Tag Archives: Cedar Brant

  • The Center for Literary Publishing’s latest nonfiction anthology, Beautiful Flesh: A Body of Essays, will officially release May 15. The production team was Cedar Brant, Dana Chellman, Cory Cotten-Potter, Michelle LaCrosse, Morgan Riedl, and Stephanie G’Schwind. The book is available from CLP’s distributor, the University Press of Colorado, or via Amazon, barnesandnoble.com, powells.com, and elsewhere.
  • Cassie Eddington’s manuscript if the garden was one of seven finalists in Kelsey Street Press’s 2017 FIRSTS! competition. Her poems will be featured on Kelsey Street Press’s blog.
  • Tobi Jacobi will deliver an invited lecture on jail volunteer training and self-care at the University of Sheffield’s workshop on the Volunteer Sector in Criminal Justice in early June in Sheffield, UK.  The workshop launches an international, multidisciplinary network of researchers, practitioners and policymakers working in the criminal justice voluntary sector led by scholars at the Universities of Cambridge and Sheffield.
  • Lauren Matheny’s short story, “The Dark”, won honorable mention (second place) in the Third Coast 2017 Fiction Contest, chosen by Desiree Cooper 🙂 Lauren says, “Don’t know if that’s worthy of the newsletter, but I’m super excited!!”
  • David Mucklow’s poem “Leaving Sediment” was published in the most recent issue of Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Kelly Weber has poems forthcoming or now appearing in Nebraska Poetry: A Sesquicentennial Anthology, The Flat Water Stirs: An Anthology of Emerging Nebraska Poets, Triggerfish, and Grasslimb.

Eddy 300 Lab
Summer Hours
May 15th– May, 19th, 2017
(Please stop by the English Department office
for access)
May 22nd-August 4th, 2017
10:00am-3:00pm

The Writing Center
Summer Hours
May 15th– August 3rd, 2017
10:00am-12:30pm
In Eddy Hall, Room 23
Online hours TBA

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A great time was had by all at Bruce Ronda’s retirement celebration

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has a lyric essay, “Family Cookbook,” accepted by Florida Review. It’s part of a new collection exploring mixed-ness and in-between-ness.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Natural History,” was awarded a Pushcart Prize and will be played published in the Best of the Small Presses anthology.
  • Joanna Doxey has a poem in the latest edition of the Denver Quarterly (51.3).
  • Jaime Jordan’s Digital Humanities class (E280) has created a blog showcasing some of the digital projects they’ve worked on this semester.  Check it out at https://exploredhblog.wordpress.com!
  • Second year MFA student Claire Boyles had an essay, “Failing at Important Things: A Parallel History,” place as a runner-up in Vela Magazine’s nonfiction contest, judged by Claire Vaye Watkins. The essay is live on the site: http://velamag.com/failing-at-important-thingsa-parallel-history/
  • Cedar Brant won the Academy of American Poet’s Prize for CSU.
  • David Mucklow was accepted and offered a scholarship to attend the Squaw Valley Community of Writers Poetry Workshop this summer, and will be attending at the end of June. A few weeks ago, his poem, “where Deer Creek dies into the Gallatin,” was published on Daily Gramma. You can find it on their site here – http://gramma.press/
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s flash story, “A Bunny’s Kidnapping” has been accepted for publication at “Gone Lawn.”
  • Come celebrate the new 2017 Fort Collins Poet Laureate (our very own Felicia Zamora!) on Sunday, May 7 from 6-8 PM at Wolverine Farm Publick House! Enjoy readings from Felicia Zamora (MFA alumnae), John Calderazzo (professor of English Emeritus), and Michelle Deschenes (MFA alumnae). For more information, please see the event calendar listing or Facebook event page.

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The Creative Writing Reading Series ended with this semester’s second, and final, thesis reading in the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art. The space was filled with family, peers and faculty members eager to hear the accomplishments of these three students: Joyce Bohling (MA in Creative Nonfiction), KT Heins (MFA in Fiction), and Cedar Brant (MFA in Poetry).

Camille Dungy opened the evening with an introduction, both excited and sad to begin the last event in the Creative Writing Reading Series of the school year.

As my fellow English department intern, I was excited to hear Joyce Bohling read an excerpt from her nonfiction graduate thesis. Associate Professor E. J. Levy introduced Bohling, describing her as a writer marked for a literary life. Bohling’s small, soft spoken demeanor is largely contrasted with her fierce words on the page.

Bohling’s thesis builds on her personal journey with anorexia, moving through the science and cultural history of eating disorders and the modern fad of dieting. As she began her piece, a stark silence settled over the group. Her cultural criticism targeted professionals in the field who combine dieting with extreme exercise as the perfect (“healthy”) duo for weight-loss maintenance.

As Bohling presented fact after fact, her powerful voice permeated the room. The weight of her evidence piled against the alleged success of dieting, moving from a satirical to an outright dismissive tone as we learned more about her personal experiences with dieting. We were left with an important explanation surrounding the reality of Health at Every Size, a lasting message that will still resonate long after the reading.

Levy took the time to also introduce MFA fiction student KT Heins, who shared the first chapter of her novel. As Levy explained, Heins’ violent and eerie prose was something that was both haunting and haunted. The story revolved around a lesbian who lost her lover one year ago to anorexia, an unplanned but recurring topic for the evening.

As she began, Heins’ words were filled with intense imagery that worked to describe the vivid scenery of the world within her novel. We followed her characters as they built a life together, a life before loss. Through her descriptions and narration, I could picture the glass house they bought in Aspen, and the way each character moved in that space, in sync with one another.

A feeling of cold, and loss, carried throughout the reading. I could almost feel the cold surround me, mimicking Heins’ tone as the ghost of the lost partner appeared, followed by the absolute weight of the memory. Her first chapter left me wanting more of this story, a haunting reflection on love and loss.

Finally, Cedar Brant read an excerpt from her MFA poetry collection. While Associate Professor and poet Dan Beachy-Quick was unable to attend the event, he sent a speech introducing Brant’s poetry which Associate Professor Sasha Steensen read.

Through Beachy-Quick’s well-formulated words, we learned of the elegant and philosophical nature of Brant’s poetry. Her deeply vulnerable poetry allows us to “see how she is of and in the world.”

Before beginning her reading, Brant explained that the inspiration for her collection, and the focus on fire, came from the experience she had when her house burned down. Unsurprisingly, her poems are themed around these powerful images and memories of fire. These poems, according to Brant, are a “space where more parts of myself can be contained.”

Brant’s voice was calm and steady as she moved through each poem, delicately circling around the theme of fire. As an audience, we moved through her painful memories and her fluctuating relationship with her sister. Each poem took these smaller memories and expanded into larger ideals and reflections. With Brant, we experienced her giving parts of herself back to the earth, allowing us to dwell on our own relationship with the earth.

When the reading ended, I found myself wanting more. This past year, each graduating MA and MFA student has worked tirelessly on completing their final thesis project. I feel privileged to have shared in this part of their process, hearing just a portion of the work that Joyce Bohling, KT Heins, and Cedar Brant put into these creative projects. I can’t help but think about the small pieces of themselves they will leave behind, pieces that have forever become a part of their work and of us.

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Today, April 17, is National Haiku Day (image by Jill Salahub)

  • The Crisis & Creativity Workgroup, comprised of writers, artists, scientists, and community members, has had a proposal exploring species extinction through poetry/art awarded a grant from the School of Environmental Sustainability — Dan Beachy-Quick and Cedar Brant are principal investigators with this project. More information can be found here: http://source.colostate.edu/school-global-environmental-sustainability-announces-global-challenges-research-teams-resident-fellow-awards/
  • Roze Hentschell attended the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in Atlanta, April 6-8, where she discussed her paper, “John Marston at Paul’s,” an examination of Marston’s plays written for the boy actors at St. Paul’s Cathedral in the early seventeenth century.
  • EJ Levy was interviewed as part of her recent visit to UMass-Lowell; the interview appears here: https://www.uml.edu/News/stories/2017/EJ-Levy.aspx
  • Dan Robinson’s third novel, Death of a Century, will be re-released in paperback next week.  Of the novel, The Manhattan Review of Books wrote, Robinson “deals with the main character’s shellshock with a great deal of care and sympathy, while paralleling the brutality of the world off the battlefield. This is a book not to be missed; it is a mystery, thriller, historical drama in one package,” and Publisher’s Weekly wrote, “Robinson’s atmospheric tale of betrayal and revenge paints a passionate picture of the Lost Generation…”
  • Barbara Sebek contributed a paper, “Archy’s Afterlives: Temporal Mash-ups During Times of Crisis,” to a seminar at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  The paper discusses the traces left by King James’s court jester, Archibald Armstrong.
  • One of Maurice Irvin’s MFA thesis stories was accepted for publication in Portland Review‘s upcoming Spring Issue.
  • Kylan Rice will be pursuing a PhD in English Literature at UNC Chapel Hill in the fall.
  • What Goes Down” by Kayann Short (BA 81, MA 88) has just been published in Rooted: The Best New Arboreal Nonfiction (Outpost19). Her flash fiction story “When It Was Lost” will appear in the spring issue of Dash.
  • Over the past year, we have lost quite a few members of our English department family.  Each year, CSU hosts a Rams Remember Rams Service.  Here are the details: Our campus community is invited to a candlelight ceremony Monday, April 17, 5 p.m. honoring CSU students, faculty, staff, and retirees who passed away this academic year.  The 15-minute ceremony will be held on the north steps of the Administration Building and will include a reading of the names – along with time for silent reflection. The Danforth Chapel will be open until 6 p.m. as a quiet place for personal contemplation.

CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

Reading

New York City author Deborah Clearman and CLC’s Mary Ellen Sanger read from their books on life “south of the border” at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House on Thursday, 4/20 at 8pm. Deborah writes evocative stories of Guatemalan realities, and Mary Ellen writes of the women she met when unjustly imprisoned in Mexico. There will be wine and beautiful cookies!

TEFL/TESL Advocacy Week 

On behalf of the TEFL/TESL Student Association, we are proud to promote our yearly event, Advocacy Week!

This week helps us achieve our central goals of promoting intercultural, linguistic, and literacy awareness in the community. To give back to the community, we have chosen to run a bookdrive for the Larimer County Jail. Bring in used or new paperback books to stock their shelves! Donation boxes can be found in the English Department office and around campus.

To engage the larger community, this week will feature presentations from Dr. Sue Doe, Dr. Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala, Dr. Kristina Quynn, the TEFL/TESL MA cohort, and TEFL/TESL alumni, focusing primarily on L2 and interdisciplinary writing. Find more details in the “2017 Advocacy Week Schedule” flyer.

Click to see a larger version

Lastly, we are excited to welcome our keynote speaker, Dr. Eli Hinkel to present “Teaching and Learning Vocabulary for Academic Writing” on Friday afternoon. Dr. Hinkel comes to us with over thirty years of experience and multiple publications which have influenced her work with ELL writers.

This year’s guest speaker

We look forward to hosting you at another successful and engaging Advocacy Week!

The Human Library 

The Fort Collins Rotaract Club will be hosting an event on Friday, April 21 from 4:30-8p.m called the Human Library.

The Human Library is a concept created in Copenhagen 17 years ago in order to establish a safe conversational space, where the people are the books. A “Living Book” is someone who represents various backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences. Books challenge prejudice and help connect people through respectful conversation with those who come to borrow them as “readers”. Each Book has a title that relates to their experiences, backgrounds, and/or identity. However, we challenge people to not judge a book by its cover and come with an open mind!

Conversations during the event are offered for 5-15 minutes, depending on what questions the reader has for the Living Book. Checking out a Book is a first come, first serve basis so people can come and go as they please.

Come engage in the conversation! If you would like to participate in an event that creates an atmosphere of storytelling, promotes community building, and celebrates differences then we would love to see you there.

Some featured Living Books include:

My Life in 2 Bathrooms
Muslim Citizen
Chief of Police

CSU Location: Lory Student Center Cherokee Park
Event Contact Name: Lisa Evans
Event Contact Email: levans2@rams.colostate.edu
Event Contact Phone: 9704818230
Audience: Alumni, Community, Faculty, Retiree / Emeritus Faculty, Staff, Student, Youth, Other
Cost: Free!

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Poudre River, image by Jill Salahub

  • Recently, Tim Amidon presented research at two concurrent conferences in Portland: the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (ATTW) and the Conference on College Composition and Communication. At ATTW, Battalion Chief Randy Callahan of Poudre Fire Authority joined Tim to speak about the ongoing community based research projects that they have been undertaking in partnership.
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s flash piece, “Dawn,” was named as a finalist in The Best Small Fictions 2017 by guest judge Amy Hempel. “Dawn” was nominated by the editors of Eleven Eleven.
  • EJ Levy’s hybrid essay, “Natural World,” appears in the most recent issue of Passages North. She will be Visiting Writing at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell on March 22-23, 2017.
  • Sasha Steensen’s chapbook, Thirty-Three Hendes was a finalist for the Tupelo Sunken Gardens chapbook contest. It will be published by Dancing Girl Press this summer.
  • Michael Knisely has a photography exhibit going on in Boulder through April at the Rocky Ridge School of Music in the Lucky’s Market shopping center at Broadway and Spruce. These are performance art photos from when he was the University of Nebraska Dance Dept.’s photographer, plus a few old concert photos (Peter, Paul, and Mary, and Bruce Springsteen).
  • Dana Chellman’s essay “How to Get to Heaven from Colorado” is a winner for the AWP Intro Journals Project, and it is being published in Iron Horse Literary Review.
  • Jennifer Stetson-Strange, Spring 2017 MA candidate in TEFL/TESL, has been offered an opportunity related to her final project, “Needs Analysis and Curriculum Development for Occupational ESP: English for hotel workers.”  Over the past nine months she dedicated over 80 hours to conducting a thorough needs analysis, compiling and analyzing specific language needs of L2 (second language) learners in order to develop a curriculum for workers in the hospitality industry and specifically housekeepers at a local hotel.

    Jenny observed more than 20 participants who worked in the housekeeping department of a local hotel in Northern Colorado.  She found it a rewarding experience to be a part of this project, including building key relationships with participants at the hotel.  At her final defense in March, the majority of the housekeeping staff attended as well as the general manager of the hotel, filling the defense room with 35-40 people.  Jenny was overwhelmed by the attendance and thankful they all were there because, as she writes, “The entire project was about them!”

    Currently, the general manager would like Jenny to implement the curriculum as soon as possible.  She will be teaching the staff once a week until she graduates.  This summer, she hopes to continue teaching the housekeeping staff twice a week.  Her future goal is to implement this program at different hotels and restaurants in Northern Colorado.

  • Mary Crow has had eight poems from her collection Addicted to the Horizon translated into Spanish by Silvia Soler-Gallego and Francisco Leal and published in AEREA: Revista Hispanoamericana de Poesia along with the English originals. This literary magazine is a joint publication of the University of Georgia and the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute.
  • James Work’s novel The Contractor was voted First Finalist in the annual Spur Award competition of Western Writers of America. His first novel of a projected series of “cozy” mysteries has been accepted by FiveStar Publishing. The title is Unmentionable Murders and the main character of the series is a RMNP ranger in the 1920s. Lots of gangsters, flappers, bootleg hooch and, of course, mysterious murder.
  • Cedar Brant has a sculpture in the CSU Art and Science Exhibition in the Curfman Gallery in Lory Student Center.  http://source.colostate.edu/celebrate-creativity-csus-art-science-exhibition-march-24/

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louislamour

  • Sue Doe’s chapter, “What Works and What Counts: Valuing the Affective in Non Tenure-Track Advocacy,” co-authored with Maria Maisto and Janelle Adsit, was just published in Contingency, Exploitation, and Solidarity: Labor and Action in English Composition. Edited by Seth Kahn, William B. Lalicker, and Amy Lynch-Biniek.
  • Darcy Gabriel has happily accepted a place in the University of Minnesota’s PhD program in Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication (RSTC) starting this fall.
  • SueEllen Campbell’s contribution to the post-election series “Letters to America” in Terrain.com appeared online last week at this link:  http://www.terrain.org/2017/guest-editorial/letter-to-america-campbell/.
  • The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico—published by the Center for Literary Publishing as part of its Mountain West Poetry Series—has been awarded the 2017 PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry. The award, for which the poet receives $5,000, is given in odd-numbered years and recognizes the high literary character of the published work to date of a new and emerging American poet of any age and the promise of further literary achievement. The book’s publishing team was Karen Montgomery Moore, Cedar Brant, Melissa Hohl, Katie Naughton, and Stephanie G’Schwind.
  • Airica Parker’s poem “Disjointed” appears in Central Michigan University’s Temenos: Skin Suits & Bare Bones online and in print. See it here for free on page 29: http://www.temenosjournal.com/current-edition.html
  • Mary Crow has had two poetry acceptances; “Beyond Tahrir” will be published by Hotel America and “Happiness Production Line” will be published by American Poetry Review.
  • Tirzah Goldenberg (MFA – Poetry, Summer 2013) has a recently published book of poetry, entitled Aleph, published by Verge Books.
  • Deanna Ludwin has been nominated for the 2017 Team Fort Collins Wellness & Prevention Lamplighter community service award.

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  • On November 16 and 17, Camille Dungy spoke at the University of Arizona Poetry Center as part of their Climate Change & Poetry Series. “Starting in October 2016, the UA Poetry Center features eight world-class poets as they address what overlaps, contradictions, mutual challenges, and confluences the categories of Climate Change & Poetry share with each other; in a series of investigative readings, we hope to offer some answers, some questions, and some new ways of thinking. In this second installment of readings built around a common question, we wonder: what role does poetry have in envisioning, articulating, or challenging our ecological present? What role does poetry have in anticipating, shaping – or even creating – our future?” http://poetry.arizona.edu/climatechange
  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s newest book, Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams, just received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews, whose editors also chose it as a “Kirkus’ Indie Books of the Month Selection” for January. https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/harrison-candelaria-fletcher/presentimiento/
  • Todd Mitchell spoke on the Author Panel last weekend at the Loveland Library Author Showcase. He also spoke with the IRS after they read one of his books (the IRS is the Poudre Library’s Interested Reader Society of teen readers. If you’re interested in finding engaged teen readers, contact the IRS. They’ll give you hope for our future).
  • In recent months, John Calderazzo has run science communication workshops for the School of Global Environmental Sustainability, the Graduate School, the College of Engineering, and the Office of the Vice President for Research. He continues to both volunteer and consult for the City of Fort Collins’ Climate Action Plan. John will also be the Guest Judge for the 2017 Waterston Desert Writing Prize. You can find out more about it here: http://www.writingranch.com/waterston-prize-for-desert-writers/
  • Bill Tremblay’s commentaries on drawings by Norman Olson will appear in Lummox #5, forthcoming 2017.
  • Felicia Zamora’s (MFA ’12) second book, & in Open, Marvel, has been accepted by Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press for publication in 2017. She also has a new poem in Tupelo Quarterly, a poem in a special election issue of Tarpaulin Sky Magazine, a poem accepted at Mid-American Review where she was a runner up for the 2016 Fineline Competition, a new poem accepted in The New Guard where she was semi-finalist in the Knightville Poetry Contest, three poems in the newest issue of Witness Magazine, four poems available in the newest issue of West Branch featuring women and the avant-garde, and she is currently participating in the Tupelo 30/30 Project for the month of November.

 

2016 Graduate Showcase Awards

 

English Department Distinction In Creativity Award – The Distinction in Creativity award is presented in Collaboration by the Graduate School and Office of Vice President for Research. This award recognizes the passion and personal contributions of these talented graduate students, and honors their commitment and efforts in their area of work.

1st Place – Kelly Weber

2nd Place – Cedar Brant

 

College of Health and Human Sciences Excellence in Creativity

Alyson Welker

 

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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  • The Center for Literary Publishing is delighted to announce that The Verging Cities, by Natalie Scenters-Zapico, a 2015 Mountain West Poetry Series title, has won the Utah Book Award in Poetry. This is the second year in a row that a CLP title has won the award (last year it went to The Logan Notebooks, by Rebecca Lindenberg). Karen Montgomery Moore was the copyeditor; Cedar Brant, the proofreader; Katie Naughton, the typesetter; Melissa Hohl, the cover designer; and Stephanie G’Schwind and Donald Revell, the acquiring editors.
  • Debbie Vance’s short story, “Quartzsite,” won second prize in Blue Mesa Review‘s 2016 Summer Contest, judged by Jensen Beach. The story will be published in Issue #34 this November.

Colloquium 

Please join us Thursday, October 27, 7:00 pm, at the home of Louann & David Reid, for the fall semester colloquium, at which we gather, with fine appetizers and drinks in hand, to enjoy one another’s company and hear about the work that our colleagues are doing. All department faculty and graduate students are invited.

Here’s a preview of the evening:

Doug Cloud will present some in-progress work on how speakers conceal animus toward marginalized groups in public discourse. He’ll show the results from an analysis of recent “bathroom bill” and transgender-rights discourse, to show how speakers are able to make prejudicial claims about transgender people indirectly. Understanding and revealing these techniques can help us be smarter consumers and producers of public rhetoric.

Kristina Quynn will talk about the phases of CSU Writes so far: where it started last year, where it currently is, and where she sees it going. She will touch on the reasons she started CSU Writes (including her own research agenda), the writing productivity research and models of women’s collectives that guide its vision, and some of the wonderful success stories of graduate students and faculty who have participated in CSU Writes organized retreats, workshops, and writing groups.

It’s always a fabulous event, so please treat yourself and make time in your calendar. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

 

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Image by Colorado State University and Chelsea Conrad

Image by Colorado State University and Chelsea Conrad

  • Camille Dungy has just signed a contract for her next book of poetry, Trophic Cascade, which will be published by Wesleyan University Press in the Spring of 2017.
  • Roze Hentschell has published an essay, “The Cultural Geography of St Paul’s Precinct” in The Oxford Handbook of the Age of Shakespeare (Oxford University Press). https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-oxford-handbook-of-the-age-of-shakespeare-9780199660841?cc=us&lang=en&
  • Barbara Sebek will be kicking off a sabbatical year by presenting a seminar paper, “Temporal and Geographical Mash-ups in Jonson and Shakespeare,” at the World Shakespeare Congress in London, England in August.
  • Cedar Brant has a poem up at West Branch Wired: http://www.bucknell.edu/west-branch-wired/cedar-brant.html
  • Teal Vickrey, received a Fulbright to the Czech Republic, http://source.colostate.edu/five-students-to-study-on-four-continents-on-fulbrights/
  • Jonathan Starke (MFA, 2011) has a short story (“Broken Leather”) coming out in the 100th issue of Greensboro Review, a short story (“Why I Say This Now”) in the current issue of Green Mountains Review, and an essay (“The Museum of Broken Relationships”) in River Teeth‘s “Beautiful Things.”
  • Stephanie Train (MFA Fiction, 2011) has been invited to speak on three panels at Denver Comic Con this summer. She is currently a Ph.D. student at CSU in the Journalism and Technical Communications department, studying transmedia narratives and toxic speech in online spaces. Her conference panels are as follows:-Transmedia in the CW television show, “Supernatural”
    -The Death Of the Hero’s Journey and the Rise of the Anti-Hero
    -Launching Your Superhero On the Screen (Film)

Eddy Computer Lab Summer Hours

Beginning Monday, May 16th, the Eddy 300 Lab summer hours will be:

Monday-Friday
10:00am – 3:00pm

Writing Center Summer Hours

Beginning, Tuesday, May 31st, the Writing Center summer hours will be:

Monday-Thursday
10:00am – 1:00pm

To make an appointment or schedule an online consultation, please visit: http://writingcenter.colostate.edu/appointment/

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Image by Ashley Alfirevic

Image by Ashley Alfirevic

  • Leslee Becker received the University’s Jack E. Cermak Award for Advising.
  • Stephanie G’Schwind is very proud to announce that Colorado Review will make a second Best American debut this year: Jonathan Franzen has selected “Namesake,” by Mason Stokes (Summer 2015 issue) for Best American Essays 2016. You can read the essay here: http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/features/namesake/
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a paper entitled “The Challenges of Going Public with Archival Prison Materials” on a panel with other prison writing scholars at the recent CCCC meeting in Houston, TX.  She also led a learning circle at the pre-conference prison pedagogy and research workshop.
  • As co-chair of the Qualitative Research Subcommittee of the Standing Commission on the Status of Women Faculty, Lisa Langstraat wrote a Vice Provost of Research Quarterly Funding Grant proposal, “Qualitative Research on the Culture and Climate for Women Faculty at CSU.”  Our committee was awarded all requested funding which will allow for the expansion of current research efforts and summer funds for coding and analyzing data.  This data will inform policy regarding improving the culture and climate for women faculty at CSU as well as nation-wide Advance Grant development.
  • Shoaib Alam’s short story “Guildwood Village” has been accepted for the 2016 Tin House Summer Workshop. He will be at Reed College in Portland from July 10-17 and is looking forward to studying with Chinelo Okparanta.
  • CSU was well represented among this year’s winners of the AWP Intro Journals Award. Cedar Brant won for her poem, “Make Blood,” and Nathaniel Barron won for the first chapter from his novel-in-progress, From the Watchtower. Emily Ziffer received an honorable mention for her nonfiction essay, “Moving Forward, In Russian.” That’s three awards for CSU, the most of any program! All of the nominees will be on our Poster at the English Department Awards Reception.
  • Two TEFL/TESL students, Kathleen Hamel and Brian Doebbeling, successfully defended their portfolios on 4/15.
  • Felicia Zamora (MFA ’12) has four poems accepted in West Branch’s upcoming feature issue focusing on avant-garde contemporary women poets. Other poems have recently been accepted to Cutbank, The Adirondack Review, and Salt Hill.

 

Greyrock Review Release Party!!!

 The Greyrock Review Release Party will be held on, Thursday, April 28th  from 6-8 at Wolverine Farm’s Letterpress & Publick House on Willow.

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