Tag Archives: Steven Schwartz

  • Matthew Cooperman currently has new poems out in The Laurel Review and Saltfront, in print. Online, Mary: A Journal of New Writing, is featuring three of his poems at http://maryjournal.org/fall2016/?page_id=416
  • On Wednesday, April 5, Camille Dungy will present at the Newberry Library, Chicago as part of a panel in celebration of the centennial of poet and former US Poet Laureate Gwendolyn Brooks. As part of a citywide celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks marking the one-hundredth anniversary of her birth, the Newberry will gather poets, scholars, historians, and archivists to discuss the historical context of Brooks’ groundbreaking first book of poems, A Street in Bronzeville. Published in in August 1945—the same month that World War II ended—the collection expresses the rich complexities of life on Chicago’s South Side within the larger fight for democracy both at home and abroad. https://www.newberry.org/04052017-gwendolyn-brooks
  • Todd Mitchell attended and delivered a session on “Teaching Dystopian Fiction” at this year’s Colorado Teen Literature Conference in Denver.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Choose Your Own,” was accepted for publication in the next issue of Black Warrior Review.
  • Steven Schwartz’s Madagascar: New and Selected Stories is a finalist for the Colorado Book Award for Literary Fiction and the Foreword Review Award for Short Stories.
  • Rico Moore, MFA Summer 2011 (Poetry), has had four poems (“Immanence of Star,” “Three Lyrics Composed of Words from Seneca’s Epistle, ‘On the God within Us,’” “When Awakened at Night by the Quiet,” and “What You’ve Unearthed from the Past,” appear in the journal, LVNG, number 17, online at https://lvngmagazine.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/lvng17.pdf.In addition, Rico has been a freelance writer for the past two years with Boulder Weekly. He writes about plans through which the Colorado Department of Parks and Wildlife hopes to kill mountain lions and bears in the name of boosting mule deer populations. His articles include “Off target: are mountain lions and bears about to be killed for the sins of the oil and gas industry?,” “Update: Commission asked to delay killing of mountain lions and bears in the name of sound science,” and “CPW and the oil and gas industry can’t have it both ways.”  An update, published Thursday, deals with an injunction filed by WildEarth Guardians.  You can read these articles online at http://www.boulderweekly.com/author/ricomoore/.
  • On March 27 at a ceremony at the Tishman Auditorium in New York, Natalie Scenters-Zapico accepted the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry for her book The Verging Cities, published by the Center for Literary Publishing as part of the Mountain West Poetry Series.

Rekindle the Classics 

The next Rekindle the Classics discussion will be on Wednesday, April 12, 6:30-8:30 pm at Wolverine Farms Publick House. MFA student Lauren Matheny will lead a discussion of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary. Rekindle the Classics brings together CSU English faculty and graduate students and lovers of literature in the Fort Collins community. For more information, see http://blog.poudrelibraries.org/2017/01/rekindle-a-love-of-the-classics/

English Department Writing Contests

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick has a group of essays from A Quiet Book in the new Copper Nickel.
  • On Saturday February 25th, Camille Dungy will be the Keynote Speaker at the Robinson Jeffers Society Annual Meeting at Occidental College. Her talk is titled: “The View From Hawk Tower Today: A Contemporary Environmental Poet Reflects on What Robinson Jeffers Has Meant to Her.” https://www.oxy.edu/oxy-arts/projects-exhibitions/visiting-artists
  • The opening reception for the CSU Art and Science exhibition is this coming Tuesday, Feb 21 from 4:30 to 6:30 pm at the Curfman gallery in the Lory Student Center. Beth Lechleitner’s collaborative poetry/visual art piece “Mettle” has been is included.  The show runs through March 24.
  • Dana Masden’s short story “Exercise, A Good Book, and a Cup of Tea” is published in the Fall 2016 issue of Third Coast.
  • Mary Ellen Sanger (Associate Director, Community Literacy Center) won second place in the North Street Book Prize contest for her book, “Blackbirds in the Pomegranate Tree: Stories from Ixcotel State Prison.” This account of her unjust imprisonment in Mexico centers on stories of solidarity and community with the women she met inside. https://winningwriters.com/past-winning-entries/blackbirds-in-the-pomegranate-tree
  • Alex Morrison’s short story, “Life Along the Fault Line,” is available in print in the Winter 2017 issue of The Cardiff Review. 
  • Catie Young’s poem “Hollow Bone” was recently published by Public Pool. You can read it here: http://www.publicpool.org/dope/cl-young/
  • Aby Kaupang was recently asked by the Lincoln Center and the Fort Collins Museum of Art to participate in the Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate exhibit by writing poems and reading them at the opening reception. Her poems can be found mounted in the lobby at FoCoMoA or online through Essay Press’ Radio Radio 11.8.16.
  • Steven Schwartz’s story “The Bad Guest” has been accepted by Ploughshares and will appear in the Winter 2017/18 issue.

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Lady Moon Meadow, image by Jill Salahub

Lady Moon Meadow, image by Jill Salahub

  • Tim Amidon and Michele Simmons (Miami University) gave a research talk titled “Negotiating ‘messy’ research context and design through adaptive research stances” at the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) Special Interest Group on the Design of Communication (SIGDOC) in Washington, D.C.  While at SIGDOC, Tim also participated in “Draw to communicate: How geometric shapes, blank pages, and crayons can improve your collaboration and creativity,” a workshop lead by Abigail Selzer, Kristen R. Moore, and Ashley Hardage (Texas Tech University). The workshop introduced participants to research and pedagogy in technical communication surrounding sketch-noting and incorporated hands on practice applying concepts such a geometric and visual metaphors to communication design problems.
  • Tim Amidon spoke as an invited panelist at the Faculty and Instructor Open Textbooks Workshop about his experiences adopting Doug Eyman’s Digital Rhetoric: Theory, Method, Practice, as an open textbook in CO402: Principles of Digital Rhetoric and Design. The event was hosted at the Morgan Library by Associate Professor and Open Education Resources Librarian Merinda McLure and Assistant Dean for Scholarly Communications and Collection Development Meg Brown-Sica.
  • Steven Schwartz’s story “The Theory of Everything” has just been published by Electric Literature on its Recommended Reading site. The story is from his newly released collection, Madagascar: New and Selected Storieshttps://electricliterature.com/the-theory-of-everything-by-steven-schwartz-52ad1978996f#.3okj44mzn
  • Bill Tremblay has received acceptances of two new poems, “Bukowski” and “The Sun’s Hands” at Cimarron Review for their Winter issue, 2016-17. Bill read with Jared Smith in Evergreen, CO, last Saturday evening. Besides the audience the reading was streamed out to 177 homes in the area. Bill will read in Laramie, WY, at the Night Heron Bookstore, Friday October 15, 7 pm. He is also scheduled to read with Joe Hutchison at the Innisfree in Boulder, 6 PM, October 20th. A reading-interview with Bill talking about Walks Along the Ditch will be broadcast and streamed from KBOO.fm Portland OR 11PM October 17. It will also be archived.
  • Andrew Mangan’s short story “Any Good Thing” has been accepted for publication by Zyzzyva. Andrew graduated from the MFA program in 2016. This is his first publication.
  • Thank you to everyone who helped to make PBK Visiting Scholar Nora Naranjo Morse’s campus visit a success.  A special thank you to Louann Reid, for her tireless support of this opportunity; Gloria Blumanhourst, who is, herself, a PBK member; she helped do all of the planning, and then she was called away to help with a family emergency; Patty Rettig, a PBK member alongside Gloria, who stepped in to help us with this event; Dean Ben Withers, also a PBK member, for his involvement in Nora’s campus visit; Colleen Timothy, who helped  with scheduling Dean Withers; Jill Salahub, our English department communications coordinator, who went above and beyond to help us to publicize this event; Sue Russell, one of our English department administrative professionals, who helped to organize the logistics of Nora’s visit; Sheila Dargon, another of our English department administrative professionals, who helped to publicize this event; Leif Sorensen, who hosted Nora in his Ethnic Literature in the United States class; Camille Dungy, who hosted Nora in her Literature of the Earth course; and Pam Coke, who served as faculty host. Thank you to everyone who attended any of the events while Nora was here.  Her visit was co-sponsored by Phi Beta Kappa and the CSU English department.

bookfest-_FINAL-273x300

The inaugural Fort Collins Books Fest: Brewin’ Up Books! is a FREE, one-day public literary festival bringing attention to the expansiveness of Fort Collins’ craft brewing culture through books and authors involved with beer, coffee, tea, and more. With over 40 speakers, readings, panels, and workshops, there is sure to be something for just about everyone.

The CSU English Department is a sponsor of this event. As part of our in-kind donation, we are asking for volunteers to help staff the day’s festivities. We need handlers to help make sure panelists are able to move comfortably between venues as well as people who can serve other necessary roles in helping to make sure the festival runs smoothly. If you are able to serve on a 2 to 5 hour volunteer shift on October 22, please write me Camille Dungy soon as possible. Conference organizers are hoping to schedule all the volunteers by the end of this week (October 7).  (Contact Camille Dungy at camille.dungy@colostate.edu). Volunteers will have access to a few backstage perks as well, so sign up soon so we can get you on those lists! http://www.focobookfest.org/

 

Cover of the latest edition

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Assistant Professor Zach Hutchins and his E630D Special Topics in Literature: Gender Studies – Witchcraft class.

Assistant Professor Zach Hutchins and his E630D Special Topics in Literature: Gender Studies – Witchcraft class.

  • Zach Hutchins has been awarded a 2016 Fellowship by the National Endowment for the Humanities. NEH support will facilitate research on Hutchins’s current book project, a prehistory of the North American slave narrative. For his research, Hutchins is reading thousands of issues of early American newspapers and transcribing every news item related to slavery, from slave-for-sale advertisements to discussions of enslaved African princes and news of runaway slaves. Those transcriptions contribute, Hutchins argues, the rhetorical framework for subsequent representations of the African American experience and the generic codes of the slave narrative.
  • This past Tuesday, Doug Cloud gave a workshop for SoGES Sustainability Fellows titled “Communicating Science to Skeptical Audiences: Some Rhetorical Strategies for Scientists.”
  • Kristina Quynn’s personal essay, “My Brother, My…,” about growing up in an interracial family is to be published in the collection What Does It Mean to Be White in America? by 2Leaf Press.
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “Tomb at the Village of the Workmen,” accepted for publication in Indianola Review. Her book of poems, Jostle, is a finalist for the T. S. Eliot Publication Award. Her history of Colorado poetry has been posted on the website of The Poetry Foundation (Poetry Magazine); it was originally written for the Academy of American Poets (and now is a bit dated).
  • Steven Schwartz’s Madagascar: New and Selected Stories will be published by Engine Books in Fall 2016. His play, “Stranger,” was selected as one of three from a national playwriting competition and received a staged reading in Los Angeles.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s 101 word flash-fiction piece, “Motherland” has been accepted for publication in Crack The Spine!

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English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub and author Neil Gaiman. Jill waited in line for seven hours at Old Firehouse Books to meet Gaiman, who stayed at that table signing books for eleven hours, until there was no more line.

English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub and author Neil Gaiman. Jill waited in line for seven hours at Old Firehouse Books to meet Gaiman, who stayed at that table signing books for eleven hours, until there was no more line.

  • Tim Amidon’s collaboratively authored chapter (with Jessica Reyman) titled “Authorship and Ownership of User Contributions on the Social Web” is now out in Cultures of Copyright  (Eds. Dànielle Nichole DeVoss and Martine Courant Rife). Additionally, this semester he is teaching “CO402: Principles of Digital Rhetoric and Design” which is the first time this course has been offered here at CSU. He will be presenting an interactive talk titled “Navigating Fair Use: Remix, Appropriation, Attribution” at the TILT MTI next Tuesday, February 10, 2015 from 12:00-1:00 PM at TILT 105.
  • Leslee Becker has won the CLA John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award.
  • Next week, John Calderazzo will conduct a science communication story-telling workshop for SoGES Ph.D and post-doctorate scholars. Also in February, he’ll give a talk/reading–“High Culture: Mountains & Our Minds”–at the Walking Mountains Science Center in Avon, Colorado.
  • Todd Mitchell spent a day last week working to inspire literacy and creativity with elementary and middle school students and faculty at Littleton Academy, in (not surprisingly) Littleton.
  • Kristina Quynn was awarded a Ripple Effect Grant to fund the first year of “CSU Writes,” a program that will set up and foster writing groups on campus for faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and the CSU community. “CSU Writes” will start in Fall of 2015 and will help support those at CSU who research and/or write for publication.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poetic sequence “The Somatic Wager: A Proof in Verse” was accepted for publication in Juked (Print).
  • Kylan Rice had a chapbook of poetry published digitally on February 5th at Gauss-PDF: http://www.gauss-pdf.com/post/110170340600/gpdf155-kylan-rice-captions
  • Kendall Umetsu, currently student teaching at Kinard Core Knowledge Middle School in Fort Collins, recently attended the University of Northern Iowa Overseas Recruiting Fair, where she signed her first teaching contract.  Starting in August, she will be moving to The Kingdom of Bahrain to teach 10/11th grade English at the Modern Knowledge School.  Congratulations, Kendall!
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “As Can Happen with an Island,” accepted for publication by Greensboro Review and she has been accepted for this year’s Ashbery Home School workshop.
  • Steven Schwartz will be the featured reader for fiction at the 2015 Rosenberry Writers’ Conference on Wednesday, March 4, 7 p.m. in the University Center Panorama Room of the University of Northern Colorado campus. Admission is free.
  • James Work’s Christmas video “Stone Soup Christmas” on Vimeo reached more than two thousand people over Christmas. His poem “The Empty Cross” is being set to music for the Easter cantata at Mountain View Presbyterian Church.

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Some of the recent publications and award winners from faculty and alumni

Some recent and award winning books from faculty and alumni

New faculty publications and awards reveal the diversi­ty of scholarly and creative strengths in this department.

  • Sue Doe and Lisa Langstraat, Generation Vet: Composition, Student-Veterans, and the Post-9/11 University
  • Zachary McLeod Hutchins, Inventing Eden: Primitivism, Millennialism, and the Making of New England
  • Tobi Jacobi (with co-author Ann Folwell Standford), Woman, Writing, and Prison: Activists, Scholars, and Writers Speak Out
  • Todd Mitchell, Backwards, winner of the 2014 Colorado Author’s League Award, and a finalist for the 2014 Colorado Book Awards
  • Sasha Steensen, House of Deer
  • Steven Schwartz, Little Raw Souls, 2014 Colorado Book Awards Literary Fiction Winner

 

It’s been a productive time for not only the publication of books but also for essays, poems, book reviews, and cre­ative nonfiction pieces. Current and emeritus faculty with new work include (but are not limited to) Leslee Becker, Tony Becker, John Calderazzo, SueEllen Campbell, Pam Coke, Pattie Cowell, Mary Crow, Sue Doe, Judy Doenges, Camille Dungy, Aparna Gollapudi, Stephanie G’Schwind, Roze Hentschell, Tobi Jacobi, Lisa Langstraat, Ellen Levy, David Milof­sky, Cindy O’Donnell-Allen, Airica Parker, Dan Robinson, Bruce Ronda, Jill Salahub, Barb Sebek, Sarah Sloane, Debby Thompson, and Bill Tremblay.

 


We are also happy to share the news of recent alumni publications.

 


In other publishing news, the Center for Literary Publishing’s grant request to the National Endowment for the Arts has been funded for 2015 in the amount of $15,000. The grant will go toward printing, mailing, and author payments for Colorado Review and to support the publication of two new titles in the Mountain West Poetry Series (forthcoming in June and November 2015).

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image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

The sun is shining on Eddy Hall this Friday afternoon, and there are many other good things to celebrate as well. Such as,

  • Dan Beachy-Quick will be presenting the Wittreich Lecture at University of Louisville. He’ll be reading an essay titled: “Poetic Geometries: Moby-Dick as Primer to Creative Crisis.” There’s a review of his book on John Keats up at The Philadelphia Review of Books: http://philadelphiareviewofbooks.com/2014/03/24/so-fair-a-form/ And a small collection of his poems from FREE POETRY is just out, titled Drone & Other Poems.
  • John Calderazzo and SueEllen Campbell are giving the Atmospheric Science Department Colloquium on March 29, on the topic of “Talking to Non-Scientists.”
  • SueEllen Campbell took part in a roundtable/workshop in Dallas this week with faculty and professionals in the fabric, textiles, and clothing industry, helping (as a climate change and sustainability educator) with a USDA-funded curriculum project for students in these fields.
  • The North American Review has invited Steven Schwartz to deliver the fiction keynote address at their bicentennial conference in June 2015.
  • Leif Sorensen presented a paper “Sounds of the Post-Dictatorial City: Punk Mappings of Buenos Aires, Montevideo and São Paulo” in a seminar “Punk and the City” at the 2014 meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association in New York City on March 21.
  • Wastershed Review has accepted three of Jerrod Bohn’s poems for publication.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Exchange Body” was given an honorable mention in the 2014 AWP Intro Journals Project competition. Her paper proposal “The Anthropocenic Lyric” was accepted for the 2015 MLA panel, “Anthropocene and Deep Time in Literary Studies,” which is co-sponsored by the divisions of 20th-Century American Literature and Literature and Science.
  • Samantha Iacovetto will be an MFA candidate in Creative Nonfiction at The Ohio State University. She will be attending on a fellowship.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore presented her paper “The Unrealized Potential of Metaphor in Relation to Cancer” this weekend at the “Undoing Health: States of Body and Mind” graduate student interdisciplinary conference at Indiana University-Bloomington. Grateful thanks to Debby Thompson and Katie Adkison for their critical feedback on this work.
  • Tanya Mykhaylychenko (MA in Literature, Summer 2009) has been, since graduating, an OWL tutor for a major publishing and education company, a full-time proposal writer for a small IT staffing agency, and is currently a freelance writing consultant. Following her long-time interest in film theory and history, she was recently admitted to a graduate program in film studies at Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema, Concordia University (Montreal) and awarded a two-year fellowship.

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