Tag Archives: EJ Levy

Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Recently, Tim Amidon presented research at two concurrent conferences in Portland: the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (ATTW) and the Conference on College Composition and Communication. At ATTW, Battalion Chief Randy Callahan of Poudre Fire Authority joined Tim to speak about the ongoing community based research projects that they have been undertaking in partnership.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s flash piece, “Dawn,” was named as a finalist in The Best Small Fictions 2017 by guest judge Amy Hempel. “Dawn” was nominated by the editors of Eleven Eleven.
  • EJ Levy’s hybrid essay, “Natural World,” appears in the most recent issue of Passages North. She will be Visiting Writing at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell on March 22-23, 2017.
  • Sasha Steensen’s chapbook, Thirty-Three Hendes was a finalist for the Tupelo Sunken Gardens chapbook contest. It will be published by Dancing Girl Press this summer.
  • Michael Knisely has a photography exhibit going on in Boulder through April at the Rocky Ridge School of Music in the Lucky’s Market shopping center at Broadway and Spruce. These are performance art photos from when he was the University of Nebraska Dance Dept.’s photographer, plus a few old concert photos (Peter, Paul, and Mary, and Bruce Springsteen).
  • Dana Chellman’s essay “How to Get to Heaven from Colorado” is a winner for the AWP Intro Journals Project, and it is being published in Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Jennifer Stetson-Strange, Spring 2017 MA candidate in TEFL/TESL, has been offered an opportunity related to her final project, “Needs Analysis and Curriculum Development for Occupational ESP: English for hotel workers.”  Over the past nine months she dedicated over 80 hours to conducting a thorough needs analysis, compiling and analyzing specific language needs of L2 (second language) learners in order to develop a curriculum for workers in the hospitality industry and specifically housekeepers at a local hotel.

    Jenny observed more than 20 participants who worked in the housekeeping department of a local hotel in Northern Colorado.  She found it a rewarding experience to be a part of this project, including building key relationships with participants at the hotel.  At her final defense in March, the majority of the housekeeping staff attended as well as the general manager of the hotel, filling the defense room with 35-40 people.  Jenny was overwhelmed by the attendance and thankful they all were there because, as she writes, “The entire project was about them!”

    Currently, the general manager would like Jenny to implement the curriculum as soon as possible.  She will be teaching the staff once a week until she graduates.  This summer, she hopes to continue teaching the housekeeping staff twice a week.  Her future goal is to implement this program at different hotels and restaurants in Northern Colorado.

  • Mary Crow has had eight poems from her collection Addicted to the Horizon translated into Spanish by Silvia Soler-Gallego and Francisco Leal and published in AEREA: Revista Hispanoamericana de Poesia along with the English originals. This literary magazine is a joint publication of the University of Georgia and the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute.
  • James Work’s novel The Contractor was voted First Finalist in the annual Spur Award competition of Western Writers of America. His first novel of a projected series of “cozy” mysteries has been accepted by FiveStar Publishing. The title is Unmentionable Murders and the main character of the series is a RMNP ranger in the 1920s. Lots of gangsters, flappers, bootleg hooch and, of course, mysterious murder.
  • Cedar Brant has a sculpture in the CSU Art and Science Exhibition in the Curfman Gallery in Lory Student Center.  http://source.colostate.edu/celebrate-creativity-csus-art-science-exhibition-march-24/

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  • In the new issue of Writer’s Chronicle there’s an essay on erasure poetry that considers Dan Beachy-Quick’s chapbook Shields & Shards & Stitches & Songs.
  • Sue Doe’s article, coauthored with Erik Juergensmeyer of Fort Lewis College, “Owning Curriculum: Megafoundations, the State, and Writing Programs” was just published in the new collection from Peter Lang Publishers called Fighting Academic Repression: Resistance, Reclaiming, Organizing, and Black Lives Matter in Education.
  • EJ Levy’s hybrid essay, “Natural World,” appears in the most recent issue of Passages North. She will be Visiting Writing at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell on March 22-23, 2017.
  • Claire Boyles’s story, “Chickens, 2019” has been accepted by The Kenyon Review.
  • Sheila Dargon, Administrative Assistant in the English Department, has been chosen to receive the inaugural College of Liberal Arts State Classified Award. The award recognizes meritorious and outstanding achievement in job skills and service to the college by State Classified employees. In addition to a monetary award, she will receive a plaque and public recognition at the spring CLA faculty/staff meeting which will be held on Tuesday, April 11th, 2017. In his congratulatory letter to Sheila, Dean Withers commends her for her “truly remarkable achievement.”  Thanks to all faculty and staff who contributed their enthusiastic comments for Sheila’s nomination.

Food Student Essay Contest 2016/2017 

CO150 Faculty: If you’re using the FOOD reader, please encourage your best students to submit essays for the Food essay contest! (Click on image for larger version).

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 14th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies.  Undergraduate applicants must be registered English majors or minors; essays from graduate applicants should have been written for a graduate-level class at CSU.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 24, 2017.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies.  Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages.  Shorter papers are welcome.  Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility: (1)  Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept. (2)  Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 3, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. 

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover sheet with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minor, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your essays and cover sheet to: Professor Zach Hutchins, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773.  Submissions can also be dropped off at the English Department Office on the third floor of Eddy.

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  • SueEllen Campbell and John Calderazzo will be busy at the upcoming American Geophysical Union (AGU) annual conference in San Francisco. SueEllen is a co-convener of three sessions about the need for multidisciplinary approach to climate change education, two oral sessions and one poster session. She will also present a poster at the latter. John will moderate and co-present a workshop, Sharing Science in Plain English; he’ll also co-chair and moderate a panel on The Many Sides of Sharing Science. Both will also talk about science communication with the general public in an informal Ask an Expert forum.
  • Antero Garcia’s most recent book Doing Youth Participatory Action Research: Transforming Inquiry with Researchers, Educators, and Students (co-authored with Nicole Mirra and Ernest Morrell) is out now through Routledge.
  • Antero Garcia has an article in the most recent issue of English Journal with Nicole Mirra and Danielle Filipiak titled “Revolutionizing Inquiry in Urban English Classrooms: Pursuing Voice and Justice through Youth Participatory Action Research.” It can be accessed here.
  • Tobi Jacobi has been appointed to serve a three-year term on the College Composition and Communication (CCC) journal editorial board.
  • An interview with EJ Levy about her fiction and essays appears in the current issue of Superstition Review, which has a wonderful archive of author interviews with Maggie Nelson, George Saunders, Tayari Jones, among others. https://superstitionreview.asu.edu/issue16/interviews/ejlevy
  • Sarah Sloane read from an essay-in-progress about her father, “Sammy Safety,” at the Western Literature Association Conference in Reno, Nevada, on October 15, 2015. She has also collaboratively written an article with artist Joe Joe Orangias and Professor Jeannie Simms (School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston) called “Pink Icons: LGBTQ2 Monuments and their Displacement of Culture,” invited and under consideration by Public Art Dialogue. Orangias, Frank Pega (University of Otega, NZ), and Sloane were collaborators on the Pink Dolphin Monument installation in Galveston, TX: http://pinkdolphinmonument.com Finally, Sloane was one of four winners of a local essay contest, “This is Fort Collins,” held annually by The Coloradoan. Her essay was published online and in the September 2, 2015 weekend edition. She also gave a reading of it at Everyday Joe’s Coffee House.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology” has been accepted for publication by the Bellevue Literary Review.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems have been recently accepted for publication in Columbia Poetry Review, Hotel Amerika, Juked, Meridian, Phoebe, and The Burnside Review. Her manuscript, Silence for the Rest of Class, was a finalist in the 2015 Akron Poetry Prize. Three of her poems are currently highlighted on The Normal School website.

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programoftheyear

  • The SpeakOut! writing program won the “Program of the Year” award last night at the Larimer County Jail volunteer awards banquet.  Congrats to the facilitators and writers!
  • Two of Dan Beachy-Quick’s  essays, “Heraclitean Thirst” and “Circles” are featured at the online journal Fogged Clarity: http://foggedclarity.com
  • Doug Cloud presented a paper titled “Coming Out Queer, Coming Out Atheist: Building Rhetorical Infrastructures for Marginalized Speakers” at the Conference on Community Writing in Boulder on October 14.
  • Next week, Doug Cloud will be leading a workshop on talking about difference in public and professional contexts for the oSTEM chapter at Colorado State University. oSTEM, which stands for “Out in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics,” aims to “identify, address, and advocate for the needs of LGBTQA students in the STEM fields.” The workshop will take place in Eddy 100 at 6:00PM on Wednesday, November 11.
  • Sue Doe presented at the recent, national Community Writing Conference in Boulder where she and former graduate students Vani Kannan, Lydia Page, and Sarah Austin presented a panel entitled “Conversations on Labor: Report on a Cross-Campus/Regional Organizing Approach Using Participatory  Theatre.”  In their presentation, Sue and her colleagues engaged in participatory methods during the panel itself, querying traditional panel models and demonstrating how engagement works for not only social justice efforts and community engagement but also for enlivening and deepening the meaning of conference presentations themselves.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented an interactive workshop focused on remixing archival documents from the 1920s NY Training School for Girls with contemporary justice reform efforts at the 10th biannual Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Tempe, AZ on Friday, Oct. 30, 2015.
  • EJ Levy’s short story “I, Spy” has been accepted for publication by The Missouri Review, where it will appear next spring.
  • EJ Levy also spoke at the NonfictionNow conference in Flagstaff, AZ, last week on the subject of women’s bodies, sex, and sexuality in writing nonfiction.
  • Mary Ellen Sanger, Tobi Jacobi and the Community Literacy Center are pleased to announce that we’ve been awarded a $1500 engaged scholarship grant from Campus Compact of the Mountain West.  The award will support an assessment project for the SpeakOut! writing workshops in Spring 2016.
  • Eleven of our English department faculty members will be working at this year’s Senior Scholarship Day on Saturday, November 14, 2015, 9:00-4:00 PM: Dan Beachy-Quick, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Kathryn Hulings, Tobi Jacobi, Ed Lessor, Tatiana Nekrasova Beker, Sarah Louise Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, and Lynn Shutters.  This committee has been developing writing prompts for a writing workshop and a writing competition for high-achieving Colorado high school seniors.  Thanks to all of them for their hard work!
  • Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub is leading two final workshops before the end of the year at Om Ananda Yoga. “Wild Writing, Crazy Wisdom: Yoga, Meditation, and Writing” on Saturday, November 28th, 1:30 – 5:30 pm, and “Wild Writing, Crazy Wisdom: Meditation and Writing” on Sunday, December 6th, 11:30 am – 1:30 pm. You can find out more about these workshops and preregister at http://omanandayoga.com/. She also teaches a weekly Hatha Yoga class at Om Ananda Yoga every Tuesday at 7 am and would love to see you there.
  • Meghan Pipe first-year MFA student (fiction) was awarded a residency at Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts in May 2016.
  • Garrett Marquez (English Education, Class of 2015) is working as a special education teacher at Alamosa High School.

Upcoming Events

Colloquium 

Please join us Thursday November 12, 7:00 pm for the second (and final) colloquium of the semester as we gather, with fine appetizers and drinks in hand, to enjoy one another’s company and hear about the work that our colleagues are doing. All department faculty and graduate students are invited.

Here’s a preview of the evening:

Drawing from an on-going scholarly webtext that is under production, Tim Amidon will share a variety of genre ecology maps and visualizations that have been created using D3 (a data visualization program). By leveraging these digital tools, Tim suggests, digital humanists might render visible the textual assemblages that are instantiated through and circulate amidst sites of production. He will discuss ways that such modeling and visualization might be leveraged pedagogically to not only support literacy learning but also to critique and reconstruct systems supported by discursive activity.

Zach Hutchins is the founder and editor in chief of TEAMS, a scholarly collective dedicated to transcribing the unread manuscript sermons of colonial and antebellum America. Those transcriptions are then coded and housed in a searchable database. Searching even the small collection of sermons currently transcribed and published by TEAMS suggests that opening up access to these texts will challenge foundational beliefs about the religious beliefs and experiences of the individuals who laid the groundwork for revolution and the new republic.

Jaime Jordan will discuss how she has used the podcast Serial in her comp class as an example of digital rhetoric and share some introductory research she’s done on the podcast as well as literary research using textual-analysis tools.

If you missed the last gathering, you really owe it to yourself to come to this one! A good time will be had by all.

 

NCTE Presents:  Standards-based Grading
November 12th, 2015, Eddy 5

Join NCTE@CSU for a discussion on Standard-based grading. We will be joined by local teachers to lead the conversation and end the evening with time for questions. As always, there will be free food and drinks.

Another exciting addition to the November meeting will be the officer elections. The positions of treasurer and secretary will be open.  If you are interested in running, please email an intent to run and statement as to why you are qualified for the position to both: pamela.coke@colostate.edu and ncte@colostate.edu by November 10th.

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pumpkin

  • Tobi Jacobi presented at the Community Writing Conference in Boulder on Friday, October 16.  She gave a retrospective talk on 10 years of directing the SpeakOut writing program and co-facilitated a “deep think tank” workshop on homelessness, prison, and poverty with Phyllis Ryder, Paula Mathieu, Mike Homner, and Isabel McDevitt.
  • EJ Levy has been invited to teach fiction at the Kenyon Review Writers Conference, June 18-25, 2016. Faculty include Lee K. Abbott, Stanly Plumly, Carl Phillips, Linda Gregerson, Dinty Moore, and Brenda Miller. Applications to this generous, generative gathering will be accepted in January 2016.
  • Debbie Vance, first-year MFA student (Fiction)’s short story, “Black Mountain Lullaby,” will appear in Flyway: Journal of Writing & Environment this Saturday, October 31. The link to the journal: https://flyway.org.
  • Pete Garrison, MA candidate in English Education, recently completed two years of volunteer service as a member of CSU’s Peace Corps Master’s International Program. Pete served in northern Ethiopia, where he taught classes and facilitated trainings at a college of teacher education. Although he will miss Ethiopia’s generous culture and delicious cuisine, he is excited to be returning to CSU this spring.
  • Aby Kaupang Cooperman recently participated in Essay Press’s EP interview project with H.L. Hix, Shane McCrae, Jena Osman and Bino A. Realuyo in a chapbook titled “Bound to the Past: Poetry (out from) under the Sign of History.” The chapbook is free online and can be found here: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-37/#HDEVk3bYIOt8vA87.99
  • Gesture Press has accepted Mandy Rose’s chapbook, Letters to Pluto, for publication in Spring 2016.

CSU Creative Writing Program Reading Series Writers’ Harvest Festival: Andrew Altschul, newest member of the CSU faculty and author of Deus Ex Machina and Julie Carr,  CU – Boulder faculty member and prize-winning author of six poetry collections. 7:30pm, University Center for the Arts, Hatten Gallery. This event is part of an annual national festival aimed to support local food banks. Bring a nonperishable food item to qualify for our exciting raffle! Thursday, November 5th, 7:30pm, Art Museum, University Center for the Arts, CSU.  Free & Open to the public. Seating on a first-come basis – no ticket required.

internshippanel

 

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computerlabhours

  • Tim Amidon and Mike Caggiano (Forestry) received funding from the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute for an interdisciplinary research project that seeks to learn how landowners, land managers, and emergency personnel in the Front Range understand the potential risks and benefits associated with Defensible Space migration efforts. The researchers have nearly completed their interviews, and will begin analysis of the data later this semester.
  • “Composing MOOCs: Conversations about Writing in Massive Open Online Courses,” a collaborative, scholarly webtext, appeared in the current issue of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, & Pedagogy. The webtext, created by Tim Amidon, Chris Andrews (McMurry University), Elkie Burnside (University of Findlay), D. Alexis Hart (Allegheny College), & Margaret M. Strain (University of Dayton), is structured like an interactive MOOC discussion board and offers insights from leading scholars within rhetoric and composition who have recently taught or designed massive open online courses in composition in local or national contexts. The webtext can be found at http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/20.1/interviews/amidon-et-al/index.html.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an essay on Moby-Dick up at the Boston Review: http://bostonreview.net/poetry/dan-beachy-quick-moby-dick
  • Pam Coke’s proposal entitled “What Are They Selling?  What Are We Buying?: Eating Disorders as Cultural Artifact” has been accepted for the international conference The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers due to take place June 23-24, 2016, at the Université du Maine in Le Mans, France.
  • Camille Dungy’s  poem “Frequently Asked Questions: #10” is featured in the October issue of Poetry, as well as on the journal’s podcast.
  • On October 1st, Roze Hentschell gave an invited lecture, “Church, Playhouse, Market, Home: The Cultural Geography of St. Paul’s Precinct,” at the Early Modern Center at UC Santa Barbara, where she had the good fortune to see two alumna from our MA program, Megan Palmer Browne (M.A. ’06) and Katie Adkison (M.A. ’14). Roze received her Ph.D. at UCSB in 1998.
  • EJ Levy’s essay “Of Liars” was published last month in After Montaigne: Contemporary Essayists Cover the Essays (2015), in which 28 contemporary essayists–from Philip Lopate to Maggie Nelson, Jared Walker to Wayne Koestenbaum, Lia Purpura to Vivian Gornick–“re-write” Montaigne’s topics, just out from University of Georgia Press.
  • Leif Sorensen attended the seventh conference of the Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present (ASAP) in Greenville, South Carolina from September 24-27. He presented two papers: “Constructing Punk Counterpublics: Neoliberalism and the Rise of Punk in Buenos Aires, Montevideo, and São Paulo” and “‘Always start with a big explosion’: Representing Violence in Post 9/11 Genre Fiction,” in panels on the aesthetics of punk rock and violence and globalization, respectively.
  • Sasha Steensen had five poems published in Northside Review. She was interviewed for the series 12 or 20 questions: http://robmclennan.blogspot.com/2015/09/12-or-20-second-series-questions-with_29.html?m=0
  • Cedar Brant had a poem accepted for publication in Black Ocean’s Handsome Journal.
  • Mandy Rose’s essay “Five” has received a nomination for Sundress Publications’ Best of the Net. Her poem, “Nom de Guerre” was accepted by University of Hell Press for an anthology to be published in Spring 2016. Mandy will also be a guest editor for the next issue of Scissors and Spackle, http://scissorsandspackle.net/submissions/, an ELJ Publications imprint. Submissions open October 1st and are read blind, so please consider sending your work!
  • Vauhini Vara has a story in the newly published O. Henry Prize Stories anthology.  The story, originally published in Tin House is called, I, Buffalo

Workshop

Professors Lynn Shutters and Matthew Cooperman will facilitate a professionalization workshop/brown-bag event entitled “Applying to PhD Programs” next Wednesday, October 7, from 12-1:30 in Aylesworth C108. It’s designed for our MA and MFA students who are considering going on to a PhD program. Shutters and Cooperman will cover many topics such as: researching programs and institutions of interest; entrance exams; the application process de-mystified; financial assistance; and online resources. It’s an invaluable seminar designed to help graduate students make their applications as strong and successful as possible.

 

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image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

  • Gulf Coast has accepted Dan Beachy-Quick’s poem, “Sibboleth.”
  • Matthew Cooperman’s chapbook, A Little History of the Panorama, a collaboration with the Italian artist Simonetta Moro, was recently named a finalist for the Omnidawn Chapbook Prize.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper on literacy outreach and prison writers at the University of Wyoming English Department’s Symposium on Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy on Friday, September 18.
  • EJ Levy’s first ever attempt at poetry, “Poem as a Letter of Apology, or What Endures” was published in the autumn issue of The Pinch (Vol.35, number 2).
  • Sasha Steensen has four new poems up at Dusie.  You can read them here: http://www.dusie.org/
  • Airica Parker will be a featured reader for 100,000 Poets for Change in Denver at West Side Books (3434 West 32 Avenue) this Sunday, September 27th from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m.

 

CSU Writes

The CSU Writes “Women Writers in Academe” discussion & workshop is coming soon!  You have two options for attending the discussion: Tuesday, September 29 at 4-5:30pm (CHEM B202) or Wednesday, September 30 at 4-5:30pm (CHEM B202). The “Women Writers in Academe” discussion & workshop focuses on identifying some of the gender-specific challenges women scholars face when writing for publication as well as strategizing solutions to enhance and support our writing here at CSU. Please spread the word. If you work with women graduate students or faculty who may be interested, let them know they can find more information at the CSU Writes page at: http://english.colostate.edu/csu-writes.

 

Scholarship

 

ENTER THE CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS SCHOLARSHIP COMPETITION IN CREATIVE WRITING!

Deadline: Friday, October 2, 2015 by 4:00pm

 

  • The Creative Writing Program is conducting its annual university wide creative writing competition for Creative & Performing Arts scholarships.
  • Students can submit multiple genres, but no more than ONE entry per genre.
  • Undergraduate students may submit three to five poems OR one short story OR one creative essay.
  • Awards are typically $500 per academic year in the form of tuition waivers; awards of $1,000 – $5,000 are sometimes given for special merit.
  • Multiple awards are available.

 

Submission Guidelines:

  1. Student may submit 3 to 5 poems OR 1 short story OR 1 creative nonfiction essay (not an academic paper).
  2. DO NOT PUT NAME OR ADDRESS ON THE MANUSCRIPT. Include only page numbers and title on manuscript.
  3. Attach a cover letter stating name, email, phone number, CSU I.D. number (not ssn number), and genre.
  4. Address manuscripts to: Professor Dan Beachy-Quick, Director, Creative Writing Program.
  5. Please be sure to either mail OR Hand-Deliver submissions to the English Department mailroom on the third floor of Eddy Hall by Friday, October 2, 2015 at 4:00pm.

 

Criteria for Award:

  1. Must have a minimum 2.4 GPA.
  2. Must be undergraduates (working on first bachelor’s degree).
  3. Must be enrolled full-time (12+ credits).
  4. Should be making satisfactory progress toward degree, i.e., must have satisfactorily completed 75% of CSU courses attempted and must not have accumulated excessive credits. (See Office of Financial Aid for further details.)
  5. Must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident.

 

The Creative Writing Faculty cannot comment on the writing; manuscripts will not be returned.

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image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

  • The French edition of EJ Levy’s story collection, Love, In Theory (Editions Rivages, 2015) received excellent reviews in Le Monde, Le Figaro, Elle, and Le Journal Dimanche this summer, and was the featured title in Paris Vogue in August, for which EJ was photographed by fashion photographer/ filmmaker Andrew Dosumnu. She read with novelist Celeste Ng at Ashland University in July.
  • Dana Masden’s short essay “For the Love of Groceries” will appear in the next issue of Fort Collins Magazine.
  • Todd Mitchell’s fourth novel, Species, a middle-grade book that involves giant sea turtles, climate refugees, and mystical encounters with the last living Florida panther, will be published in Winter/Spring 2017 by Delacorte Press (an imprint of Random House).
  • In an article on new books about World War I as well as a review of Dan Robinson’s novel, the Historical Novels Society wrote, “The lessons of World War I are as relevant today as they were one hundred years ago and when we read novels like Death of a Century, we are reminded poignantly of these lessons.” The full article/review can be accessed on historicalnovelsociety.org or on the board outside Dan’s office. Also, Dan will present a paper on Ernest Hemingway’s In Our Time and moderate a panel on the story “Indian Camp” at the 17th Biennial International Hemingway Conference in Oak Park next July.
  • Bill Tremblay’s adaptation of Aaron A. Abeyta’s novel, RISE, DO NOT BE AFRAID [Ghost Road Press, 2003] is a finalist in the Moondance International Film Festival’s screenplay competition for feature films.
  • Kayann Short’s essay, “Soil vs Dirt: A Reverie on Getting Down to Earth,” appears in Dirt: A Love Story, edited by Barbara K Richardson and published by University Press of New England.

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"Love, In Theory" by E.J. Levy, the French edition

“Love, In Theory” by E.J. Levy, the French edition

  • Good news from E.J. Levy: “My award-winning story collection, ‘Love, In Theory,’ is being released today in France by Editions Payot & Rivages, publishers of (among others) Elmore Leonard, David Lodge, Alison Lurie, and Willa Cather. They compare my work to that of Lorrie Moore, Grace Paley, and Nobel Prize winner Alice Munro. The collection won the Flannery O’Connor Award and the GLCA New Writers Award, previously awarded to Munro, Richard Ford, Louise Erdrich and other award-winning authors.”
  • Leslee Becker’s story collection, The Little Gentleman, has been named a Finalist for the Snake Nation Press Fiction Award.  She was also listed in the Literary Arts category as one of Silicon Valley Creates Awards Laureates for winning the Santa Clara County Arts Council Short Story Award. (She has not moved to Silicon Valley, but is being cited as an Artist Laureate in honor of SVC’s 25th anniversary.)
  • Ellen Brinks has an essay on queer Victorian childhood and adolescence in an edited collection entitled Queer Victorian Families: Curious Relations in Literature. The volume, which appeared this spring, is part of the Routledge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature.
  • Camille Dungy has a new poem featured in the Kenyon Review. http://www.kenyonreview.org/journal/mayjune-2015/selections/camille-t-dungy/
  • Tobi Jacobi was elected to serve a 3 year term on the CSU Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research advisory board.
  • Tobi Jacobi and Wendy Wolters Hinshaw’s essay, “What Words Might Do: The Challenge of Representing Incarcerated Women and their Writing” appears in the most recent issue of Feminist Formations, a feminist scholarly journal.
  • Two English majors received Top Honors at the CURC Showcase and five others received High or Highest Honors. The Celebrate Undergraduate Research and Creativity (CURC) Showcase features writing, oral presentations, service-learning, art, and research by CSU undergraduate students. Seventeen English majors entered. An interesting note in the poetry competition is that the first place winner, Eric Bleem, is a Biochemistry major whose E210 instructor was English MFA student Kristen George Bagdanov. Eric was awarded first place for his poem “Hollows.” You can see pictures and read about the winners at http://english.colostate.edu/2015/05/celebrate-undergraduate-research-and-creativity-curc-showcase-winners/
  • Five of our current student teachers returned to campus on Monday, May 4th, to talk and workshop with our current Methods students.  Stephanie McElroy, Melinda Smith, Kendall Umetsu, Chris Vanjonack, and Kelly Wimler visited Pam Coke‘s EDUC 463: Methods–Teaching Language Arts class.  They answered questions about student teaching, and then they worked with students in small groups to answer questions about their unit plans.  Melinda, Kendall, and Chris have already secured teaching positions for the fall.
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “Short Cut,” accepted by Calliope magazine.
  • Christine Robinson (2011 MA, Rhet/Comp) was recently named recipient of the College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences (LAS) Outstanding Instructor award for 2015. Christine just finished her fourth year as a full-time instructor at UCCS.

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Lory Student Center Curfman Gallery Student Art Exhibit

Lory Student Center Curfman Gallery Student Art Exhibit (image by Jill Salahub)

  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s new book, gentlessness, has just been published by Tupelo Press, and received an early review here: http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-936797-57-8. It is accompanied by a chapbook, Shields & Shards & Stitches & Songs also just out from Omnidawn.
  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang just returned from AWP in Minneapolis, where they gave readings for SpringGun/Noemi, and Laurel Review. The latter reading, co-hosted by Colorado Review, featured (for Colorado Review), Julie Carr, Andy S. Nicholson and Janet Sylvester. In addition, Matthew’s poem “Good Day” has just been accepted by Prairie Schooner.”
  • A conversation between Camille Dungy and Pulitzer-prize finalist Adrian Matejka is collected in Tracking / Teaching: On Documentary Poetics, which is “up” and available to the world at http: //www.essaypress.org/ep-2
  • EJ Levy presented at AWP as part of “Eye on the (Book) Prize.” Her first attempt at poem, inspired by Carl Phillips, has been accepted for publication in The Pinch.
  • This year’s judge of our Academy of American Poets Prize, Bin Ramke, has announced his choice of winner and runner-up. Congratulations to Kristin George Bagdanov whose three poems “Calving,” “When First I heard,” & “Lamb Body” have been awarded 1st place; and congratulations to Kylan Rice whose suite of “eve” poems received honorable mention. It’s needful to mention that Mr. Ramke had a very difficult time deciding, and described himself as so impressed with all the entrees that he wanted to drive up here and ask us what is going on.

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