Tag Archives: Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri

A great time was had by all at Bruce Ronda’s retirement celebration

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has a lyric essay, “Family Cookbook,” accepted by Florida Review. It’s part of a new collection exploring mixed-ness and in-between-ness.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Natural History,” was awarded a Pushcart Prize and will be played published in the Best of the Small Presses anthology.
  • Joanna Doxey has a poem in the latest edition of the Denver Quarterly (51.3).
  • Jaime Jordan’s Digital Humanities class (E280) has created a blog showcasing some of the digital projects they’ve worked on this semester.  Check it out at https://exploredhblog.wordpress.com!
  • Second year MFA student Claire Boyles had an essay, “Failing at Important Things: A Parallel History,” place as a runner-up in Vela Magazine’s nonfiction contest, judged by Claire Vaye Watkins. The essay is live on the site: http://velamag.com/failing-at-important-thingsa-parallel-history/
  • Cedar Brant won the Academy of American Poet’s Prize for CSU.
  • David Mucklow was accepted and offered a scholarship to attend the Squaw Valley Community of Writers Poetry Workshop this summer, and will be attending at the end of June. A few weeks ago, his poem, “where Deer Creek dies into the Gallatin,” was published on Daily Gramma. You can find it on their site here – http://gramma.press/
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s flash story, “A Bunny’s Kidnapping” has been accepted for publication at “Gone Lawn.”
  • Come celebrate the new 2017 Fort Collins Poet Laureate (our very own Felicia Zamora!) on Sunday, May 7 from 6-8 PM at Wolverine Farm Publick House! Enjoy readings from Felicia Zamora (MFA alumnae), John Calderazzo (professor of English Emeritus), and Michelle Deschenes (MFA alumnae). For more information, please see the event calendar listing or Facebook event page.

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Happy New Year!

  • Dan Beachy-Quick has a set of poems and set of essays nominated for a Pushcart Prize.
  • Roze Hentschell, currently serving as Interim Associate Dean in the College of Liberal Arts, emceeed the College of Liberal Arts Fall commencement, Saturday December 17th at 5:00 p.m. If you couldn’t be there in person, check out the webcast archives and watch our wonderful graduates receive their diplomas: http://commencement.colostate.edu/webcast-archives/
  • Congratulations to the 2016-17 CLC interns, Dominique Garnett, Alina Lugo, Sarah Von Nostrand, and Shelley Curry and Associate director, Mary Ellen Sanger on successfully designing and facilitating six SpeakOut writing workshops. Three evening journal launch parties were held. Watch for the winter copy in January.
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay on curating community writing and social action in jail appears in the forthcoming issue of the Community Literacy Journal.
  • Bill Tremblay has a poem entitled “November 9, 2016,” coming out in the next issue of TRUCK magazine.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s “Song of Rachel” has been accepted for publication at The Molotov Cocktail.

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Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri

MFA Candidate in Fiction, 2018

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While getting good grades is vital, I’ve learned it’s the grade I give myself as a writer that has driven me to write, revise, and to craft smooth, well-developed short stories to send into the world, a marker by which to define myself, to sound my “barbaric YAWP over the roofs of the world.”


What inspired you to get a degree in English? 

I became fascinated by creative writing after taking several fiction classes as an undergraduate, and joined a writing group in my hometown (Boise, ID). During that period, I became intrigued by the idea of pursuing an MFA, and taking my fiction to the next level. I knew that writing was driving me intellectually, and I could spend my life pursuing a career as a fiction writer.

Why do you think the humanities are important? 

There is too much of an emphasis on material profits, as opposed to profiting in the sphere of ideas and discourses. Students need to be grounded in a healthy discussion of ideas and principles, to have a sense of their place in the great pantheon of history, of art, of literature. Society cannot function without healthy, intellectual debate, and without freethinkers to challenge problematic assumptions and norms, we are fostering a dangerous climate, driven by conformity and gladiator mentality, a society driven by brutal competition. As Kevin Spacey said in “Horrible Bosses”, “Life is a marathon and you cannot win a marathon without putting a few Band-Aids on your nipples.” Let us put Band-Aids on our preconceived notions, and heal our minds, rather than thinking of writing and life as brutal competition. 

You are teaching E210: Beginning Creative Writing in the fall. What is your favorite thing about teaching? 

The idea of instigating a dialogue about creative writing, and thus leaving a mark on my students. The beauty of teaching creative writing is that it opens itself up to vigorous but civil debate, a debate in which healthy dissent is encouraged, and students can begin to form their own particular philosophies and principles on the subject. I want to get students thinking about all the possibilities available to them, rather than guiding them in one particular direction.

What do you consider to be your greatest accomplishments (both personally and professionally)? How did your experience in the English Department help you with these achievements?

I have had the good fortune to get short-stories (namely flash fiction) published in various on-line journals. I’ve seen the highest caliber work from my cohorts in the program, and have subsequently been driven to better myself as a writer and self-motivator. While getting good grades is vital, I’ve learned it’s the grade I give myself as a writer that has driven me to write, revise, and to craft smooth, well-developed short stories to send into the world, a marker by which to define myself, to sound my “barbaric YAWP over the roofs of the world.” 

What was the last piece of writing you read or wrote? OR, What are you currently reading, writing? 

I recently wrote a story called, “Abide”, about a young woman who is a single mother, posing as the child’s older sister. She is grappling with the ramifications of this lifelong charade, as she contemplates leaving home, and leaving her son in the hands of her autocratic, overbearing father.

What are you doing with your summer break? 

We might imagine faculty hidden in secret teachers’ lounges, plotting nefarious schemes. But the only thing I’ve been plotting is publication, shooting high. With a kind of manic energy, I’ve plunged myself into a regimen of writing, revising, and submitting to top literary journals, including the Holy Grail of them all: The New Yorker. To me summer is a time to challenge myself, to push myself as far as I can go. Every day I submit, I feel an ultimate satisfaction at sending my work out into the world. With each rejection, I send a new piece out, determined to fight on. And I feel confident that I will reach “the unreachable star” to quote a favorite song.

What are your hobbies or special interests, what do you enjoy doing with your free time?

I like to listen to Tchaikovsky and other great classical composers, in addition to my Netflix and Amazon prime binges. I feel like classical music truly induces creativity, and puts me in the proper emotional mood to write, to produce the stories that matter, the stories that induce what Nabokov referred to as “that little sob in the spine of the artist-reader.”

What is something most people don’t know about you? 

I adore Tchaikovsky and consider myself a Romantic, with a capital R. A 19th century Romantic.

What is your favorite word and why? 

Abide. I love the word. The word conveys the mantra of The Dude from my favorite movie, “The Big Lebowski.” It holds a soothing, peaceful connotation, and a signpost by which to guide my daily outlook. The word guides me away from conflict and dwelling on negativity, and into a gentle dreamlike state.

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  • Camille Dungy’s poems have been published in two new anthologies: Of Poetry & Protest: From Emmett Till to Trayvon Martin. (W.W. Norton) and Read America(s): An Anthology (Locked Horn Press). Camille will be a member of the faculty of the Napa Valley Writer’s Conference this summer. The other conference faculty will be Brenda Hillman, Brian Teare, Major Jackson. Applications are still being accepted for remaining spots: http://www.napawritersconference.org/attend-the-conference/apply/
  • Todd Mitchell presented a master class on Earning The Transformation at this year’s Northern Colorado Writer’s Conference last weekend.
  • Neil FitzPatrick was awarded a 2016-2017 fiction Fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Fellowships last from October – May, and Fellows receive a live/work space and a stipend.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s “The Story of A Starry Night” has been accepted for publication in Crab Fat Magazine.
  • Kiley Miller and Michelle Wilk presented last Saturday at the Colorado Wyoming Writing Tutors Conference in Denver. Their presentation was titled, “Power Dynamics: Navigating the Needs and Demands of the Writing Center.”
  • Bill Tremblay will do a reading on Thursday, May 5, at the Wolverine Publick House and Letterpress, 316 Willow St, Ft. Collins, from his just-published book, Walks Along the Ditch: Poems, starting at 8:00 PM.
  • From Publishers Lunch, Fiction: Debut … “Devin Murphy’s (MFA, Fiction ’09) The Boat Runner, the story of a wealthy Dutch family, industrious owners of a lightbulb factory in a small town, whose world is upended over the course of four years during the WWII Nazi occupation; we follow the youngest son through the forests of France, the stormy beaches of England, and deep within the secret missions of the German Navy, as he is confronted with the moral dilemma that will change his life forever—a novel that explores the human cost of war and questions what national borders really mean when weighed against a single human heart, pitched as reminiscent of All the Light We Cannot See and Cold Mountain, to Laura Brown at Harper Perennial, for publication in Fall 2017, by Rayhane Sanders at Lippincott Massie McQuilkin (World English).”
  • Mandy Rose reviewed Lynn Pederson’s book, The Nomenclature of Small Things, for the April issue of Stirring: A Literary Collection. The review can be found here: http://www.sundresspublications.com/stirring/

English Department Internship Opportunity

Reading

 

Please join the Department of English and the Creative Writing program at the University of Denver to hear the internationally renowned poet, Raúl Zurita.

When: Monday, May 9th / 7pm
Where: The University of Denver
Sturm Hall / Room 454

Raúl Zurita is one of Latin America’s most celebrated and controversial poets. After Augusto Pinochet’s 1973 US-supported military coup that ousted Salvador Allende’s democratically elected government, Zurita’s poetry sought to register the violence and atrocities committed against the Chilean people and the corruption of the Spanish language. During the dictatorship that lasted from 1973 to 1990, Zurita published a trilogy of books (Purgatory, Anteparadise, and The New Life), wrote poems in the sky above New York City, bulldozed poems in the Chilean desert, and helped to form the art collective “Colectivo de Accion de Arte” that used performance as an act of political resistance. Of his early poetry, C.D. Wright has written: “Under the eyes of church and dictatorship, he began to write and publish his poetry, juxtaposing secular and sacred, ruled and unruled. With a mysterious admixture of logic and logos, Christian Symbols, brain scans, graphics, and a medical report, Zurita expanded the formal repertoire of his language, of poetic materials, pushing back against the ugly vapidity of rule by force.”

Zurita was awarded the Chilean National Prize for Literature, a scholarship from the Guggenheim Foundation, and he has held poetry readings at numerous American universities including Harvard, Yale, Stanford and Berkeley. His books in English translation include Anteparadise (translated by Jack Schmitt), Purgatory (translated by Anna Deeny), INRI (translated by William Rowe) and Song for His Disappeared Love (translated by Daniel Borzutzky). He lives in Chile.

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  • On Friday, February 5th, Pam Coke gave two invited presentations at the Colorado Council International Reading Association (CCIRA):  “Teaching as Close Reading: Igniting a Sense of Wonder about Why I Teach” and “If I Stay: Developing a Plan for Keeping a Sense of Wonder about Why I Teach.”  Dr. Coke was thrilled to have the opportunity to reconnect with several CSU English department graduates who are currently teaching in schools in Colorado and Nebraska, including Nick Bonnet, Dakota Davis-Powers, Marissa Kast, Marie Paul, and Emily Schlehuber.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s “Carousel” has been accepted for publication online in Flash Fiction Magazine on March 19th.
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “My City,” accepted for publication by Blue Moon Literary and Art Review.
  • Bill Tremblay’s latest book, Walks Along the Ditch: Poems, will be published in early April, 2016, by Lynx House Press.

CO301B, Writing in the Sciences, Information Session

During this one hour session, Dr. Sue Doe and Christina Sutton will capture what the Writing in the Sciences course is here at CSU. The following will be described:

  • history of CO301B
  • rhetoric in science communication
  • campus interest in science communication
  • rigors of the course

If you feel you might be interested in teaching CO301B in the future, you will want to come hear about this exciting course.

You have the opportunity to attend on either Wednesday, March 9th at 2:00 P.M. OR Thursday, March 10th at 2:00 P.M. We will meet in the Whitaker Room.

 

Outstanding Literary Essay Awards

The English Department’s Literature Program announces the 13th annual Outstanding Literary Essay Awards contest, which recognizes outstanding critical writing and interpretive work in literary studies. Applicants must be registered graduate or undergraduate English majors or minors.  Awards of $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place will be offered at both the graduate and undergraduate level.  Winners will be honored at the English Department Awards on Monday, April 25, 2016.

Submission Guidelines: Students should submit an essay that represents their best critical work in literary studies. Undergraduate essays should be no longer than 15 pages and graduate essays should be no longer than 20 pages. Shorter papers are welcome. Only one submission is allowed per student.

Eligibility:     (1) Essay should be written for a course taken in the CSU English Dept.

(2) Writer should be an English major or English minor

Submission deadline is Monday April 4, 2016, at 5:00 p.m.

Please submit:

  • TWO clean copies, with no name, address, or instructor’s comments. Only a title and page numbers should appear on the paper.
  • Include with your essay a separate cover letter with your (a)name, (b)address, (c) phone number, (d) e-mail address, (e)university ID number, (f) title of your essay (g) course for which the essay was written and the professor who taught the course, and (h) indicate whether you are an undergraduate English major, minoring in English, or a graduate student at CSU.

Address your cover letter to: Professor Aparna Gollapudi, Department of English, Campus Delivery 1773, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1773. Cover letter and submissions can be dropped off at the English Department Office in Eddy Bldg.

 

Tools from the Workshop: Theory and “Hands On” Practice with Multimodal Engagement in UD Composition Courses Part II

The Upper Division Composition Professional Development Workshop Series is proud to present the second installment of our spring 2016 offerings: During the week of March 21st we will hold our second workshop: The Possibility of Actually Composing a Visual Argument (Days and times to be determined by a coming Doodle poll!)

Come join us as we discuss a sprinkling of theory that connects visual argument with the course goals of CO 300. The bulk of the workshop will be devoted to a “hands on” exploration of the new Photoshop software that has been installed on the computers in Eddy 2 and 4. Help us explore this rich visual editing software and envision ways that it can be effectively utilized in the classroom. A nice takeaway from the workshop will be the production of a flyer to advertise one of your upcoming classes. (Never be caught unprepared when the call for a class flyer is issued!)

All are welcome to join.

Four great incentives:

  1. Conversation with your awesome peers
  2. Certificate of Completion for those pesky Evaluation files
  3. Intellectual Engagement
  4. Snacks!

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick gave a reading in Salt Lake City for the University of Utah and the Utah Arts Council. A poem, “A Century of Meditation,” has been accepted for the Kenyon Review’s special issue on long lyric forms.
  • The Center for Literary Publishing received funding from the VPR’s FY2016 Quarterly Strategic Investment Process to support travel to this year’s Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Los Angeles, to be held at the end of March. Twelve graduate student interns will receive travel funds, as well as the director and two faculty editors.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s new book, Spool, winner of the New Measure Prize, has been released by Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press. Information re: the book can be found at http://www.parlorpress.com/freeverse/cooperman
  • Sue Doe’s article, ‘Affective Activism: Answering Institutional Productions of Precarity in the Corporate University,” and  coauthored with Janelle Adsit, Maria Maisto and others, was published in Feminist Formations (Volume 27, Issue 13, Winter 2015) and is now viewable via Project Muse: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/feminist_formations/toc/ff.27.3.html
  • Sue Doe gave a presentation at the January 2016 Modern Language Association annual convention entitled “Academic Freedom for Contingent Faculty Members: Strategies for Establishing Due Process.”
  • Sue Doe’s workshop, “Don’t Throw Up Your Hands, Throw Up a Scene” has been accepted as part of the Spring 2016 LEAP (Leadership, Entrepreneurship, Arts Advocacy and the Public) Masters program in Arts Leadership and Administration.
  • Todd Mitchell’s graphic novel project Broken Saviors received a generous grant from Colorado Creative Industries and National Endowment for the Arts to continue producing issues of the story. Many thanks to all who have helped support this project. You can view the first 47 pages of the project at www.ToddMitchellBooks.com. Todd is traveling to several elementary and middle schools across the state this month (including a full day visit to McGraw Elementary in Fort Collins on February 10th) to run workshops and give presentations focused on promoting literacy and developing creativity.
  • Airica Parker is featured in CALYX Journal’s blog: https://calyxpress.wordpress.com/2016/01/22/identity-by-airica-parker/
  • Kristina Quynn’s article “’My Vagina Had Rewritten Joyce:’ Teaching Critical Engagement from Virginia Woolf to Shelley Jackson” has been accepted in the MLA’s options for teaching volume Teaching Modernist Women’s Writing in English.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s 50 word fiction piece, “Procedures” has been accepted for publication at the *82 Review, in a special 50-word themed issue, to be released at some point between May and August.
  • For its commemorative issue, Pinyon magazine has selected Mary Crow’s poem, “And Though He’s Cut Out for Noble Acts.”
  • Black Warrior Review has accepted Mandy Rose’s lyric essay, Incident Checklist, for publication.

 

CSU Writes is honored to announce Dr. Joli Jensen—expert on faculty writers and writing programs—from University of Tulsa will guest present and lead workshops for graduate students and faculty writers.  Friday & Saturday, February 26 & 27 on the topics of PROTECTING TIME, SPACE AND ENERGY (graduate student), STALLED PROJECTS: FINDING WAYS TO MOVE AHEAD (faculty), and SEMESTER WRITING PLAN & LAUNCH (faculty).

If you are interested in the topic of faculty writers and faculty writing support, you are welcome to join Joli and Kristina on Thursday evening for conversation (more details to follow). Email Kristina at quynn@colostate.edu if you are interested.

CSU Writes fosters writing groups for faculty, graduate students, and creative/life-writers who write for publication or degree completion. CSU Writes also offers workshops, regular drop in writing sessions, and consultations. The Spring Workshop Schedule includes: INTRODUCTION TO WRITING GROUPS (Feb 3 & 4); CLOCKWORK MUSE WORKSHOP (Feb 9 & 10); JOLI JENSEN GUEST PRESENTER (Feb 26 & 27); and SUFFERING FROM JARGONITIS? (Apr 5 & 6).

More information on workshops and CSU Writes offerings can be found at: http://english.colostate.edu/csu-writes/

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ZambiaSummer2016

  • 2016 Summer Education Abroad Program in Zambia. Information Session TODAY! 12:00 pm, LSC 308. Read more about it here: http://english.colostate.edu/2016/01/2016-summer-education-abroad-program-zambia/
  • On Saturday, January 23rd, Doug Cloud gave a talk on the rhetoric of atheism at the annual Fort Collins Skepticamp, a gathering of local atheists, humanists and agnostics.
  • Camille Dungy is featured and quoted in the LA Review of Books essay, “Toward a Wider View of ‘Nature Writing'” January 10, 2016. https://lareviewofbooks.org/essay/toward-a-wider-view-of-nature-writing
  • Abby Kerstetter’s proposal was accepted to present at the 2016 Alaska Native Studies Conference in Anchorage. She will be reading a selection of poems from her thesis project.
  • Ivy Scherbarth, a graduate student in the Creative Nonfiction program, will have her essay “Enchantment” published in the next issue of Taproot Magazine (Issue 17: Myth).
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s flash piece, “Mothers and Sons” has been accepted for publication in Cease Cows (101 words). Publication date is forthcoming!
  • The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico, published in March 2015 as part of the Mountain West Poetry Series by the Center for Literary Publishing, has been awarded the Great Lakes College Association’s New Writers Award. The book has also won the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies award for best poetry collection about a significant topic related to the Mexican-American and/or Chicana/o experience. And it is included in Poets & Writers’ annual Debut Poets feature — a “highlight of ten of the most compelling and inspiring first books of poetry published in 2015” — in the January/February 2016 issue. Karen Montgomery Moore, Katie Naughton, Melissa Hohl, and Cedar Brant were the editorial and production team.

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Assistant Professor Zach Hutchins and his E630D Special Topics in Literature: Gender Studies – Witchcraft class.

Assistant Professor Zach Hutchins and his E630D Special Topics in Literature: Gender Studies – Witchcraft class.

  • Zach Hutchins has been awarded a 2016 Fellowship by the National Endowment for the Humanities. NEH support will facilitate research on Hutchins’s current book project, a prehistory of the North American slave narrative. For his research, Hutchins is reading thousands of issues of early American newspapers and transcribing every news item related to slavery, from slave-for-sale advertisements to discussions of enslaved African princes and news of runaway slaves. Those transcriptions contribute, Hutchins argues, the rhetorical framework for subsequent representations of the African American experience and the generic codes of the slave narrative.
  • This past Tuesday, Doug Cloud gave a workshop for SoGES Sustainability Fellows titled “Communicating Science to Skeptical Audiences: Some Rhetorical Strategies for Scientists.”
  • Kristina Quynn’s personal essay, “My Brother, My…,” about growing up in an interracial family is to be published in the collection What Does It Mean to Be White in America? by 2Leaf Press.
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “Tomb at the Village of the Workmen,” accepted for publication in Indianola Review. Her book of poems, Jostle, is a finalist for the T. S. Eliot Publication Award. Her history of Colorado poetry has been posted on the website of The Poetry Foundation (Poetry Magazine); it was originally written for the Academy of American Poets (and now is a bit dated).
  • Steven Schwartz’s Madagascar: New and Selected Stories will be published by Engine Books in Fall 2016. His play, “Stranger,” was selected as one of three from a national playwriting competition and received a staged reading in Los Angeles.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s 101 word flash-fiction piece, “Motherland” has been accepted for publication in Crack The Spine!

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Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • John Calderazzo has accepted an invitation to join the Fort Collins Climate Action Plan communication team.  The City’s plan is widely regarded as among the strongest in the nation.This week, John conducted a story-telling workshop for CSU’s External Relations Team.  He also moderated part of a panel at the Foothills Unitarian Church on The Moral Imperative for Climate Action.
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay, “‘A Tangle of Circumstance’: Life in the Early Years of the NYS Training School for Girls in Hudson,’ appears in the Fall 2015 issue of the Columbia County History & Heritage Magazine.
  • Barbara Sebek attended a conference on Appropriation in an Age of Global Shakespeare in Athens, Georgia.  She presented a paper, “Blurring Binaries in Frank McGuinness’s Mutabilitie (1997).”
  • A review of Dan Robinson’s novel, Death of a Century, in the Manhattan Book Review concluded with this admonition: “This is a book not to be missed.”
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s story, “The Next Step” (1721 words) has accepted for publication in the upcoming issue of Gravel Magazine.
  • Adam Mackie, English Education graduate and former composition instructor at Colorado State University, promised he’d stay in touch with the English Department at CSU. Adam recently has accepted a full-time English language arts position in his hometown of Anchorage, Alaska. Starting in January 2016, Adam will teach classic mythology and American literature at West Anchorage High School. Adam also published a set of poems with BlazeVOX in Western New York that he’d like to share with everyone: http://blazevox.org/index.php/journal/

 

TONIGHT: Grand Opening – Wolverine Farm Publishing – come celebrate the new Letterpress & Publick House on from 8-11pm. Listen to the beautiful words of  Poet Laureate (and CSU alumna) Aby Kaupang and the fabulous sounds of Souvenir Thread.

 

Reminder: Deadline for Greyrock Review submissions is December 9th. Visit greyrockreview.colostate.edu to submit.

 

December 1st: Scholarship online application opens.  The application for all scholarships in the English department is online at www.ramweb.colostate.edu. Sign in using your eID and select the CSU Scholarship Application link.

 

Spring 2016 Internships Available!

Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students. Please note that the list is likely to grow with more opportunities, so stay tuned!

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SPRING:

  • Publishing/Editorial Internships:
    • Editorial Interns, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
    • Publishing Assistant Internship (2 positions), Bailiwick Press (Ft. Collins)
    • Publication Assistant, Wolverine Farm Publishing Co. & Bookstore (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing/Editorial Internships (several positions), The Borgen Project (remote)

 

  • Educational Internships:
    • Grading Assistant, NCTE@CSU with Poudre High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing Coach and Grader, NCTE@CSU, Fort Collins High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Adult ESL Teacher, Global Refugee Center (Greeley, CO)

 

  • Non-Profit/Communications Internships:
    • Social Media and Communications Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)
    • Communications Intern (paid), Otter Products (Ft. Collins, CO)

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Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu  for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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The cake for the Homecoming open house was delicious

The cake for the Homecoming open house was delicious, and eventually it was all gone

  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Openings: Into Our Vertical Cosmos,” was released by Essay Press as a digital chapbook.  She thought of titling the essay “What Not to do on Sabbatical,” in case that piques your interest.  You can read the essay here:  http://www.essaypress.org/ep-40/
  • Skyhorse Press has released Dan Robinson’s first novel, After the Fire, in paperback, so those who didn’t buy it in the first go round can find it now.  When it was first published in hardback, Wildland Firefighter Magazine said that it contained “some of the best stuff ever written about [fire] crews,” Bloomsbury Review wrote that it “engages you with a kind of terrible beauty,” and Booklist called it “a fine debut.”
  • Courtney Polland’s proposal “Playing with Pastoral: Socio-Economic and Geographic Relations in Herrick’s Hesperides” has been accepted to the Graduate Student Showcase, November 11.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s, MFA (Fiction) 420 word flash-fiction piece, entitled “Love and Reefer” has been accepted for publication in Straylight Literary Magazine.
  • Meagan Wilson’s proposal “Mere Imagination: Mind & Material” was accepted to the Graduate Student Showcase, November 11. She’ll present from 11-12:30.

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