) first book, Of Form & Gather, winner of the 2016 Andrès Montoya Poetry Prize, was released on February 28 from the University of Notre Dame Press. Of Form & Gather is listed as one of the “9 Outstanding Latino Books Recently Published by Independent and University Presses” by NBC News. Her manuscript Galaxy Inside Your Inadequately Small Heart was selected as a finalist in the 2017 Alice James Award and the 2017 Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry. Her poem “In all the pretty roam” was featured on Zòcalo Public Square on Friday, March 17 and her poem “Virgule” was selected by The Georgia Review for publication. Zamora read her poetry for the AKO Collective’s Day Without A Woman recognition event on March 8.
  • Kathleen Willard will be the BreckCreate Breckenridge Creative Arts Tin Shop Guest Artist in Residence for the month of April. In addition to working on her new poetry manuscript, she will give a poetry reading, conduct four poetry workshops, and host a community poetry reading. She hosts Open Studio Hours at the Tin Shop Thursday through Sunday to talk about poetry and share her process. The BreckCreate website has details of her events.

Checkout the English Department’s new lunch counter!  In response to our See Change 2 request for more common space for faculty and staff, we have put the west end of Eddy to work. Two lunch counters are open and ready to entice you out of your offices for lunch and conversation. We will devote the exhibit space above each counter to departmental work on diversity and inclusion for at least the first year.

  • The northwest corner launches this new “Counter Talk” space with an exhibit featuring the 1960 Greensboro lunch counter sit-in and additional images — including two from the Smithsonian’s 2010 50th anniversary celebration.  Look here for some interesting ways to incorporate such moments into your courses: http://americanhistory.si.edu/freedomandjustice.

Stay tuned: Jaime Jordan’s exhibit featuring a moment in her CO150 course will be added next week to the southwest counter.

 

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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  • Matthew Cooperman currently has new poems out in The Laurel Review and Saltfront, in print. Online, Mary: A Journal of New Writing, is featuring three of his poems at http://maryjournal.org/fall2016/?page_id=416
  • On Wednesday, April 5, Camille Dungy will present at the Newberry Library, Chicago as part of a panel in celebration of the centennial of poet and former US Poet Laureate Gwendolyn Brooks. As part of a citywide celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks marking the one-hundredth anniversary of her birth, the Newberry will gather poets, scholars, historians, and archivists to discuss the historical context of Brooks’ groundbreaking first book of poems, A Street in Bronzeville. Published in in August 1945—the same month that World War II ended—the collection expresses the rich complexities of life on Chicago’s South Side within the larger fight for democracy both at home and abroad. https://www.newberry.org/04052017-gwendolyn-brooks
  • Todd Mitchell attended and delivered a session on “Teaching Dystopian Fiction” at this year’s Colorado Teen Literature Conference in Denver.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Choose Your Own,” was accepted for publication in the next issue of Black Warrior Review.
  • Steven Schwartz’s Madagascar: New and Selected Stories is a finalist for the Colorado Book Award for Literary Fiction and the Foreword Review Award for Short Stories.
  • Rico Moore, MFA Summer 2011 (Poetry), has had four poems (“Immanence of Star,” “Three Lyrics Composed of Words from Seneca’s Epistle, ‘On the God within Us,’” “When Awakened at Night by the Quiet,” and “What You’ve Unearthed from the Past,” appear in the journal, LVNG, number 17, online at https://lvngmagazine.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/lvng17.pdf.In addition, Rico has been a freelance writer for the past two years with Boulder Weekly. He writes about plans through which the Colorado Department of Parks and Wildlife hopes to kill mountain lions and bears in the name of boosting mule deer populations. His articles include “Off target: are mountain lions and bears about to be killed for the sins of the oil and gas industry?,” “Update: Commission asked to delay killing of mountain lions and bears in the name of sound science,” and “CPW and the oil and gas industry can’t have it both ways.”  An update, published Thursday, deals with an injunction filed by WildEarth Guardians.  You can read these articles online at http://www.boulderweekly.com/author/ricomoore/.
  • On March 27 at a ceremony at the Tishman Auditorium in New York, Natalie Scenters-Zapico accepted the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry for her book The Verging Cities, published by the Center for Literary Publishing as part of the Mountain West Poetry Series.

Rekindle the Classics 

The next Rekindle the Classics discussion will be on Wednesday, April 12, 6:30-8:30 pm at Wolverine Farms Publick House. MFA student Lauren Matheny will lead a discussion of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary. Rekindle the Classics brings together CSU English faculty and graduate students and lovers of literature in the Fort Collins community. For more information, see http://blog.poudrelibraries.org/2017/01/rekindle-a-love-of-the-classics/

English Department Writing Contests

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Recently, Tim Amidon presented research at two concurrent conferences in Portland: the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (ATTW) and the Conference on College Composition and Communication. At ATTW, Battalion Chief Randy Callahan of Poudre Fire Authority joined Tim to speak about the ongoing community based research projects that they have been undertaking in partnership.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s flash piece, “Dawn,” was named as a finalist in The Best Small Fictions 2017 by guest judge Amy Hempel. “Dawn” was nominated by the editors of Eleven Eleven.
  • EJ Levy’s hybrid essay, “Natural World,” appears in the most recent issue of Passages North. She will be Visiting Writing at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell on March 22-23, 2017.
  • Sasha Steensen’s chapbook, Thirty-Three Hendes was a finalist for the Tupelo Sunken Gardens chapbook contest. It will be published by Dancing Girl Press this summer.
  • Michael Knisely has a photography exhibit going on in Boulder through April at the Rocky Ridge School of Music in the Lucky’s Market shopping center at Broadway and Spruce. These are performance art photos from when he was the University of Nebraska Dance Dept.’s photographer, plus a few old concert photos (Peter, Paul, and Mary, and Bruce Springsteen).
  • Dana Chellman’s essay “How to Get to Heaven from Colorado” is a winner for the AWP Intro Journals Project, and it is being published in Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Jennifer Stetson-Strange, Spring 2017 MA candidate in TEFL/TESL, has been offered an opportunity related to her final project, “Needs Analysis and Curriculum Development for Occupational ESP: English for hotel workers.”  Over the past nine months she dedicated over 80 hours to conducting a thorough needs analysis, compiling and analyzing specific language needs of L2 (second language) learners in order to develop a curriculum for workers in the hospitality industry and specifically housekeepers at a local hotel.

    Jenny observed more than 20 participants who worked in the housekeeping department of a local hotel in Northern Colorado.  She found it a rewarding experience to be a part of this project, including building key relationships with participants at the hotel.  At her final defense in March, the majority of the housekeeping staff attended as well as the general manager of the hotel, filling the defense room with 35-40 people.  Jenny was overwhelmed by the attendance and thankful they all were there because, as she writes, “The entire project was about them!”

    Currently, the general manager would like Jenny to implement the curriculum as soon as possible.  She will be teaching the staff once a week until she graduates.  This summer, she hopes to continue teaching the housekeeping staff twice a week.  Her future goal is to implement this program at different hotels and restaurants in Northern Colorado.

  • Mary Crow has had eight poems from her collection Addicted to the Horizon translated into Spanish by Silvia Soler-Gallego and Francisco Leal and published in AEREA: Revista Hispanoamericana de Poesia along with the English originals. This literary magazine is a joint publication of the University of Georgia and the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute.
  • James Work’s novel The Contractor was voted First Finalist in the annual Spur Award competition of Western Writers of America. His first novel of a projected series of “cozy” mysteries has been accepted by FiveStar Publishing. The title is Unmentionable Murders and the main character of the series is a RMNP ranger in the 1920s. Lots of gangsters, flappers, bootleg hooch and, of course, mysterious murder.
  • Cedar Brant has a sculpture in the CSU Art and Science Exhibition in the Curfman Gallery in Lory Student Center.  http://source.colostate.edu/celebrate-creativity-csus-art-science-exhibition-march-24/

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  • In the new issue of Writer’s Chronicle there’s an essay on erasure poetry that considers Dan Beachy-Quick’s chapbook Shields & Shards & Stitches & Songs.
  • Sue Doe’s article, coauthored with Erik Juergensmeyer of Fort Lewis College, “Owning Curriculum: Megafoundations, the State, and Writing Programs” was just published in the new collection from Peter Lang Publishers called Fighting Academic Repression: Resistance, Reclaiming, Organizing, and Black Lives Matter in Education.
  • EJ Levy’s hybrid essay, “Natural World,” appears in the most recent issue of Passages North. She will be Visiting Writing at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell on March 22-23, 2017.
  • Claire Boyles’s story, “Chickens, 2019” has been accepted by The Kenyon Review.
  • Sheila Dargon, Administrative Assistant in the English Department, has been chosen to receive the inaugural College of Liberal Arts State Classified Award. The award recognizes meritorious and outstanding achievement in job skills and service to the college by State Classified employees. In addition to a monetary award, she will receive a plaque and public recognition at the spring CLA faculty/staff meeting which will be held on Tuesday, April 11th, 2017. In his congratulatory letter to Sheila, Dean Withers commends her for her “truly remarkable achievement.”  Thanks to all faculty and staff who contributed their enthusiastic comments for Sheila’s nomination.

Food Student Essay Contest 2016/2017 

CO150 Faculty: If you’re using the FOOD reader, please encourage your best students to submit essays for the Food essay contest! (Click on image for larger version).

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 14th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies.  Undergraduate applicants must be registered English majors or minors; essays from graduate applicants should have been written for a graduate-level class at CSU.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 24, 2017.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies.  Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages.  Shorter papers are welcome.  Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility: (1)  Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept. (2)  Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 3, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. 

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover sheet with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minor, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your essays and cover sheet to: Professor Zach Hutchins, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773.  Submissions can also be dropped off at the English Department Office on the third floor of Eddy.

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Sunset on the Oval, image by Colorado State University

  • Dan Beachy-Quick had a conversation with Alex at Wolverine Farms that is now this podcast: http://www.wolverinefarm.org/matter-podcast/
  • Sue Doe and Mike Palmquist presented a workshop on writing across the curriculum to the faculty at CSU Pueblo last Thursday. They enjoyed the drive south and the conversation in both directions, but didn’t have a lot of good things to say about the snow, ice, and parking-lot conditions on I-25 south of Denver.
  • A Release Party for new poetry collections by Camille Dungy with Eleni Sikelianos and Julie Carr at Old Firehouse Books was held Sunday, March 5. 4-5:30 pm.
  • Kristina Quynn chaired a panel on innovative literary criticism at the Literature and Culture Since 1900 Conference at the University of Louisville last week.  Her paper, “Good Writers, Bad Selfies,” explored avant-garde, self-reflexive literary portraits in the work of Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, Anaïs Nin, and Kristjana Gunnars.
  • Caleb Gonzalez’s travel essay “One Ticket, Twenty Euros” that he wrote for Sarah’s Sloane’s CNF Workshop last semester was published in InTravel Magazine this week! http://www.intravelmag.com/intravel/interest/one-ticket-twenty-euros-pamplona-at-the-running-of-the-bulls 

Food Student Essay Contest 2016/2017 

CO150 Faculty: If you’re using the FOOD reader, please encourage your best students to submit essays for the Food essay contest!

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 14th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies.  Undergraduate applicants must be registered English majors or minors; essays from graduate applicants should have been written for a graduate-level class at CSU.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 24, 2017.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies.  Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages.  Shorter papers are welcome.  Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility: (1)  Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept. (2)  Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 3, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. 

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover sheet with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minor, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your essays and cover sheet to: Professor Zach Hutchins, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773.  Submissions can also be dropped off at the English Department Office on the third floor of Eddy.

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louislamour

  • Sue Doe’s chapter, “What Works and What Counts: Valuing the Affective in Non Tenure-Track Advocacy,” co-authored with Maria Maisto and Janelle Adsit, was just published in Contingency, Exploitation, and Solidarity: Labor and Action in English Composition. Edited by Seth Kahn, William B. Lalicker, and Amy Lynch-Biniek.
  • Darcy Gabriel has happily accepted a place in the University of Minnesota’s PhD program in Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication (RSTC) starting this fall.
  • SueEllen Campbell’s contribution to the post-election series “Letters to America” in Terrain.com appeared online last week at this link:  http://www.terrain.org/2017/guest-editorial/letter-to-america-campbell/.
  • The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico—published by the Center for Literary Publishing as part of its Mountain West Poetry Series—has been awarded the 2017 PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry. The award, for which the poet receives $5,000, is given in odd-numbered years and recognizes the high literary character of the published work to date of a new and emerging American poet of any age and the promise of further literary achievement. The book’s publishing team was Karen Montgomery Moore, Cedar Brant, Melissa Hohl, Katie Naughton, and Stephanie G’Schwind.
  • Airica Parker’s poem “Disjointed” appears in Central Michigan University’s Temenos: Skin Suits & Bare Bones online and in print. See it here for free on page 29: http://www.temenosjournal.com/current-edition.html
  • Mary Crow has had two poetry acceptances; “Beyond Tahrir” will be published by Hotel America and “Happiness Production Line” will be published by American Poetry Review.
  • Tirzah Goldenberg (MFA – Poetry, Summer 2013) has a recently published book of poetry, entitled Aleph, published by Verge Books.
  • Deanna Ludwin has been nominated for the 2017 Team Fort Collins Wellness & Prevention Lamplighter community service award.

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick has a group of essays from A Quiet Book in the new Copper Nickel.
  • On Saturday February 25th, Camille Dungy will be the Keynote Speaker at the Robinson Jeffers Society Annual Meeting at Occidental College. Her talk is titled: “The View From Hawk Tower Today: A Contemporary Environmental Poet Reflects on What Robinson Jeffers Has Meant to Her.” https://www.oxy.edu/oxy-arts/projects-exhibitions/visiting-artists
  • The opening reception for the CSU Art and Science exhibition is this coming Tuesday, Feb 21 from 4:30 to 6:30 pm at the Curfman gallery in the Lory Student Center. Beth Lechleitner’s collaborative poetry/visual art piece “Mettle” has been is included.  The show runs through March 24.
  • Dana Masden’s short story “Exercise, A Good Book, and a Cup of Tea” is published in the Fall 2016 issue of Third Coast.
  • Mary Ellen Sanger (Associate Director, Community Literacy Center) won second place in the North Street Book Prize contest for her book, “Blackbirds in the Pomegranate Tree: Stories from Ixcotel State Prison.” This account of her unjust imprisonment in Mexico centers on stories of solidarity and community with the women she met inside. https://winningwriters.com/past-winning-entries/blackbirds-in-the-pomegranate-tree
  • Alex Morrison’s short story, “Life Along the Fault Line,” is available in print in the Winter 2017 issue of The Cardiff Review. 
  • Catie Young’s poem “Hollow Bone” was recently published by Public Pool. You can read it here: http://www.publicpool.org/dope/cl-young/
  • Aby Kaupang was recently asked by the Lincoln Center and the Fort Collins Museum of Art to participate in the Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate exhibit by writing poems and reading them at the opening reception. Her poems can be found mounted in the lobby at FoCoMoA or online through Essay Press’ Radio Radio 11.8.16.
  • Steven Schwartz’s story “The Bad Guest” has been accepted by Ploughshares and will appear in the Winter 2017/18 issue.

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oval

Image by Paul L Dineen

  • SueEllen Campbell has three recent publications: “Making Climate Change Our Job,” the lead article in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, eds. Siperstein, Hall, and LeMenager, Routledge, 2017; the forward, “Sunrise, Celebration,” to Ellen Wohl, Rhythms of Change in Rocky Mountain National Park, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016; and “The White-tailed Ptarmigan,” an excerpt from Even Mountains Vanish, in The Rocky Mountain National Park Reader, ed. James H. Pickering, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016. She continues her work on the 100 Views of Climate Change website, http://changingclimates.colostate.edu, endeavoring to deal with a backlog of good new accessible sources of information of all kinds.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher just had a prose poem sequence accepted for the Manifest West anthology on “Women of the West.” The anthology is due out later this year.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, titled “Re-Writing a Discursive Practice: Atheist Adaptation of Coming Out Discourse” has been accepted for publication in Written Communication. It will be out this April.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s essay “Notes Toward a Poetics of Drought” is up at Omniverse right now. The essay, part of panel proceedings from a panel organized and chaired by Kristen George Bagdanov (MFA ’15), is a three-part series being run by Omniverse. You can find it here: http://omniverse.us/poetics-of-drought-matthew-cooperman/
  • From Sue Doe: “I am excited to announce a new online journal, Academic Labor:  Research and Artistry. ALRA is published by the Center for the Study of Academic Labor, a CSU center supported by President Tony Frank (see http://csal.colostate.edu/about/tony-franks-statement/) and Dean Ben Withers. We seek to provide perspectives from the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts on contingency, tenure and the future of higher education. Please consider submitting something for the inaugural issue, and please circulate the CFP to your colleagues and distribute it to disciplinary list-servs, journals, websites, discussion boards, etc. Note that the journal invites varied genres, including art.”
  • Todd Mitchell launched a new program today to encourage literacy, creativity, and caring for our earth by delivering free books and free author visits to underfunded schools in Colorado. If you want to learn more (or become a supporter), check out http://youcaring.com/Books4Change.
  • Todd Mitchell cover reveal. After years of writing and countless drafts. I’m finally able to share with you the cover for my new book. It’s coming out in August, 2017. Just in time for the new school year. I can’t wait to release this one into the wild, along with several new presentations for schools! Click to read early reviews, preorder a copy, and learn more about why I wrote this book.  lastpanther
  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Bellwethers: Shame and My Left Breast” is up at Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-83/
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the January 2017 issue of OmniVerse and other poems have recently been accepted in the Raleigh Review, Bellingham Review, and Sugar House Review. Her blogpost “Consideration of Self in Poetry: You & the Page” is up at North American Review, and a new interview with poems can be found online at HocTok.

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Happy New Year!

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has a set of poems and set of essays nominated for a Pushcart Prize.
  • Roze Hentschell, currently serving as Interim Associate Dean in the College of Liberal Arts, emceeed the College of Liberal Arts Fall commencement, Saturday December 17th at 5:00 p.m. If you couldn’t be there in person, check out the webcast archives and watch our wonderful graduates receive their diplomas: http://commencement.colostate.edu/webcast-archives/
  • Congratulations to the 2016-17 CLC interns, Dominique Garnett, Alina Lugo, Sarah Von Nostrand, and Shelley Curry and Associate director, Mary Ellen Sanger on successfully designing and facilitating six SpeakOut writing workshops. Three evening journal launch parties were held. Watch for the winter copy in January.
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay on curating community writing and social action in jail appears in the forthcoming issue of the Community Literacy Journal.
  • Bill Tremblay has a poem entitled “November 9, 2016,” coming out in the next issue of TRUCK magazine.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s “Song of Rachel” has been accepted for publication at The Molotov Cocktail.

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