Tag Archives: Pam Coke

The Poudre River this morning (image by Jill Salahub)

The Poudre River (image by Jill Salahub)

  • On October 28th, Tim Amidon, Elizabeth Williams (Communication Studies), Kim Henry (Psychology), and Tiffany Lipsey (Health and Exercise Science) partnered with the Poudre Fire Authority to host a symposium on the intersections of work, knowledge, and safety in the fireservice. Over 70 fireservice leaders from as far away as Oakland, CA and Ontario, Canada participated in interactive, stakeholder conversations designed to help researchers and participants identify the types of human factors that impact firefighter occupational safety and health outcomes. Breakout sessions included discussions on wearable technologies and next generation PPE, post-traumatic stress, the impact of chronic stress, sleep deprivation, and diet on decision making and cognition, how blue-collar traditions and working class identity impact how firefighters value the types of labor they perform, and how the challenges of certifying skills and building learning organizations through training and education programs. The event was sponsored by PFA and Pre-Catalyst for Innovative Partnerships seed funding awarded to the research team by the Office of the Vice President for Research. Tim would also personally thank our student intern Tiffany Lingo and administrative gurus Sheila Dargon and Lilian Nugent for their support!
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an interview up on the Kenyon Review’s website with: http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/dan-beachy-quick/ and a group of linked essays at EuropeNow: http://www.europenowjournal.org/2016/11/30/sunlight-and-arrows-five-invocations-for-the-silent-muse/
  • John Calderazzo will be presenting a talk on “Climate Change and Quechua Ritual” at the Sacred Landscapes and Mountains conference at the China India Institute in New York City.  The talk is based on a trip he took to a glacier-fed basin in the Peruvian Andes. John will also be the judge for the 2017 Eugene V. Shea National Poetry Contest.
  • Sue Doe and Lisa Langstraat’s essay “Faculty Development Workshops with Student Vet Participants: Seizing the Induction Possibilities” will shortly appear in Reflections: Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning (Volume 16, Issue 2).
  • On November 18, just prior to the start of Fall Break, CO130 faculty welcomed around 75 international students to a Harvest Meal in the Whitaker Room.  It was crazy fun in there, particularly as faculty watered down the soup to make it stretch to meet the larger-than-expected crowd and as Cassie Eddington’s kimchi was pronounced “Superb!” by a Korean student. This event was the brainchild of Karen Montgomery Moore and was assisted by Cassie Eddington, Virginia Chaffee, Kristie Yelinek, Hannah Caballero, Leslie Davis, Sheila Dargon, and Sue Doe.  Thanks go to our Chair, Louann Reid, for her support for this very special and timely event. Thanks also to the front office staff who participated and strongly communicated the department’s support for the diverse students of CO130! Thanks as well to our amazing Eddy custodial staff who not only helped bring food from our cars to the third floor but stuck around late to help clean up the mess!
  • On Saturday, October 15th, the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) hosted its 47th Annual Regional Conference at Metro State University in Denver.  This year’s theme was “For the Love of Teaching: Reclaiming the Classroom.”  CLAS presented CSU’s English Professor Emeritus William McBride with the Legacy Award.  English Education graduate student Jenna (Franklin) Martin shared her presentation, titled “Intercultural Sensitivity in the Middle School Language Arts Classroom.”  Dr. Pam Coke gave a presentation with Cheryl Kula, a fourth grade teacher at St. John the Evangelist Catholic School in Loveland, titled “Hard to Learn, Hard to Teach: Using Problem-Based Strategies in the Classroom.”  A good conference was had by all.
  • On Saturday, November 12th, CSU welcomed high school seniors from around the country to campus to take part in Senior Scholarship Day. English department colleagues led students through a writing workshop, followed by a timed writing competition.  CSU Admissions offered scholarships to the top writers. Our English department team included Tony Becker, Doug Cloud, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Tobi Jacobi, Sarah Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, Catherine Ratliff, and fearless leader Ed Lessor. Thank you, team, for your hard work!
  • On Saturday, November 19th, Dr. Pam Coke presented her research at the National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention in Atlanta.  Her session, titled “Performing Adolescence on the Page and in the Classroom: Using Adolescents’ Literature to Advocate for Students’ Mental Health,” She helped participants examine critical questions for educators, including: Is it ethical to teach a text that I know can trigger forms of PTSD for students?  Is it irresponsible to avoid such issues in the classroom?  If and when I do teach these texts (and I believe it is irresponsible to omit controversial texts from our classrooms), what can I do to best advocate for the mental health and well-being of the students? The presentation sparked valuable conversation among attendees.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology,” published earlier this year in The Bellevue Literary Review, has been nominated for a Pushcart prize.

speakout

SpeakOut!

We have three SpeakOut Journal Launch events during finals week. We will be celebrating the publication of our Fall 2016 issue of the SpeakOut Journal with a reading by our participants and refreshments. Please contact Tobi Jacobi (tjacobi@colostate.edu) if you would like to attend the readings at the jail or community corrections. We’d love to see you there!

SpeakOut! Youth Groups: Monday, December 12 from 6:45 to 8:15pm at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House

SpeakOut! @ Community Corrections and Work Release: Wednesday, December 14 from 7:30 to 8:30pm at LCJ Administration Building

SpeakOut! Men & Women’s Groups @ Larimer County Jail: Thursday, December 15 from 6:30 to 8:00pm at the Larimer County Jail.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Lady Moon Meadow, image by Jill Salahub

Lady Moon Meadow, image by Jill Salahub

  • Tim Amidon and Michele Simmons (Miami University) gave a research talk titled “Negotiating ‘messy’ research context and design through adaptive research stances” at the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) Special Interest Group on the Design of Communication (SIGDOC) in Washington, D.C.  While at SIGDOC, Tim also participated in “Draw to communicate: How geometric shapes, blank pages, and crayons can improve your collaboration and creativity,” a workshop lead by Abigail Selzer, Kristen R. Moore, and Ashley Hardage (Texas Tech University). The workshop introduced participants to research and pedagogy in technical communication surrounding sketch-noting and incorporated hands on practice applying concepts such a geometric and visual metaphors to communication design problems.
  • Tim Amidon spoke as an invited panelist at the Faculty and Instructor Open Textbooks Workshop about his experiences adopting Doug Eyman’s Digital Rhetoric: Theory, Method, Practice, as an open textbook in CO402: Principles of Digital Rhetoric and Design. The event was hosted at the Morgan Library by Associate Professor and Open Education Resources Librarian Merinda McLure and Assistant Dean for Scholarly Communications and Collection Development Meg Brown-Sica.
  • Steven Schwartz’s story “The Theory of Everything” has just been published by Electric Literature on its Recommended Reading site. The story is from his newly released collection, Madagascar: New and Selected Storieshttps://electricliterature.com/the-theory-of-everything-by-steven-schwartz-52ad1978996f#.3okj44mzn
  • Bill Tremblay has received acceptances of two new poems, “Bukowski” and “The Sun’s Hands” at Cimarron Review for their Winter issue, 2016-17. Bill read with Jared Smith in Evergreen, CO, last Saturday evening. Besides the audience the reading was streamed out to 177 homes in the area. Bill will read in Laramie, WY, at the Night Heron Bookstore, Friday October 15, 7 pm. He is also scheduled to read with Joe Hutchison at the Innisfree in Boulder, 6 PM, October 20th. A reading-interview with Bill talking about Walks Along the Ditch will be broadcast and streamed from KBOO.fm Portland OR 11PM October 17. It will also be archived.
  • Andrew Mangan’s short story “Any Good Thing” has been accepted for publication by Zyzzyva. Andrew graduated from the MFA program in 2016. This is his first publication.
  • Thank you to everyone who helped to make PBK Visiting Scholar Nora Naranjo Morse’s campus visit a success.  A special thank you to Louann Reid, for her tireless support of this opportunity; Gloria Blumanhourst, who is, herself, a PBK member; she helped do all of the planning, and then she was called away to help with a family emergency; Patty Rettig, a PBK member alongside Gloria, who stepped in to help us with this event; Dean Ben Withers, also a PBK member, for his involvement in Nora’s campus visit; Colleen Timothy, who helped  with scheduling Dean Withers; Jill Salahub, our English department communications coordinator, who went above and beyond to help us to publicize this event; Sue Russell, one of our English department administrative professionals, who helped to organize the logistics of Nora’s visit; Sheila Dargon, another of our English department administrative professionals, who helped to publicize this event; Leif Sorensen, who hosted Nora in his Ethnic Literature in the United States class; Camille Dungy, who hosted Nora in her Literature of the Earth course; and Pam Coke, who served as faculty host. Thank you to everyone who attended any of the events while Nora was here.  Her visit was co-sponsored by Phi Beta Kappa and the CSU English department.

bookfest-_FINAL-273x300

The inaugural Fort Collins Books Fest: Brewin’ Up Books! is a FREE, one-day public literary festival bringing attention to the expansiveness of Fort Collins’ craft brewing culture through books and authors involved with beer, coffee, tea, and more. With over 40 speakers, readings, panels, and workshops, there is sure to be something for just about everyone.

The CSU English Department is a sponsor of this event. As part of our in-kind donation, we are asking for volunteers to help staff the day’s festivities. We need handlers to help make sure panelists are able to move comfortably between venues as well as people who can serve other necessary roles in helping to make sure the festival runs smoothly. If you are able to serve on a 2 to 5 hour volunteer shift on October 22, please write me Camille Dungy soon as possible. Conference organizers are hoping to schedule all the volunteers by the end of this week (October 7).  (Contact Camille Dungy at camille.dungy@colostate.edu). Volunteers will have access to a few backstage perks as well, so sign up soon so we can get you on those lists! http://www.focobookfest.org/

 

Cover of the latest edition

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

~From English Department Communications Intern Beth Campbell

applyingtoanMAPhDprogramworkshop

Event flyer

We rarely turn our thoughts to the future as college students. We are focused on the here and now – what assignments need to be done, what classes need to be taken, which meetings we need to go to, and how we are going to spend our Friday nights. For those of us who sat in a circle in one of Eddy’s classrooms and listened to Roze Hentschell, Pam Coke, and Aparna Gollapudi outline what it takes to get into a good graduate English program, thoughts of grad school couldn’t have been further from our minds.

I, for one, had never really considered grad school. I suppose it was always in the back of my mind, nagging at me from a distance like that crazy great aunt no one likes to admit they have. I had only ever seriously considered completing my undergraduate years, and then moving on to whatever job came into view. Considering getting a higher degree was like doggie-paddling in the shallow end of the pool and wishing I could do backflips off the diving board into the deep end like my superiors. I never really gave it any credence, but as I began to really look and what applying to a graduate program could mean, my interest and my motivation peaked.

I was not the only one. This was the general consensus of the room before the presentation began. There were about twenty of us, all undergraduate students, anxious about our lives beyond our perfectly penned four-year plans and  looking for something to further our education.

Aparna Gollapudi, Pam Coke, and Roze Hentschell

Aparna Gollapudi, Pam Coke, and Roze Hentschell

Roze Hentschell, Pam Coke, and Aparna Gollapudi had compiled a packet of information and tips on applying to graduate schools. I had no idea what an extensive process this could be. They began by talking about making a list of programs to which you would wish to apply, double checking prices, GTA positions, testing requirements such as the GRE or any subject tests, and other general application requirements. From there, one looks to the application process itself. We spent a large amount of time discussing how to ask for letters of recommendation, what to provide to your recommenders, compiling writing samples, and writing a statement of purpose.

The statement of purpose I found to be particularly interesting. It needs to be professional and brief, but it also needs to showcase who you are as a student to the application committee. A truly well-crafted statement of purpose combines who you are as a person with who you wish to become and how that program will help get you there.

The presentation became a dialogue, moving through the information packet, but speckled with questions and insights. If a question arose, it was answered without a second thought. This interactive exchange made the entire prospect of applying to a graduate program much more real and tangible. Suddenly, it was not just some lofty dream tangled up in the rafters of our minds. It was a yellow brick road laid right under our feet and headed toward a world about which we barely dared to whisper. It was an actual opportunity, a chance to do what we had thought impossible. And it was empowering to hear that we could.

The hour-long presentation passed in what felt like twenty minutes. I left with my mind buzzing, ideas and inspiration twirling about my thoughts like bees. I now am not afraid to look toward my future, especially when considering a higher degree. I left feeling stronger and more driven than I have ever felt before, and I know that no matter what happens, I can do this.

Tags: , , , ,

blueskyeddy02

  • On Friday, February 5th, Pam Coke gave two invited presentations at the Colorado Council International Reading Association (CCIRA):  “Teaching as Close Reading: Igniting a Sense of Wonder about Why I Teach” and “If I Stay: Developing a Plan for Keeping a Sense of Wonder about Why I Teach.”  Dr. Coke was thrilled to have the opportunity to reconnect with several CSU English department graduates who are currently teaching in schools in Colorado and Nebraska, including Nick Bonnet, Dakota Davis-Powers, Marissa Kast, Marie Paul, and Emily Schlehuber.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s “Carousel” has been accepted for publication online in Flash Fiction Magazine on March 19th.
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “My City,” accepted for publication by Blue Moon Literary and Art Review.
  • Bill Tremblay’s latest book, Walks Along the Ditch: Poems, will be published in early April, 2016, by Lynx House Press.

CO301B, Writing in the Sciences, Information Session

During this one hour session, Dr. Sue Doe and Christina Sutton will capture what the Writing in the Sciences course is here at CSU. The following will be described:

  • history of CO301B
  • rhetoric in science communication
  • campus interest in science communication
  • rigors of the course

If you feel you might be interested in teaching CO301B in the future, you will want to come hear about this exciting course.

You have the opportunity to attend on either Wednesday, March 9th at 2:00 P.M. OR Thursday, March 10th at 2:00 P.M. We will meet in the Whitaker Room.

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 13th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies. Applicants must be registered graduate or undergraduate English majors or minors.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 25, 2016.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies. Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages. Shorter papers are welcome. Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility:     (1) Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept.

(2) Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 4, 2016, at 5:00 p.m.

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover letter with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minoring in English, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your cover letter to: Professor Aparna Gollapudi, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773. Cover letter and submissions can be dropped off at the English Department Office in Eddy Bldg.

 

Tools from the Workshop: Theory and “Hands On” Practice with Multimodal Engagement in UD Composition Courses Part II

The Upper Division Composition Professional Development Workshop Series is proud to present the second installment of our spring 2016 offerings: During the week of March 21st we will hold our second workshop: The Possibility of Actually Composing a Visual Argument (Days and times to be determined by a coming Doodle poll!)

Come join us as we discuss a sprinkling of theory that connects visual argument with the course goals of CO 300. The bulk of the workshop will be devoted to a “hands on” exploration of the new Photoshop software that has been installed on the computers in Eddy 2 and 4. Help us explore this rich visual editing software and envision ways that it can be effectively utilized in the classroom. A nice takeaway from the workshop will be the production of a flyer to advertise one of your upcoming classes. (Never be caught unprepared when the call for a class flyer is issued!)

All are welcome to join.

Four great incentives:

  1. Conversation with your awesome peers
  2. Certificate of Completion for those pesky Evaluation files
  3. Intellectual Engagement
  4. Snacks!

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

programoftheyear

  • The SpeakOut! writing program won the “Program of the Year” award last night at the Larimer County Jail volunteer awards banquet.  Congrats to the facilitators and writers!
  • Two of Dan Beachy-Quick’s  essays, “Heraclitean Thirst” and “Circles” are featured at the online journal Fogged Clarity: http://foggedclarity.com
  • Doug Cloud presented a paper titled “Coming Out Queer, Coming Out Atheist: Building Rhetorical Infrastructures for Marginalized Speakers” at the Conference on Community Writing in Boulder on October 14.
  • Next week, Doug Cloud will be leading a workshop on talking about difference in public and professional contexts for the oSTEM chapter at Colorado State University. oSTEM, which stands for “Out in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics,” aims to “identify, address, and advocate for the needs of LGBTQA students in the STEM fields.” The workshop will take place in Eddy 100 at 6:00PM on Wednesday, November 11.
  • Sue Doe presented at the recent, national Community Writing Conference in Boulder where she and former graduate students Vani Kannan, Lydia Page, and Sarah Austin presented a panel entitled “Conversations on Labor: Report on a Cross-Campus/Regional Organizing Approach Using Participatory  Theatre.”  In their presentation, Sue and her colleagues engaged in participatory methods during the panel itself, querying traditional panel models and demonstrating how engagement works for not only social justice efforts and community engagement but also for enlivening and deepening the meaning of conference presentations themselves.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented an interactive workshop focused on remixing archival documents from the 1920s NY Training School for Girls with contemporary justice reform efforts at the 10th biannual Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Tempe, AZ on Friday, Oct. 30, 2015.
  • EJ Levy’s short story “I, Spy” has been accepted for publication by The Missouri Review, where it will appear next spring.
  • EJ Levy also spoke at the NonfictionNow conference in Flagstaff, AZ, last week on the subject of women’s bodies, sex, and sexuality in writing nonfiction.
  • Mary Ellen Sanger, Tobi Jacobi and the Community Literacy Center are pleased to announce that we’ve been awarded a $1500 engaged scholarship grant from Campus Compact of the Mountain West.  The award will support an assessment project for the SpeakOut! writing workshops in Spring 2016.
  • Eleven of our English department faculty members will be working at this year’s Senior Scholarship Day on Saturday, November 14, 2015, 9:00-4:00 PM: Dan Beachy-Quick, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Kathryn Hulings, Tobi Jacobi, Ed Lessor, Tatiana Nekrasova Beker, Sarah Louise Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, and Lynn Shutters.  This committee has been developing writing prompts for a writing workshop and a writing competition for high-achieving Colorado high school seniors.  Thanks to all of them for their hard work!
  • Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub is leading two final workshops before the end of the year at Om Ananda Yoga. “Wild Writing, Crazy Wisdom: Yoga, Meditation, and Writing” on Saturday, November 28th, 1:30 – 5:30 pm, and “Wild Writing, Crazy Wisdom: Meditation and Writing” on Sunday, December 6th, 11:30 am – 1:30 pm. You can find out more about these workshops and preregister at http://omanandayoga.com/. She also teaches a weekly Hatha Yoga class at Om Ananda Yoga every Tuesday at 7 am and would love to see you there.
  • Meghan Pipe first-year MFA student (fiction) was awarded a residency at Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts in May 2016.
  • Garrett Marquez (English Education, Class of 2015) is working as a special education teacher at Alamosa High School.

Upcoming Events

Colloquium 

Please join us Thursday November 12, 7:00 pm for the second (and final) colloquium of the semester as we gather, with fine appetizers and drinks in hand, to enjoy one another’s company and hear about the work that our colleagues are doing. All department faculty and graduate students are invited.

Here’s a preview of the evening:

Drawing from an on-going scholarly webtext that is under production, Tim Amidon will share a variety of genre ecology maps and visualizations that have been created using D3 (a data visualization program). By leveraging these digital tools, Tim suggests, digital humanists might render visible the textual assemblages that are instantiated through and circulate amidst sites of production. He will discuss ways that such modeling and visualization might be leveraged pedagogically to not only support literacy learning but also to critique and reconstruct systems supported by discursive activity.

Zach Hutchins is the founder and editor in chief of TEAMS, a scholarly collective dedicated to transcribing the unread manuscript sermons of colonial and antebellum America. Those transcriptions are then coded and housed in a searchable database. Searching even the small collection of sermons currently transcribed and published by TEAMS suggests that opening up access to these texts will challenge foundational beliefs about the religious beliefs and experiences of the individuals who laid the groundwork for revolution and the new republic.

Jaime Jordan will discuss how she has used the podcast Serial in her comp class as an example of digital rhetoric and share some introductory research she’s done on the podcast as well as literary research using textual-analysis tools.

If you missed the last gathering, you really owe it to yourself to come to this one! A good time will be had by all.

 

NCTE Presents:  Standards-based Grading
November 12th, 2015, Eddy 5

Join NCTE@CSU for a discussion on Standard-based grading. We will be joined by local teachers to lead the conversation and end the evening with time for questions. As always, there will be free food and drinks.

Another exciting addition to the November meeting will be the officer elections. The positions of treasurer and secretary will be open.  If you are interested in running, please email an intent to run and statement as to why you are qualified for the position to both: pamela.coke@colostate.edu and ncte@colostate.edu by November 10th.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

computerlabhours

  • Tim Amidon and Mike Caggiano (Forestry) received funding from the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute for an interdisciplinary research project that seeks to learn how landowners, land managers, and emergency personnel in the Front Range understand the potential risks and benefits associated with Defensible Space migration efforts. The researchers have nearly completed their interviews, and will begin analysis of the data later this semester.
  • “Composing MOOCs: Conversations about Writing in Massive Open Online Courses,” a collaborative, scholarly webtext, appeared in the current issue of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, & Pedagogy. The webtext, created by Tim Amidon, Chris Andrews (McMurry University), Elkie Burnside (University of Findlay), D. Alexis Hart (Allegheny College), & Margaret M. Strain (University of Dayton), is structured like an interactive MOOC discussion board and offers insights from leading scholars within rhetoric and composition who have recently taught or designed massive open online courses in composition in local or national contexts. The webtext can be found at http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/20.1/interviews/amidon-et-al/index.html.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an essay on Moby-Dick up at the Boston Review: http://bostonreview.net/poetry/dan-beachy-quick-moby-dick
  • Pam Coke’s proposal entitled “What Are They Selling?  What Are We Buying?: Eating Disorders as Cultural Artifact” has been accepted for the international conference The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers due to take place June 23-24, 2016, at the Université du Maine in Le Mans, France.
  • Camille Dungy’s  poem “Frequently Asked Questions: #10” is featured in the October issue of Poetry, as well as on the journal’s podcast.
  • On October 1st, Roze Hentschell gave an invited lecture, “Church, Playhouse, Market, Home: The Cultural Geography of St. Paul’s Precinct,” at the Early Modern Center at UC Santa Barbara, where she had the good fortune to see two alumna from our MA program, Megan Palmer Browne (M.A. ’06) and Katie Adkison (M.A. ’14). Roze received her Ph.D. at UCSB in 1998.
  • EJ Levy’s essay “Of Liars” was published last month in After Montaigne: Contemporary Essayists Cover the Essays (2015), in which 28 contemporary essayists–from Philip Lopate to Maggie Nelson, Jared Walker to Wayne Koestenbaum, Lia Purpura to Vivian Gornick–“re-write” Montaigne’s topics, just out from University of Georgia Press.
  • Leif Sorensen attended the seventh conference of the Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present (ASAP) in Greenville, South Carolina from September 24-27. He presented two papers: “Constructing Punk Counterpublics: Neoliberalism and the Rise of Punk in Buenos Aires, Montevideo, and São Paulo” and “‘Always start with a big explosion’: Representing Violence in Post 9/11 Genre Fiction,” in panels on the aesthetics of punk rock and violence and globalization, respectively.
  • Sasha Steensen had five poems published in Northside Review. She was interviewed for the series 12 or 20 questions: http://robmclennan.blogspot.com/2015/09/12-or-20-second-series-questions-with_29.html?m=0
  • Cedar Brant had a poem accepted for publication in Black Ocean’s Handsome Journal.
  • Mandy Rose’s essay “Five” has received a nomination for Sundress Publications’ Best of the Net. Her poem, “Nom de Guerre” was accepted by University of Hell Press for an anthology to be published in Spring 2016. Mandy will also be a guest editor for the next issue of Scissors and Spackle, http://scissorsandspackle.net/submissions/, an ELJ Publications imprint. Submissions open October 1st and are read blind, so please consider sending your work!
  • Vauhini Vara has a story in the newly published O. Henry Prize Stories anthology.  The story, originally published in Tin House is called, I, Buffalo

Workshop

Professors Lynn Shutters and Matthew Cooperman will facilitate a professionalization workshop/brown-bag event entitled “Applying to PhD Programs” next Wednesday, October 7, from 12-1:30 in Aylesworth C108. It’s designed for our MA and MFA students who are considering going on to a PhD program. Shutters and Cooperman will cover many topics such as: researching programs and institutions of interest; entrance exams; the application process de-mystified; financial assistance; and online resources. It’s an invaluable seminar designed to help graduate students make their applications as strong and successful as possible.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

You're never too old to get your letter from Hogwart's

Dr. Pam Coke Running into Platform 9 3/4!

“For me, summer always inflicts an urge to travel. As a young girl, I would help my parents plan our summer vacations, mapping out routes, selecting sites to see. I truly believe that travel is one of the greatest gifts my parents gave me. It instilled in me a love of learning and a love of exploring.  As a family, we traveled domestically, branching out from Iowa to wherever the open road could take us. I love the United States, but I always wondered what else was out there to see. Over my 13 years at CSU, I have helped numerous students plan study abroad and other international experiences, but I had never experienced those places for myself. Until now.


“I always tell students that in order to be an interesting teacher, you need to be an interesting person, so be sure to make time for yourself and your interests. Hopefully, what I did on my summer vacation will help me be an even more interesting teacher.”


In June 2015, my husband, Ken, and our 11-year-old-son, Rikky, and I took the [first] trip of a lifetime to England and to France, complete with an afternoon in Scotland. For three years, we hosted British soccer coaches in the summer while our son participated in Challenger Soccer Camps (an experience we highly recommend). Each year, the coaches would say, “You should come and visit us sometime.”  Sometime was here.  We began our trip by staying with one of our soccer families (Jim, Sue, and Tom Cosgrove) in Bury, England, just outside of Manchester. We had hosted Tom in August 2013, and we had kept in touch over the years. Their family showed us what England is like from the inside. We toured Ramsbottom by foot. We traveled Bury on bicycles. Rikky had a kickabout with local soccer fans. The Cosgroves threw us a huge party, where their family and friends came to meet “the Americans.” In England, we got to see four soccer venues (Bury stadium, Old Trafford/Manchester United, Stamford Bridge/Chelsea, Emirates/Arsenal). Another of Rikky’s former coaches drove three hours to have lunch with us at one of my tennis pilgrimage sites: Wimbledon, where we enjoyed the coveted strawberries and cream.

As our fellow Harry Potter fans out there can appreciate, we took broomstick flying lessons at Alnwick Castle in North Umberland and we attempted to push a tram through Platform 9 3/4 at King’s Cross Station in London. It was a magical trip, indeed.

Dr. Pam Coke Takes Flying Lessons at  Alnwic Castle

Dr. Pam Coke Takes Flying Lessons at Alnwick Castle

For over 40 years, I have dreamed of going to Paris. As an undergraduate student, I earned degrees in both English and French. As an Associate Professor of English Education, I get to speak and write in English every day. At CSU, I am fortunate to get to serve on graduate student committees for French, so I have the occasional opportunity to speak and write in French, but I had never been immersed in the language. As part of our trip, we took the Chunnel from London to Paris. We walked approximately 15 miles per day, seeing Notre Dame, the Louvre, and the Eiffel Tower. We savored ice cream at Berthillon, rumored–and proven–to serve the best ice cream in the world. We got to see one more soccer venue: Parc des Princes/Paris Saint-Germain, and we got to sit centre court at Roland Garros.

The Coke Family underneath the Eiffel Tower in Paris

The Coke Family Underneath the Eiffel Tower in Paris

We came home with our suitcases filled with books and memories. We are already plotting our next adventure, which involves reuniting with the Cosgrove family to visit soccer venues in Spain (Camp Nou/Barcelona!) and Italy. I always tell students that in order to be an interesting teacher, you need to be an interesting person, so be sure to make time for yourself and your interests. Hopefully, what I did on my summer vacation will help me be an even more interesting teacher.”

Dr. Pam Coke visits Roland Garros in Paris

Dr. Pam Coke and her son Rikky Visiting Roland Garros in Paris

Tags:

This past semester, we’ve been asking people in various interviews and profiles, “What are you looking forward to most about moving back into a remodeled Eddy Hall?” Here are some of the responses:

“Next semester, I plan on studying abroad in Dublin, Ireland, so I won’t be able to see Eddy right when it gets finished, but I am excited to see it a year from now. Being scattered across campus has been a bit of a pain, though Eddy needed the remodeling, and any updates to modernize the structure are welcome.” ~Colin Stevens, Double Majoring in English (Creative Writing) and Journalism and Technical Communications, Senior

“Even though I’ve graduated, I’m honestly excited that Eddy’s getting a facelift. As charming as the old building was, it needed to be updated like none other. I can’t recall the floor plans, but I hope they kept the central courtyard. That was such a nice space and it really gave Eddy some good character.” ~Lauren Cofer, English: Creative Writing, Graduated Spring 2014

“Being in a classroom that doesn’t smell like science chemicals, being in a classroom that isn’t located in a basement or windowless, not having to make the trek to Ingersoll, and having a central place to store my jacket and lunch. I also think it will provide an even bigger sense of community and help with communication within the English department, because we won’t be spread out all over the place.”~Kristen Mullen, MA English: Literature, Graduating Spring 2016

“When I visited CSU as a prospective MFA student last March, one of the things that drew me to the program was the fact that the entire department had its own building. I am looking forward to bringing that sense of community into the new Eddy.” ~Alex Morrison, MFA Fiction, Assistant Director of the Community Literacy Center, and Writing Center Consultant

“The thing I’m looking forward to the most about moving back into Eddy is to see it for the first time ever! When I moved to Colorado, Eddy was already under renovations, so I’ve never actually been in the building!” ~Kathleen Hamel, MA English: Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (TEFL/TESL), 1st year

“Seeing familiar faces on those crowded stairs! We are all so spread out right now, and I am excited to get everyone back where I can corner them more easily.” ~Sarah Hansen, MFA Creative Writing: Fiction, Writing Center Assistant Director, Intern with the Center for Literary Publishing and the Literacy through Prose and Poetry Program

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

"Love, In Theory" by E.J. Levy, the French edition

“Love, In Theory” by E.J. Levy, the French edition

  • Good news from E.J. Levy: “My award-winning story collection, ‘Love, In Theory,’ is being released today in France by Editions Payot & Rivages, publishers of (among others) Elmore Leonard, David Lodge, Alison Lurie, and Willa Cather. They compare my work to that of Lorrie Moore, Grace Paley, and Nobel Prize winner Alice Munro. The collection won the Flannery O’Connor Award and the GLCA New Writers Award, previously awarded to Munro, Richard Ford, Louise Erdrich and other award-winning authors.”
  • Leslee Becker’s story collection, The Little Gentleman, has been named a Finalist for the Snake Nation Press Fiction Award.  She was also listed in the Literary Arts category as one of Silicon Valley Creates Awards Laureates for winning the Santa Clara County Arts Council Short Story Award. (She has not moved to Silicon Valley, but is being cited as an Artist Laureate in honor of SVC’s 25th anniversary.)
  • Ellen Brinks has an essay on queer Victorian childhood and adolescence in an edited collection entitled Queer Victorian Families: Curious Relations in Literature. The volume, which appeared this spring, is part of the Routledge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature.
  • Camille Dungy has a new poem featured in the Kenyon Review. http://www.kenyonreview.org/journal/mayjune-2015/selections/camille-t-dungy/
  • Tobi Jacobi was elected to serve a 3 year term on the CSU Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research advisory board.
  • Tobi Jacobi and Wendy Wolters Hinshaw’s essay, “What Words Might Do: The Challenge of Representing Incarcerated Women and their Writing” appears in the most recent issue of Feminist Formations, a feminist scholarly journal.
  • Two English majors received Top Honors at the CURC Showcase and five others received High or Highest Honors. The Celebrate Undergraduate Research and Creativity (CURC) Showcase features writing, oral presentations, service-learning, art, and research by CSU undergraduate students. Seventeen English majors entered. An interesting note in the poetry competition is that the first place winner, Eric Bleem, is a Biochemistry major whose E210 instructor was English MFA student Kristen George Bagdanov. Eric was awarded first place for his poem “Hollows.” You can see pictures and read about the winners at http://english.colostate.edu/2015/05/celebrate-undergraduate-research-and-creativity-curc-showcase-winners/
  • Five of our current student teachers returned to campus on Monday, May 4th, to talk and workshop with our current Methods students.  Stephanie McElroy, Melinda Smith, Kendall Umetsu, Chris Vanjonack, and Kelly Wimler visited Pam Coke‘s EDUC 463: Methods–Teaching Language Arts class.  They answered questions about student teaching, and then they worked with students in small groups to answer questions about their unit plans.  Melinda, Kendall, and Chris have already secured teaching positions for the fall.
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “Short Cut,” accepted by Calliope magazine.
  • Christine Robinson (2011 MA, Rhet/Comp) was recently named recipient of the College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences (LAS) Outstanding Instructor award for 2015. Christine just finished her fourth year as a full-time instructor at UCCS.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Alumnus Justin Hocking accepting his award

Alumnus Justin Hocking accepting his award

  • Alumnus Justin Hocking’s memoir The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld won the Oregon Book Award for Creative Nonfiction. The book is also: a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, listed as one of Ten Brilliant Books That Will Grab You from Page One in Kirkus Reviews and The Huffington Post, selected by Hector Tobar as his Favorite Book of 2014 in Publisher’s Weekly and Salon.com, A Library Journal Best Books of 2014 Selection, a Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2014 Selection, a Hudson’s Books 2014 Booksellers Favorite, a Book Club pick for April 2014 on The Nervous Breakdown, and a #3 Denver Post Bestseller.
  • Moriah Kent, a graduate student in the TEFL/TESL program, was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship grant. She will spend 10 months teaching English at a Bulgarian secondary school. She chose to apply to Bulgaria because she wanted to gain experience in the European educational system and has long admired art and culture of the Balkan region.
  • Tim Amidon was elected to the Committee on the Responsibilities and Standing of Academic Faculty (CoRSAF).
  • A free pdf chapbook of Dan Beachy-Quick’s early sections of “A Quiet Book” is available at Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-23/
  • Leslee Becker has received a writing residency/fellowship at Brush Creek Foundation in Wyoming.
  • Pam Coke’s article  “Making Meaning of Experience: Navigating the Transformation from Graduate Student to Tenure-Track Professor,” co-authored with her graduate school colleagues Sheila Benson and Monie Hayes, appears in the April 2015 issue of The Journal of Transformative Education.  You can access the article here: http://jtd.sagepub.com/content/current.
  • The members of NCTE@CSU held officer elections at their meeting on Wednesday, April 22, 2015. Congratulations to our new slate of student officers: Jenna Franklin (President); Emily Rice (Vice President); Paul Binkley (Secretary); Ian McCreary (Treasurer); and Morgan Bennett (Marketing Coordinator). Thank you to our outgoing officers: Anton Gerth (President); Belle Kraxberger (Vice President); Alex Andrews (Secretary); Jenna Franklin (Treasurer); and Emily Rice (Marketing Coordinator). Faculty sponsor Pam Coke is thankful for you and proud of you.
  • Sue Doe presented preliminary results of the TILT-funded course redesign study, “Engaged Learning Through Writing: A Faculty Development Project” alongside Mary Pilgrim (Math) and Hilary Spriggs (Math) on Saturday April 18 at the Rocky Mountain Regional Conference of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), at Colorado College. Preliminary results from their study suggest outcomes similar to those found in a similar study undertaken with the Department of Psychology — that student learning is improved at a statistically significant level by low-stakes engagement writing in the disciplinary classroom. The interdisciplinary study group, which also includes Kate Kiefer, will also present their project to the CSU Math Department on April 27.
  • Camille Dungy spoke at the CLA’s Great Conversations on April 23. Topic: How the environment is changing how we write and why.
  • Bruce Ronda’s chapter “Imagination and Apocalypse: Christopher Cranch’s Novels for Young Readers” appears in Romantic Education in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. National and Transatlantic Contexts (New York: Routledge, 2015).  Also: he has signed a pre-publication contract with University of Georgia Press for The Fate of Transcendentalism.
  • Cory Holland just published a paper in American Speech: Bayley, Robert, and Cory Holland. “Variation in Chicano English: the case of final (z) devoicing.” American Speech 89, no. 4 (2014): 385-407. http://americanspeech.dukejournals.org/content/89/4/385.full.pdf+html And a book review in the LinguistList on “Sounds Interesting” by J.C. Wells. https://linguistlist.org/pubs/reviews/get-review.cfm?SubID=35993937
  •  As part of a short but nice review of Dan Robinson’s forthcoming novel, Death of a Century (out June 5), Publishers Weekly wrote, “Set in 1922, Robinson’s atmospheric tale of betrayal and revenge paints a passionate picture of the Lost Generation, those who came of age during WWI.”
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Moon Body” was accepted for publication by Berkeley Poetry Review.  She has also accepted an offer to attend UC Davis’s PhD in Literature program, where she will be a Provost’s Fellow in the fall.
  • Mandi Casolo has accepted an offer of admission to the University of Houston’s English Literature and Creative Writing PhD program with a teaching fellowship, and was awarded the Inprint Donald Barthelme Prize in Fiction.

Now Taking Applications: English Department Communications Internship

Number of positions: 2
Internship term: Fall 2015 Semester, 15 weeks, August 24th – December 11th, 2015
Total credits: 2
Hours: 80 hours (40 per credit hour), approximately 5 per week
Stipend: $500
Application Deadline: Friday, May 8th by 12:00 p.m.

The English Department is looking for two engaged, self-motivated, responsible, creative, and enthusiastic CSU students, undergraduate or graduate, with good communication and writing skills to help tell the story of the English Department. The interns in this position will help facilitate communication and community with students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends of the English Department.

Interns will spend most of their time researching, interviewing, attending events, writing, and developing content — both for print and online. A major responsibility of this internship will be creating content for the department’s blog. Interns will work directly with the English department’s Communications Coordinator to meet departmental communication needs and complete various content development projects as assigned, including but not limited to creating profiles of people (alumni, faculty & staff, students), programs and projects; conducting interviews; providing event coverage (which would include attendance and photos, along with other modes of recording where relevant); and reporting departmental news and upcoming events.

For these internship positions, some prior reporting or blogging experience and/or education is preferred, as well as an understanding of principles for writing for the web and strong communication skills, both in person and in text. We also prefer applicants who are familiar with the English Department, its programs, people, and events – and who are willing to learn more. Content will be developed in various modes, and therefore skill with technologies such as sound recording and photography, as well as image and sound editing experience is preferred. We are also looking for interns with good people skills, the ability to participate in effective verbal and written exchanges, understanding that as they attend events and conduct interviews and such, they are acting as a “goodwill ambassador” for the department.

Applicants should email or hand deliver to the English Department main office the following: a cover letter, résumé, contact information for three references (phone and email), and three writing samples (plus multimedia samples, if applicable) by the application deadline to:

English Department
c/o Jill Salahub: Communications Coordinator
Jill.Salahub@colostate.edu
A105 Behavioral Sciences Bldg.
1773 Campus Delivery
Ft. Collins, CO 80523-1773

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,