Tag Archives: Catherine Ratliff

The Poudre River this morning (image by Jill Salahub)

The Poudre River (image by Jill Salahub)

  • On October 28th, Tim Amidon, Elizabeth Williams (Communication Studies), Kim Henry (Psychology), and Tiffany Lipsey (Health and Exercise Science) partnered with the Poudre Fire Authority to host a symposium on the intersections of work, knowledge, and safety in the fireservice. Over 70 fireservice leaders from as far away as Oakland, CA and Ontario, Canada participated in interactive, stakeholder conversations designed to help researchers and participants identify the types of human factors that impact firefighter occupational safety and health outcomes. Breakout sessions included discussions on wearable technologies and next generation PPE, post-traumatic stress, the impact of chronic stress, sleep deprivation, and diet on decision making and cognition, how blue-collar traditions and working class identity impact how firefighters value the types of labor they perform, and how the challenges of certifying skills and building learning organizations through training and education programs. The event was sponsored by PFA and Pre-Catalyst for Innovative Partnerships seed funding awarded to the research team by the Office of the Vice President for Research. Tim would also personally thank our student intern Tiffany Lingo and administrative gurus Sheila Dargon and Lilian Nugent for their support!
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an interview up on the Kenyon Review’s website with: http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/dan-beachy-quick/ and a group of linked essays at EuropeNow: http://www.europenowjournal.org/2016/11/30/sunlight-and-arrows-five-invocations-for-the-silent-muse/
  • John Calderazzo will be presenting a talk on “Climate Change and Quechua Ritual” at the Sacred Landscapes and Mountains conference at the China India Institute in New York City.  The talk is based on a trip he took to a glacier-fed basin in the Peruvian Andes. John will also be the judge for the 2017 Eugene V. Shea National Poetry Contest.
  • Sue Doe and Lisa Langstraat’s essay “Faculty Development Workshops with Student Vet Participants: Seizing the Induction Possibilities” will shortly appear in Reflections: Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning (Volume 16, Issue 2).
  • On November 18, just prior to the start of Fall Break, CO130 faculty welcomed around 75 international students to a Harvest Meal in the Whitaker Room.  It was crazy fun in there, particularly as faculty watered down the soup to make it stretch to meet the larger-than-expected crowd and as Cassie Eddington’s kimchi was pronounced “Superb!” by a Korean student. This event was the brainchild of Karen Montgomery Moore and was assisted by Cassie Eddington, Virginia Chaffee, Kristie Yelinek, Hannah Caballero, Leslie Davis, Sheila Dargon, and Sue Doe.  Thanks go to our Chair, Louann Reid, for her support for this very special and timely event. Thanks also to the front office staff who participated and strongly communicated the department’s support for the diverse students of CO130! Thanks as well to our amazing Eddy custodial staff who not only helped bring food from our cars to the third floor but stuck around late to help clean up the mess!
  • On Saturday, October 15th, the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) hosted its 47th Annual Regional Conference at Metro State University in Denver.  This year’s theme was “For the Love of Teaching: Reclaiming the Classroom.”  CLAS presented CSU’s English Professor Emeritus William McBride with the Legacy Award.  English Education graduate student Jenna (Franklin) Martin shared her presentation, titled “Intercultural Sensitivity in the Middle School Language Arts Classroom.”  Dr. Pam Coke gave a presentation with Cheryl Kula, a fourth grade teacher at St. John the Evangelist Catholic School in Loveland, titled “Hard to Learn, Hard to Teach: Using Problem-Based Strategies in the Classroom.”  A good conference was had by all.
  • On Saturday, November 12th, CSU welcomed high school seniors from around the country to campus to take part in Senior Scholarship Day. English department colleagues led students through a writing workshop, followed by a timed writing competition.  CSU Admissions offered scholarships to the top writers. Our English department team included Tony Becker, Doug Cloud, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Tobi Jacobi, Sarah Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, Catherine Ratliff, and fearless leader Ed Lessor. Thank you, team, for your hard work!
  • On Saturday, November 19th, Dr. Pam Coke presented her research at the National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention in Atlanta.  Her session, titled “Performing Adolescence on the Page and in the Classroom: Using Adolescents’ Literature to Advocate for Students’ Mental Health,” She helped participants examine critical questions for educators, including: Is it ethical to teach a text that I know can trigger forms of PTSD for students?  Is it irresponsible to avoid such issues in the classroom?  If and when I do teach these texts (and I believe it is irresponsible to omit controversial texts from our classrooms), what can I do to best advocate for the mental health and well-being of the students? The presentation sparked valuable conversation among attendees.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology,” published earlier this year in The Bellevue Literary Review, has been nominated for a Pushcart prize.

speakout

SpeakOut!

We have three SpeakOut Journal Launch events during finals week. We will be celebrating the publication of our Fall 2016 issue of the SpeakOut Journal with a reading by our participants and refreshments. Please contact Tobi Jacobi (tjacobi@colostate.edu) if you would like to attend the readings at the jail or community corrections. We’d love to see you there!

SpeakOut! Youth Groups: Monday, December 12 from 6:45 to 8:15pm at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House

SpeakOut! @ Community Corrections and Work Release: Wednesday, December 14 from 7:30 to 8:30pm at LCJ Administration Building

SpeakOut! Men & Women’s Groups @ Larimer County Jail: Thursday, December 15 from 6:30 to 8:00pm at the Larimer County Jail.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Eddy Hall atrium

Eddy Hall atrium, image by Jill Salahub

  • Dan Beachy-Quick went to Yale University last week to meet with the Poetics Work Group to discuss his most recent book, gentlessness.
  • Antero Garcia published a blog post for DMLCentral discussing the racism of #BoycottStarWarsVII and the implications for classrooms: http://dmlcentral.net/boycottstarwarsvii-racism-and-classroom-responsibility/
  • Cindy O’Donnell-Allen presented last week at the annual conference of the Associations of Science and Technology Centers along with Holly Le Masurier from the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery. Their presentation featured work with local youth participating in the Youth Science Civic Inquiry (YSCI) Institute focused on water use and protection that was held last summer at the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery. The work is part of a large grant sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the National Writing Project that centers on the intersections between science and literacy practices.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Meta-Hamster” has been accepted for the Ruminations section of January’s issue of Under the Sun.  The essay is both an analysis of pet-keeping in the US and a rumination on the place of analysis in creative nonfiction.
  • Catherine Ratliff successfully defended her dissertation on the female expatriate communities of interwar Paris.
  • The Literature Program was awarded a $500 mini-grant from the CSU Graduate School to be used for recruiting MA students.
  • Kayann Short (BA 1981; MA 1988) presented her paper “Between War and Wheat: The Cultivation of Ellen Webb in Mildred Walker’s Winter Wheat” at the recent Western Literature Association conference in Reno, NV.
  • Dancing Girl Press has accepted Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) chapbook, Imbibe {et alia}here, for publication in summer 2016. She also has poems accepted in the Indian Review, North American Review, Pleaides, and Matter Journal. Her poem “Decoy” was a runner-up in the 2015 Indiana Review ½ K Prize and her poem “Not not” was a finalist in the Black Warrior Review Poetry Contest.

internshippanel

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The English Department Non-Tenure Track Faculty (NTTF) Committee does all kinds of good work. One good thing is their newsletter “In Addition…News from the English Department’s NTTF Committee.” One of the features of the newsletter, which is sent monthly to NTTF in the department, is a faculty profile, which they’ve agreed to let us share on the blog.

catherineratliff

Catherine Ratliff

What name do you prefer to go by? Where are you located on campus?

I go by Catherine and most days on campus I can be found in the Behavioral Sciences (BS) building or the library. Nearly every MWF around 11:00 I can be found eating lunch somewhere not too far from the Department copy room in BS. My office is in Ingersoll 251.

 

What courses do you teach at CSU? What (if any) courses have you taught before?

This semester I’m teaching CO 150 and AMST 101, which I teach as an American Studies course that examines aspects of US culture since 1877 through literary and cultural narratives. Last fall I also taught Modern Women Writers, E332, and included texts by contemporary women writers such as The Bluest Eye, How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, and The God of Small Things.

 

What has been your greatest challenge while teaching here at CSU?

The greatest challenge so far has been adapting to a new campus and learning as much as I can about the student body here at CSU. I find that each university has its own personality when it comes to students and campus, and for me learning this vibe is essential to being an effective teacher. Sometimes it’s seemingly the simplest things, such as figuring out where certain offices are located or what resources there are for students, so that I can pass that information along to students. Other times it’s getting to know the overarching values of the institution and student body. Having just taught one semester here at CSU I’m still learning but definitely getting the hang of things.

 

What do you like to do when you are not teaching? What do you like to do for fun?

I’m in the process of completing my dissertation on female expatriate literary communities of early twentieth-century Paris. So, in all honesty I don’t have much free time right now. When I can squeeze in some fun I do like kayaking, hiking, traveling to new places, listening to music, and finding new local restaurant spots. Being new to Colorado I’m still enjoying exploring new outdoor spaces. There are so many great outdoor activities here!

 

If someone wrote a biography about you, what do you think the title should be (and why)?

What a great (and tough) question! I think that I’d have to incorporate something connected to the ocean because I absolutely love the water and grew up in Florida so I feel a strong connection to the Gulf and Atlantic waters. I’d love for the title to include a connection to Paris between the World Wars too because I adore that time period and city. Perhaps Floating on Parisian Dreams.

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