Tag Archives: Joanna Doxey

A great time was had by all at Bruce Ronda’s retirement celebration

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has a lyric essay, “Family Cookbook,” accepted by Florida Review. It’s part of a new collection exploring mixed-ness and in-between-ness.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Natural History,” was awarded a Pushcart Prize and will be played published in the Best of the Small Presses anthology.
  • Joanna Doxey has a poem in the latest edition of the Denver Quarterly (51.3).
  • Jaime Jordan’s Digital Humanities class (E280) has created a blog showcasing some of the digital projects they’ve worked on this semester.  Check it out at https://exploredhblog.wordpress.com!
  • Second year MFA student Claire Boyles had an essay, “Failing at Important Things: A Parallel History,” place as a runner-up in Vela Magazine’s nonfiction contest, judged by Claire Vaye Watkins. The essay is live on the site: http://velamag.com/failing-at-important-thingsa-parallel-history/
  • Cedar Brant won the Academy of American Poet’s Prize for CSU.
  • David Mucklow was accepted and offered a scholarship to attend the Squaw Valley Community of Writers Poetry Workshop this summer, and will be attending at the end of June. A few weeks ago, his poem, “where Deer Creek dies into the Gallatin,” was published on Daily Gramma. You can find it on their site here – http://gramma.press/
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s flash story, “A Bunny’s Kidnapping” has been accepted for publication at “Gone Lawn.”
  • Come celebrate the new 2017 Fort Collins Poet Laureate (our very own Felicia Zamora!) on Sunday, May 7 from 6-8 PM at Wolverine Farm Publick House! Enjoy readings from Felicia Zamora (MFA alumnae), John Calderazzo (professor of English Emeritus), and Michelle Deschenes (MFA alumnae). For more information, please see the event calendar listing or Facebook event page.

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Have a happy & safe #Halloween weekend, State 👻🎃Remember, Rams take care of Rams. #ColoradoState 📷: @aleora2013

A photo posted by Colorado State University (@coloradostateuniversity) on

  • Skyhorse Press will re-release Dan Robinson’s latest novel, Death of a Century, in paperback in April 2017.  If people didn’t purchase it in its glorious hardback edition, they can now purchase it in its cheaper (altho no less glorious) paperback form — same cover but a slight change to the ending.
  • A short story from Shoaib Alam’s master’s thesis titled “Guildwood Village” was a finalist in Glimmer Train’s July/August Fiction Open. He wrote the first draft for Steven Schwartz‘s fiction workshop and revised subsequent versions with help from Leslee Becker, E.J. Levy, and Alexandra Bernasek.
  • Claire Boyles’ short story, “Ledgers,” received second place in the Short Story Award for New Writers contest from the Masters Review. It is published on their site at the following link: https://mastersreview.com/new-voices/ledgers-by-claire-boyles/
  • Joanna Doxey’s poem “Guidebook to Landscape: The Border” is in the current issue of Tinderbox Poetry Journal, here – http://tinderboxpoetry.com/
  • Mandy Rose’s “On Car Accidents and Second Wives” was cited in Christian Exoo’s pedagogical piece, “Using CNF to Teach the Realities of Intimate Partner Violence to First Responders: An Annotated Bibliography,” published in Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies, issue 3.1.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Image by Jill Salahub -- 1 in 5 trees in Fort Collins are Ash. Other than Aspens, they are the most beautiful of all the trees in fall. Because of a pest on its way, the emerald ash borer, in about 5 years they could ALL be gone.

Fall Ash, image by Jill Salahub

  • On October 8 Leif Sorensen presented his paper “Constructing the Pulp Genre System” at the First Annual Pulp Studies Symposium hosted by James Madison University.
  • Joanna Doxey’s book of poetry, Plainspeak, WY, is now available for pre-order through Platypus Press (in the UK) here: http://platypuspress.co.uk/plainspeakwy.  The first twenty-five copies reserved will receive a letterpressed broadside from the book.

Courses

Trying to decide which classes to take next semester? Check out our updated course listings: http://english.colostate.edu/courses/

bookfest-_FINAL-273x300

THIS WEEKEND! The inaugural Fort Collins Books Fest: Brewin’ Up Books! is a FREE, one-day public literary festival bringing attention to the expansiveness of Fort Collins’ craft brewing culture through books and authors involved with beer, coffee, tea, and more. With over 40 speakers, readings, panels, and workshops, there is sure to be something for just about everyone. http://www.focobookfest.org/

 

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

 

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

 

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~from English Department Communications Intern Joyce Bohling

Thinking about applying to graduate school in English or another liberal arts field?

Last Friday, a panel consisting of Academic Success Coordinators Joanna Doxey and Sarah Wernsing, along with Professor Ellen Brinks, presented to an audience of undergraduate students to address questions and concerns about the application process.

isgradschoolright

Academic Success Coordinators Joanna Doxey and Sarah Wernsing along withProfessor Ellen Brinks present at the recent undergraduate professionalization workshop, “Is Graduate School Right for You?”

Here are 9 key tips from their presentation:

  1. Be prepared to write a lot. In order to be successful in a humanities graduate program, “you have to love writing and be a stickler for perfection,” said Professor Brinks.
  2. Know what kind of program you’re looking for. If your goal is to become a professor, applying straight to a Ph.D. program is a smart choice. On the other hand, Wernsing and Doxey added that for those interested in a career outside of the academy, and for those who are considering an academic career but aren’t certain, an M.A. or M.F.A. is often the better option.
  3. Do your research. Talk to your professors about programs they’d recommend. Look for programs that have faculty with whom you’re interested in working and preferably at least two or three faculty in your field of interest. If you can, visit campus
  4. Think about the kind of community you want. Wernsing explained that, while there are many benefits of highly-ranked, prestigious programs, they can also be very “cut-throat.” Depending on your goals and priorities, you may have just as much success in a less-prestigious program that nonetheless offers a quality education and lots of collaboration and camaraderie among its students.
  5. Save your English papers. Not only is a writing sample required in many applications, but it can help the instructors who write your letters of recommendation recall your work. Keep copies of papers with your instructor’s annotations and revise according to their suggestions. Having a strong writing sample is key to being accepted into any liberal arts program, Professor Brinks emphasized.
  6. The personal statement should be about your future, not your past. Use the personal statement to discuss your academic and career goals and explain the steps that you’ve taken towards those goals. Do not tell stories about your childhood, or mention your childhood at all, for that matter. “Any time you can talk about scholarly discussions in the field,” talk about them, said Professor Brinks.
  7. Know how much money you’re willing to put down. The panelists discussed various approaches to funding graduate school. Whereas many Ph.D. programs have funding for most or all of their students, funded positions such as graduate teaching assistantships can be harder to find in master’s programs. Doxey shared that she chose to attend CSU for its location and sense of community, even though the program didn’t offer her funding; however, she had worked for six years before coming to graduate school and had savings to pay for her M.F.A. Think carefully before taking out loans.
  8. The job market is tough, but not as dire as you might think. You will likely be able to obtain a variety of jobs with your degree, both within and beyond academia. If you want to teach and do research at a college or university, there are tenured and tenure-track positions, as well adjunct teaching positions, at both 4-year and 2-year institutions. Currently, about 80% of people with Ph.D.’s are eventually able to find tenure-track jobs. In the private or non-profit sector, employers often consider an M.A. a more generalized degree that nonetheless shows a high level of commitment, and applications with master’s degrees often stand out as candidates.
  9. Look for programs that offer professionalization opportunities. Internships, such as that offered here at CSU at the Center for Literary Publishing, can offer gateways into careers, especially for those who aren’t looking to become professors.

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The sky over Ingersoll Hall today.

The sky over Ingersoll Hall today.

  • Stephanie G’Schwind is pleased to announce that the Center for Literary Publishing’s grant request to the National Endowment for the Arts has been funded for 2015 in the amount of $15,000. The grant will go toward printing, mailing, and author payments for Colorado Review and to support the publication of two new titles in the Mountain West Poetry Series (forthcoming in June and November 2015). Stephanie is very grateful to Catherine Coleman Kane, Director of Research Support in the Dean’s Office, for all her help with shaping and submitting this grant, and to Amparo Jeffrey, for providing assistance with the budget.
  • Dan Beachy-Quick gave a reading at Harvard this past week with Fanny Howe, Peter O’Leary, and Patrick Pritchett.
  • “Imagining the Planet: Arts & Environment”: Part of the monthly “Managing the Planet” series run by CSU’s School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES), this panel will include SueEllen Campbell (English), Erika Osborne (Art), Liz Hobbs (Landscape Design), and Kurt Fausch (Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology). Free and open to the public. Avo’s, Wednesday December 10, 5-6:30 pm.
  • Debby Thompson has a blog post on Assay, the new journal of nonfiction studies, as part of the “My Favorite Essay to Teach” series. Her post discusses teaching Gerry Callahan‘s essay “Chimera.” Her post can be read at: https://assayjournal.wordpress.com/2014/12/01/deborah-thompson-on-gerald-callahans-chimera/
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poems “Monster Body” and “Fault Line” were accepted for publication in The Laurel Review.
  • Mandy Billings will be leaving CSU Friday, Dec. 5th to pursue other opportunities in San Francisco. She would like to say thank you and best of luck to all her colleagues and friends in the English Department.
  • Four of Joanna Doxey’s poems were selected for publication in CutBank literary journal. CutBank 82 will be issued in the winter.
  • Samantha Iocovetto, Creative Nonfiction program alumna, has an essay on Roxanne Gay’s new website on The Toast. Sam’s essay, “Highlights from the Apocalypse,” which some of you may remember from her reading last spring, was a chapter in her thesis “The American Dream Starts Here” and can be read at: http://the-toast.net/2014/12/01/highlights-apocalypse/view-all/
  • Chloe’ Leisure’s (MFA, Spring 2006) Chapbook, The End of the World Again is being published by Finishing Line Press.

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