Tag Archives: Greyrock Review

The Poudre River this morning (image by Jill Salahub)

The Poudre River (image by Jill Salahub)

  • On October 28th, Tim Amidon, Elizabeth Williams (Communication Studies), Kim Henry (Psychology), and Tiffany Lipsey (Health and Exercise Science) partnered with the Poudre Fire Authority to host a symposium on the intersections of work, knowledge, and safety in the fireservice. Over 70 fireservice leaders from as far away as Oakland, CA and Ontario, Canada participated in interactive, stakeholder conversations designed to help researchers and participants identify the types of human factors that impact firefighter occupational safety and health outcomes. Breakout sessions included discussions on wearable technologies and next generation PPE, post-traumatic stress, the impact of chronic stress, sleep deprivation, and diet on decision making and cognition, how blue-collar traditions and working class identity impact how firefighters value the types of labor they perform, and how the challenges of certifying skills and building learning organizations through training and education programs. The event was sponsored by PFA and Pre-Catalyst for Innovative Partnerships seed funding awarded to the research team by the Office of the Vice President for Research. Tim would also personally thank our student intern Tiffany Lingo and administrative gurus Sheila Dargon and Lilian Nugent for their support!
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an interview up on the Kenyon Review’s website with: http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/dan-beachy-quick/ and a group of linked essays at EuropeNow: http://www.europenowjournal.org/2016/11/30/sunlight-and-arrows-five-invocations-for-the-silent-muse/
  • John Calderazzo will be presenting a talk on “Climate Change and Quechua Ritual” at the Sacred Landscapes and Mountains conference at the China India Institute in New York City.  The talk is based on a trip he took to a glacier-fed basin in the Peruvian Andes. John will also be the judge for the 2017 Eugene V. Shea National Poetry Contest.
  • Sue Doe and Lisa Langstraat’s essay “Faculty Development Workshops with Student Vet Participants: Seizing the Induction Possibilities” will shortly appear in Reflections: Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning (Volume 16, Issue 2).
  • On November 18, just prior to the start of Fall Break, CO130 faculty welcomed around 75 international students to a Harvest Meal in the Whitaker Room.  It was crazy fun in there, particularly as faculty watered down the soup to make it stretch to meet the larger-than-expected crowd and as Cassie Eddington’s kimchi was pronounced “Superb!” by a Korean student. This event was the brainchild of Karen Montgomery Moore and was assisted by Cassie Eddington, Virginia Chaffee, Kristie Yelinek, Hannah Caballero, Leslie Davis, Sheila Dargon, and Sue Doe.  Thanks go to our Chair, Louann Reid, for her support for this very special and timely event. Thanks also to the front office staff who participated and strongly communicated the department’s support for the diverse students of CO130! Thanks as well to our amazing Eddy custodial staff who not only helped bring food from our cars to the third floor but stuck around late to help clean up the mess!
  • On Saturday, October 15th, the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) hosted its 47th Annual Regional Conference at Metro State University in Denver.  This year’s theme was “For the Love of Teaching: Reclaiming the Classroom.”  CLAS presented CSU’s English Professor Emeritus William McBride with the Legacy Award.  English Education graduate student Jenna (Franklin) Martin shared her presentation, titled “Intercultural Sensitivity in the Middle School Language Arts Classroom.”  Dr. Pam Coke gave a presentation with Cheryl Kula, a fourth grade teacher at St. John the Evangelist Catholic School in Loveland, titled “Hard to Learn, Hard to Teach: Using Problem-Based Strategies in the Classroom.”  A good conference was had by all.
  • On Saturday, November 12th, CSU welcomed high school seniors from around the country to campus to take part in Senior Scholarship Day. English department colleagues led students through a writing workshop, followed by a timed writing competition.  CSU Admissions offered scholarships to the top writers. Our English department team included Tony Becker, Doug Cloud, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Tobi Jacobi, Sarah Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, Catherine Ratliff, and fearless leader Ed Lessor. Thank you, team, for your hard work!
  • On Saturday, November 19th, Dr. Pam Coke presented her research at the National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention in Atlanta.  Her session, titled “Performing Adolescence on the Page and in the Classroom: Using Adolescents’ Literature to Advocate for Students’ Mental Health,” She helped participants examine critical questions for educators, including: Is it ethical to teach a text that I know can trigger forms of PTSD for students?  Is it irresponsible to avoid such issues in the classroom?  If and when I do teach these texts (and I believe it is irresponsible to omit controversial texts from our classrooms), what can I do to best advocate for the mental health and well-being of the students? The presentation sparked valuable conversation among attendees.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology,” published earlier this year in The Bellevue Literary Review, has been nominated for a Pushcart prize.

speakout

SpeakOut!

We have three SpeakOut Journal Launch events during finals week. We will be celebrating the publication of our Fall 2016 issue of the SpeakOut Journal with a reading by our participants and refreshments. Please contact Tobi Jacobi (tjacobi@colostate.edu) if you would like to attend the readings at the jail or community corrections. We’d love to see you there!

SpeakOut! Youth Groups: Monday, December 12 from 6:45 to 8:15pm at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House

SpeakOut! @ Community Corrections and Work Release: Wednesday, December 14 from 7:30 to 8:30pm at LCJ Administration Building

SpeakOut! Men & Women’s Groups @ Larimer County Jail: Thursday, December 15 from 6:30 to 8:00pm at the Larimer County Jail.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Image by Jill Salahub -- 1 in 5 trees in Fort Collins are Ash. Other than Aspens, they are the most beautiful of all the trees in fall. Because of a pest on its way, the emerald ash borer, in about 5 years they could ALL be gone.

Fall Ash, image by Jill Salahub

  • On October 8 Leif Sorensen presented his paper “Constructing the Pulp Genre System” at the First Annual Pulp Studies Symposium hosted by James Madison University.
  • Joanna Doxey’s book of poetry, Plainspeak, WY, is now available for pre-order through Platypus Press (in the UK) here: http://platypuspress.co.uk/plainspeakwy.  The first twenty-five copies reserved will receive a letterpressed broadside from the book.

Courses

Trying to decide which classes to take next semester? Check out our updated course listings: http://english.colostate.edu/courses/

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THIS WEEKEND! The inaugural Fort Collins Books Fest: Brewin’ Up Books! is a FREE, one-day public literary festival bringing attention to the expansiveness of Fort Collins’ craft brewing culture through books and authors involved with beer, coffee, tea, and more. With over 40 speakers, readings, panels, and workshops, there is sure to be something for just about everyone. http://www.focobookfest.org/

 

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

 

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

 

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Lady Moon Meadow, image by Jill Salahub

Lady Moon Meadow, image by Jill Salahub

  • Tim Amidon and Michele Simmons (Miami University) gave a research talk titled “Negotiating ‘messy’ research context and design through adaptive research stances” at the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) Special Interest Group on the Design of Communication (SIGDOC) in Washington, D.C.  While at SIGDOC, Tim also participated in “Draw to communicate: How geometric shapes, blank pages, and crayons can improve your collaboration and creativity,” a workshop lead by Abigail Selzer, Kristen R. Moore, and Ashley Hardage (Texas Tech University). The workshop introduced participants to research and pedagogy in technical communication surrounding sketch-noting and incorporated hands on practice applying concepts such a geometric and visual metaphors to communication design problems.
  • Tim Amidon spoke as an invited panelist at the Faculty and Instructor Open Textbooks Workshop about his experiences adopting Doug Eyman’s Digital Rhetoric: Theory, Method, Practice, as an open textbook in CO402: Principles of Digital Rhetoric and Design. The event was hosted at the Morgan Library by Associate Professor and Open Education Resources Librarian Merinda McLure and Assistant Dean for Scholarly Communications and Collection Development Meg Brown-Sica.
  • Steven Schwartz’s story “The Theory of Everything” has just been published by Electric Literature on its Recommended Reading site. The story is from his newly released collection, Madagascar: New and Selected Storieshttps://electricliterature.com/the-theory-of-everything-by-steven-schwartz-52ad1978996f#.3okj44mzn
  • Bill Tremblay has received acceptances of two new poems, “Bukowski” and “The Sun’s Hands” at Cimarron Review for their Winter issue, 2016-17. Bill read with Jared Smith in Evergreen, CO, last Saturday evening. Besides the audience the reading was streamed out to 177 homes in the area. Bill will read in Laramie, WY, at the Night Heron Bookstore, Friday October 15, 7 pm. He is also scheduled to read with Joe Hutchison at the Innisfree in Boulder, 6 PM, October 20th. A reading-interview with Bill talking about Walks Along the Ditch will be broadcast and streamed from KBOO.fm Portland OR 11PM October 17. It will also be archived.
  • Andrew Mangan’s short story “Any Good Thing” has been accepted for publication by Zyzzyva. Andrew graduated from the MFA program in 2016. This is his first publication.
  • Thank you to everyone who helped to make PBK Visiting Scholar Nora Naranjo Morse’s campus visit a success.  A special thank you to Louann Reid, for her tireless support of this opportunity; Gloria Blumanhourst, who is, herself, a PBK member; she helped do all of the planning, and then she was called away to help with a family emergency; Patty Rettig, a PBK member alongside Gloria, who stepped in to help us with this event; Dean Ben Withers, also a PBK member, for his involvement in Nora’s campus visit; Colleen Timothy, who helped  with scheduling Dean Withers; Jill Salahub, our English department communications coordinator, who went above and beyond to help us to publicize this event; Sue Russell, one of our English department administrative professionals, who helped to organize the logistics of Nora’s visit; Sheila Dargon, another of our English department administrative professionals, who helped to publicize this event; Leif Sorensen, who hosted Nora in his Ethnic Literature in the United States class; Camille Dungy, who hosted Nora in her Literature of the Earth course; and Pam Coke, who served as faculty host. Thank you to everyone who attended any of the events while Nora was here.  Her visit was co-sponsored by Phi Beta Kappa and the CSU English department.

bookfest-_FINAL-273x300

The inaugural Fort Collins Books Fest: Brewin’ Up Books! is a FREE, one-day public literary festival bringing attention to the expansiveness of Fort Collins’ craft brewing culture through books and authors involved with beer, coffee, tea, and more. With over 40 speakers, readings, panels, and workshops, there is sure to be something for just about everyone.

The CSU English Department is a sponsor of this event. As part of our in-kind donation, we are asking for volunteers to help staff the day’s festivities. We need handlers to help make sure panelists are able to move comfortably between venues as well as people who can serve other necessary roles in helping to make sure the festival runs smoothly. If you are able to serve on a 2 to 5 hour volunteer shift on October 22, please write me Camille Dungy soon as possible. Conference organizers are hoping to schedule all the volunteers by the end of this week (October 7).  (Contact Camille Dungy at camille.dungy@colostate.edu). Volunteers will have access to a few backstage perks as well, so sign up soon so we can get you on those lists! http://www.focobookfest.org/

 

Cover of the latest edition

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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~From English Department Communications Intern Ashley Alfirevic

Cover of the latest edition

Cover of the latest edition

The last few weeks of my senior year have been filled with nostalgia for CSU, a calm fondness and bittersweet assurance that just as I finally understood all the ins and outs of the English Department, I’d soon be leaving. And as a former editor of the Greyrock Review, I thought I knew just what this year’s Release Party would entail: a little bit of mingling beforehand, selling books with an outdated credit card carbon copier, and readings from a brilliant new batch of authors, with a few returns from the last issue.

Nostalgia can also be hampering, and the present rarely resembles the past. The changes that have taken place for the Greyrock Review have been amazing for the editors, authors, and readers, but not so much for the former editor who declined to rush over on the assumption that mingling and an outdated carbon copier would delay the actual start time.

When I arrived at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House, the room was packed to the brim, the journals nearly sold out, and the readings already underway. As I noticed how this Release Party had diverted from ours, it was so spectacular to see the changes this year’s editorial team had made. The crowd seemed to have doubled, maybe tripled in size, as had the number of authors featured. The sleek new copies had an updated format and gorgeous design. And, thanks to a strengthened affiliation with ASCSU, the journals were now free to students, eliminating the need for outdated and cumbersome carbon copiers for credit card purchases.

As I stood in the threshold of the doorway, the downstairs music from the Publick House mingled with the spoken words of former classmates and acquaintances whose insightful writing I had admired and envied, and nostalgia blended with an equally wonderful reality.

A former classmate from my creative nonfiction course read her short story “Petrichor.” With lines like, “golden, but dulled in the diffused light of a cloud-laden, late afternoon sky,” her voice sounded just as it had when she would read lines in workshop.

Another read, “Small Lipstick,” a piece we had discussed all together. Hearing where she honed certain images or paragraphs with lines like, “Her body weakens, her mind festers,” made the ambiguities all the more mysterious and poignant.

One more from our class read “Song.” A poem filled with lines like, “where buds, blossoms, and broken stems are buoyed by equal eyes,” it so gorgeously expressed the zest for life and incredible kindness that accompanied all of her writing and critique.

A fellow editor from last year read her poem “Decomposition.” Seamlessly combining beauty and decay, lines like, “the weeds swelter in the noon-day heat. I wonder if I were to lick the stems, would their dirt coat my tongue?” brought back fond memories of our poetry fundraiser.

Upon my return home, I couldn’t stop turning the pages of the new Greyrock, filled with both unfamiliar authors I would not have the chance to meet, and ones I had always felt in awe of but had never quite gotten to know.

Nostalgia can be dangerous when it constitutes what you think will happen next. But being surrounded by such passionate authors, editors, and classmates, I couldn’t help but be in the present in those moments. CSU is filled with so many talented thinkers and writers that must be appreciated while they’re here, before they’ll have to be relegated to memory.

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Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • John Calderazzo has accepted an invitation to join the Fort Collins Climate Action Plan communication team.  The City’s plan is widely regarded as among the strongest in the nation.This week, John conducted a story-telling workshop for CSU’s External Relations Team.  He also moderated part of a panel at the Foothills Unitarian Church on The Moral Imperative for Climate Action.
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay, “‘A Tangle of Circumstance’: Life in the Early Years of the NYS Training School for Girls in Hudson,’ appears in the Fall 2015 issue of the Columbia County History & Heritage Magazine.
  • Barbara Sebek attended a conference on Appropriation in an Age of Global Shakespeare in Athens, Georgia.  She presented a paper, “Blurring Binaries in Frank McGuinness’s Mutabilitie (1997).”
  • A review of Dan Robinson’s novel, Death of a Century, in the Manhattan Book Review concluded with this admonition: “This is a book not to be missed.”
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s story, “The Next Step” (1721 words) has accepted for publication in the upcoming issue of Gravel Magazine.
  • Adam Mackie, English Education graduate and former composition instructor at Colorado State University, promised he’d stay in touch with the English Department at CSU. Adam recently has accepted a full-time English language arts position in his hometown of Anchorage, Alaska. Starting in January 2016, Adam will teach classic mythology and American literature at West Anchorage High School. Adam also published a set of poems with BlazeVOX in Western New York that he’d like to share with everyone: http://blazevox.org/index.php/journal/

 

TONIGHT: Grand Opening – Wolverine Farm Publishing – come celebrate the new Letterpress & Publick House on from 8-11pm. Listen to the beautiful words of  Poet Laureate (and CSU alumna) Aby Kaupang and the fabulous sounds of Souvenir Thread.

 

Reminder: Deadline for Greyrock Review submissions is December 9th. Visit greyrockreview.colostate.edu to submit.

 

December 1st: Scholarship online application opens.  The application for all scholarships in the English department is online at www.ramweb.colostate.edu. Sign in using your eID and select the CSU Scholarship Application link.

 

Spring 2016 Internships Available!

Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students. Please note that the list is likely to grow with more opportunities, so stay tuned!

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SPRING:

  • Publishing/Editorial Internships:
    • Editorial Interns, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
    • Publishing Assistant Internship (2 positions), Bailiwick Press (Ft. Collins)
    • Publication Assistant, Wolverine Farm Publishing Co. & Bookstore (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing/Editorial Internships (several positions), The Borgen Project (remote)

 

  • Educational Internships:
    • Grading Assistant, NCTE@CSU with Poudre High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing Coach and Grader, NCTE@CSU, Fort Collins High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Adult ESL Teacher, Global Refugee Center (Greeley, CO)

 

  • Non-Profit/Communications Internships:
    • Social Media and Communications Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)
    • Communications Intern (paid), Otter Products (Ft. Collins, CO)

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Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu  for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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~From English Department Communications Intern Ashley Afirevic

While we pride ourselves on being part of a global community, Fort Collins is also wonderfully self-contained in a way. We have an abundance of art and culture right in our own city, including our own little bundle of literary journals. Whether you’re an undergrad looking to make your foray into publishing, a grad student looking to put that first reputable journal on your cover letter, or a local looking to share, Fort Collins has a literary journal that fits your needs. Check out our four picks:

1. Greyrock Review: CSU’s Undergraduate Literary Journal has a team of talented student interns* ready to read and edit pieces of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and art. After accepting admissions October through December, they publish an annual volume during the Spring semester with pieces from undergrads across the university. CSU students have the opportunity to promote their literary talents and interns become familiar with the publishing processes. Their release party usually involves fun readings at one of Fort Collins’ local food or beer joints, so you can enjoy yourself while picking up your newly published work!

*Okay – maybe I’m a tad biased as a former Nonfiction editor.
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Website: http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu/

Submit: https://greyrockreview.submittable.com/submit

 

2. Journal of Undergraduate Research and Scholarly Excellence: Another undergraduate-run publication, this journal publishes creative writing side-by-side with scholarly essays of all disciplines. A true testament to the “scholarly power of undergraduate students,” journalism, fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and prose sit pretty right next to science-y articles. Though it’s published through CSU’s Office of Undergraduate Research and Artistry, JUR accepts pieces from undergraduate institutions all across the world. If you think it would be hard for editors to work with such a breadth of subjects, have no fear; the team works with faculty, specialists, professionals, and legal council to ensure all of the work is up to standards, and accepts works in English as well as Spanish.

Final-JUR-Header
Website: http://jur.colostate.edu/

Submit: http://jurtest.colostate.edu/submit/

 

3. Matter Journal: Right out of Wolverine Farm Publishing inside Old Town’s Bean Cycle, Matter publishes themed journals, accepting submissions that take interesting and inspiring perspectives on the publication’s chosen topic. Some of them revolve around FoCo’s favorites: “art, agriculture, bicycles, wilderness, environmental concerns.” Combining journalism, literature, and art, Matter accepts interviews, essays, fiction, and poetry for a cohesive literary experience. They publish one issue annually, and submissions just closed for the next issue: Nomad. Submitting to Matter is a great way to share your artistic talents with the Fort Collins community and support a local publishing house.

wolverinefarm

Website: http://www.wolverinefarm.org/publications/matter-journal/

Submit: http://www.wolverinefarm.org/publications/submissions/

P.S. Wolverine Farm Publishing is officially unveiling and celebrating their new Letterpress & Publick House on Friday, November 20th from 8-11 pm. Join them as they:

  • Sip libations that can only be found in Fort Collins.
  • Gander letterpress art, prints, and ephemera.
  • Ponder a speech of triumph, woe, and most importantly, glorious beginnings!
  • Listen to the beautiful words of Fort Collins Poet Laureate Aby Kaupang, and then the fabulous sounds of Souvenir Thread.
  • Last but not least, dance dance dance!

Tickets go on sale Saturday, November 14th at 5pm at the Letterpress & Publick House, 316 Willow St, FoCo.  Tickets are $15, include one free drink, and are good indefinitely. For more information please call the Publick House during normal business hours at 970-682-2590.

 

4. Colorado Review:  The pride and joy of the CSU English Department, the Colorado Review is a world renowned literary journal that has published the likes of E. E. Cummings, William Carlos Williams, and Langston Hughes in its fifty-nine year history. Found in universities, libraries, and independent bookstores all across the country, the journal provides a wonderful sampling of current poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and book reviews. Open to burgeoning writers whose stuff is ready for the big leagues and established writers adding to their repertoires of credible journals, the Colorado Review provides a window to the modern literary community and a sensibility of what’s happening in contemporary publishing.

Colorado Review Spring 2015 issue, cover design by Abby Kerstetter

Colorado Review Spring 2015 issue, cover design by Abby Kerstetter

 

Website: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/colorado-review/

Submit: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/colorado-review/submit/

 

Go, submit! What are you waiting for?

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from English Department Communications Coordinator Ashley Alfirevic

Back when we were both on the Greyrock Review, Taylor served as our group’s fearless leader, tackling everything from editing to formatting. Now, she’s working on some pretty cool stuff and stopped to chat with us about Eddy, NYC, and NBC.

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Taylor Heussner
English, Creative Writing Major

What do you like most about your major?

I like how we are taught how to critically think. It’s a valuable technique inside and outside of education. Depending on the courses you choose, you can learn information that is usually found in certain majors only. It’s a melting pot of subjects.

How do you spend most of your time in Eddy Hall?

Printing my endless amounts of papers and articles I have to read. Also, using the gender-neutral bathroom because that’s awesome.

Do you have a favorite moment in Eddy Hall?

When I turned in my graduation qualifications! Also, when everyone moved back into Eddy Hall – I work at Resources for Disabled Students and when they were in Ingersoll Hall, well, that’s a long walk to deliver a test.

Do you have a favorite English class or teacher?

I really enjoyed Advanced Poetry with Camille Dungy because she gave me constructive and beneficial advice; I felt like I grew as a poet.

I also liked Environmental Writing with John Calderazzo because he is a great storyteller and the topics are pretty relevant subjects right now, and I liked how he mixed science with literature and writing. I think our schools need more inclusiveness like that.

Right now, I am taking the Empathy Capstone with Lisa Langstraat and I find it interesting to be studying emotion critically – maybe this is how psychology majors feel, but with less memorization and more essays.

What did you enjoy about your internship with the Greyrock Review?

I enjoyed reading other people’s work because I was able to discover a lot of hidden talent. It was also nice to work with deadlines to reach an end product. Our team liked to have fun, and when you like your tasks and meetings together, it’s easy to manage stress.

Have you had any cool or interesting internship experiences?

Summer 2015, I interned at USA Network, NBCUniversal in New York City as a production marketing intern. I fell in love with the smelly city and I loved working with video and media every day. To have the ability to work closely with Creative Directors and Producers is something I’ll never forget. I made a lot of valuable relationships, and I don’t have the horror intern stories that some people get on their first “real life” job.

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Currently, I am interning for 303 Magazine in their music section, so I get to attend concerts and review them, as well as conduct interviews with artists and write up anything I feel like writing. It’s a cool gig.

I also intern at F and W Media as a marketing intern where I copy-write and update their website. I like the experience of marketing, especially since I am not a business major, and it’s fun that I get to dip into other fields – don’t be scared when people ask you what you’re going to do with your degree!

What’s your favorite book, poem, quote, lyric, or genre?

I really hate this question because once people know you’re an English major, this is the first question they will ask you. It’s like asking a parent which child they love the most. Sometimes I’ll get anxiety depending on the person who’ll ask. But, I guess The Reader by Bernhard Schlink because I read it in middle school, and if you’ve read the book, you’ll know the adult themes, and it was classic and unlike anything I had read. “There’s no need to talk about it, because the truth of what one says lies in what one does,” is a quote I admire from the novel.

If you were to give advice to incoming CSU English majors, what would it be?

Value your major because language and communication is very important, especially post-grad.

Clean up your life and get rid of your filler words. They are not needed and you’re not fooling anyone with word count.

What’s your biggest goal/priority right now?

To get through my last semester without slacking off.  Finding a job would be a bonus.

 

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Eddy Hall behind blooms, image by Jill Salahub

  • Associate Professor of Creative Writing Dan Beachy-Quick has been named a fellow by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Beachy-Quick was one of 175 scholars, artists and scientists selected to receive a 2015 Guggenheim fellowship and one of 10 recipients in the organization’s poetry category, (there were more than 3,100 applicants). He is the first CSU professor from the humanities to win the prestigious award and only the fourth professor from the university. The award will enable Beachy-Quick, who also is a CSU Monfort professor (he was the first humanities professor to be awarded that title) to spend the next year writing. Read more here: http://source.colostate.edu/csu-creative-writing-professor-wins-guggenheim-fellowship/
  • Dan Beachy-Quick is on two panels at this year’s AWP, one for Omnidawn Press, and the other, the 35th Anniversary Reading for Milkweed Editions. He also has been awarded a Woodberry Poetry Room Creative Grant at Harvard University for 2015-2016 to continue work on his long, meandering essay “A Quiet Book.”
  • Leslee Becker’s story, “The Other Party,” has been accepted for publication in Breakwater Review.
  • In mid-May, at CSU’s Mountain Campus, John Calderazzo will be conducting a science communication workshop on story-telling for the graduate fellows of the Center for Collaborative Conservation.
  • Better: Culture & Lit has published three poems by Sarah Louise Pieplow; the poems were selected as finalist entries in Better’s 2014 Better contest. http://bettermagazine.org Sarah is pleased to share the company of CSU’s Deborah Thompson in Issue Six.
  • Gazing Grains Press has also published a miniature of a poem from Sarah Louise Pieplow‘s 2013 finalist chapbook, golem.
  • Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub contributed to a series Marianne Elliott is hosting on courage, “I showed up. I opened my heart. I stayed.
  • Our own Abby Kerstetter has been named as one of the winners of this year’s AWP INTRO Awards, and her poem “Blackout” will be published in a forthcoming Hayden Ferry’s Review. The Intro Journals Project is a literary competition for the discovery and publication of the best new works by students currently enrolled in AWP member programs. Program directors are invited to nominate students works, which are selected for publication in participating literary journals. Congratulations, Abby!  Here’s the link: https://www.awpwriter.org/contests/intro_journals_project_overview
  • Come enjoy the grand release party of the Greyrock Review. Sunday, April 26th will be the day to celebrate our writing communities flourishing Writers & Artists. Anyone is welcome. Our hosts, Equinox Brewing will kindly give us the stage at 6:30 to present the Greyrock journals published authors. Meet the Greyrock team that brought together a brewing company, a surprise food truck and artists for a release party you shouldn’t miss.

 

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Migrating geese take a break on Ingersoll Hall’s front lawn

Migrating geese take a break on Ingersoll Hall’s front lawn, image by Jill Salahub

  • Last week, TEFL/TESL faculty and students attended the Annual Co-TESOL Convention in Denver (November 14-15, 2014). Three student-led presentations were delivered at the convention: Angela Sharpe, Moriah Kent and Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker discussed the benefits of Using Corpora in the L2 Classroom; Kenshin Huang and Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker shared their insights on Engaging Asian Students in Classroom Interactions, and Reyila Hadeer and Victor Kuan presented a session on Teacher’s Support during Project-based Learning. Due to the generous support of INTO-CSU, 16 graduate students attended the convention this year.
  • Sarah Sloane gave two presentations, one at a roundtable and another on a featured panel at Writing on the Range, a conference held at University of Denver for college and university faculty from Colorado (and a couple from New Mexico) who do scholarship in the field of writing studies.Her roundtable participation included a discussion of state guidelines for advanced composition classes and a proposal for an advanced writing course that starts by reading Colorado prepper literature. Looking historically at the various permutations of prepper responses to a culture of fear as it has informed 1980s survivalist literature, 1990s prepper handbooks, and contemporary descriptions of potential disasters and 72-hour bug-out bags, students will examine the shaky evidence and rhetorical appeals embedded in YouTube videos, podcasts, social media, listserves like “Vegas Preppers,” and blogs about prepping. Students will then move from reading these flawed rhetorical constructions to composing their own well-supported arguments on a wide range of topics. Students will develop the rhetorical sensitivity and critical acumen necessary to compose within more typical rhetorical situations and Colorado contexts.Her featured panel presentation discussed the Colorado State University Composition Program, its location within local, regional, and state contexts, and our program’s collaborative efforts to bring state-of-the-art facilities to support critical analyses of websites, blogs, podcasts, prezis, and new notions of intellectual property, copyright, credibility, the material and the virtual, credibility, representation, and all the many forms, genres, and questions that digital systems, digital publics, and online social networks allow.
  • Leif Sorensen’s essay “Against the Post-Apocalyptic: Narrative Closure in Colson Whitehead’s Zone One,” on the most recent novel by MacArthur genius grant recipient Colson Whitehead is now available in the current issue of Contemporary Literature.Professor Sorensen also attended the annual meeting of the Modernist Studies Association in Pittsburgh in early November and presented a paper, “Fragmented Ancestors,” on the literary recoveries of Américo Paredes and D’Arcy McNickle.
  • Graduating English Education student Clint Pendley has accepted a position teaching seventh grade Literacy and English Language Development at Columbia Middle School in Aurora, CO. Congratulations, Clint!
  • Greyrock Review is now accepting submissions! Greyrock Review is an undergraduate anthology at Colorado State University. Submissions are open from October 6, 2014 to December 1, 2014 for original work in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual arts. Any undergraduate at CSU may submit their work at https://greyrockreview.submittable.com/submit for free and will be notified by December 15, 2014. Any questions may be sent to editor.csu@gmail.com

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Blue sky over Ingersoll Hall in Fall, image by Jill Salahub

  • Gerry Delahunty presented his paper on “Lexical semantics: How much English teachers need to know?” at the 7th International Conference on English Language Teaching (ELT) in China, in Nanjing, China.
  • Lisa Langstraat and Sue Doe are delighted to announce that their book-length collection, Generation Vet: Student-Veterans, Composition, and the Post-9/11 University, has been released by Utah State Press and the University Press of Colorado. Sue and Lisa celebrated by giving a presentation at CSU’s first-ever national veteran symposium on Thursday, October 30. Their presentation focused on “Pathologization and Sanitization: Two Problematic Extremes of University Relationships with Military and Veteran Populations” which is based on their ongoing longitudinal study of over two dozen student-veterans and their transitional literacies.
  • Jonathan Starke (MFA Fiction/Nonfiction 2011) has essays in the current issues of North American Review and River Teeth and an essay in the annual Baltimore Review print issue. He also has a short story in the summer issue of Shenandoah. He’s spending the winter vagabonding through France, Croatia, Germany, and anywhere one can find authentic handmade soaps and local beers.
  • Upcoming 4×4 Reading, November 4th – Reading will be Hannah Kezema from Naropa University, Aditi Machado from Denver University, Caroline Rothnie from CU–Boulder, and CSU’s own Melissa Hohl. University Center for the Arts , 7:30pm.
  • Greyrock Review is now accepting submissions! Greyrock Review is an undergraduate anthology at Colorado State University. Submissions are open from October 6, 2014 to December 1, 2014 for original work in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual arts. Any undergraduate at CSU may submit their work at https://greyrockreview.submittable.com/submit for free and will be notified by December 15, 2014. Any questions may be sent to editor.csu@gmail.com

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