Tag Archives: Doug Cloud

Image by Jill Salahub

  • Next Wednesday, Doug Cloud will be giving a workshop for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) Sustainability Fellows titled “Talking Science with Conservative, Religious and Other Potentially Skeptical Audiences.”
  • Tobi Jacobi participated at the recent Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) through a panel presentation entitled, “Not “All Ellas”: Risking Exploitation in a Prison Public Memory Project,” and a preconference prison teaching workshop (“The Prison Next Door: What Types of Connections Do We Want to Cultivate?”).
  • Michael Knisely’s Boulder’s Rocky Ridge Music Academy photography exhibit runs through April, he will also showcase additional photographs as part of the Month of Photography exhibit at the ACE Storage gallery on north Broadway also in Boulder. A collaboration of poets and visual artist’s exhibit at the First Congregational Church at Broadway and Spruce Streets in Boulder will feature two of his poems. He will also be reading from his poetry work as part of a large poetry reading this Friday for the First Friday Arts event at the First Congregational Church, which runs from 6:30 – 8:00 this Friday evening.
  • Dan Robinson’s paper, The Second Battle of the Champagne & the Inexpressibility Topos, has been accepted for the XVIII International Hemingway Conference in Paris next summer.
  • Morgan Riedl (MA in CNF, 2017) has a piece up on Brevity’s blog.  It’s a hermit crab essay in the form of a workshop critique of Sean Spicer’s press conferences.  You can read it here: https://brevity.wordpress.com/2017/03/30/workshop-comments-for-sean-spicer/
  • Catie Young’s poem “Merrily Merrily M​errily Merrily” is in the new issue of The Volta: ​http://www.thevolta.org/twstbs-poem185-cyoung.html
  • On April 21, John Calderazzo will read an essay at the Sacred Mountains and Landscapes conference at The New School.  The essay will discuss a centuries-old agricultural ritual in the Peruvian Andes he attended in which Quechua people have recently changed their behavior because of the climate change induced shrinking of their glaciers.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) first book, Of Form & Gather, winner of the 2016 Andrès Montoya Poetry Prize, was released on February 28 from the University of Notre Dame Press. Of Form & Gather is listed as one of the “9 Outstanding Latino Books Recently Published by Independent and University Presses” by NBC News. Her manuscript Galaxy Inside Your Inadequately Small Heart was selected as a finalist in the 2017 Alice James Award and the 2017 Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry. Her poem “In all the pretty roam” was featured on Zòcalo Public Square on Friday, March 17 and her poem “Virgule” was selected by The Georgia Review for publication. Zamora read her poetry for the AKO Collective’s Day Without A Woman recognition event on March 8.
  • Kathleen Willard will be the BreckCreate Breckenridge Creative Arts Tin Shop Guest Artist in Residence for the month of April. In addition to working on her new poetry manuscript, she will give a poetry reading, conduct four poetry workshops, and host a community poetry reading. She hosts Open Studio Hours at the Tin Shop Thursday through Sunday to talk about poetry and share her process. The BreckCreate website has details of her events.

Checkout the English Department’s new lunch counter!  In response to our See Change 2 request for more common space for faculty and staff, we have put the west end of Eddy to work. Two lunch counters are open and ready to entice you out of your offices for lunch and conversation. We will devote the exhibit space above each counter to departmental work on diversity and inclusion for at least the first year.

  • The northwest corner launches this new “Counter Talk” space with an exhibit featuring the 1960 Greensboro lunch counter sit-in and additional images — including two from the Smithsonian’s 2010 50th anniversary celebration.  Look here for some interesting ways to incorporate such moments into your courses: http://americanhistory.si.edu/freedomandjustice.

Stay tuned: Jaime Jordan’s exhibit featuring a moment in her CO150 course will be added next week to the southwest counter.

 

The English department has FOUR different writing contests running right now. Check out the details here, and submit something!

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Image by Paul L Dineen

  • SueEllen Campbell has three recent publications: “Making Climate Change Our Job,” the lead article in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, eds. Siperstein, Hall, and LeMenager, Routledge, 2017; the forward, “Sunrise, Celebration,” to Ellen Wohl, Rhythms of Change in Rocky Mountain National Park, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016; and “The White-tailed Ptarmigan,” an excerpt from Even Mountains Vanish, in The Rocky Mountain National Park Reader, ed. James H. Pickering, Univ. of Utah Press, 2016. She continues her work on the 100 Views of Climate Change website, http://changingclimates.colostate.edu, endeavoring to deal with a backlog of good new accessible sources of information of all kinds.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher just had a prose poem sequence accepted for the Manifest West anthology on “Women of the West.” The anthology is due out later this year.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, titled “Re-Writing a Discursive Practice: Atheist Adaptation of Coming Out Discourse” has been accepted for publication in Written Communication. It will be out this April.
  • Matthew Cooperman’s essay “Notes Toward a Poetics of Drought” is up at Omniverse right now. The essay, part of panel proceedings from a panel organized and chaired by Kristen George Bagdanov (MFA ’15), is a three-part series being run by Omniverse. You can find it here: http://omniverse.us/poetics-of-drought-matthew-cooperman/
  • From Sue Doe: “I am excited to announce a new online journal, Academic Labor:  Research and Artistry. ALRA is published by the Center for the Study of Academic Labor, a CSU center supported by President Tony Frank (see http://csal.colostate.edu/about/tony-franks-statement/) and Dean Ben Withers. We seek to provide perspectives from the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts on contingency, tenure and the future of higher education. Please consider submitting something for the inaugural issue, and please circulate the CFP to your colleagues and distribute it to disciplinary list-servs, journals, websites, discussion boards, etc. Note that the journal invites varied genres, including art.”
  • Todd Mitchell launched a new program today to encourage literacy, creativity, and caring for our earth by delivering free books and free author visits to underfunded schools in Colorado. If you want to learn more (or become a supporter), check out http://youcaring.com/Books4Change.
  • Todd Mitchell cover reveal. After years of writing and countless drafts. I’m finally able to share with you the cover for my new book. It’s coming out in August, 2017. Just in time for the new school year. I can’t wait to release this one into the wild, along with several new presentations for schools! Click to read early reviews, preorder a copy, and learn more about why I wrote this book.  lastpanther
  • Sasha Steensen’s essay “Bellwethers: Shame and My Left Breast” is up at Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-83/
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) poems are in the January 2017 issue of OmniVerse and other poems have recently been accepted in the Raleigh Review, Bellingham Review, and Sugar House Review. Her blogpost “Consideration of Self in Poetry: You & the Page” is up at North American Review, and a new interview with poems can be found online at HocTok.

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The Poudre River this morning (image by Jill Salahub)

The Poudre River (image by Jill Salahub)

  • On October 28th, Tim Amidon, Elizabeth Williams (Communication Studies), Kim Henry (Psychology), and Tiffany Lipsey (Health and Exercise Science) partnered with the Poudre Fire Authority to host a symposium on the intersections of work, knowledge, and safety in the fireservice. Over 70 fireservice leaders from as far away as Oakland, CA and Ontario, Canada participated in interactive, stakeholder conversations designed to help researchers and participants identify the types of human factors that impact firefighter occupational safety and health outcomes. Breakout sessions included discussions on wearable technologies and next generation PPE, post-traumatic stress, the impact of chronic stress, sleep deprivation, and diet on decision making and cognition, how blue-collar traditions and working class identity impact how firefighters value the types of labor they perform, and how the challenges of certifying skills and building learning organizations through training and education programs. The event was sponsored by PFA and Pre-Catalyst for Innovative Partnerships seed funding awarded to the research team by the Office of the Vice President for Research. Tim would also personally thank our student intern Tiffany Lingo and administrative gurus Sheila Dargon and Lilian Nugent for their support!
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an interview up on the Kenyon Review’s website with: http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/dan-beachy-quick/ and a group of linked essays at EuropeNow: http://www.europenowjournal.org/2016/11/30/sunlight-and-arrows-five-invocations-for-the-silent-muse/
  • John Calderazzo will be presenting a talk on “Climate Change and Quechua Ritual” at the Sacred Landscapes and Mountains conference at the China India Institute in New York City.  The talk is based on a trip he took to a glacier-fed basin in the Peruvian Andes. John will also be the judge for the 2017 Eugene V. Shea National Poetry Contest.
  • Sue Doe and Lisa Langstraat’s essay “Faculty Development Workshops with Student Vet Participants: Seizing the Induction Possibilities” will shortly appear in Reflections: Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning (Volume 16, Issue 2).
  • On November 18, just prior to the start of Fall Break, CO130 faculty welcomed around 75 international students to a Harvest Meal in the Whitaker Room.  It was crazy fun in there, particularly as faculty watered down the soup to make it stretch to meet the larger-than-expected crowd and as Cassie Eddington’s kimchi was pronounced “Superb!” by a Korean student. This event was the brainchild of Karen Montgomery Moore and was assisted by Cassie Eddington, Virginia Chaffee, Kristie Yelinek, Hannah Caballero, Leslie Davis, Sheila Dargon, and Sue Doe.  Thanks go to our Chair, Louann Reid, for her support for this very special and timely event. Thanks also to the front office staff who participated and strongly communicated the department’s support for the diverse students of CO130! Thanks as well to our amazing Eddy custodial staff who not only helped bring food from our cars to the third floor but stuck around late to help clean up the mess!
  • On Saturday, October 15th, the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) hosted its 47th Annual Regional Conference at Metro State University in Denver.  This year’s theme was “For the Love of Teaching: Reclaiming the Classroom.”  CLAS presented CSU’s English Professor Emeritus William McBride with the Legacy Award.  English Education graduate student Jenna (Franklin) Martin shared her presentation, titled “Intercultural Sensitivity in the Middle School Language Arts Classroom.”  Dr. Pam Coke gave a presentation with Cheryl Kula, a fourth grade teacher at St. John the Evangelist Catholic School in Loveland, titled “Hard to Learn, Hard to Teach: Using Problem-Based Strategies in the Classroom.”  A good conference was had by all.
  • On Saturday, November 12th, CSU welcomed high school seniors from around the country to campus to take part in Senior Scholarship Day. English department colleagues led students through a writing workshop, followed by a timed writing competition.  CSU Admissions offered scholarships to the top writers. Our English department team included Tony Becker, Doug Cloud, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Tobi Jacobi, Sarah Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, Catherine Ratliff, and fearless leader Ed Lessor. Thank you, team, for your hard work!
  • On Saturday, November 19th, Dr. Pam Coke presented her research at the National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention in Atlanta.  Her session, titled “Performing Adolescence on the Page and in the Classroom: Using Adolescents’ Literature to Advocate for Students’ Mental Health,” She helped participants examine critical questions for educators, including: Is it ethical to teach a text that I know can trigger forms of PTSD for students?  Is it irresponsible to avoid such issues in the classroom?  If and when I do teach these texts (and I believe it is irresponsible to omit controversial texts from our classrooms), what can I do to best advocate for the mental health and well-being of the students? The presentation sparked valuable conversation among attendees.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology,” published earlier this year in The Bellevue Literary Review, has been nominated for a Pushcart prize.

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SpeakOut!

We have three SpeakOut Journal Launch events during finals week. We will be celebrating the publication of our Fall 2016 issue of the SpeakOut Journal with a reading by our participants and refreshments. Please contact Tobi Jacobi (tjacobi@colostate.edu) if you would like to attend the readings at the jail or community corrections. We’d love to see you there!

SpeakOut! Youth Groups: Monday, December 12 from 6:45 to 8:15pm at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House

SpeakOut! @ Community Corrections and Work Release: Wednesday, December 14 from 7:30 to 8:30pm at LCJ Administration Building

SpeakOut! Men & Women’s Groups @ Larimer County Jail: Thursday, December 15 from 6:30 to 8:00pm at the Larimer County Jail.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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~from English Department Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub

After a brief hiatus, the English department Colloquium has returned. For those of you who don’t know, colloquium is an event where we gather, with fine appetizers and drinks in hand, to enjoy one another’s company and hear about the work that our colleagues are doing. All department faculty and graduate students are welcome, and the event is typically held at the home of Louann and David Reid.

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As promised, department faculty and graduate students gathered with fine appetizers and drinks in hand.

After a bit of socializing, typically two faculty present their work, with a discussion following each presentation. Stephanie G’Schwind, Director of the Center for Literary Publishing, facilitates the event — everything from helping to make plates of snacks and welcoming people as they arrive, to introducing the speakers and facilitating the discussion. As anyone who has read an issue of the Colorado Review already knows, she’s a master at bringing voices together, engaging an audience, and keeping things organized as well as beautifully presented.

For this most recent colloquium, the presenters were Assistant Professor Doug Cloud and English Instructor Kristina Quynn.

Doug Cloud presented his in-progress work on how speakers conceal animus toward marginalized groups in public discourse. He shared the results from an analysis of recent “bathroom bill” and transgender-rights discourse, to show how speakers are able to make prejudicial claims about transgender people indirectly. He proposes that understanding and revealing these techniques can help us be smarter consumers and producers of public rhetoric.

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Before starting, there was a short lesson from department chair Louann Reid on how to adjust the new leather couch for maximum comfort, which led to an interesting fact you might not know about Doug Cloud — he worked at an IKEA during graduate school. “I used to sell couches and that’s a good couch.”

Once we all got settled, Doug started by saying “I’ll jump right in, like I do with most things — eyes closed, head first.” The title of his talk was, “An Incitement to Essentialism: Recent Conservative and Religious Rhetorics on Transgender Rights and Their Implications.” He said that we often see two sides of an issue as needing to fight each other or remain locked in some sort of opposition until someone “wins,” when actually we could see such engagements as a drug and a bacterial strain or two fencers might approach each other — each on their own “side” but not needing to be at war. Rather they can dance with each other and adapt. “Movements and counter-movements influence one another’s rhetoric.”

Doug considered examples of the rhetoric in petitions written by six different conservative organizations, crafted in response to three events that brought transgender identities into the national spotlight in the past year: HB2 in North Carolina, the bathroom policy at Target, and Obama’s letter to schools about the issue. It was in part a fascinating look at the many ways we try to define gender, and what our definitions reveal about what we value and believe. While Doug admitted, “It’s hard to nail down the effect of any rhetoric or discourse, even tougher to predict what impact it will have,” working with this issue and writing about it is his way of “staying on the bus.” A good discussion followed, and it’s probably safe to say we didn’t answer all the questions involved with this complex issue that night.

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Kristina Quynn talked about the phases of CSU Writes so far: where it started last year, where it currently is, and where she sees it going. She touched on the reasons she started CSU Writes (including her own research agenda), the writing productivity research and models of women’s collectives that guide its vision, and some of the wonderful success stories of graduate students and faculty who have participated in CSU Writes organized retreats, workshops, and writing groups.

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Kristina’s original search was a personal one, “I was looking for a writing group for myself to support my own work.” Her search led to starting CSU Writes, originally funded through a grant awarded to her by The Ripple Effect. Although the writing productivity research and models of women’s collectives guided her vision of the project, she knew it couldn’t just be for women, that it should be open to everyone — all genders, graduate students and faculty, undergraduates and staff. The project began with Writing Groups, Drop In writing sessions (Show Up & Write), and workshops.

Kristina learned some things early on in the project, about what was needed and by whom, and more importantly about who the project might best serve. She realized that the project should focus on purely academic writing, and refocused the program to support the needs of academic writers (Faculty and Graduate Students) writing projects with the goal of either publication or degree completion. Last year, the project worked with 277 writers, fostered 36 writing groups, held 16 workshops on the 4 topic that writers struggle with most (space, time, energy, and style), had 126 Show Up & Write sessions, and invited one guest speaker. Kristina also published an essay in an edited collection, had another accepted for the MLA Approaches to Teaching Series, had 3 conference paper proposals accepted at MSA & MLA, and has recently finished work co-editing a collection on experimental literature and criticism soon to be coming out at Palgrave Press, thus meeting her original personal goal for the project.

CSU Writes had writing retreats for graduate students that were very popular. Almost too popular. There were 30 spots and after the first few days the first retreat was open for registration, there were 65 applications, and Kristina had to contact me to take down the website submission form. Students who attended practiced writing a lot in healthy, sustainable writing sessions as a writing community. One of the most popular aspects of the retreat was Professor (now Emeritus) John Calderazzo’s session on capturing audience through storytelling.

One of the surprises of the retreats, and of the program in general, is that large numbers of international students who are looking for help for their writing as English Language Learners, that there’s a real need there, but CSU Writes offers support primarily for writing productivity, which isn’t exactly the right fit for student seeking ESL/ELL support.

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Kristina describes what she does facilitating writing groups as being the Match.com for academic writers at CSU. She confessed she even used wedding planning software to help her match writers together into workable writing groups. “There’s a lot of romance involved,” she joked. The primary way she matches people is through their schedules, stated interests, and the length of the project they are working on, but admits that whether their writing group will work out over the long-haul or not is another matter — “Chemistry is more of a mystery.”

During the discussion, John Calderazzo asked her, “how do you measure success?” Kristina answered:

  • Are graduate students experiencing speedier time to degree?
  • Can participants see an overall improvement in the writing?
  • Are participating writers feeling more comfortable and content with their writing practice?

She also suggested that measuring success by tying it to grant money is a bad idea.

Kristina talked about what seems to be at the heart of the struggles of academic writers, and what in turn points to the solutions: space for writing, time to write, maintaining momentum and energy. She suggested that accountability to a group and some practical skills, like using the Pomodoro Technique (which Catherine Ratliff introduced at the graduate student writing retreats), and separating drafting from editing, are some of the benefits of CSU Writes. She also asserted that “binge writing is bad” and suggests “writers are putting off large writing projects to the last minute.” She closed with stating, “I suspect that a lot of the crankiness on campus has to do with a lack of writing.”

It was a great event, and a good time was had by all. Stay tuned for information on next semester’s colloquium, and we hope to see you there.

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Rainy day on the Oval, image by Jill Baylis

  • Doug Cloud gave a presentation titled “Strategies for Concealing and Revealing Animus in Public Arguments About LGBTQ People” at After Marriage: A Conference Organized by CLAGS, The Center for LGBTQ Studies (CUNY) in New York, New York.
  • The Academy of American Poets has posted three of Mary Crow’s translations of the Argentine poet Olga Orozco on their website, Poets.org: Song of Berenice, IIBallad of Forgotten Places; and It Comes in Every Storm. These translations are from her book, Engravings Torn from Insomnia: Poems by Olga Orozco (Boa Editions, Inc.).

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The inaugural Fort Collins Books Fest: Brewin’ Up Books! is a FREE, one-day public literary festival bringing attention to the expansiveness of Fort Collins’ craft brewing culture through books and authors involved with beer, coffee, tea, and more. With over 40 speakers, readings, panels, and workshops, there is sure to be something for just about everyone. http://www.focobookfest.org/

Cover of the latest edition

 

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene atbmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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  • Dan Beachy-Quick will be on Colorado Matters on the Denver NPR station on May 11.
  • Ellen Brinks has been invited to give a plenary talk at the conference “Forgotten Geographies in the Fin de Siècle, 1880-1920,” at Birkbeck College, University of London, in early July.
  • Doug Cloud’s article, “Talking Climate Change Across Difference” has been accepted for publication in a special issue of Reflections focused on “Sustainable Communities and Environmental Communication.” The issue will be out this fall.
  • Roze Hentschell will be leading a group of 10 CSU Honors Program students to study in Oxford, England. From late May through June, the students will take her 3 credit class, “Shakespeare in Oxford,” and they will take field trips to Bath, Windsor, Stratford-upon-Avon, and London. The students will also take a 3 credit independent tutorial with an Oxford professor in their field of study.
  • A short story from Colorado Review, “Midterm,” by Leslie Johnson (Spring 2015), has been selected for the 2017 Pushcart Prize anthology. You can read the story here: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/features/midterm/
  • The Community Literacy Center received a $5000 grant from the Bohemian Pharos Fund in support of the youth SpeakOut writing workshops.
  • Tobi Jacobi and Lara Roberts’s essay, “Developing Self-Care Strategies for Volunteers in a Prison Writing Program” appears in the new edited collection, The Volunteer Sector in Prisons: Encouraging Institutional and Personal Change (May 2016).
  • Larissa Willkomm’s research poster on a collaborative writing project on women, jail, and addiction won a 3rd place service learning prize at the recent CSU CURC competition.  Larissa completed this project as part of her CLC internship and work with SpeakOut.

    Larissa presenting her work at the recent CURC

    Larissa presenting her work at the recent CURC

  • Dana Masden’s short story “Exercise, a Good Book, and a Cup of Tea” will be published in an upcoming issue of Third Coast.
  • Kristina Quynn’s essay “My Brother, My….” is part of the just published collection of personal essays from 2Leaf Press on white privilege and whiteness in America.  The collection, What Does It Mean to Be White In America, includes an introduction by Debby White and an afterword by Tara Betts. While not light summer reading, it could be useful to those teaching about race in America.  You can find more information at: http://whiteinamerica.org
  • The following group presented a panel at the April 29 Writing on the Range Conference at the University of Denver, where Cheryl Ball was the featured speaker: Tim Amidon, Hannah Caballero, Doug Cloud, Sue Doe, Ed Lessor, Amanda Memoli, and James Roller. The group focused on examples, challenges, questions, and opportunities associated with integrating multimodality into writing. The presentation was entitled:”A Case of Wishful Thinking?  Our Plans for an Integrated and Coordinated Multimodal Curriculum.”
  • Mary Crow will take part in a public reception and reading for artworks inspired by poems May 19 in Loveland at Artworks, 6:30 p.m., 310 N. Railroad Ave. (Hwy 287 to 3rd, then R a block). She will read her poem. “Dear X,” and the artwork it inspired will be part of the exhibit.
  • “Food for Bears” by Kayann Short (BA 81; MA 88), an essay about the 2015 Front Range food collapse, appears in the latest issue of the environmental literary magazine, The Hopper.
  • Kathleen Willard’s (MFA, poetry Spring 2004) poetry chapbook Cirque & Sky won Middle Creek Publishing & Audio’s Fledge Chapbook Contest. Her book is a series of pastorals and anti-pastorals that “attunes its lyric eye to local ecological crises” (Dan Beachy-Quick)  & evokes “a periodic table of agitation over the continued plunder of Colorado and by extension the world.” (John Calderazzo). Her book is available online at Middle Creek Publishing and Audio, and Amazon.

    Kathleen Willard gave a reading with other Middle Creek Publishing & Audio poets in Pueblo, Colorado as part of the Earth Day Celebration sponsored by Colorado State University at Pueblo and the Sierra Club on April 23rd at Songbird Cellars, a local winery.

    She is also speaking at the Colorado Creative Industry Summit at Carbondale, Colorado on May 5th. In her presentation “Thinking Outside the Book”, she will share how receiving a Colorado Creative Industry Career Advancement Grant shifted her thinking about publishing poetry, how by using some basic business practices increased her poetry readership, and led her to pursue alternative spaces for her poetry, such as art galleries, community newspapers, installations, & the Denver Botanic Gardens CSA Art Share Project. While still wildly interested in the traditional modes of book publication, she would like to increase chance encounters that the public may have with poetry outside the book.

    She is also curating with Todd Simmons of Wolverine Farm and Publishing, a Food Truck Reading Series at Wolverine Farm Letterpress this summer, which is being supported by New Belgium Brewing Company.

    The Fort Collins Book Launch for Cirque & Sky will be June 21st, Midsummer’s Eve at Wolverine Letterpress.

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  • 2016 Summer Education Abroad Program in Zambia. Information Session TODAY! 12:00 pm, LSC 308. Read more about it here: http://english.colostate.edu/2016/01/2016-summer-education-abroad-program-zambia/
  • On Saturday, January 23rd, Doug Cloud gave a talk on the rhetoric of atheism at the annual Fort Collins Skepticamp, a gathering of local atheists, humanists and agnostics.
  • Camille Dungy is featured and quoted in the LA Review of Books essay, “Toward a Wider View of ‘Nature Writing'” January 10, 2016. https://lareviewofbooks.org/essay/toward-a-wider-view-of-nature-writing
  • Abby Kerstetter’s proposal was accepted to present at the 2016 Alaska Native Studies Conference in Anchorage. She will be reading a selection of poems from her thesis project.
  • Ivy Scherbarth, a graduate student in the Creative Nonfiction program, will have her essay “Enchantment” published in the next issue of Taproot Magazine (Issue 17: Myth).
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s flash piece, “Mothers and Sons” has been accepted for publication in Cease Cows (101 words). Publication date is forthcoming!
  • The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico, published in March 2015 as part of the Mountain West Poetry Series by the Center for Literary Publishing, has been awarded the Great Lakes College Association’s New Writers Award. The book has also won the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies award for best poetry collection about a significant topic related to the Mexican-American and/or Chicana/o experience. And it is included in Poets & Writers’ annual Debut Poets feature — a “highlight of ten of the most compelling and inspiring first books of poetry published in 2015” — in the January/February 2016 issue. Karen Montgomery Moore, Katie Naughton, Melissa Hohl, and Cedar Brant were the editorial and production team.

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Assistant Professor Zach Hutchins and his E630D Special Topics in Literature: Gender Studies – Witchcraft class.

Assistant Professor Zach Hutchins and his E630D Special Topics in Literature: Gender Studies – Witchcraft class.

  • Zach Hutchins has been awarded a 2016 Fellowship by the National Endowment for the Humanities. NEH support will facilitate research on Hutchins’s current book project, a prehistory of the North American slave narrative. For his research, Hutchins is reading thousands of issues of early American newspapers and transcribing every news item related to slavery, from slave-for-sale advertisements to discussions of enslaved African princes and news of runaway slaves. Those transcriptions contribute, Hutchins argues, the rhetorical framework for subsequent representations of the African American experience and the generic codes of the slave narrative.
  • This past Tuesday, Doug Cloud gave a workshop for SoGES Sustainability Fellows titled “Communicating Science to Skeptical Audiences: Some Rhetorical Strategies for Scientists.”
  • Kristina Quynn’s personal essay, “My Brother, My…,” about growing up in an interracial family is to be published in the collection What Does It Mean to Be White in America? by 2Leaf Press.
  • Mary Crow has had her poem, “Tomb at the Village of the Workmen,” accepted for publication in Indianola Review. Her book of poems, Jostle, is a finalist for the T. S. Eliot Publication Award. Her history of Colorado poetry has been posted on the website of The Poetry Foundation (Poetry Magazine); it was originally written for the Academy of American Poets (and now is a bit dated).
  • Steven Schwartz’s Madagascar: New and Selected Stories will be published by Engine Books in Fall 2016. His play, “Stranger,” was selected as one of three from a national playwriting competition and received a staged reading in Los Angeles.
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s 101 word flash-fiction piece, “Motherland” has been accepted for publication in Crack The Spine!

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programoftheyear

  • The SpeakOut! writing program won the “Program of the Year” award last night at the Larimer County Jail volunteer awards banquet.  Congrats to the facilitators and writers!
  • Two of Dan Beachy-Quick’s  essays, “Heraclitean Thirst” and “Circles” are featured at the online journal Fogged Clarity: http://foggedclarity.com
  • Doug Cloud presented a paper titled “Coming Out Queer, Coming Out Atheist: Building Rhetorical Infrastructures for Marginalized Speakers” at the Conference on Community Writing in Boulder on October 14.
  • Next week, Doug Cloud will be leading a workshop on talking about difference in public and professional contexts for the oSTEM chapter at Colorado State University. oSTEM, which stands for “Out in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics,” aims to “identify, address, and advocate for the needs of LGBTQA students in the STEM fields.” The workshop will take place in Eddy 100 at 6:00PM on Wednesday, November 11.
  • Sue Doe presented at the recent, national Community Writing Conference in Boulder where she and former graduate students Vani Kannan, Lydia Page, and Sarah Austin presented a panel entitled “Conversations on Labor: Report on a Cross-Campus/Regional Organizing Approach Using Participatory  Theatre.”  In their presentation, Sue and her colleagues engaged in participatory methods during the panel itself, querying traditional panel models and demonstrating how engagement works for not only social justice efforts and community engagement but also for enlivening and deepening the meaning of conference presentations themselves.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented an interactive workshop focused on remixing archival documents from the 1920s NY Training School for Girls with contemporary justice reform efforts at the 10th biannual Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference in Tempe, AZ on Friday, Oct. 30, 2015.
  • EJ Levy’s short story “I, Spy” has been accepted for publication by The Missouri Review, where it will appear next spring.
  • EJ Levy also spoke at the NonfictionNow conference in Flagstaff, AZ, last week on the subject of women’s bodies, sex, and sexuality in writing nonfiction.
  • Mary Ellen Sanger, Tobi Jacobi and the Community Literacy Center are pleased to announce that we’ve been awarded a $1500 engaged scholarship grant from Campus Compact of the Mountain West.  The award will support an assessment project for the SpeakOut! writing workshops in Spring 2016.
  • Eleven of our English department faculty members will be working at this year’s Senior Scholarship Day on Saturday, November 14, 2015, 9:00-4:00 PM: Dan Beachy-Quick, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Kathryn Hulings, Tobi Jacobi, Ed Lessor, Tatiana Nekrasova Beker, Sarah Louise Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, and Lynn Shutters.  This committee has been developing writing prompts for a writing workshop and a writing competition for high-achieving Colorado high school seniors.  Thanks to all of them for their hard work!
  • Communications Coordinator Jill Salahub is leading two final workshops before the end of the year at Om Ananda Yoga. “Wild Writing, Crazy Wisdom: Yoga, Meditation, and Writing” on Saturday, November 28th, 1:30 – 5:30 pm, and “Wild Writing, Crazy Wisdom: Meditation and Writing” on Sunday, December 6th, 11:30 am – 1:30 pm. You can find out more about these workshops and preregister at http://omanandayoga.com/. She also teaches a weekly Hatha Yoga class at Om Ananda Yoga every Tuesday at 7 am and would love to see you there.
  • Meghan Pipe first-year MFA student (fiction) was awarded a residency at Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts in May 2016.
  • Garrett Marquez (English Education, Class of 2015) is working as a special education teacher at Alamosa High School.

Upcoming Events

Colloquium 

Please join us Thursday November 12, 7:00 pm for the second (and final) colloquium of the semester as we gather, with fine appetizers and drinks in hand, to enjoy one another’s company and hear about the work that our colleagues are doing. All department faculty and graduate students are invited.

Here’s a preview of the evening:

Drawing from an on-going scholarly webtext that is under production, Tim Amidon will share a variety of genre ecology maps and visualizations that have been created using D3 (a data visualization program). By leveraging these digital tools, Tim suggests, digital humanists might render visible the textual assemblages that are instantiated through and circulate amidst sites of production. He will discuss ways that such modeling and visualization might be leveraged pedagogically to not only support literacy learning but also to critique and reconstruct systems supported by discursive activity.

Zach Hutchins is the founder and editor in chief of TEAMS, a scholarly collective dedicated to transcribing the unread manuscript sermons of colonial and antebellum America. Those transcriptions are then coded and housed in a searchable database. Searching even the small collection of sermons currently transcribed and published by TEAMS suggests that opening up access to these texts will challenge foundational beliefs about the religious beliefs and experiences of the individuals who laid the groundwork for revolution and the new republic.

Jaime Jordan will discuss how she has used the podcast Serial in her comp class as an example of digital rhetoric and share some introductory research she’s done on the podcast as well as literary research using textual-analysis tools.

If you missed the last gathering, you really owe it to yourself to come to this one! A good time will be had by all.

 

NCTE Presents:  Standards-based Grading
November 12th, 2015, Eddy 5

Join NCTE@CSU for a discussion on Standard-based grading. We will be joined by local teachers to lead the conversation and end the evening with time for questions. As always, there will be free food and drinks.

Another exciting addition to the November meeting will be the officer elections. The positions of treasurer and secretary will be open.  If you are interested in running, please email an intent to run and statement as to why you are qualified for the position to both: pamela.coke@colostate.edu and ncte@colostate.edu by November 10th.

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doortonowhere

National Poetry Day was yesterday, (image by Jill Salahub).

  • The Rhetoric Society of America has accepted a panel organized by Doug Cloud titled “Tracing Effect in Social Movement Studies” for presentation at their biennial conference in Atlanta in 2016. The inter-disciplinary panel includes scholars from Kansas State University and Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne. At that same conference, he will help present a white paper on social movements authored with over a dozen other scholars from English and Communication Studies.
  • Kathryn Hulings is happy to announce that her essay, “Light,” has been accepted to appear in the 18.1 issue of Fourth Genre which will be released in February of 2016.
  • Todd Mitchell will present the Saturday keynote address at this year’s Writer’s Retreat in the Rockies. Todd will also conduct a session on Saturday focused on developing character-driven plots. The retreat is taking place from October 16th-18th in Estes Park. It’s not too late to sign up if you’re interested in meeting editors, agents, and other writers, while having a brisk weekend in the mountains. Visit the Northern Colorado Writers (NCW) website for details.
  • Airica Parker’s poem “Earth” appears in Driftwood Press 2:4, which can be viewed on electronic page 16 here: http://media.wix.com/ugd/d32313_bacfd52dc9144aa5a842ef8ba547f4c4.pdf and purchased in print here: http://www.driftwoodpress.net/#!issues/cnec
  • The Community Literacy Center has been awarded a $500 grant from the Mountain and Plains Booksellers Association to support a special 10th anniversary retrospective issue of the SpeakOut Journal.  Representative writings from each issue published since 2005 are being nominated by our six community writing groups and the project is being coordinated by English major, Sarah Rossi.
  • The Center for Literary Publishing announces the release of two new books: The Business, by Stephanie Lenox, winner of the 2015 Colorado Prize for Poetry, and A Lamp Brighter than Foxfire, by Andy Nicholson, newest addition to the Mountain West Poetry Series. Cedar Brant, KT Heins, Melissa Hohl, Abby Kerstetter, and Katie Naughton each helped bring these books to publication by handling the copyediting, typesetting, proofreading, and cover design. Both books are available from the University Press of Colorado or from Amazon.

English Department Homecoming Event 

We hope you are able to join us for the English department Homecoming event next Friday, October 16th, 2:00-4:00 PM, on our very own third floor of Eddy Hall.  We will be having a *special presentation* at 3:00 PM, outside Eddy 300, and you won’t want to miss it!  Throughout the event, we will be welcoming alumni and other special guests.  Students will be providing guided tours of our newly renovated Eddy Hall.  Did I mention that we will have cake???

 

NCTE Presents: National Day of Writing At Colorado State University

Come joing NCTE@CSU to celebrate the National Day of Writing! The theme this year is #WhyIWrite. We will be hosting a writing blackout for middle school, hight school, and college students in honor of the National Day of Writing on campus. For 30 minutes, we will sit quietly without electronics and focus on writing. NCTE@CSU will provide snacks, beverages, and prompts. Please come prepared to share ideas and discuss wriitng. We look forward to seeing you there! October 15, 2015 5:30-6:30pm, Eddy 5 (in the basement of Eddy).

NCTE National Day of Writing

 

 

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