Group discusses the classic novel "Beloved" at Wolverine Letterpress & Publick House as part of Rekindle the Classics

Group discusses “Beloved” at Wolverine Letterpress & Publick House as part of Rekindle the Classics

  • On August 28, Pam Coke co-presented the paper “Examining Attrition in English Education: A Qualitative Study of the Impact of Preparation, Persistence, and Dispositions in Teacher Education” with Heidi Frederiksen and Ann Sebald of the CSU Center for Educator Preparation at the 19th International Conference on Education Studies in Paris, France. This research is part of a longitudinal qualitative study on why English Education students do/not stay in their education programs.  If you would like to learn more, you can view the abstract here: file:///C:/Users/pamel/AppData/Local/Packages/Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe/TempState/Downloads/abstract.pdf
  • Matthew Cooperman’s Spool received two very positive reviews in the past few months, one at Sugar House Review (scroll to second review) http://sugarhousereviews.blogspot.com and one at Mayday Magazine http://www.maydaymagazine.com/issue11reviewburzynskispool.php
  • Camille Dungy was the keynote speaker at the Kentucky Women Writers Conference on 9/15/17. https://womenwriters.as.uky.edu/
  • Sarah Green’s poem “Scar Stars” was selected as the winner of Ghost Proposal‘s Instagram contest, and appears in this month’s issue of Letterboxes.
  • Katherine Indermaur’s poem, “American Bison,” that was just published this morning, at Muse /A Journal: http://www.museajournal.com/2017/09/k-indermaur/
  • Meghan Pipe’s short story “Alternating Current” appears in the Fall/Winter 2017 issue of Nimrod. The story was an Honorable Mention for the Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction.
  • John Calderazzo will tell a story about hiking in the mountains of Bhutan as part of KUNC’s “The Great Outdoors” Live Storytelling Event at Wolverine Farm’s Publick House next Wednesday, September 20, starting at 6 p.m. Further details here: http://www.kunc.org/post/great-outdoors-live-storytelling-event John is also slated to run four workshops for City of Fort Collins’ Climate Action Plan employees on how to use stories to communicate science and environmental research to the public.
  • Ricki Ginsberg’s article, “Opportunities for Advocacy: Interrogating Multivoiced YAL’s Treatment of Denied Identities” was published in English Journal.
  • Four of Colorado Reviews essays made the Notables list in the Best American Essays 2017: CSU MFA Fiction (1992) alum Wendy Rawlings‘s “Portrait of a Family, Crooked and Straight,” Emily Strasser’s “Exposure,” Stephanie Harrison’s “What We Have Left,” and Rose Whitmore‘s “Witness.”
  • Todd Mitchell recently completed two Books for Change author visits to Colorado schools. He was at Dunn elementary last week, and Columbine Elementary School in Boulder this week, speaking with over 700 elementary school students, and giving interactive writing presentations with students and teachers to inspire literacy, creativity, and positive activism. Many thanks to all the kind souls who supported Books for Change, and helped make these visits possible. Todd Mitchell also participated in a YA and middle grade author tea party talk with the fabulous YA author Anna-Marie McLemore (author of Wild Beauty, The Weight of Feathers, and When the Moon Was Ours, a Stonewall Honor book) at Old Firehouse Books.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Tilting at Windmills,” was selected as a semi-finalist for the 2017 American Short Fiction Prize.
  • Mary Crow has had two poems, “Theory of the Angelic Figure” and “Theory of the Human Figure,” accepted for publication by 2river (Fall 2017).
  • Shoaib Alam has recently taken on the role of Chief of Staff at Teach For Bangladesh, a nonprofit based in Dhaka, his hometown. Alam spends his evening writing fiction and is currently hoping to draw the attention of American poets and writers to the ongoing Rohingya genocide currently engulfing Bangladesh. Please get in touch with him to learn more about this crisis. great–shoaibalam@outlook.com.

 

CSU to launch a Feminist Fight Club with Events & Book Signing on Sept 25

Feminist Fight Club author gives public talk

In keeping with the University mission to improve campus culture and climate around gender and make Colorado State University the best place for women to work and learn, CSU has joined with Feminist Fight Club author Jessica Bennett to establish the first campus chapter of the Feminist Fight Club on Monday, September 25th, 2017.

Purchase a copy of Feminist Fight Club and get it signed by Jessica Bennett!
Book sales and book signing will be available from 10:30-11:30am outside of Ballroom D in the Lory Student Center.

Fireside Chat on Challenging Subtle Sexism in the Workplace with author, Jessica Bennett
1:00-2:15 in Ballroom D of the Lory Student Center
(This event is free and open to the public; no registration required).

 

 

Symbols and History of Lynching in America

Symbols of Lynching event flyer

CLA along with the Departments of Communication Studies, Ethnic Studies, and History are working with BAACC and ACT to host a special event during the Diversity Symposium: Symbols and History of Lynching in America. The event is Wednesday, Sept. 27 from 5:30–7 p.m. in the LSC Theatre. It’s free to attend and contributes to the college’s thematic focus on diversity, inclusion, and free speech. Read more about the film and filmmakers here: http://www.aaihs.org/an-outrage-a-new-film-about-lynching-in-the-american-south/

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~from Michaela Hayes

Rekindle the Classics Flyer

Recently, representatives from the CSU English department and the Poudre Valley Public library gathered to lead a discussion on Toni Morrison’s acclaimed novel Beloved. The discussion was the first of the season for the Fort Collins book club appropriately named “Rekindle the Classics.”

Rekindle the Classics was started several years ago by CSU English professor Ellen Brinks. As stated by Lynn Shutters, also a professor of English at CSU, “The basic idea behind the program is that a lot of people are curious about ‘classic’ literature, but might be a little intimidated by it, or might want someone with whom they can talk about it, or might just want to have a regular monthly meeting to encourage them to actually read that book. Rekindle the Classics is a program for those people.” Rekindle now meets once a month during the academic year, always at the Wolverine Farm Letterpress & Publick House, to discuss a new (or old!) book.

Copy of Beloved the book and cup of coffee

Each discussion is led by a different member of the CSU English department, faculty and students alike. This particular discussion was led by Kelly Weber, an MFA student in the poetry program. After the meeting, Weber spoke to her love for the novel and how it has inspired her transformation as a poet: “It was the first book that really got to me. I think it’s the book that introduced me to real poetry before I liked poems.” As Weber led the discussion, her enthusiasm for the novel radiated from her in waves.

Lynn Shutters and Kelly Weber (top left) discuss Beloved with a group of interested readers

Lynn Shutters and Kelly Weber (top left) discuss Beloved with a group of interested readers

As a fellow English student, I understand this enthusiasm fully. There’s a very specific and very beautiful light that only a person talking about their favorite book can emit. We English majors live for it.

Rekindle the Classics will be meeting again in October, but with a different discussion leader and book. Next month, they will be discussing The Call of Cthulhu by H.P. Lovecraft. Anyone in the community who would like to come is welcome; the more diverse the group, the more lively the discussion. As put by Lynn Shutters, “ Everyone has something to bring to the table. Discussions are lively and fun, smart but highly accessible. I encourage anyone who’s interested to show up for a session and check it out.” This English major agrees.

 

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Amanda in her Creative Writing class in Eddy Hall

Amanda Micek
Freshman
English Major: Literature

What inspired me to be an English major? I actually switched from a biology major to English because with biology there was no passion for me. English gives me the opportunity to express myself in ways no other subject was ever able to.

As an English major I want to be a journalist for the New York Times. The New York Times is very highly ranked, and it is my dream to write for such an amazing news company. Being able to speak what you believe and have your opinion matter to the lives of others who want to know what you write is the highest honor any English major could strive to achieve.

The CSU English department is very open and inviting, as is the liberal arts college in general. Students who decide to be a part of the English department will find people around them who care and want to help you succeed, along with cheerful and like-minded people who have an understanding of your passions.

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~from Intern Katie Haggstrom

Mackenzie (Mack)
English Education Major with Spanish Minor

I notice that you brought some veggies into the Writing Center today. 
My parents have an urban farm down in Denver for the joy of gardening. It has exploded with so much produce they could stock our local King Soopers. They make pizza sauce and other canned goods but still had too many vegetables. That’s when I stepped in and was able to bring baskets and coolers full of vegetables for the Writing Center and other community members in Eddy.

How do you spend most of your time in Eddy Hall? 
I spend my time in Eddy as a Writing center consultant, a student and an advisee. I have had several classes in Eddy and also have a wonderful academic advisor named Joanna Doxey. I’m most excited to spend my time in Eddy as a consultant for the Writing center because writing is a very fluid process and everyone can use support to make their dreams realities.

It’s only the third week of classes, but what has been your favorite moment in the Writing Center so far? Or favorite moment in Eddy? 
The staff in the Writing Center is so warm and welcoming that it’s hard to not want to spend an afternoon with any of them. I myself had a presentation coming up and didn’t know where to start so I created an appointment with one of my co-workers to brainstorm ideas. It was so helpful that I have no idea why I didn’t use the Writing Center for every paper I ever had while attending CSU.

What’s your favorite book, poem, quote, lyric? Or favorite writer? 
Currently my favorite book is “Life of Pi” but if you ask me in a week the same question my answer might change.

Can you describe Eddy in just one word? 
Ready.  Ready to help and support anyone with all their needs.

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Fall Along the Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Matthew Cooperman’s hybrid work “Difference Essay” is out in the latest issue of Seattle Review. This summer spacecraftprojects featured poems from his “Precarity” series for its summer solstice launch. https://spacecraftproject.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/poems-from-the-precarity-series-by-matthew-cooperman1.pdf
  • Camille Dungy will read from her essay collection, Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood, and History, and from her newest book of poems, Trophic Cascade, at various venues this fall.  She’ll read at Prairie Lights Bookstore in Iowa City on September 7 and will give the Keynote address and read at the Kentucky Women Writers Conference at the University of Kentucky in Lexington on September 15.
  • Bill Tremblay served as poetry judge for the Wyoming Arts Council annual 2017 Creative Writing Fellowship program.  There were twenty-two [22] entries and well over 200 poems to evaluate. It was great fun and truly interesting.

 

TEFL/TESL Student Association Pot Luck

Friday, September 8th 5:00pm at City Park, join the TEFL/TESL student association for our fall potluck! Open to undergraduate and graduate students, our organization aims to promote linguistic and cultural diversity though awareness, to network with professionals locally and internationally, and to provide leaning and literacy outreach to the greater Fort Collins community. We will sponsor a variety of social and academic events throughout the academic year, starting with our potluck. Check us out on Ram Link to see our other events! Contact csu.tefl.tesl@gmail.com for more information or questions.

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