Tag Archives: Kristin George Bagdanov

Workers on a lunch break. Ingersoll Hall is officially under construction.

Workers on a lunch break. Ingersoll Hall is officially under construction.

  • Antero Garcia recently received grant funding as a co-PI on a project funded by the George Lucas Educational Foundation. “Composing Our World: Supporting Literacy and Social and Emotional Learning through 9th Grade ELA Project-Based Learning” is a three year study taking place throughout Northern Colorado.
  • On May 2, Nancy Henke will be inducted into the Forensics Hall of Fame at Boise State University in Boise, Idaho.  She and the other members of the 2005 Boise State University Speech and Debate team are being honored to commemorate the ten-year anniversary of the team’s first national championship.  Boise State has won three more national titles in forensics since the first win in 2005.
  • Kristina Quynn’s article “Elsewheres of Diaspora: Dionne Brand’s In Another Place, Not Here” will be published in the spring special topic issue on theorizing elsewhere of the Journal of Midwest Modern Language Association.
  • Three Community Literacy Center interns presented research at the 2015 Celebrate Undergraduate Research and Creativity poster showcase. English major Meg Monacelli and Sociology major Chelsea Mitchell presented their collaborative poster on prison re-entry education and training programs. English major, Hannah Polland presented a poster on her research on literacy and sex trafficking. Hannah’s poster/presentation earned 1st place in the service-learning category. Congratulations, Meg, Chelsea, and Hannah!
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Moon Body” was accepted for publication by Berkeley Poetry Review.  She has also accepted an offer to attend UC Davis’s PhD in Literature program, where she will be a Provost’s Fellow in the fall.
  • Olivia Tracy will be presenting her paper “‘Rise Up Through the Words’: Nature and Power in Haitian Uncoverings of Anacaona” in June at the 2015 ASLE Biennial conference in Moscow, Idaho. She will be presenting as part of the panel “Postcolonial Uncoverings: Caribbean Ecologies.”
  • Earlier this week Alam Shoaib (MFA, fiction) heard from the editors at the British literary magazine Wasafiri. They have accepted his poems “Customs,” “Sepulchre,” and “Apartment 651J” for their upcoming November special issue on Writing from Bangladesh.
  • Davis Webster, a current English (Creative Writing) undergraduate, is a finalist in the New York Times “Modern Love” College Essay Contest. His essay, one of ten chosen out of 1800 essays from 400 colleges, will be appearing on the New York Times’ website next week.
  • Janelle Adsit, MA student (’09) in the English department (communication development) has accepted a tenure-line position at Humboldt State University. She will be teaching creative writing workshops there. Humboldt State is the northernmost Cal State school.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Alumnus Justin Hocking accepting his award

Alumnus Justin Hocking accepting his award

  • Alumnus Justin Hocking’s memoir The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld won the Oregon Book Award for Creative Nonfiction. The book is also: a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, listed as one of Ten Brilliant Books That Will Grab You from Page One in Kirkus Reviews and The Huffington Post, selected by Hector Tobar as his Favorite Book of 2014 in Publisher’s Weekly and Salon.com, A Library Journal Best Books of 2014 Selection, a Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2014 Selection, a Hudson’s Books 2014 Booksellers Favorite, a Book Club pick for April 2014 on The Nervous Breakdown, and a #3 Denver Post Bestseller.
  • Moriah Kent, a graduate student in the TEFL/TESL program, was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship grant. She will spend 10 months teaching English at a Bulgarian secondary school. She chose to apply to Bulgaria because she wanted to gain experience in the European educational system and has long admired art and culture of the Balkan region.
  • Tim Amidon was elected to the Committee on the Responsibilities and Standing of Academic Faculty (CoRSAF).
  • A free pdf chapbook of Dan Beachy-Quick’s early sections of “A Quiet Book” is available at Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-23/
  • Leslee Becker has received a writing residency/fellowship at Brush Creek Foundation in Wyoming.
  • Pam Coke’s article  “Making Meaning of Experience: Navigating the Transformation from Graduate Student to Tenure-Track Professor,” co-authored with her graduate school colleagues Sheila Benson and Monie Hayes, appears in the April 2015 issue of The Journal of Transformative Education.  You can access the article here: http://jtd.sagepub.com/content/current.
  • The members of NCTE@CSU held officer elections at their meeting on Wednesday, April 22, 2015. Congratulations to our new slate of student officers: Jenna Franklin (President); Emily Rice (Vice President); Paul Binkley (Secretary); Ian McCreary (Treasurer); and Morgan Bennett (Marketing Coordinator). Thank you to our outgoing officers: Anton Gerth (President); Belle Kraxberger (Vice President); Alex Andrews (Secretary); Jenna Franklin (Treasurer); and Emily Rice (Marketing Coordinator). Faculty sponsor Pam Coke is thankful for you and proud of you.
  • Sue Doe presented preliminary results of the TILT-funded course redesign study, “Engaged Learning Through Writing: A Faculty Development Project” alongside Mary Pilgrim (Math) and Hilary Spriggs (Math) on Saturday April 18 at the Rocky Mountain Regional Conference of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), at Colorado College. Preliminary results from their study suggest outcomes similar to those found in a similar study undertaken with the Department of Psychology — that student learning is improved at a statistically significant level by low-stakes engagement writing in the disciplinary classroom. The interdisciplinary study group, which also includes Kate Kiefer, will also present their project to the CSU Math Department on April 27.
  • Camille Dungy spoke at the CLA’s Great Conversations on April 23. Topic: How the environment is changing how we write and why.
  • Bruce Ronda’s chapter “Imagination and Apocalypse: Christopher Cranch’s Novels for Young Readers” appears in Romantic Education in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. National and Transatlantic Contexts (New York: Routledge, 2015).  Also: he has signed a pre-publication contract with University of Georgia Press for The Fate of Transcendentalism.
  • Cory Holland just published a paper in American Speech: Bayley, Robert, and Cory Holland. “Variation in Chicano English: the case of final (z) devoicing.” American Speech 89, no. 4 (2014): 385-407. http://americanspeech.dukejournals.org/content/89/4/385.full.pdf+html And a book review in the LinguistList on “Sounds Interesting” by J.C. Wells. https://linguistlist.org/pubs/reviews/get-review.cfm?SubID=35993937
  •  As part of a short but nice review of Dan Robinson’s forthcoming novel, Death of a Century (out June 5), Publishers Weekly wrote, “Set in 1922, Robinson’s atmospheric tale of betrayal and revenge paints a passionate picture of the Lost Generation, those who came of age during WWI.”
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Moon Body” was accepted for publication by Berkeley Poetry Review.  She has also accepted an offer to attend UC Davis’s PhD in Literature program, where she will be a Provost’s Fellow in the fall.
  • Mandi Casolo has accepted an offer of admission to the University of Houston’s English Literature and Creative Writing PhD program with a teaching fellowship, and was awarded the Inprint Donald Barthelme Prize in Fiction.

Now Taking Applications: English Department Communications Internship

Number of positions: 2
Internship term: Fall 2015 Semester, 15 weeks, August 24th – December 11th, 2015
Total credits: 2
Hours: 80 hours (40 per credit hour), approximately 5 per week
Stipend: $500
Application Deadline: Friday, May 8th by 12:00 p.m.

The English Department is looking for two engaged, self-motivated, responsible, creative, and enthusiastic CSU students, undergraduate or graduate, with good communication and writing skills to help tell the story of the English Department. The interns in this position will help facilitate communication and community with students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends of the English Department.

Interns will spend most of their time researching, interviewing, attending events, writing, and developing content — both for print and online. A major responsibility of this internship will be creating content for the department’s blog. Interns will work directly with the English department’s Communications Coordinator to meet departmental communication needs and complete various content development projects as assigned, including but not limited to creating profiles of people (alumni, faculty & staff, students), programs and projects; conducting interviews; providing event coverage (which would include attendance and photos, along with other modes of recording where relevant); and reporting departmental news and upcoming events.

For these internship positions, some prior reporting or blogging experience and/or education is preferred, as well as an understanding of principles for writing for the web and strong communication skills, both in person and in text. We also prefer applicants who are familiar with the English Department, its programs, people, and events – and who are willing to learn more. Content will be developed in various modes, and therefore skill with technologies such as sound recording and photography, as well as image and sound editing experience is preferred. We are also looking for interns with good people skills, the ability to participate in effective verbal and written exchanges, understanding that as they attend events and conduct interviews and such, they are acting as a “goodwill ambassador” for the department.

Applicants should email or hand deliver to the English Department main office the following: a cover letter, résumé, contact information for three references (phone and email), and three writing samples (plus multimedia samples, if applicable) by the application deadline to:

English Department
c/o Jill Salahub: Communications Coordinator
Jill.Salahub@colostate.edu
A105 Behavioral Sciences Bldg.
1773 Campus Delivery
Ft. Collins, CO 80523-1773

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Lory Student Center Curfman Gallery Student Art Exhibit

Lory Student Center Curfman Gallery Student Art Exhibit (image by Jill Salahub)

  • Dan Beachy-Quick’s new book, gentlessness, has just been published by Tupelo Press, and received an early review here: http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-936797-57-8. It is accompanied by a chapbook, Shields & Shards & Stitches & Songs also just out from Omnidawn.
  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang just returned from AWP in Minneapolis, where they gave readings for SpringGun/Noemi, and Laurel Review. The latter reading, co-hosted by Colorado Review, featured (for Colorado Review), Julie Carr, Andy S. Nicholson and Janet Sylvester. In addition, Matthew’s poem “Good Day” has just been accepted by Prairie Schooner.”
  • A conversation between Camille Dungy and Pulitzer-prize finalist Adrian Matejka is collected in Tracking / Teaching: On Documentary Poetics, which is “up” and available to the world at http: //www.essaypress.org/ep-2
  • EJ Levy presented at AWP as part of “Eye on the (Book) Prize.” Her first attempt at poem, inspired by Carl Phillips, has been accepted for publication in The Pinch.
  • This year’s judge of our Academy of American Poets Prize, Bin Ramke, has announced his choice of winner and runner-up. Congratulations to Kristin George Bagdanov whose three poems “Calving,” “When First I heard,” & “Lamb Body” have been awarded 1st place; and congratulations to Kylan Rice whose suite of “eve” poems received honorable mention. It’s needful to mention that Mr. Ramke had a very difficult time deciding, and described himself as so impressed with all the entrees that he wanted to drive up here and ask us what is going on.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Chloe’ Leisure’s (MFA, Spring 2006) Chapbook, The End of the World Again

Chloe’ Leisure’s (MFA, Spring 2006) recently published chapbook, The End of the World Again

  • CLA Spring Faculty/Staff Meeting and Awards Ceremony: Three of our MFA students — Abby Kerstetter, Matt Truslow, and Nate Barron — will be featured readers at the College of Liberal Arts Spring Faculty/Staff Meeting & Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, April 8th. Past spring meetings have included entertainment from theatre and music students, and we are proud that Abby, Matt, and Nate were chosen to showcase the liberal arts and the creative writing program this year. Five English department faculty members will be recognized with awards for teaching, research/creative artistry, and service. Please come support not only our department faculty and students but also faculty from the rest of the college. This is always an upbeat and celebratory event. The ceremony from 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm in the Durrell Center Seminar Rooms A & B. There is parking available near Moby.
  • Leslee Becker’s story, “The Continental,” has been accepted for publication in Ascent.
  • Next week, Doug Cloud will be giving at talk in Athens, Ohio at the third annual Ohio University Queer Studies Conference titled, “Coming Out Gay, Coming Out Atheist: Re-Thinking the Long-Term Influence of the LGBTQ Movement(s).” He’ll also lead a workshop for queer students and students of color titled, “Queer in the Workplace, Queer in the World: Some Key Concepts for Talking About Categories of Difference in Public and Professional Contexts.”
  • Roze Hentschell is attending the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in Vancouver, B.C., where she presented a paper, “‘They Sing’: Comedy, Choirboys, and Actors at St. Paul’s.”
  • A French edition of EJ Levy’s story collection, Love, In Theory, will be issued by Payots & Rivages on May 5, 2015.
  • This week, Nancy Henke learned that she received a Senior Teaching Appointment. She joins 19 other department faculty whose long-term, high-quality teaching and service have been recognized with this honor.
  • Todd Mitchell attended and presented two sessions at the Northern Colorado Writers Conference last weekend (one on developing layered characters, and one on developing engaging conflicts).
  • Todd Mitchell also launched a Kickstarter campaign to support the continued production of a graphic novel he’s working on with the Irish artist, Patrick Mullholland. The story uses a matriarchal alien invasion to explore crucial environmental, social, and political questions. If you’re curious, the first issue is produced and available for free off the Kickstarter page: http://kck.st/1OCQTP9
  • Mid-American Review interviewed Kristin George Bagdanov about her poem in their recent issue here: http://casit.bgsu.edu/marblog/mar-asks-kristin-george-bagdanov-answers/ She will also be reading at MAR’s 35 year anniversary party at AWP next week: Friday, April 10th at 8pm, Gallery13 in Minneapolis.
  • The Moscow Arts Commission and Broadsided Press has selected Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Earth Body” as one of the four ASLE-member poems to be broadsided for the “Broadsides on the Bus” program this summer in Moscow, Idaho. The broadside will be on display on the Moscow buses during the ASLE (Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment) conference, and copies of the poem and accompanying original art will be on display in the Transit Center; the broadsides will also be downloadable.
  • Undergraduate Choice Award: The Graduate School partnered with the Office for Undergraduate Research and Artistry to sponsor the Undergraduate Choice Awards through which each category of the Graduate Student Showcase will be judged by a team of undergraduate scholars. This category is designed to expose undergraduates to graduate level scholarship, facilitate the training of undergraduates in the critical analysis of scholarly products, and to reward graduate students whose work is perceived to be among the highest quality by the undergraduate team of judges. Two Graduate students in the Department of English received awards. In the Creative category, Cedar Brant won second prize ($75) for The Hidden Hinge: Mapping Memory and Myth through Poetry, and in the Research category John Whalen won third prize ($50) for The Utilization of Web-based Resources for Computer Assisted Vocabulary Learning

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

by English Department Communications Intern Kara Nosal

Where does a person end and her words begin? I began to wonder at the February 19th Master of Fine Arts poetry and fiction reading held at the University Center for the Arts. Each of the four writers — Kristin George Bagdanov, Mary Hill, Bryan Johnson, and M.C. Torres — infused their art with distinctive parts of their identities, and because of this, as the night went on, I could feel boundaries disappear.

First to read was Kristin George Bagdanov, an ecopoet. Before many of her poems, she explained to the audience what part of nature inspired her to write. One poem was written from her history with earthquakes as a young girl in Orange Country, California. Another was inspired by a recent fascination with YouTube videos chronicling the crumbling of polar ice caps.

Interspersed between these poems examining large swaths of the natural world were poems about bodies. Bagdanov reminded the audience that the human body is also part of the natural world, even if we often live as separate from it as possible. In her poem “Purge Body” which was also published in the Mid-American Review, Bagdanov writes about light pollution on a very small, very human scale: “Small crack/ in the door, green flare of the charger: no/ darkness. No place left wholly its own.”

kristin_b

Kristin George Bagdanov

Mary Hill was next to read. Recently, Hill worked as a caregiver for an elderly man with Parkinson’s and her poetry chronicles their parallel journeys: her journey from caretaker to friend and his journey to his final days on Earth. These journeys were not easy, it seemed. One series of poems from this time period was titled, “Reasons to Get Up in the Morning.” The reoccurring sound of these words created a time loop in which the audience could get lost. Hill’s use of line breaks continued this loop. I remember one line that seemed to end like this: “to fix you” but was immediately followed by “eggs.” The closeness of this relationship, between these two people who “grow cold together” is apparent in the tiniest of details.

mary_hill

Mary Hill

Soon it was Bryan Johnson’s turn to read from his novella, In the Eternal Shade. Like Hill, Johnson zoomed in to focus on the small details of his story. Quickly, I became engrossed in the drama happening in front of me centralized in the main character, Leon, a father and artist struggling to create the life he wants. I listened intently as Johnson drew a parallel between Leon’s interactions with his daughter, which balance on the brink of violence, and Leon’s need for literal balance up in a tree later. The tension as Leon reins in his temper toward his daughter and shifts his weight to keep from falling was revealed in the details: the accidental bonk of the daughter’s head on the back of a chair, or a quick test of a branch’s strength.

bryan

Bryan Johnson

Lastly, M.C. Torres approached the podium to read from her novel, All Things Occur in the Heights, which focuses on four characters who live in the same town, but happen to live in different time periods. “The day,” Torres recited, “never ended and perhaps it never began.” Torres read to us in a voice much like the “methodic rhythm of the bus” while leaning intently on the podium to get as close to us as she could. I’ll admit that I didn’t take very many notes as Torres read. I couldn’t tear myself away from her description of one character who hears the voice of God long enough to pick up my pen again. I simply wanted to know what was next, what was around the corner.

mctorres

M.C. Torres

At the end of the reading, I felt as if I had shared the personal experiences of these writers. The line between words and writer had dissolved, but furthermore, the line between the writers and myself seemed to have dissolved as well — all because they were brave enough to allow me into their art.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

GradShow, a one-day conference showcasing Colorado State University’s graduate student research and creative work, will take place from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Feb. 25 in the Lory Student Center. More than 300 graduate students will be presenting their work from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., followed by presentations and a guest speaker. The GradShow is a one day graduate conference at CSU that provides an opportunity for graduate students to showcase their talents, connect with other graduate students, and enjoy the possibility of winning a cash award.

Alan Rudolph, vice president for research at CSU, will present the keynote, “Challenging Boundaries: Experiences and Opportunities in Interdisciplinary Creative Artistry and Scholarship” at 1:30 p.m. Following Rudolph, brief talks will be presented by John Simmons, founder of C3 Real Estate Solutions; Brian Ashe, director of business development at Riverside Technology Inc.; Corkie Odell, co-founder of Odell Brewing Company; Jeff Poore, president of Numerica; and Gino Campana, Fort Collins District 3 City Council member and founder and president of Bellisimo Inc.

Breakout sessions on the theme of “Expanding the Graduate Experience through Interdisciplinary and Innovative Approaches” will take place from 3 to 4 p.m. The sessions, led by guest panelists, will focus on creating and nurturing diverse teams from composition to integration and synergy.

Graduate presenters will also compete for cash awards, presented at a reception from 4-6 p.m. Awards will be given in the general two areas of “Great Minds in Research” and “Distinction in Creativity.” In addition, there will be awards for submissions in areas such as global impact, alumni and diversity/social justice. More than $9,000 will be awarded.

The Graduate Student Showcase will be held in the Grand Ballroom of the Lory Student Center on Wednesday, February 25 from 10:00 A.M. – 6:00 P.M. More specifically, the schedule is as follows:

10:00 A.M.:  Check-in for Graduate Student Presenters

10:30 A.M.:  Check-in for Judges

10:30 A.M. – 1:30 P.M.:  Poster Presentations, Artwork, and Performances

12:00 P.M. – 1:30 P.M.:  Lunch is Served

1:30 P.M. – 4:00 P.M.:  Connecting with Graduate Students, Faculty, and Community Partners. Presentations and Talks will be sponsored by the Vice President for Research.

4:00 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.: Awards Ceremony. Cash prizes and recognition to awardees. Light hors d’oeuvres and beverages.

The event is free and open to the campus and community.  For more information, read about the event in SOURCE, or visit gradshow.colostate.edu, or click here to view a PDF of the 2015 Showcase program.


We are so proud of the English department students whose work will be presented at the Showcase. Please consider showing your support for them by visiting the Showcase, talking with students about their projects, being in the audience for the creative and performing arts presentations between 11:00 am and 12:15 pm, attending the Awards Ceremony starting at 4:00 pm, and staying for the reception to congratulate and celebrate with the participants.

English department GradShow participants and their projects:

KRISTIN GEORGE BAGDANOV
Department: English, MFA Creative Writing

The Somatic Wager: Just as the mere naming of the Anthropocene has enabled productive discussions across academic fields, naming a new category of ecopoet­ics will encourage reflection on the role of poetry in the wider sphere of environmental communication. This category is the “anthropocenic lyric.” This lyric helps us cultivate an ecological self through form and content, enacting and professing methods of sustaining this self in the Anthropocene. My critical paper expands upon this lyric by looking at contemporary poets Bin Ramke, Juliana Spahr, and Brenda Hillman, while my collection of poems, “The Somatic Wager,” engages the an­thropocenic crisis formally and conceptually.

 

LARA ROBERTS
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Performing Identity Discomfort: Writers’ identities are delicate façades, constructed from essays, po­ems, and artist statements, and performed at conferences and readings. These are spaces where we can be comfortable in the accuracy of our own self-portrayals, but I am more interested in the spaces where our pieces are open to be read (and misread) by others. By recording myself reading aloud others’ works and inviting others to read mine, I hope to create a space of discomfort to explore the intersections between our own performances and others’ perceptions of us. Here, we might see a facet of ourselves that we have not before.

 

JESSICA HILL
Department: English, MA English/Creative Nonfiction

India’s Daughters: “India’s Daughters” discusses the fear of rape a woman encounters on her solo travels through India. She arrived three weeks after the world­wide media scandal of Jyoti Singh Pandey’s gang rape and subsequent death, and the author couldn’t let her story go as she made her way through the country as a solo, white, female traveler. It sheds light on the way media upholds Orientalistic ideals by covering rape in India differently than rape in the U.S., and how this shapes Americans’ in­herent fear of “other.” This essay is an excerpt from a memoir-in-essays titled, “The People We Meet.”

 

ABBY KERSTETTER
Department: English, MFA Creative Writing

She Took Her Power from the Water: In 1901, Michael Chabitnoy, an orphan and full-blooded Aleut, was sent to the Carlisle Indian School and subsequently married a non-na­tive, took a factory job, and settled in Pennsylvania, far removed from his Native Alaskan heritage. This body of poetry not only explores fam­ily history and the Aleut culture, but also incorporates personal and Native American myth and addresses questions of the relationship of culture, place, and the individual. Heavily influenced by research and documentary poetics, this work provides witness to and seeks under­standing of the Aleut people, the history of Native Americans, and his­torical acts of acculturation and appropriation.

 

CEDAR BRANT (Undergraduate Choice Award, Creative, 2nd Place)
Department: English, MFA Creative Writing

The Hidden Hinge: Mapping Memory and Myth through Poetry: Both science and poetry are organizational nets that I place over the er­ratic natural and emotional worlds and begin to track patterns, growth, and unlikely relationships. I explore the movement between external and internal experience of place, using landscape as a lens to the more difficult-to-access inner emotional world. I’m compelled by poems as a manifestation of memory and myth unearthed from the body, and as a subconscious compass that informs our actions. Using the tools of language and imagery of landscape, I seek to navigate the process of symbolic transformation through poetic storytelling.

 

PAUL BINKLEY
Department: English, MA English/English Education

Science Fiction and the STEM Fields: Interdisciplinary Education: The presenter outlines his work and research in designing a high-school-level English course aimed at using science fiction as a tool for interdisciplinary learning. Taking advantage of this unique and often marginalized form of literature can open new avenues for engaging students’ existing passions and hooking student interest into learning in the science fields. Based on ongoing and existing research, this hy­pothetical course is intended to support an interdisciplinary approach to both learning and teaching by using science fiction novels, informa­tional science writing, and critical theory to foster inquiry, language skills, and science proficiency in those students.

 

LESLIE DAVIS
Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL

Anti-Racist and Anti-Linguicist Action in the CSU Writing Center: This paper looks at the work done in the CSU Writing Center, and how racist or linguicist attitudes may manifest themselves in the interac­tions between consultants and students. While these attitudes may take the form of microaggressions, they may also show up covertly in staff discussions of working with English language learners (ELLs). While it is important to recognize the ways that we at the Writing Center may be perpetuating racist or linguicist attitudes during consultations, the CSU community as a whole must also be brought into the process of self-examination and reflection, specifically regarding academic writ­ing standards.

 

JENNA FRANKLIN
Department: English, MA English/English Education

Write OPEN: Developing Open- Mindedness in High School Youth: Being critically open-minded is essential to successfully collaborating cross-culturally in our increasingly globalized society and within the microcosm of multicultural school environments. I plan to experiment in pedagogy and praxis by asking if open-mindedness can be developed in high schoolers and result in increased cross-cultural understanding and civic activism. As a pilot project for developing future curriculum, I am proposing a 2-week summer course, called Write OPEN (Writing for Open Perspectives and Engagement Now), for 10-15 voluntary stu­dents at Rocky Mountain High School in Fort Collins, Colorado in the summer of 2015.

 

REYILA HADEER
Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL

How to Eat Well in Fort Collins?: The number of international students in the US is increasing sharply nowadays. International students are coming across different difficul­ties in terms of language, culture, daily life, relationship with others and so on. Among various difficulties, food is one of the major issues for international students. In this paper, I would like to design an ESP (En­glish for specific purpose) course for Chinese students in Fort Collins in order to help them eat well and live more smoothly in such a foreign city.

 

JONI HAYWARD
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Woman as Rebel: Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac: Throughout his career, Danish filmmaker Lars Von Trier has gained a reputation for his misogynist depiction of women in his films—and Nymphomaniac Volume I & II is no exception. The examination of fe­male characters in a medium as popular and widely consumed as film creates a dialogue about current trends in culture surrounding the treatment of women, and parallels well with a study of current feminist criticism. Looking specifically at Sara Ahmed’s feminist theory in her book The Promise of Happiness, one gains insight into current issues in feminist thought and how women are depicted in film.

 

EMILY LAPADURA
Department: English, MA English/Rhetoric/Composition

Reconstructing Social Futures: Current first-year composition (FYC) research proves many students write daily on digital platforms like social networking sites (SNS). As we move from a page to screen society, most SNS writing is visually ori­ented as students produce and consume digital photography. My study seeks to discover how designing and teaching an FYC class exploring SNS use develops students’ critical digital literacies. I applied a criti­cal approach to CSU’s FYC course by introducing students to ideology, and how social norms produced by systems of power can effect on their rhetorical choices when posting personal photos on popular SNS like Facebook and Instagram.

 

ANGELINA MAIO
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Immigration Policies and Human Consequences in Ana Castillo’s The Guardians: Ana Castillo’s The Guardians centers on a family who is occupying the space on the U.S.-Mexico border and having to occupy that space within given rules and regulations that protect the border. This project focuses on Gabo, a sixteen year old who crossed the U.S.-Mexico bor­der illegally. I argue that the character of Gabo serves as a critique and analysis of borders, spaces and policies.

 

KAREN MONTGOMERY MOORE
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Embodiment in Absence: Representation of Loss in the White Spaces: Carole Maso’s The Art Lover and HR Hegnauer’s Sir strategically use white space in order to represent the textually unmarked body of their subject. Such formatting is a deliberate choice which allows space to consider the physical body- whether a character or memory of a some­one known to the author- on the part of both the reader as well as the author. This space for consideration becomes temporal as well, by cre­ating a pause in the writing, and also works as a prompt: if this space is so empty, what (or who) should be here to fill it?

 

COURTNEY POLLARD
Department: English, MA English/Literature

Creating Public Literacy: Reading Text and Image in Broadside Ballads: This project is an exploration of how English broadside ballads of the seventeenth century are multimedia texts that create and propagate public literacy. The font, language, and literary devices used in the texts of ballads made them readable by people of varying textual literacy levels. Additionally, the text-image relations of ballads allowed illiter­ate audiences to become visually literate through “reading” the images of the ballads. Since broadside ballads were most accessible and most commonly read in the public sphere, they contributed to the creation of public forms of literacy.

 

OLIVIA TRACY
Department: English, MA English/Literature

“Rise up through the words”: Postcolonial Haitian Uncoverings of Anacaona : This work analyzes historical representations of Anacaona– Columbus’ Four Voyages, de Las Casas’ History of the Indies and A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies– and postcolonial representations– Jean Metellus’ play Anacaona, Danielle Legros Georges’ poem “Anaca­ona,” and Edwidge Danticat’s young adult novel Anacaona, Haiti, 1490. Through textual analysis of these works, I argue that these three post­colonial authors are bringing Anacaona’s narrative, obscured in many narratives of first contact, to the surface in order to posit the figure of Anacaona as new symbol of postcolonial Haitian identity, one that is grounded in place and a pre-Columbian origin.

 

JOHN WHALEN, ALHASSANE ALI DROUHAMANE, and NATE WILL (Undergraduate Choice Award, Research, 3rd place)
(John Whalen) Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL
(Alhassane Ali Drouhamane) Department: English, MA English/TEFL/TESL
(Nate Will) Department: English and Foreign Languages, MA English/TEFL/TESL and MA Languages, Literatures, and Culture/Spanish

The Utilization of Web-based Resources for Computer Assisted Vocabulary Learning: Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) plays an important role in the field of teaching English as a second language. However, in­creasing specialization within the field means that CALL resources are sometimes perceived as accessible only to specialized researchers. This presentation will outline a recent migration of CALL technologies into accessible, web-based platforms and discuss how three CALL websites in particular, Vocab Sushi, Storybird, and ESLVideo.com, can be incor­porated into an existing ESL classroom with minimal teacher training. An example syllabus will be modified for illustration, and the benefits to teachers and students will be discussed.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Colorado Review Spring 2015 issue, cover design by Abby Kerstetter

Colorado Review Spring 2015 issue, to be published in March. Cover design by Abby Kerstetter

The Center for Literary Publishing has received matching funds from the Vice President of Research, the College of Liberal Arts, and the English Department to provide travel funding for twelve CLP interns — Jayla Rae Ardelean, Kristin George Bagdanov, Cedar Brant, Neil FitzPatrick, Melissa Hohl, Anitra Ingham, Bryan Johnson, Andrew Mangan, John McDonough, Katie Naughton, Marie Turner, and Drew Webster — to attend the annual Association of Writers and Writing Programs in Minneapolis, April 9-11, 2015.

Students will represent the Center and Colorado Review in the conference exhibit hall; interact with CLP/CR authors; meet both CSU alumni and potential students; attend panels on writing, publishing, and pedagogy; and have the opportunity to attend readings by such literary icons as Louise Erdrich, Charles Baxter, T. C. Boyle, and Alice McDermott, among many others.

The Center was also awarded a $15,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts for 2015. The grant will support the publication of two new titles in the Center’s Mountain West Poetry Series: The Verging Cities, by Utah poet Natalie Scenters-Zapico, and A Lamp Brighter than Foxfire, by Nevada poet Andrew S. Nicholson. Designed, typeset, and copyedited by CLP interns, the books will be published in April and November, respectively, and distributed to the trade by the University Press of Colorado. The grant additionally funds the production costs and author payments for the Spring 2015 issue of Colorado Review, to be published in March.

Cover design by Melissa Hohl

Cover design by Melissa Hohl

Cover design by Abby Kerstetter

Cover design by Abby Kerstetter

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub and author Neil Gaiman. Jill waited in line for seven hours at Old Firehouse Books to meet Gaiman, who stayed at that table signing books for eleven hours, until there was no more line.

English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub and author Neil Gaiman. Jill waited in line for seven hours at Old Firehouse Books to meet Gaiman, who stayed at that table signing books for eleven hours, until there was no more line.

  • Tim Amidon’s collaboratively authored chapter (with Jessica Reyman) titled “Authorship and Ownership of User Contributions on the Social Web” is now out in Cultures of Copyright  (Eds. Dànielle Nichole DeVoss and Martine Courant Rife). Additionally, this semester he is teaching “CO402: Principles of Digital Rhetoric and Design” which is the first time this course has been offered here at CSU. He will be presenting an interactive talk titled “Navigating Fair Use: Remix, Appropriation, Attribution” at the TILT MTI next Tuesday, February 10, 2015 from 12:00-1:00 PM at TILT 105.
  • Leslee Becker has won the CLA John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award.
  • Next week, John Calderazzo will conduct a science communication story-telling workshop for SoGES Ph.D and post-doctorate scholars. Also in February, he’ll give a talk/reading–“High Culture: Mountains & Our Minds”–at the Walking Mountains Science Center in Avon, Colorado.
  • Todd Mitchell spent a day last week working to inspire literacy and creativity with elementary and middle school students and faculty at Littleton Academy, in (not surprisingly) Littleton.
  • Kristina Quynn was awarded a Ripple Effect Grant to fund the first year of “CSU Writes,” a program that will set up and foster writing groups on campus for faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and the CSU community. “CSU Writes” will start in Fall of 2015 and will help support those at CSU who research and/or write for publication.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poetic sequence “The Somatic Wager: A Proof in Verse” was accepted for publication in Juked (Print).
  • Kylan Rice had a chapbook of poetry published digitally on February 5th at Gauss-PDF: http://www.gauss-pdf.com/post/110170340600/gpdf155-kylan-rice-captions
  • Kendall Umetsu, currently student teaching at Kinard Core Knowledge Middle School in Fort Collins, recently attended the University of Northern Iowa Overseas Recruiting Fair, where she signed her first teaching contract.  Starting in August, she will be moving to The Kingdom of Bahrain to teach 10/11th grade English at the Modern Knowledge School.  Congratulations, Kendall!
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “As Can Happen with an Island,” accepted for publication by Greensboro Review and she has been accepted for this year’s Ashbery Home School workshop.
  • Steven Schwartz will be the featured reader for fiction at the 2015 Rosenberry Writers’ Conference on Wednesday, March 4, 7 p.m. in the University Center Panorama Room of the University of Northern Colorado campus. Admission is free.
  • James Work’s Christmas video “Stone Soup Christmas” on Vimeo reached more than two thousand people over Christmas. His poem “The Empty Cross” is being set to music for the Easter cantata at Mountain View Presbyterian Church.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

image by Marc Levin

image by Marc Levin

Join us in congratulating the recipients of recent travel funding awards. We are so proud of their efforts and so happy they will be getting the opportunity to travel and share their work.

Graduate Student Travel Grant Awards:

Kristin George Bagdanov: Presenting “The Anthropocenic Lyric” at the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE) biennial conference in Moscow, Idaho

Mandi Casolo: presenting on “The Promise of Too Much Happiness: Alice Munro’s Undertaking of Contemporary Feminist Concerns in Literary Narrative” for the North American Review bicentennial conference, Cedar Falls, Iowa

Alhassane Ali Drouhamane: Presenting “Using CALL Websites to Enhance and Streamline L2 Vocabulary Learning” at the 46th Annual TESOL Convention in Toronto

Joni Hayward: presenting “Woman as Rebel: Depiction of Woman in Lars Von Trier’s Nymphomaniac Volume I & II” at the Image of the Rebel in Literature, Media and Society conference in Colorado Springs, CO

Moriah Kent: presenting “Exploring a Potential Vocabulary Gap Between the Lexical Proficiency of Advanced ELLs and the Lexical Requirements of First-Year University Readings,” American Association for Applied Linguistics and Association Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée 2015 Conference in Toronto, Ontario

Angelina Maio: Presenting “The Illegal Immigrant as Rebel: Immigration Policies and Human Consequences in Ana Castillo’s The Guardians” at the Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery Conference titled “The Image of the Rebel” in Pueblo, Colorado

Karen Montgomery Moore: presenting “Reading the Dead Bodies on Bones” at the University of Nevada, Reno’s College of Liberal Arts Graduate Symposium

Courtney Pollard: Presenting “Exploring Alternative Literacies: Reading English Broadside Ballads as Multimedia Texts” at the “Expanding Boundaries and Reconceptualizing Text” conference hosted by the University of South Florida English Graduate Student Association in Tampa, Florida

Kylan Rice: Presenting “Knotted Up in Place: Melville and the American Spatial Subject” at the Melville in a Global Context – The Tenth International Melville Conference in Tokyo

John Whalen: presenting “Using CALL Websites to Enhance and Streamline L2 Vocabulary Learning” at the 46th Annual TESOL Convention in Toronto

 

AWP Attendees with Funding:

With support from the office of the Vice President of Research, the College of Liberal Arts, the English Department, and the Center for Literary Publishing, the following graduate students will receive funding to attend the Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Minneapolis in April: Jayla Rae Ardelean, Kristin George Bagdanov, Cedar Brant, Neil FitzPatrick, Melissa Hohl, Anitra Ingham, Bryan Johnson, Andrew Mangan, John McDonough, Katie Naughton, Marie Turner, and Drew Webster.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Construction progress on the main entrance of Eddy Hall

Construction progress on the main entrance of Eddy Hall

  • John Calderazzo did a talk/workshop on January 14 to the staff and field workers of the National Wildlife Research Center on using story-telling to communicate science to the public.
  • Doug Cloud’s journal article, “The Social Consequences of Dissociation: Lessons from the Same-Sex Marriage Debate” is now out in ‘Argumentation and Advocacy,’ a publication of the American Forensic Association.
  • Camille Dungy has been named as one of 10 young American poets changing the face of poetry, http://theculturetrip.com/north-america/articles/10-young-american-poets-changing-the-face-of-poetry/. On a side note, one of the others on the list visited Camille’s class via Skype last semester.
  • Over winter break, Todd Mitchell performed readings and presented sessions on creative writing at Antioch University in Los Angeles and at the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts on Whidbey Island, Washington.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Resurrection Body” was accepted for publication in The Cincinnati Review.
  • A review Meagan Wilson wrote of Emily Skillings’s book of poems, Backchannel, was just published in Heavy Feather Review. It’s in the Reviews section of heavyfeatherreview.com.
  • Mandy Rose has a creative nonfiction piece, titled Five,  published in Alyss. The essay can be found here: http://alysslit.com/2014/12/29/five/

Tags: , , , , , , ,