Tag Archives: Kayann Short

Today, April 17, is National Haiku Day (image by Jill Salahub)

  • The Crisis & Creativity Workgroup, comprised of writers, artists, scientists, and community members, has had a proposal exploring species extinction through poetry/art awarded a grant from the School of Environmental Sustainability — Dan Beachy-Quick and Cedar Brant are principal investigators with this project. More information can be found here: http://source.colostate.edu/school-global-environmental-sustainability-announces-global-challenges-research-teams-resident-fellow-awards/
  • Roze Hentschell attended the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in Atlanta, April 6-8, where she discussed her paper, “John Marston at Paul’s,” an examination of Marston’s plays written for the boy actors at St. Paul’s Cathedral in the early seventeenth century.
  • EJ Levy was interviewed as part of her recent visit to UMass-Lowell; the interview appears here: https://www.uml.edu/News/stories/2017/EJ-Levy.aspx
  • Dan Robinson’s third novel, Death of a Century, will be re-released in paperback next week.  Of the novel, The Manhattan Review of Books wrote, Robinson “deals with the main character’s shellshock with a great deal of care and sympathy, while paralleling the brutality of the world off the battlefield. This is a book not to be missed; it is a mystery, thriller, historical drama in one package,” and Publisher’s Weekly wrote, “Robinson’s atmospheric tale of betrayal and revenge paints a passionate picture of the Lost Generation…”
  • Barbara Sebek contributed a paper, “Archy’s Afterlives: Temporal Mash-ups During Times of Crisis,” to a seminar at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  The paper discusses the traces left by King James’s court jester, Archibald Armstrong.
  • One of Maurice Irvin’s MFA thesis stories was accepted for publication in Portland Review‘s upcoming Spring Issue.
  • Kylan Rice will be pursuing a PhD in English Literature at UNC Chapel Hill in the fall.
  • What Goes Down” by Kayann Short (BA 81, MA 88) has just been published in Rooted: The Best New Arboreal Nonfiction (Outpost19). Her flash fiction story “When It Was Lost” will appear in the spring issue of Dash.
  • Over the past year, we have lost quite a few members of our English department family.  Each year, CSU hosts a Rams Remember Rams Service.  Here are the details: Our campus community is invited to a candlelight ceremony Monday, April 17, 5 p.m. honoring CSU students, faculty, staff, and retirees who passed away this academic year.  The 15-minute ceremony will be held on the north steps of the Administration Building and will include a reading of the names – along with time for silent reflection. The Danforth Chapel will be open until 6 p.m. as a quiet place for personal contemplation.

CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

Reading

New York City author Deborah Clearman and CLC’s Mary Ellen Sanger read from their books on life “south of the border” at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House on Thursday, 4/20 at 8pm. Deborah writes evocative stories of Guatemalan realities, and Mary Ellen writes of the women she met when unjustly imprisoned in Mexico. There will be wine and beautiful cookies!

TEFL/TESL Advocacy Week 

On behalf of the TEFL/TESL Student Association, we are proud to promote our yearly event, Advocacy Week!

This week helps us achieve our central goals of promoting intercultural, linguistic, and literacy awareness in the community. To give back to the community, we have chosen to run a bookdrive for the Larimer County Jail. Bring in used or new paperback books to stock their shelves! Donation boxes can be found in the English Department office and around campus.

To engage the larger community, this week will feature presentations from Dr. Sue Doe, Dr. Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala, Dr. Kristina Quynn, the TEFL/TESL MA cohort, and TEFL/TESL alumni, focusing primarily on L2 and interdisciplinary writing. Find more details in the “2017 Advocacy Week Schedule” flyer.

Click to see a larger version

Lastly, we are excited to welcome our keynote speaker, Dr. Eli Hinkel to present “Teaching and Learning Vocabulary for Academic Writing” on Friday afternoon. Dr. Hinkel comes to us with over thirty years of experience and multiple publications which have influenced her work with ELL writers.

This year’s guest speaker

We look forward to hosting you at another successful and engaging Advocacy Week!

The Human Library 

The Fort Collins Rotaract Club will be hosting an event on Friday, April 21 from 4:30-8p.m called the Human Library.

The Human Library is a concept created in Copenhagen 17 years ago in order to establish a safe conversational space, where the people are the books. A “Living Book” is someone who represents various backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences. Books challenge prejudice and help connect people through respectful conversation with those who come to borrow them as “readers”. Each Book has a title that relates to their experiences, backgrounds, and/or identity. However, we challenge people to not judge a book by its cover and come with an open mind!

Conversations during the event are offered for 5-15 minutes, depending on what questions the reader has for the Living Book. Checking out a Book is a first come, first serve basis so people can come and go as they please.

Come engage in the conversation! If you would like to participate in an event that creates an atmosphere of storytelling, promotes community building, and celebrates differences then we would love to see you there.

Some featured Living Books include:

My Life in 2 Bathrooms
Muslim Citizen
Chief of Police

CSU Location: Lory Student Center Cherokee Park
Event Contact Name: Lisa Evans
Event Contact Email: levans2@rams.colostate.edu
Event Contact Phone: 9704818230
Audience: Alumni, Community, Faculty, Retiree / Emeritus Faculty, Staff, Student, Youth, Other
Cost: Free!

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick will be on Colorado Matters on the Denver NPR station on May 11.
  • Ellen Brinks has been invited to give a plenary talk at the conference “Forgotten Geographies in the Fin de Siècle, 1880-1920,” at Birkbeck College, University of London, in early July.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, “Talking Climate Change Across Difference” has been accepted for publication in a special issue of Reflections focused on “Sustainable Communities and Environmental Communication.” The issue will be out this fall.
  • Roze Hentschell will be leading a group of 10 CSU Honors Program students to study in Oxford, England. From late May through June, the students will take her 3 credit class, “Shakespeare in Oxford,” and they will take field trips to Bath, Windsor, Stratford-upon-Avon, and London. The students will also take a 3 credit independent tutorial with an Oxford professor in their field of study.
  • A short story from Colorado Review, “Midterm,” by Leslie Johnson (Spring 2015), has been selected for the 2017 Pushcart Prize anthology. You can read the story here: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/features/midterm/
  • The Community Literacy Center received a $5000 grant from the Bohemian Pharos Fund in support of the youth SpeakOut writing workshops.
  • Tobi Jacobi and Lara Roberts’s essay, “Developing Self-Care Strategies for Volunteers in a Prison Writing Program” appears in the new edited collection, The Volunteer Sector in Prisons: Encouraging Institutional and Personal Change (May 2016).
  • Larissa Willkomm’s research poster on a collaborative writing project on women, jail, and addiction won a 3rd place service learning prize at the recent CSU CURC competition.  Larissa completed this project as part of her CLC internship and work with SpeakOut.

    Larissa presenting her work at the recent CURC

    Larissa presenting her work at the recent CURC

  • Dana Masden’s short story “Exercise, a Good Book, and a Cup of Tea” will be published in an upcoming issue of Third Coast.
  • Kristina Quynn’s essay “My Brother, My….” is part of the just published collection of personal essays from 2Leaf Press on white privilege and whiteness in America.  The collection, What Does It Mean to Be White In America, includes an introduction by Debby White and an afterword by Tara Betts. While not light summer reading, it could be useful to those teaching about race in America.  You can find more information at: http://whiteinamerica.org
  • The following group presented a panel at the April 29 Writing on the Range Conference at the University of Denver, where Cheryl Ball was the featured speaker: Tim Amidon, Hannah Caballero, Doug Cloud, Sue Doe, Ed Lessor, Amanda Memoli, and James Roller. The group focused on examples, challenges, questions, and opportunities associated with integrating multimodality into writing. The presentation was entitled:”A Case of Wishful Thinking?  Our Plans for an Integrated and Coordinated Multimodal Curriculum.”
  • Mary Crow will take part in a public reception and reading for artworks inspired by poems May 19 in Loveland at Artworks, 6:30 p.m., 310 N. Railroad Ave. (Hwy 287 to 3rd, then R a block). She will read her poem. “Dear X,” and the artwork it inspired will be part of the exhibit.
  • “Food for Bears” by Kayann Short (BA 81; MA 88), an essay about the 2015 Front Range food collapse, appears in the latest issue of the environmental literary magazine, The Hopper.
  • Kathleen Willard’s (MFA, poetry Spring 2004) poetry chapbook Cirque & Sky won Middle Creek Publishing & Audio’s Fledge Chapbook Contest. Her book is a series of pastorals and anti-pastorals that “attunes its lyric eye to local ecological crises” (Dan Beachy-Quick)  & evokes “a periodic table of agitation over the continued plunder of Colorado and by extension the world.” (John Calderazzo). Her book is available online at Middle Creek Publishing and Audio, and Amazon.

    Kathleen Willard gave a reading with other Middle Creek Publishing & Audio poets in Pueblo, Colorado as part of the Earth Day Celebration sponsored by Colorado State University at Pueblo and the Sierra Club on April 23rd at Songbird Cellars, a local winery.

    She is also speaking at the Colorado Creative Industry Summit at Carbondale, Colorado on May 5th. In her presentation “Thinking Outside the Book”, she will share how receiving a Colorado Creative Industry Career Advancement Grant shifted her thinking about publishing poetry, how by using some basic business practices increased her poetry readership, and led her to pursue alternative spaces for her poetry, such as art galleries, community newspapers, installations, & the Denver Botanic Gardens CSA Art Share Project. While still wildly interested in the traditional modes of book publication, she would like to increase chance encounters that the public may have with poetry outside the book.

    She is also curating with Todd Simmons of Wolverine Farm and Publishing, a Food Truck Reading Series at Wolverine Farm Letterpress this summer, which is being supported by New Belgium Brewing Company.

    The Fort Collins Book Launch for Cirque & Sky will be June 21st, Midsummer’s Eve at Wolverine Letterpress.

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Eddy Hall atrium

Eddy Hall atrium, image by Jill Salahub

  • Dan Beachy-Quick went to Yale University last week to meet with the Poetics Work Group to discuss his most recent book, gentlessness.
  • Antero Garcia published a blog post for DMLCentral discussing the racism of #BoycottStarWarsVII and the implications for classrooms: http://dmlcentral.net/boycottstarwarsvii-racism-and-classroom-responsibility/
  • Cindy O’Donnell-Allen presented last week at the annual conference of the Associations of Science and Technology Centers along with Holly Le Masurier from the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery. Their presentation featured work with local youth participating in the Youth Science Civic Inquiry (YSCI) Institute focused on water use and protection that was held last summer at the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery. The work is part of a large grant sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the National Writing Project that centers on the intersections between science and literacy practices.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Meta-Hamster” has been accepted for the Ruminations section of January’s issue of Under the Sun.  The essay is both an analysis of pet-keeping in the US and a rumination on the place of analysis in creative nonfiction.
  • Catherine Ratliff successfully defended her dissertation on the female expatriate communities of interwar Paris.
  • The Literature Program was awarded a $500 mini-grant from the CSU Graduate School to be used for recruiting MA students.
  • Kayann Short (BA 1981; MA 1988) presented her paper “Between War and Wheat: The Cultivation of Ellen Webb in Mildred Walker’s Winter Wheat” at the recent Western Literature Association conference in Reno, NV.
  • Dancing Girl Press has accepted Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) chapbook, Imbibe {et alia}here, for publication in summer 2016. She also has poems accepted in the Indian Review, North American Review, Pleaides, and Matter Journal. Her poem “Decoy” was a runner-up in the 2015 Indiana Review ½ K Prize and her poem “Not not” was a finalist in the Black Warrior Review Poetry Contest.

internshippanel

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image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

  • The French edition of EJ Levy’s story collection, Love, In Theory (Editions Rivages, 2015) received excellent reviews in Le Monde, Le Figaro, Elle, and Le Journal Dimanche this summer, and was the featured title in Paris Vogue in August, for which EJ was photographed by fashion photographer/ filmmaker Andrew Dosumnu. She read with novelist Celeste Ng at Ashland University in July.
  • Dana Masden’s short essay “For the Love of Groceries” will appear in the next issue of Fort Collins Magazine.
  • Todd Mitchell’s fourth novel, Species, a middle-grade book that involves giant sea turtles, climate refugees, and mystical encounters with the last living Florida panther, will be published in Winter/Spring 2017 by Delacorte Press (an imprint of Random House).
  • In an article on new books about World War I as well as a review of Dan Robinson’s novel, the Historical Novels Society wrote, “The lessons of World War I are as relevant today as they were one hundred years ago and when we read novels like Death of a Century, we are reminded poignantly of these lessons.” The full article/review can be accessed on historicalnovelsociety.org or on the board outside Dan’s office. Also, Dan will present a paper on Ernest Hemingway’s In Our Time and moderate a panel on the story “Indian Camp” at the 17th Biennial International Hemingway Conference in Oak Park next July.
  • Bill Tremblay’s adaptation of Aaron A. Abeyta’s novel, RISE, DO NOT BE AFRAID [Ghost Road Press, 2003] is a finalist in the Moondance International Film Festival’s screenplay competition for feature films.
  • Kayann Short’s essay, “Soil vs Dirt: A Reverie on Getting Down to Earth,” appears in Dirt: A Love Story, edited by Barbara K Richardson and published by University Press of New England.

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Professor Roze Hentschell and family (husband, Thomas Cram, daughter Eleanor, and son Felix) pictured attending the Newly Promoted and Tenured Faculty Reception at Colorado State University on Dec. 1. Other English faculty, Professor Ellen Brinks and Associate Professor EJ Levy, were also honored.

Professor Roze Hentschell and family (husband, Thomas Cram, daughter Eleanor, and son Felix) pictured attending the Newly Promoted and Tenured Faculty Reception at Colorado State University on December 1st.

  • Several faculty members began the academic year with changes in rank or appointment. EJ Levy received tenure and promotion to associate professor and Ellen Brinks and Roze Hentschell were promoted to full professor. Sharon Grindle, Jenny Levin, and Dana Masden received Senior Teaching Appointments in recognition of their years of excellent teaching. Todd Mitchell moved to the non-tenure-track rank of Assistant Professor and was reappointed as Director of Creative Writing Pedagogy.
  • Sue Doe was awarded the Paulo Friere Educator Award for 2014 on December 6 by the Denver-based Romero Theater Troupe for “work on behalf of contingent labor in higher education.” The Romero Theater Troupe, a Denver-based group, addresses social justice issues through organic theater.  Along with several graduate students and NTTF, notably led by former grad student Vani Kannan (now at Syracuse U), Sue helped put together last year’s performance called, Contingency: A Crisis for Teaching and Learning which was performed on the campuses of CSU and Front Range Community College. The Fort Collins performances were subsequently folded into a larger production of the Romero Theater Troupe. An Adjunct at Ludlow integrated stories of adjunct faculty, undocumented workers, discarded senior workers, marginalized female workers, and embattled union workers, among others. Organic theater is participatory theater that depicts the everyday, often invisible violences that people experience, in the workplace, on the streets, at home, and elsewhere. Participant-actors write short scenes to depict their own experiences. The act of writing the play brings people together to address the social justice issues in question and the differences between actors. This work builds on Augusto Boal’s Theater of the Oppressed.
  • Tobi Jacobi and Ann Folwell Stanford (DePaul University) are pleased to announce the release of Women, Writing, and Prison: Activists, Scholars, and Writers Speak Out, an edited collection of essays and narratives on women’s experiences in prison (Rowman and Littlefield).
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper ((Re)writing ‘Lila: Stories from the New York Training School for Girls, 1920-1935) at the National Women’s Studies Association conference in San Juan.
  • The Community Literacy Center is pleased to announce the launch of the fall 2014 SpeakOut! Journal.  The issue, titled, “We Make Our Future,” features 68 community writers from our youth and adult programs.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s panel “Cultivating and Communicating Crisis in Ecopoetics” was accepted for the Conference on Communication and Environment (COCE) in Boulder this June. Also presenting on this ASLE-sponsored panel is 3rd year poet, Gracie McCarroll.
  • Kayann Short’s (English BA 1981; MA 1988) essay, “Floodables,” about the aftermath of Colorado’s 2013 flood, appears in the Winter 2014 issue of The Fort Collins Courier.
  • Chris Vanjonack has two short stories accepted for publication: “The Last Times You Saw Jenny McCreary” – Buffalo Almanack – Issue 6 – December 15th and “Last Letter Home” – New Haven Review – Issue 15 – Winter 2014.
  • Upcoming Event: SpeakOut fall journal launch. Tuesday, December 16, 6:30-8 pm at the Wild Boar Coffee Shop (lower level).  “Please join us to celebrate writing with Fort Collins poet laureate and English Department alumna, Chloe’ Leisure, and our youth writers. Refreshments will be served.”

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The Eddy Redbud tree is in bloom.

The Eddy Redbud tree is in bloom.

  • There’s a podcast interview with Dan Beachy-Quick at Poetry Northwest.
  • Leslee Becker won First Prize in the Boston Review’s 2014 Fiction Contest for her story, “Severance.”
  • Basic Veterinary Immunology co-authored by Gerry Callahan and Robin Yates was published this month by University Press of Colorado, Boulder, Co.
  • Antero Garcia is the featured guest on the Connect Learning Alliance Podcast today. I talk about “Making Learning Relevant.” The program can be streamed or downloaded here: http://clalliance.org/whatsnew-main/antero-garcia-podcast-making-learning-relevant/
  • Tobi Jacobi gave a presentation on developing self-care strategies for volunteers working in jail/prison writing programs at recent workshop on “Innovations in Prison” sponsored by UCLA and the UK Economic and Social Research Council.
  • Elise Yenne (CLC intern) won 1st place for her service-learning poster presentation for the 2014 CSU CURC competition.  She highlighted her work as an intern and writing workshop facilitator with the Larimer County Detention Center men’s writing group.
  • Rachel Linnea Brown’s poem “Memento” has been selected for publication by Gulf Coast.  She has also accepted a position at University of Kansas as a PhD student of Nineteenth-Century American Literature.  Rachel will be attending KU with a research fellowship, a department fellowship, and a $5,000 Mary Elizabeth and Andrew P. Debicki Scholarship for graduate studies.  She is excited to begin her KU studies in the fall.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poems “Damage Body” and “Commodity Body” were accepted for publication in Word Riot.
  • This year’s issue of the Greyrock Review is now available for purchase! Please stop by the English Department office, Eddy Building, Room 359. The Journal is $12 and T-Shirts, white with this year’s cover and green with the Greyrock logo are $20.00. Stickers are available in black & white and green & gold for $2 each.

Alumni News: Kayann Short, PhD, (CSU, Alumna 1988) has received the following awards: for A Bushel’s Worth: An Ecobiography:

  • Sarton Memoir Award Finalist from Story Circle Network
  • Nautilus Silver Award in Green Living & Sustainability

The Sarton Memoir Award is presented annually by Story Circle Network, an international network of women lifewriters. The award is named in honor of May Sarton (1912-1995), distinguished American poet, novelist, and author of twelve memoirs and journals.

Nautilus “Better Books for a Better World” Awards recognize exceptional literary contributions to spiritual growth, conscious living, high-level wellness, green values, responsible leadership and positive social change.

Published by Torrey House Press, A Bushel’s Worth: An Ecobiography is a memoir of reunion with a family’s farming past and a call to action for farmland preservation through community supported agriculture today. These awards exemplify the way A Bushel’s Worth engages readers across generations and diverse backgrounds through stories that portray the relationship between food, farming, and the environment.

A retired award-winning teacher from the University of Colorado-Boulder, Short farms and teaches writing at Stonebridge Farm, the first community-supported agricultural farm (CSA) in Boulder County. Established in 1992, Stonebridge is committed to small-scale, organic farming and agricultural land preservation on the Front Range. Short offers writing workshops to community groups, libraries, and book clubs. She also teaches at the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology on the Oregon coast. She will offer a “food preservation stories” workshop September 18-19 at her farm outside Lyons, CO.

A Bushel’s Worth is a books-in-a-bag selection of the Longmont Public Library. More about A Bushel’s Worth, including a virtual book tour, press kit, links to reading videos and digital excerpts, and book group suggestions and discussion questions are available at http://abushelsworth.com

 

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