Tag Archives: Kylan Rice

CLA Dean Ben Withers opens the Spring 2017 CLA Awards Ceremony

Recently, the College of Liberal Arts (CLA) held their annual awards ceremony. Five members of the English department were honored. Sheila Dargon received the State Classified Award, Zach Hutchins and Kylan Rice were awarded for Excellence in Teaching, Tony Becker was presented with the Faculty Development Award, and Bruce Ronda was presented with the John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award.

When presenting the CLA State Classified Award to Shelia Dargon, Roze Hentschell said,

The College of Liberal Arts State Classified Award recognizes outstanding contributions and achievements by state classified employees. This year, the award goes to Sheila DArgon, who has been with the Department of English for the last 10 years. Sheila’s nomination letter celebrates her exemplary leadership in supporting faculty and students to ensure their success. She anticipates problems before they manifest, can handle a crisis with composure, and is a careful listener who guides students to make the best decisions about their academic careers and helps them feel welcome, comfortable and confident. She is the first point of contact for all students who come to the third floor of Eddy (thousands of students, since all Composition students come that way as well) and a fine example of the excellence of State Classified employees. Congratulations, Sheila!

CLA Dean Ben Withers presents Sheila Dargon her award

Sheila Dargon
Undergraduate Program Assistant

What brought you to CSU?

I moved to Fort Collins in 2005. My sister and her family had lived here for years and I needed to start over, so I came out here and started working for a temporary agency while applying for jobs everywhere! I remember when filling out the application for a job here at the University, that I really liked the energy of being on campus, and thought it would be a great place to work. I actually got the offer from the English department on the day I would have been hired by the company I was temping!

What’s your favorite thing about working in the English Department?

My favorite thing about working in the English department is that every day is different. Some days I see and speak to a lot of students and faculty, and the next, I am working on the computer.

What’s one thing you’d like students in the English Department to know about you?

I want English students to know that I’m here to help and really want them to succeed here at CSU.

What’s your secret? By which I mean: what makes you so good at keeping track of so much information and so many people?

I have no idea, I guess when you like what you do and the people you work with, it makes it easy.

CLA Dean Ben Withers presents Kylan Rice his Excellence in Teaching Award (GTA)

The Excellence in Teaching Award recognizes one outstanding teacher in each of the following categories: Tenured Faculty, Tenure-Track Faculty, Special & Temporary Faculty, Graduate Teaching Assistant.

CLA Dean Ben Withers presents Zach Hutchens his Excellence in Teaching Award

Zach Hutchins
Assistant Professor of English: Literature

Professor Zach Hutchins received the Excellence in Teaching Award for his hard work as a tenure track with the English Department since joining in 2013.

Associate Dean for Faculty and Graduate Studies Bruce Ronda introduced Hutchins’ award, calling him a “curricular innovator, brilliant scholar, dynamic classroom presenter, mentor and role-model” who is known for his “witty, relaxed and deeply informed teaching.”

From faculty to student support, Hutchins has made an impact within our own English Department. Bruce reminisced that his colleagues praised his “ease in front of the class “and his “invite interaction” coupled with “evident joy in teaching the class.”

But first person testimonials from his students speak louder than those. Bruce explained that these students “drew the attention of the Committee on the Liberal Arts.” One student said “Professor Hutchins is a no-brainer when it comes to being recognized as an excellent teacher in the College of Liberal Arts, and I’m all too happy to officially give him my personal seal of approval.”

This award will not slow Hutchins down. We were able to ask him a few questions about his time in the English Department and how he plans to continue doing what he’s doing.

 

What has been the most rewarding moment(s) at the English Department, or in Eddy?

I think my most rewarding moment here at CSU came in the spring of 2016, when students from my fall 2015 senior capstone course, “Your Success Story,” emailed me to say that assignments completed in the course had helped them secure the dream job they had targeted. I love to see student work find a second life, outside the classroom.

Do you plan on working on any projects this summer?

I’ve got too many projects this summer, but the most exciting is an essay on Herman Melville’s epic poem Clarel that will take me to London in June, for the International Melville Conference.

Who (or what) had the greatest influence on your career path?

Probably a high school teacher who was willing to talk books (and play chess!) with me after school—not just during class hours. He helped me see that literature mattered and that teacher/student interactions could be more meaningful than an exchange of paperwork.

In one word, how would you describe Eddy/the English department?

Energizing!

CLA Dean Withers presents Tony Becker with his Faculty Development Award

The Faculty Development Award, presented to Assistant Professor Tony Becker, provides support for outstanding research and/or creative activity, and is funded by participants in the Great Conversations Speaker Series.

Tony Becker
Assistant Professor, English: Applied Linguistics and TESL/TEFL

What do you enjoy most about working in the English Department or Eddy? 

Without a doubt, I enjoy working with our students. That is why I entered into this profession: to engage with students, to create knowledge together, and to strengthen the notion that they can make meaningful contributions to our world. I thoroughly enjoy the fact that we have relatively small (i.e., manageable) class sizes whereby we can interact very closely with our students and work with them to make connections between what we learn and what we experience out in the world beyond the classroom.

Also, it would be an understatement to say that I really enjoy the colleagues that I work in the English department. I have only been here at CSU for five years, but I have interacted with enough units across campus to know that the faculty and staff in the English department are among the most caring and collegial people at CSU. There is an incredible sense of community among many of the faculty and staff, and that resonates throughout our department, even to our students. It is easy to come to work when you know that your colleagues are genuinely interested in the happenings of your life and are willing to listen to what you have to say.

How do you plan to spend the summer? Is there a new project you’re excited to start?

Not surprisingly, I like my summers to be as stress-free as possible. I am hoping to devote a bit more time to getting outdoors with my wife and son, and just being more active in general (more than I typically am during the semester). We will take a short trip to the Gulf of Mexico this summer – nothing quite like the beach in the summer. I also like to do some hands-on projects when the semester finishes up. This summer, I am planning to replace the gutters on our house – how exciting, right!

In terms of my work, much of my summer will be spent on writing up my most recent research project. I am currently working on a project that examines the decisions that ESL students (approximately 50-75) make as they participate in a series of activities used to assess their writing (e.g., developing a scoring rubric, assessing peers’ work with the scoring rubric, and viewing the scoring rubric). Depending on the results of the study, I believe that the findings for this qualitative investigation can help to raise greater awareness regarding the importance of including students first-hand in the assessment process, resulting in improved writing performance and instruction.

What was the last piece of writing you read or wrote? Or what are you currently reading or writing?

I know that it is strange for me to say this, but, even though I am in an English department, I am not an avid leisure reader. It takes me forever to read things, especially when the sun is shining and there are so many things to do outdoors in Colorado; I get distracted easily. With that said, aside from reading children’s books with my son (although, secretly, I love them too!) and journal articles, I am hoping to finish Alan Moore’s Watchmen and then jump into one of his later books, V for Vendetta. I am a huge fan of graphic novels – must be all of the pictures that accompany the text!

In one word, how would you describe Eddy/the English department? 

Transformative

Bruce Ronda with his John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award

Bruce Ronda
Associate Dean for Faculty and Graduate Studies

Bruce Ronda was presented the John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award, which recognizes faculty who have demonstrated exemplary accomplishments in all aspects of their professional responsibilities over an extended period of time. As he’ll be retiring this year, we took the opportunity to ask him a few more questions about his experience at CSU and what his plans are for after.

What will you miss most about working at CSU?

Despite its many challenges and difficulties, colleges and universities like Colorado State are still very special places.  They provide an opportunity to reflect, create, analyze, propose, and converse in company with people who are also committed to those tasks.  So I will miss spending my days in the midst of such a community of thoughtful people: students, faculty members, administrators, and support staff.

Now that you’ll be retired, what are your plans?

I have several plans for the near future, some of which will start happening even before June 30.  I’m working on two book projects, one a biography of early-mid twentieth-century American poet Stephen Vincent Benet, the other a biography of Robert Coles, child psychiatrist and cultural commentator.  Then, I’ll be away for two weeks at the end of May for a trip to Scotland.  After I truly retire, I plan to keep working on those book projects, travel to Cape Cod for our annual post-Labor Day week there, see my family in Michigan, Oklahoma, and California some more, work in the garden, and spend more time playing the piano. . . and the banjo!

What wisdom do you have to offer about working and/or studying at CSU?

Maybe the most important advice I’d give to students at CSU is to appreciate and work with the faculty. We have amazing faculty members in English, in Liberal Arts, and throughout the university, and all the ones I know are eager to talk with their students. So: cultivate your teachers, talk with them about your questions, ask about their research or creative work, see if you can serve as a grader or intern in some capacity. As for working at CSU, I’ve found that the most important relationships to nurture have been with support staff. They are the true historical memory of our departments and colleges and are truly important contributors to the teaching/learning and outreach mission of the university.

Why do you think it’s important to study the Humanities?

I want to include the social sciences, too, in my response. This is a hard question, because it goes in so many ways. I’ll limit myself to two big reasons: the first is to understand better our “moment” in time by understanding history, economics, politics, society, and forms of expression in the arts. We come into a world not of our own making, and it’s enormously important to understand the forces that made the world the way it is and how those forces are expressed. Knowing where our “moment” comes from empowers us to live in it and change it. The second is to grow in empathy. While we cannot live in another’s skin or experience, we can grow in appreciation of the vast diversity of life, human and more-than-human. Here the arts and humanities have particular value, since they present us with the lived experience of people very different from us, and yet also strangely recognizable. Empathy, I’d say, is strikingly missing from our political and social discourse these days.

What project/paper/book have you most enjoyed working on?

All my projects have provided moments of pleasure and satisfaction, as well as frustration and anxiety. In many ways, my most recent project, the book called The Fate of Transcendentalism, has given me the most satisfaction because it brings together so many of my interests explored over many years.

What course have you enjoyed teaching the most?

That’s another hard question to answer, since courses differ so much in content, students, and the whole “feeling” of the course. Several CSU courses come to mind: a graduate authors course on Faulkner and grad topics courses on Hawthorne and Stowe, American Transcendentalism, and Terrorism and the Novel, and this most recent course on pragmatism.

What was it like teaching the Pragmatism course as your last course at CSU?

While it’s true that I’ve been thinking about this course for a long time, and reading in and about pragmatism for an even longer time, teaching it, of course, was something else again. I had wonderful students from the MFA and the MA lit programs—thoughtful, articulate, interesting people doing their own work and thinking their own thoughts. Their comments illuminated the texts in ways I hadn’t anticipated, so that was a real gift. It’s equally true that I taught this last course in a very different political and cultural moment than the one in which I planned it. The entire course was inflected with our awareness of the changes brought about, and the forces unleashed, by the presidential election. I think the election made us read Emerson and James, Stein and Susan Howe, in different ways. That was painful, but good.

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Today, April 17, is National Haiku Day (image by Jill Salahub)

  • The Crisis & Creativity Workgroup, comprised of writers, artists, scientists, and community members, has had a proposal exploring species extinction through poetry/art awarded a grant from the School of Environmental Sustainability — Dan Beachy-Quick and Cedar Brant are principal investigators with this project. More information can be found here: http://source.colostate.edu/school-global-environmental-sustainability-announces-global-challenges-research-teams-resident-fellow-awards/
  • Roze Hentschell attended the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in Atlanta, April 6-8, where she discussed her paper, “John Marston at Paul’s,” an examination of Marston’s plays written for the boy actors at St. Paul’s Cathedral in the early seventeenth century.
  • EJ Levy was interviewed as part of her recent visit to UMass-Lowell; the interview appears here: https://www.uml.edu/News/stories/2017/EJ-Levy.aspx
  • Dan Robinson’s third novel, Death of a Century, will be re-released in paperback next week.  Of the novel, The Manhattan Review of Books wrote, Robinson “deals with the main character’s shellshock with a great deal of care and sympathy, while paralleling the brutality of the world off the battlefield. This is a book not to be missed; it is a mystery, thriller, historical drama in one package,” and Publisher’s Weekly wrote, “Robinson’s atmospheric tale of betrayal and revenge paints a passionate picture of the Lost Generation…”
  • Barbara Sebek contributed a paper, “Archy’s Afterlives: Temporal Mash-ups During Times of Crisis,” to a seminar at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  The paper discusses the traces left by King James’s court jester, Archibald Armstrong.
  • One of Maurice Irvin’s MFA thesis stories was accepted for publication in Portland Review‘s upcoming Spring Issue.
  • Kylan Rice will be pursuing a PhD in English Literature at UNC Chapel Hill in the fall.
  • What Goes Down” by Kayann Short (BA 81, MA 88) has just been published in Rooted: The Best New Arboreal Nonfiction (Outpost19). Her flash fiction story “When It Was Lost” will appear in the spring issue of Dash.
  • Over the past year, we have lost quite a few members of our English department family.  Each year, CSU hosts a Rams Remember Rams Service.  Here are the details: Our campus community is invited to a candlelight ceremony Monday, April 17, 5 p.m. honoring CSU students, faculty, staff, and retirees who passed away this academic year.  The 15-minute ceremony will be held on the north steps of the Administration Building and will include a reading of the names – along with time for silent reflection. The Danforth Chapel will be open until 6 p.m. as a quiet place for personal contemplation.

CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

Reading

New York City author Deborah Clearman and CLC’s Mary Ellen Sanger read from their books on life “south of the border” at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House on Thursday, 4/20 at 8pm. Deborah writes evocative stories of Guatemalan realities, and Mary Ellen writes of the women she met when unjustly imprisoned in Mexico. There will be wine and beautiful cookies!

TEFL/TESL Advocacy Week 

On behalf of the TEFL/TESL Student Association, we are proud to promote our yearly event, Advocacy Week!

This week helps us achieve our central goals of promoting intercultural, linguistic, and literacy awareness in the community. To give back to the community, we have chosen to run a bookdrive for the Larimer County Jail. Bring in used or new paperback books to stock their shelves! Donation boxes can be found in the English Department office and around campus.

To engage the larger community, this week will feature presentations from Dr. Sue Doe, Dr. Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala, Dr. Kristina Quynn, the TEFL/TESL MA cohort, and TEFL/TESL alumni, focusing primarily on L2 and interdisciplinary writing. Find more details in the “2017 Advocacy Week Schedule” flyer.

Click to see a larger version

Lastly, we are excited to welcome our keynote speaker, Dr. Eli Hinkel to present “Teaching and Learning Vocabulary for Academic Writing” on Friday afternoon. Dr. Hinkel comes to us with over thirty years of experience and multiple publications which have influenced her work with ELL writers.

This year’s guest speaker

We look forward to hosting you at another successful and engaging Advocacy Week!

The Human Library 

The Fort Collins Rotaract Club will be hosting an event on Friday, April 21 from 4:30-8p.m called the Human Library.

The Human Library is a concept created in Copenhagen 17 years ago in order to establish a safe conversational space, where the people are the books. A “Living Book” is someone who represents various backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences. Books challenge prejudice and help connect people through respectful conversation with those who come to borrow them as “readers”. Each Book has a title that relates to their experiences, backgrounds, and/or identity. However, we challenge people to not judge a book by its cover and come with an open mind!

Conversations during the event are offered for 5-15 minutes, depending on what questions the reader has for the Living Book. Checking out a Book is a first come, first serve basis so people can come and go as they please.

Come engage in the conversation! If you would like to participate in an event that creates an atmosphere of storytelling, promotes community building, and celebrates differences then we would love to see you there.

Some featured Living Books include:

My Life in 2 Bathrooms
Muslim Citizen
Chief of Police

CSU Location: Lory Student Center Cherokee Park
Event Contact Name: Lisa Evans
Event Contact Email: levans2@rams.colostate.edu
Event Contact Phone: 9704818230
Audience: Alumni, Community, Faculty, Retiree / Emeritus Faculty, Staff, Student, Youth, Other
Cost: Free!

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snOval, image by Colorado State University

snOval, image by Colorado State University

  • Aby Kaupang and Matthew Cooperman’s book NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified) was recently a finalist for the Essay Press Book Prize. Largely detailing the challenges and joys of raising their autistic daughter Maya, the book has been in progress for many years. A chapbook from that collection, Disorder 299.00, has just been released from Essay Press, and can be found at http://www.essaypress.org/ep-52/
  • Thanks to the amazing work of Shoaib Alam and Karen Montgomery Moore, Colorado Review now has 10,000 followers on Twitter.
  • Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala has been appointed to serve as Editor of the American Association for Applied Linguistics Newsletter.  She will serve a three-year term (2016-2019).  Fabiola is also currently serving in the Editorial Review Board for Volume 70 of The Reading Teacher (RT) for the 2015-2016 period. Fabiola’s latest 2015 publication is: Meeting the reading comprehension challenges of diverse English language learners in K-12:  Key contributions from reading research (pp. 147-164).  In M. Daniel & K. Mokhtari (Eds.), Research and instruction that makes a difference in English learners’success.  Lanham, MD: Roman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. Fabiola, together with Tony Maciejewsky (Department Head of Electrical and Computer Engineering at CSU), will be presenting the results of their investigation titled “Mental imagery experienced by both pathway and non-pathway graduate students in an engineering course at a US Research I institution” at the upcoming 2016 AAAL Conference in Orlando.
  • Sarah Louise Pieplow’s poem, ghazal [16.], will be published in the spring edition of burntdistrict. You can find the journal at http://burntdistrict.org/
  • Mary Crow’s poetry is the subject (along with Karen Swenson’s) of a chapter in Marilyn Krysl’s Yes, There Will Be Singing, published in the University of Michigan series, Poets on Poetry.
  • Here’s James Work’s latest contribution to world literature. Publication expected in July. jameswork
  • Two of Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the newest issue of TriQuarterly Review. Her poem “In tuck” has also been selected for publication at The Cincinnati Review and her poem “& in wonder too,” first printed in Meridian, will be the poem of the day on Poetry Daily on February 11.
  • The English Department is pleased to award the following graduate students departmental funds for travel associated with professional activities. The department gave a total of $7,420 in award money to students this year. The grants ranged from $300-$750. Students will be traveling to conferences from Alaska to points eastward. Congratulations to all our students who are sharing their research and creative work in professional circles!
    Paul Binkley
    Denise Garrett
    Kelsey Hatley
    Abby Kerstetter
    John Koban
    Cole Konopka
    David Mucklow
    Kathleen Naughton
    Meghan Pipes
    Kylan Rice
    Lara Roberts
    John Whalen
    Meagan Wilson
    Catie Young

NCTE@CSU

On April 9th of this year we will be hosting our first conference.

“Literacy Through Popular Culture.”

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL

The conference theme is on research-based strategies for teaching literacy through popular culture. This theme engages students and teachers in embracing the rele-vance and power of popular culture—from comic books to teen novels to video-games— as a form of literacy in the classroom. Presentations and workshops should offer teachers concrete, actionable strategies that they can incorporate into their own language arts classrooms. We invite secondary (grades 6-12) language arts teachers and students, university professors and students, and other related profes-sionals to send in proposals for workshops or presentations.

DEADLINE: MARCH 7

Email proposal submissions to ncte@colostate.edu

We are very excited about this event and are working hard to make it an amazing and memorable one. Please visit the website for information: http://nctecsuconference2016.weebly.com

Show Up & Write

“show up & write” sessions started this week.  “show up & write” runs from February 1 to May 4, on Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays: 9-9:50 in Eddy 100 and 2-2:50 in Eddy 200. These drop-in writing sessions offer a regularly scheduled time in a communal, academic setting for writers to make progress on writing projects. Look for information in your mailbox to share with your students. And, “show up & write” regularly to see what you accomplish this semester!

 

Workshop Reminder: UD Composition

On February 16 from 5-7, in Eddy 4, we will offer the first installment of our series — “Sound Matters”. In this workshop we will discuss rationales for including multimodal elements in the composition course and work with sound recording equipment to produce a short piece using Audacity. More specifically, we will record vocal tracks using department equipment, gather and import music and sound effects, and mix these down into a finished audio version of a children’s story.  Faculty and graduate students from all areas are welcome to attend, but due to space limitations preference for attendees will go to those scheduled to teach UD Comp in upcoming semesters. Attendees should bring along a USB drive to save your creations. Snacks will be provided!

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The Tenth International Melville Conference recently took place at Keio University (Mita Campus, Tokyo) from June 25 to June 29. The five-day conference (including a day-trip to cities by the sea in Kanagawa Prefecture, reminiscent of the days of Commodore Perry’s Black Ship) invited participants to consider Melville’s deep interest in globalism, the many contexts in which his work has been and continues to be read, and the range of uses to which his writings have been put.

CSU’s own Kylan Rice (pictured below) presented his research, “Knotted Up in Place: Melville and the American Spatial Subject,” and was asked to do a write-up on the conference for the journal Leviathan (which will likely be published in the fall issue).

kylan presenting

CSU Assistant Professor Zach Hutchins (pictured below, second from the left) also presented a piece titled “‘Kith and Kin to Noble Benjamin’: Imitation and the Autobiography of Ishmael,” an extract from one of his current book projects, Melville’s Representative Men. Hutchins also chaired a panel on “Capitalism.”

image2

Hutchins reflected that the most valuable part of his time in Tokyo was the opportunity to meet with likeminded scholars and to make personal connections that will persist beyond the conference.

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Lory Student Center Curfman Gallery Student Art Exhibit

Lory Student Center Curfman Gallery Student Art Exhibit (image by Jill Salahub)

  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s new book, gentlessness, has just been published by Tupelo Press, and received an early review here: http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-936797-57-8. It is accompanied by a chapbook, Shields & Shards & Stitches & Songs also just out from Omnidawn.
  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang just returned from AWP in Minneapolis, where they gave readings for SpringGun/Noemi, and Laurel Review. The latter reading, co-hosted by Colorado Review, featured (for Colorado Review), Julie Carr, Andy S. Nicholson and Janet Sylvester. In addition, Matthew’s poem “Good Day” has just been accepted by Prairie Schooner.”
  • A conversation between Camille Dungy and Pulitzer-prize finalist Adrian Matejka is collected in Tracking / Teaching: On Documentary Poetics, which is “up” and available to the world at http: //www.essaypress.org/ep-2
  • EJ Levy presented at AWP as part of “Eye on the (Book) Prize.” Her first attempt at poem, inspired by Carl Phillips, has been accepted for publication in The Pinch.
  • This year’s judge of our Academy of American Poets Prize, Bin Ramke, has announced his choice of winner and runner-up. Congratulations to Kristin George Bagdanov whose three poems “Calving,” “When First I heard,” & “Lamb Body” have been awarded 1st place; and congratulations to Kylan Rice whose suite of “eve” poems received honorable mention. It’s needful to mention that Mr. Ramke had a very difficult time deciding, and described himself as so impressed with all the entrees that he wanted to drive up here and ask us what is going on.

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English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub and author Neil Gaiman. Jill waited in line for seven hours at Old Firehouse Books to meet Gaiman, who stayed at that table signing books for eleven hours, until there was no more line.

English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub and author Neil Gaiman. Jill waited in line for seven hours at Old Firehouse Books to meet Gaiman, who stayed at that table signing books for eleven hours, until there was no more line.

  • Tim Amidon’s collaboratively authored chapter (with Jessica Reyman) titled “Authorship and Ownership of User Contributions on the Social Web” is now out in Cultures of Copyright  (Eds. Dànielle Nichole DeVoss and Martine Courant Rife). Additionally, this semester he is teaching “CO402: Principles of Digital Rhetoric and Design” which is the first time this course has been offered here at CSU. He will be presenting an interactive talk titled “Navigating Fair Use: Remix, Appropriation, Attribution” at the TILT MTI next Tuesday, February 10, 2015 from 12:00-1:00 PM at TILT 105.
  • Leslee Becker has won the CLA John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award.
  • Next week, John Calderazzo will conduct a science communication story-telling workshop for SoGES Ph.D and post-doctorate scholars. Also in February, he’ll give a talk/reading–“High Culture: Mountains & Our Minds”–at the Walking Mountains Science Center in Avon, Colorado.
  • Todd Mitchell spent a day last week working to inspire literacy and creativity with elementary and middle school students and faculty at Littleton Academy, in (not surprisingly) Littleton.
  • Kristina Quynn was awarded a Ripple Effect Grant to fund the first year of “CSU Writes,” a program that will set up and foster writing groups on campus for faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and the CSU community. “CSU Writes” will start in Fall of 2015 and will help support those at CSU who research and/or write for publication.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poetic sequence “The Somatic Wager: A Proof in Verse” was accepted for publication in Juked (Print).
  • Kylan Rice had a chapbook of poetry published digitally on February 5th at Gauss-PDF: http://www.gauss-pdf.com/post/110170340600/gpdf155-kylan-rice-captions
  • Kendall Umetsu, currently student teaching at Kinard Core Knowledge Middle School in Fort Collins, recently attended the University of Northern Iowa Overseas Recruiting Fair, where she signed her first teaching contract.  Starting in August, she will be moving to The Kingdom of Bahrain to teach 10/11th grade English at the Modern Knowledge School.  Congratulations, Kendall!
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “As Can Happen with an Island,” accepted for publication by Greensboro Review and she has been accepted for this year’s Ashbery Home School workshop.
  • Steven Schwartz will be the featured reader for fiction at the 2015 Rosenberry Writers’ Conference on Wednesday, March 4, 7 p.m. in the University Center Panorama Room of the University of Northern Colorado campus. Admission is free.
  • James Work’s Christmas video “Stone Soup Christmas” on Vimeo reached more than two thousand people over Christmas. His poem “The Empty Cross” is being set to music for the Easter cantata at Mountain View Presbyterian Church.

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image by Marc Levin

image by Marc Levin

Join us in congratulating the recipients of recent travel funding awards. We are so proud of their efforts and so happy they will be getting the opportunity to travel and share their work.

Graduate Student Travel Grant Awards:

Kristin George Bagdanov: Presenting “The Anthropocenic Lyric” at the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE) biennial conference in Moscow, Idaho

Mandi Casolo: presenting on “The Promise of Too Much Happiness: Alice Munro’s Undertaking of Contemporary Feminist Concerns in Literary Narrative” for the North American Review bicentennial conference, Cedar Falls, Iowa

Alhassane Ali Drouhamane: Presenting “Using CALL Websites to Enhance and Streamline L2 Vocabulary Learning” at the 46th Annual TESOL Convention in Toronto

Joni Hayward: presenting “Woman as Rebel: Depiction of Woman in Lars Von Trier’s Nymphomaniac Volume I & II” at the Image of the Rebel in Literature, Media and Society conference in Colorado Springs, CO

Moriah Kent: presenting “Exploring a Potential Vocabulary Gap Between the Lexical Proficiency of Advanced ELLs and the Lexical Requirements of First-Year University Readings,” American Association for Applied Linguistics and Association Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée 2015 Conference in Toronto, Ontario

Angelina Maio: Presenting “The Illegal Immigrant as Rebel: Immigration Policies and Human Consequences in Ana Castillo’s The Guardians” at the Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery Conference titled “The Image of the Rebel” in Pueblo, Colorado

Karen Montgomery Moore: presenting “Reading the Dead Bodies on Bones” at the University of Nevada, Reno’s College of Liberal Arts Graduate Symposium

Courtney Pollard: Presenting “Exploring Alternative Literacies: Reading English Broadside Ballads as Multimedia Texts” at the “Expanding Boundaries and Reconceptualizing Text” conference hosted by the University of South Florida English Graduate Student Association in Tampa, Florida

Kylan Rice: Presenting “Knotted Up in Place: Melville and the American Spatial Subject” at the Melville in a Global Context – The Tenth International Melville Conference in Tokyo

John Whalen: presenting “Using CALL Websites to Enhance and Streamline L2 Vocabulary Learning” at the 46th Annual TESOL Convention in Toronto

 

AWP Attendees with Funding:

With support from the office of the Vice President of Research, the College of Liberal Arts, the English Department, and the Center for Literary Publishing, the following graduate students will receive funding to attend the Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Minneapolis in April: Jayla Rae Ardelean, Kristin George Bagdanov, Cedar Brant, Neil FitzPatrick, Melissa Hohl, Anitra Ingham, Bryan Johnson, Andrew Mangan, John McDonough, Katie Naughton, Marie Turner, and Drew Webster.

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