Tag Archives: John Whalen

snOval, image by Colorado State University

snOval, image by Colorado State University

  • Aby Kaupang and Matthew Cooperman’s book NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified) was recently a finalist for the Essay Press Book Prize. Largely detailing the challenges and joys of raising their autistic daughter Maya, the book has been in progress for many years. A chapbook from that collection, Disorder 299.00, has just been released from Essay Press, and can be found at http://www.essaypress.org/ep-52/
  • Thanks to the amazing work of Shoaib Alam and Karen Montgomery Moore, Colorado Review now has 10,000 followers on Twitter.
  • Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala has been appointed to serve as Editor of the American Association for Applied Linguistics Newsletter.  She will serve a three-year term (2016-2019).  Fabiola is also currently serving in the Editorial Review Board for Volume 70 of The Reading Teacher (RT) for the 2015-2016 period. Fabiola’s latest 2015 publication is: Meeting the reading comprehension challenges of diverse English language learners in K-12:  Key contributions from reading research (pp. 147-164).  In M. Daniel & K. Mokhtari (Eds.), Research and instruction that makes a difference in English learners’success.  Lanham, MD: Roman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. Fabiola, together with Tony Maciejewsky (Department Head of Electrical and Computer Engineering at CSU), will be presenting the results of their investigation titled “Mental imagery experienced by both pathway and non-pathway graduate students in an engineering course at a US Research I institution” at the upcoming 2016 AAAL Conference in Orlando.
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poem, ghazal [16.], will be published in the spring edition of burntdistrict. You can find the journal at http://burntdistrict.org/
  • Mary Crow’s poetry is the subject (along with Karen Swenson’s) of a chapter in Marilyn Krysl’s Yes, There Will Be Singing, published in the University of Michigan series, Poets on Poetry.
  • Here’s James Work’s latest contribution to world literature. Publication expected in July. jameswork
  • Two of Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the newest issue of TriQuarterly Review. Her poem “In tuck” has also been selected for publication at The Cincinnati Review and her poem “& in wonder too,” first printed in Meridian, will be the poem of the day on Poetry Daily on February 11.
  • The English Department is pleased to award the following graduate students departmental funds for travel associated with professional activities. The department gave a total of $7,420 in award money to students this year. The grants ranged from $300-$750. Students will be traveling to conferences from Alaska to points eastward. Congratulations to all our students who are sharing their research and creative work in professional circles!
    Paul Binkley
    Denise Garrett
    Kelsey Hatley
    Abby Kerstetter
    John Koban
    Cole Konopka
    David Mucklow
    Kathleen Naughton
    Meghan Pipes
    Kylan Rice
    Lara Roberts
    John Whalen
    Meagan Wilson
    Catie Young

NCTE@CSU

On April 9th of this year we will be hosting our first conference.

“Literacy Through Popular Culture.”

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL

The conference theme is on research-based strategies for teaching literacy through popular culture. This theme engages students and teachers in embracing the rele-vance and power of popular culture—from comic books to teen novels to video-games— as a form of literacy in the classroom. Presentations and workshops should offer teachers concrete, actionable strategies that they can incorporate into their own language arts classrooms. We invite secondary (grades 6-12) language arts teachers and students, university professors and students, and other related profes-sionals to send in proposals for workshops or presentations.

DEADLINE: MARCH 7

Email proposal submissions to ncte@colostate.edu

We are very excited about this event and are working hard to make it an amazing and memorable one. Please visit the website for information: http://nctecsuconference2016.weebly.com

Show Up & Write

“show up & write” sessions started this week.  “show up & write” runs from February 1 to May 4, on Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays: 9-9:50 in Eddy 100 and 2-2:50 in Eddy 200. These drop-in writing sessions offer a regularly scheduled time in a communal, academic setting for writers to make progress on writing projects. Look for information in your mailbox to share with your students. And, “show up & write” regularly to see what you accomplish this semester!

 

Workshop Reminder: UD Composition

On February 16 from 5-7, in Eddy 4, we will offer the first installment of our series — “Sound Matters”. In this workshop we will discuss rationales for including multimodal elements in the composition course and work with sound recording equipment to produce a short piece using Audacity. More specifically, we will record vocal tracks using department equipment, gather and import music and sound effects, and mix these down into a finished audio version of a children’s story.  Faculty and graduate students from all areas are welcome to attend, but due to space limitations preference for attendees will go to those scheduled to teach UD Comp in upcoming semesters. Attendees should bring along a USB drive to save your creations. Snacks will be provided!

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Image by Colorado State University

Image by Colorado State University

  • There’s a review of Dan Beachy-Quick’s book of poems, gentlessness, up at Rain Taxi: http://www.raintaxi.com/gentlessness/
  • Antero Garcia reflected on Teacher Professional Development and Loss, Trauma, and Empathy for DMLcentral. You can read his post here: http://dmlcentral.net/loss-trauma-and-the-digital-language-of-empathy-in-schools/
  • Antero Garcia wrote a blog post for the Compose Our World research project funded by Lucas Educational Research. You can read his George Clinton-quoting post here: http://composeourworld.org/blog/2015/11/13/we-do-this-this-is-what-we-do/
  • Stephanie G’Schwind presented on a panel, “The View from the Slush Pile,” at the NonfictioNow conference in Flagstaff, Arizona, last month.
  • Cindy O’Donnell-Allen and Antero Garcia were featured guests on the NWP Radio program to discuss their new book, Pose, Wobble, Flow: A Culturally Proactive Approach to Literacy Instruction. The archived broadcast is available here: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/nwp_radio.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “The Four Stages of Cancer,” published in Upstreet, was listed as a “notable” in Best American Essays 2015.
  • Airica Parker’s poem “Form” will appear in the Winter 2015 issue of The Nature of the West: Camas.
  • Beth Stoneburner has an essay up at xoJane.com on rape and justice. Link is:
    http://www.xojane.com/issues/confronting-my-rapist-taught-me-about-justice
  • MA and MFA students showed out in full force at the Graduate Student Showcase on Wednesday, November 11th. Their posters and presentations revealed the diversity and depth of the creativity and scholarship in this department. They even garnered prizes to boot. We want to call attention and thank all the participants in the Showcase from English, and give a special shout-out to those who won awards for their work. The participants were, in alphabetical order, Alhassane Ali Drouhamane, Paul Binkley, Cedar Brant, Lindsay Brookshier, Leslie Davis, Annette Gabriel, Kathleen Hamel, Kelsey Hatley, Melissa Hohl, Abby Kerstetter, Samantha Killmeyer, Kaitlyn Mainhart, John McDonough, Kristen Mullen, Kathleen Naughton, Courtney Pollard, Sarahbeth Stoneburner, John Whalen, Michelle Wilk, and Meagan Wilson. The prizewinners were: Melissa Hohl (College of Liberal Arts Award), Abby Kerstetter (Distinction in Creativity Award) and John Whalen (Great Minds in Research Award).
  • Melissa Hohl was awarded Highest Achievement in Performing Arts from the College of Liberal Arts at the Graduate Student Showcase.
  • Abby Kerstetter was awarded 2nd Place in the category of Distinction in Creativity at the Graduate Student Showcase.
  • John Whalen was awarded 2nd place in “Great Minds in Research” for his project entitled “Which Reporting Verbs Characterize Successful Academic Writing?” at the Graduate Student Showcase.

    john

    John Whalen at the Graduate Student Showcase

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Chloe’ Leisure’s (MFA, Spring 2006) Chapbook, The End of the World Again

Chloe’ Leisure’s (MFA, Spring 2006) recently published chapbook, The End of the World Again

  • CLA Spring Faculty/Staff Meeting and Awards Ceremony: Three of our MFA students — Abby Kerstetter, Matt Truslow, and Nate Barron — will be featured readers at the College of Liberal Arts Spring Faculty/Staff Meeting & Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, April 8th. Past spring meetings have included entertainment from theatre and music students, and we are proud that Abby, Matt, and Nate were chosen to showcase the liberal arts and the creative writing program this year. Five English department faculty members will be recognized with awards for teaching, research/creative artistry, and service. Please come support not only our department faculty and students but also faculty from the rest of the college. This is always an upbeat and celebratory event. The ceremony from 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm in the Durrell Center Seminar Rooms A & B. There is parking available near Moby.
  • Leslee Becker’s story, “The Continental,” has been accepted for publication in Ascent.
  • Next week, Doug Cloud will be giving at talk in Athens, Ohio at the third annual Ohio University Queer Studies Conference titled, “Coming Out Gay, Coming Out Atheist: Re-Thinking the Long-Term Influence of the LGBTQ Movement(s).” He’ll also lead a workshop for queer students and students of color titled, “Queer in the Workplace, Queer in the World: Some Key Concepts for Talking About Categories of Difference in Public and Professional Contexts.”
  • Roze Hentschell is attending the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in Vancouver, B.C., where she presented a paper, “‘They Sing’: Comedy, Choirboys, and Actors at St. Paul’s.”
  • A French edition of EJ Levy’s story collection, Love, In Theory, will be issued by Payots & Rivages on May 5, 2015.
  • This week, Nancy Henke learned that she received a Senior Teaching Appointment. She joins 19 other department faculty whose long-term, high-quality teaching and service have been recognized with this honor.
  • Todd Mitchell attended and presented two sessions at the Northern Colorado Writers Conference last weekend (one on developing layered characters, and one on developing engaging conflicts).
  • Todd Mitchell also launched a Kickstarter campaign to support the continued production of a graphic novel he’s working on with the Irish artist, Patrick Mullholland. The story uses a matriarchal alien invasion to explore crucial environmental, social, and political questions. If you’re curious, the first issue is produced and available for free off the Kickstarter page: http://kck.st/1OCQTP9
  • Mid-American Review interviewed Kristin George Bagdanov about her poem in their recent issue here: http://casit.bgsu.edu/marblog/mar-asks-kristin-george-bagdanov-answers/ She will also be reading at MAR’s 35 year anniversary party at AWP next week: Friday, April 10th at 8pm, Gallery13 in Minneapolis.
  • The Moscow Arts Commission and Broadsided Press has selected Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Earth Body” as one of the four ASLE-member poems to be broadsided for the “Broadsides on the Bus” program this summer in Moscow, Idaho. The broadside will be on display on the Moscow buses during the ASLE (Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment) conference, and copies of the poem and accompanying original art will be on display in the Transit Center; the broadsides will also be downloadable.
  • Undergraduate Choice Award: The Graduate School partnered with the Office for Undergraduate Research and Artistry to sponsor the Undergraduate Choice Awards through which each category of the Graduate Student Showcase will be judged by a team of undergraduate scholars. This category is designed to expose undergraduates to graduate level scholarship, facilitate the training of undergraduates in the critical analysis of scholarly products, and to reward graduate students whose work is perceived to be among the highest quality by the undergraduate team of judges. Two Graduate students in the Department of English received awards. In the Creative category, Cedar Brant won second prize ($75) for The Hidden Hinge: Mapping Memory and Myth through Poetry, and in the Research category John Whalen won third prize ($50) for The Utilization of Web-based Resources for Computer Assisted Vocabulary Learning

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GradShow, a one-day conference showcasing Colorado State University’s graduate student research and creative work, will take place from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Feb. 25 in the Lory Student Center. More than 300 graduate students will be presenting their work from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., followed by presentations and a guest speaker. The GradShow is a one day graduate conference at CSU that provides an opportunity for graduate students to showcase their talents, connect with other graduate students, and enjoy the possibility of winning a cash award.

Alan Rudolph, vice president for research at CSU, will present the keynote, “Challenging Boundaries: Experiences and Opportunities in Interdisciplinary Creative Artistry and Scholarship” at 1:30 p.m. Following Rudolph, brief talks will be presented by John Simmons, founder of C3 Real Estate Solutions; Brian Ashe, director of business development at Riverside Technology Inc.; Corkie Odell, co-founder of Odell Brewing Company; Jeff Poore, president of Numerica; and Gino Campana, Fort Collins District 3 City Council member and founder and president of Bellisimo Inc.

Breakout sessions on the theme of “Expanding the Graduate Experience through Interdisciplinary and Innovative Approaches” will take place from 3 to 4 p.m. The sessions, led by guest panelists, will focus on creating and nurturing diverse teams from composition to integration and synergy.

Graduate presenters will also compete for cash awards, presented at a reception from 4-6 p.m. Awards will be given in the general two areas of “Great Minds in Research” and “Distinction in Creativity.” In addition, there will be awards for submissions in areas such as global impact, alumni and diversity/social justice. More than $9,000 will be awarded.

The Graduate Student Showcase will be held in the Grand Ballroom of the Lory Student Center on Wednesday, February 25 from 10:00 A.M. – 6:00 P.M. More specifically, the schedule is as follows:

10:00 A.M.:  Check-in for Graduate Student Presenters

10:30 A.M.:  Check-in for Judges

10:30 A.M. – 1:30 P.M.:  Poster Presentations, Artwork, and Performances

12:00 P.M. – 1:30 P.M.:  Lunch is Served

1:30 P.M. – 4:00 P.M.:  Connecting with Graduate Students, Faculty, and Community Partners. Presentations and Talks will be sponsored by the Vice President for Research.

4:00 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.: Awards Ceremony. Cash prizes and recognition to awardees. Light hors d’oeuvres and beverages.

The event is free and open to the campus and community.  For more information, read about the event in SOURCE, or visit gradshow.colostate.edu, or click here to view a PDF of the 2015 Showcase program.


We are so proud of the English department students whose work will be presented at the Showcase. Please consider showing your support for them by visiting the Showcase, talking with students about their projects, being in the audience for the creative and performing arts presentations between 11:00 am and 12:15 pm, attending the Awards Ceremony starting at 4:00 pm, and staying for the reception to congratulate and celebrate with the participants.

English department GradShow participants and their projects:

KRISTIN GEORGE BAGDANOV
Department: English, MFA Creative Writing

The Somatic Wager: Just as the mere naming of the Anthropocene has enabled productive discussions across academic fields, naming a new category of ecopoet­ics will encourage reflection on the role of poetry in the wider sphere of environmental communication. This category is the “anthropocenic lyric.” This lyric helps us cultivate an ecological self through form and content, enacting and professing methods of sustaining this self in the Anthropocene. My critical paper expands upon this lyric by looking at contemporary poets Bin Ramke, Juliana Spahr, and Brenda Hillman, while my collection of poems, “The Somatic Wager,” engages the an­thropocenic crisis formally and conceptually.

 

LARA ROBERTS
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Performing Identity Discomfort: Writers’ identities are delicate façades, constructed from essays, po­ems, and artist statements, and performed at conferences and readings. These are spaces where we can be comfortable in the accuracy of our own self-portrayals, but I am more interested in the spaces where our pieces are open to be read (and misread) by others. By recording myself reading aloud others’ works and inviting others to read mine, I hope to create a space of discomfort to explore the intersections between our own performances and others’ perceptions of us. Here, we might see a facet of ourselves that we have not before.

 

JESSICA HILL
Department: English, MA English/Creative Nonfiction

India’s Daughters: “India’s Daughters” discusses the fear of rape a woman encounters on her solo travels through India. She arrived three weeks after the world­wide media scandal of Jyoti Singh Pandey’s gang rape and subsequent death, and the author couldn’t let her story go as she made her way through the country as a solo, white, female traveler. It sheds light on the way media upholds Orientalistic ideals by covering rape in India differently than rape in the U.S., and how this shapes Americans’ in­herent fear of “other.” This essay is an excerpt from a memoir-in-essays titled, “The People We Meet.”

 

ABBY KERSTETTER
Department: English, MFA Creative Writing

She Took Her Power from the Water: In 1901, Michael Chabitnoy, an orphan and full-blooded Aleut, was sent to the Carlisle Indian School and subsequently married a non-na­tive, took a factory job, and settled in Pennsylvania, far removed from his Native Alaskan heritage. This body of poetry not only explores fam­ily history and the Aleut culture, but also incorporates personal and Native American myth and addresses questions of the relationship of culture, place, and the individual. Heavily influenced by research and documentary poetics, this work provides witness to and seeks under­standing of the Aleut people, the history of Native Americans, and his­torical acts of acculturation and appropriation.

 

CEDAR BRANT (Undergraduate Choice Award, Creative, 2nd Place)
Department: English, MFA Creative Writing

The Hidden Hinge: Mapping Memory and Myth through Poetry: Both science and poetry are organizational nets that I place over the er­ratic natural and emotional worlds and begin to track patterns, growth, and unlikely relationships. I explore the movement between external and internal experience of place, using landscape as a lens to the more difficult-to-access inner emotional world. I’m compelled by poems as a manifestation of memory and myth unearthed from the body, and as a subconscious compass that informs our actions. Using the tools of language and imagery of landscape, I seek to navigate the process of symbolic transformation through poetic storytelling.

 

PAUL BINKLEY
Department: English, MA English/English Education

Science Fiction and the STEM Fields: Interdisciplinary Education: The presenter outlines his work and research in designing a high-school-level English course aimed at using science fiction as a tool for interdisciplinary learning. Taking advantage of this unique and often marginalized form of literature can open new avenues for engaging students’ existing passions and hooking student interest into learning in the science fields. Based on ongoing and existing research, this hy­pothetical course is intended to support an interdisciplinary approach to both learning and teaching by using science fiction novels, informa­tional science writing, and critical theory to foster inquiry, language skills, and science proficiency in those students.

 

LESLIE DAVIS
Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL

Anti-Racist and Anti-Linguicist Action in the CSU Writing Center: This paper looks at the work done in the CSU Writing Center, and how racist or linguicist attitudes may manifest themselves in the interac­tions between consultants and students. While these attitudes may take the form of microaggressions, they may also show up covertly in staff discussions of working with English language learners (ELLs). While it is important to recognize the ways that we at the Writing Center may be perpetuating racist or linguicist attitudes during consultations, the CSU community as a whole must also be brought into the process of self-examination and reflection, specifically regarding academic writ­ing standards.

 

JENNA FRANKLIN
Department: English, MA English/English Education

Write OPEN: Developing Open- Mindedness in High School Youth: Being critically open-minded is essential to successfully collaborating cross-culturally in our increasingly globalized society and within the microcosm of multicultural school environments. I plan to experiment in pedagogy and praxis by asking if open-mindedness can be developed in high schoolers and result in increased cross-cultural understanding and civic activism. As a pilot project for developing future curriculum, I am proposing a 2-week summer course, called Write OPEN (Writing for Open Perspectives and Engagement Now), for 10-15 voluntary stu­dents at Rocky Mountain High School in Fort Collins, Colorado in the summer of 2015.

 

REYILA HADEER
Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL

How to Eat Well in Fort Collins?: The number of international students in the US is increasing sharply nowadays. International students are coming across different difficul­ties in terms of language, culture, daily life, relationship with others and so on. Among various difficulties, food is one of the major issues for international students. In this paper, I would like to design an ESP (En­glish for specific purpose) course for Chinese students in Fort Collins in order to help them eat well and live more smoothly in such a foreign city.

 

JONI HAYWARD
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Woman as Rebel: Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac: Throughout his career, Danish filmmaker Lars Von Trier has gained a reputation for his misogynist depiction of women in his films—and Nymphomaniac Volume I & II is no exception. The examination of fe­male characters in a medium as popular and widely consumed as film creates a dialogue about current trends in culture surrounding the treatment of women, and parallels well with a study of current feminist criticism. Looking specifically at Sara Ahmed’s feminist theory in her book The Promise of Happiness, one gains insight into current issues in feminist thought and how women are depicted in film.

 

EMILY LAPADURA
Department: English, MA English/Rhetoric/Composition

Reconstructing Social Futures: Current first-year composition (FYC) research proves many students write daily on digital platforms like social networking sites (SNS). As we move from a page to screen society, most SNS writing is visually ori­ented as students produce and consume digital photography. My study seeks to discover how designing and teaching an FYC class exploring SNS use develops students’ critical digital literacies. I applied a criti­cal approach to CSU’s FYC course by introducing students to ideology, and how social norms produced by systems of power can effect on their rhetorical choices when posting personal photos on popular SNS like Facebook and Instagram.

 

ANGELINA MAIO
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Immigration Policies and Human Consequences in Ana Castillo’s The Guardians: Ana Castillo’s The Guardians centers on a family who is occupying the space on the U.S.-Mexico border and having to occupy that space within given rules and regulations that protect the border. This project focuses on Gabo, a sixteen year old who crossed the U.S.-Mexico bor­der illegally. I argue that the character of Gabo serves as a critique and analysis of borders, spaces and policies.

 

KAREN MONTGOMERY MOORE
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Embodiment in Absence: Representation of Loss in the White Spaces: Carole Maso’s The Art Lover and HR Hegnauer’s Sir strategically use white space in order to represent the textually unmarked body of their subject. Such formatting is a deliberate choice which allows space to consider the physical body- whether a character or memory of a some­one known to the author- on the part of both the reader as well as the author. This space for consideration becomes temporal as well, by cre­ating a pause in the writing, and also works as a prompt: if this space is so empty, what (or who) should be here to fill it?

 

COURTNEY POLLARD
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Creating Public Literacy: Reading Text and Image in Broadside Ballads: This project is an exploration of how English broadside ballads of the seventeenth century are multimedia texts that create and propagate public literacy. The font, language, and literary devices used in the texts of ballads made them readable by people of varying textual literacy levels. Additionally, the text-image relations of ballads allowed illiter­ate audiences to become visually literate through “reading” the images of the ballads. Since broadside ballads were most accessible and most commonly read in the public sphere, they contributed to the creation of public forms of literacy.

 

OLIVIA TRACY
Department: English, MA English/Literature

“Rise up through the words”: Postcolonial Haitian Uncoverings of Anacaona : This work analyzes historical representations of Anacaona– Columbus’ Four Voyages, de Las Casas’ History of the Indies and A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies– and postcolonial representations– Jean Metellus’ play Anacaona, Danielle Legros Georges’ poem “Anaca­ona,” and Edwidge Danticat’s young adult novel Anacaona, Haiti, 1490. Through textual analysis of these works, I argue that these three post­colonial authors are bringing Anacaona’s narrative, obscured in many narratives of first contact, to the surface in order to posit the figure of Anacaona as new symbol of postcolonial Haitian identity, one that is grounded in place and a pre-Columbian origin.

 

JOHN WHALEN, ALHASSANE ALI DROUHAMANE, and NATE WILL (Undergraduate Choice Award, Research, 3rd place)
(John Whalen) Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL
(Alhassane Ali Drouhamane) Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL
(Nate Will) Department: English and Foreign Languages, MA English/TEFL/TESL and MA Languages, Literatures, and Culture/Spanish

The Utilization of Web-based Resources for Computer Assisted Vocabulary Learning: Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) plays an important role in the field of teaching English as a second language. However, in­creasing specialization within the field means that CALL resources are sometimes perceived as accessible only to specialized researchers. This presentation will outline a recent migration of CALL technologies into accessible, web-based platforms and discuss how three CALL websites in particular, Vocab Sushi, Storybird, and ESLVideo.com, can be incor­porated into an existing ESL classroom with minimal teacher training. An example syllabus will be modified for illustration, and the benefits to teachers and students will be discussed.

 

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image by Marc Levin

image by Marc Levin

Join us in congratulating the recipients of recent travel funding awards. We are so proud of their efforts and so happy they will be getting the opportunity to travel and share their work.

Graduate Student Travel Grant Awards:

Kristin George Bagdanov: Presenting “The Anthropocenic Lyric” at the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE) biennial conference in Moscow, Idaho

Mandi Casolo: presenting on “The Promise of Too Much Happiness: Alice Munro’s Undertaking of Contemporary Feminist Concerns in Literary Narrative” for the North American Review bicentennial conference, Cedar Falls, Iowa

Alhassane Ali Drouhamane: Presenting “Using CALL Websites to Enhance and Streamline L2 Vocabulary Learning” at the 46th Annual TESOL Convention in Toronto

Joni Hayward: presenting “Woman as Rebel: Depiction of Woman in Lars Von Trier’s Nymphomaniac Volume I & II” at the Image of the Rebel in Literature, Media and Society conference in Colorado Springs, CO

Moriah Kent: presenting “Exploring a Potential Vocabulary Gap Between the Lexical Proficiency of Advanced ELLs and the Lexical Requirements of First-Year University Readings,” American Association for Applied Linguistics and Association Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée 2015 Conference in Toronto, Ontario

Angelina Maio: Presenting “The Illegal Immigrant as Rebel: Immigration Policies and Human Consequences in Ana Castillo’s The Guardians” at the Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery Conference titled “The Image of the Rebel” in Pueblo, Colorado

Karen Montgomery Moore: presenting “Reading the Dead Bodies on Bones” at the University of Nevada, Reno’s College of Liberal Arts Graduate Symposium

Courtney Pollard: Presenting “Exploring Alternative Literacies: Reading English Broadside Ballads as Multimedia Texts” at the “Expanding Boundaries and Reconceptualizing Text” conference hosted by the University of South Florida English Graduate Student Association in Tampa, Florida

Kylan Rice: Presenting “Knotted Up in Place: Melville and the American Spatial Subject” at the Melville in a Global Context – The Tenth International Melville Conference in Tokyo

John Whalen: presenting “Using CALL Websites to Enhance and Streamline L2 Vocabulary Learning” at the 46th Annual TESOL Convention in Toronto

 

AWP Attendees with Funding:

With support from the office of the Vice President of Research, the College of Liberal Arts, the English Department, and the Center for Literary Publishing, the following graduate students will receive funding to attend the Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Minneapolis in April: Jayla Rae Ardelean, Kristin George Bagdanov, Cedar Brant, Neil FitzPatrick, Melissa Hohl, Anitra Ingham, Bryan Johnson, Andrew Mangan, John McDonough, Katie Naughton, Marie Turner, and Drew Webster.

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