Tag Archives: Barbara Sebek

Today, April 17, is National Haiku Day (image by Jill Salahub)

  • The Crisis & Creativity Workgroup, comprised of writers, artists, scientists, and community members, has had a proposal exploring species extinction through poetry/art awarded a grant from the School of Environmental Sustainability — Dan Beachy-Quick and Cedar Brant are principal investigators with this project. More information can be found here: http://source.colostate.edu/school-global-environmental-sustainability-announces-global-challenges-research-teams-resident-fellow-awards/
  • Roze Hentschell attended the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in Atlanta, April 6-8, where she discussed her paper, “John Marston at Paul’s,” an examination of Marston’s plays written for the boy actors at St. Paul’s Cathedral in the early seventeenth century.
  • EJ Levy was interviewed as part of her recent visit to UMass-Lowell; the interview appears here: https://www.uml.edu/News/stories/2017/EJ-Levy.aspx
  • Dan Robinson’s third novel, Death of a Century, will be re-released in paperback next week.  Of the novel, The Manhattan Review of Books wrote, Robinson “deals with the main character’s shellshock with a great deal of care and sympathy, while paralleling the brutality of the world off the battlefield. This is a book not to be missed; it is a mystery, thriller, historical drama in one package,” and Publisher’s Weekly wrote, “Robinson’s atmospheric tale of betrayal and revenge paints a passionate picture of the Lost Generation…”
  • Barbara Sebek contributed a paper, “Archy’s Afterlives: Temporal Mash-ups During Times of Crisis,” to a seminar at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  The paper discusses the traces left by King James’s court jester, Archibald Armstrong.
  • One of Maurice Irvin’s MFA thesis stories was accepted for publication in Portland Review‘s upcoming Spring Issue.
  • Kylan Rice will be pursuing a PhD in English Literature at UNC Chapel Hill in the fall.
  • What Goes Down” by Kayann Short (BA 81, MA 88) has just been published in Rooted: The Best New Arboreal Nonfiction (Outpost19). Her flash fiction story “When It Was Lost” will appear in the spring issue of Dash.
  • Over the past year, we have lost quite a few members of our English department family.  Each year, CSU hosts a Rams Remember Rams Service.  Here are the details: Our campus community is invited to a candlelight ceremony Monday, April 17, 5 p.m. honoring CSU students, faculty, staff, and retirees who passed away this academic year.  The 15-minute ceremony will be held on the north steps of the Administration Building and will include a reading of the names – along with time for silent reflection. The Danforth Chapel will be open until 6 p.m. as a quiet place for personal contemplation.

CSAL Roundtable Discussion 

Sue Doe wishes to announce that the Center for the Study of Academic Labor (CSAL) will host a roundtable discussion of the CSU “Proposal for Re-Envisioning Faculty Appointments” (authored by the Committee on Non Tenure-Track Faculty –CoNTTF) featuring leaders of the academic labor movement on April 27 at 3 PM. Visiting campus will be Maria Maisto of the New Faculty Majority, Joe Berry, faculty member in the Chicago Labor Education Program and  author of Reclaiming the Ivory Tower, John Curtis, former research director of the American Sociological Association, Marisa Allison, founder of the Women & Contingency Database and doctoral candidate at George Mason University’s Public and Applied Sociology Program, and Jim Walsh, University of Colorado-Denver Political Science Professor, social justice activist, and founder/director of the Denver Romero Theatre Troupe.

Reading

New York City author Deborah Clearman and CLC’s Mary Ellen Sanger read from their books on life “south of the border” at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House on Thursday, 4/20 at 8pm. Deborah writes evocative stories of Guatemalan realities, and Mary Ellen writes of the women she met when unjustly imprisoned in Mexico. There will be wine and beautiful cookies!

TEFL/TESL Advocacy Week 

On behalf of the TEFL/TESL Student Association, we are proud to promote our yearly event, Advocacy Week!

This week helps us achieve our central goals of promoting intercultural, linguistic, and literacy awareness in the community. To give back to the community, we have chosen to run a bookdrive for the Larimer County Jail. Bring in used or new paperback books to stock their shelves! Donation boxes can be found in the English Department office and around campus.

To engage the larger community, this week will feature presentations from Dr. Sue Doe, Dr. Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala, Dr. Kristina Quynn, the TEFL/TESL MA cohort, and TEFL/TESL alumni, focusing primarily on L2 and interdisciplinary writing. Find more details in the “2017 Advocacy Week Schedule” flyer.

Click to see a larger version

Lastly, we are excited to welcome our keynote speaker, Dr. Eli Hinkel to present “Teaching and Learning Vocabulary for Academic Writing” on Friday afternoon. Dr. Hinkel comes to us with over thirty years of experience and multiple publications which have influenced her work with ELL writers.

This year’s guest speaker

We look forward to hosting you at another successful and engaging Advocacy Week!

The Human Library 

The Fort Collins Rotaract Club will be hosting an event on Friday, April 21 from 4:30-8p.m called the Human Library.

The Human Library is a concept created in Copenhagen 17 years ago in order to establish a safe conversational space, where the people are the books. A “Living Book” is someone who represents various backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences. Books challenge prejudice and help connect people through respectful conversation with those who come to borrow them as “readers”. Each Book has a title that relates to their experiences, backgrounds, and/or identity. However, we challenge people to not judge a book by its cover and come with an open mind!

Conversations during the event are offered for 5-15 minutes, depending on what questions the reader has for the Living Book. Checking out a Book is a first come, first serve basis so people can come and go as they please.

Come engage in the conversation! If you would like to participate in an event that creates an atmosphere of storytelling, promotes community building, and celebrates differences then we would love to see you there.

Some featured Living Books include:

My Life in 2 Bathrooms
Muslim Citizen
Chief of Police

CSU Location: Lory Student Center Cherokee Park
Event Contact Name: Lisa Evans
Event Contact Email: levans2@rams.colostate.edu
Event Contact Phone: 9704818230
Audience: Alumni, Community, Faculty, Retiree / Emeritus Faculty, Staff, Student, Youth, Other
Cost: Free!

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Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • John Calderazzo has accepted an invitation to join the Fort Collins Climate Action Plan communication team.  The City’s plan is widely regarded as among the strongest in the nation.This week, John conducted a story-telling workshop for CSU’s External Relations Team.  He also moderated part of a panel at the Foothills Unitarian Church on The Moral Imperative for Climate Action.
  • Tobi Jacobi’s essay, “‘A Tangle of Circumstance’: Life in the Early Years of the NYS Training School for Girls in Hudson,’ appears in the Fall 2015 issue of the Columbia County History & Heritage Magazine.
  • Barbara Sebek attended a conference on Appropriation in an Age of Global Shakespeare in Athens, Georgia.  She presented a paper, “Blurring Binaries in Frank McGuinness’s Mutabilitie (1997).”
  • A review of Dan Robinson’s novel, Death of a Century, in the Manhattan Book Review concluded with this admonition: “This is a book not to be missed.”
  • Mir-Yashar Seyedbagheri’s story, “The Next Step” (1721 words) has accepted for publication in the upcoming issue of Gravel Magazine.
  • Adam Mackie, English Education graduate and former composition instructor at Colorado State University, promised he’d stay in touch with the English Department at CSU. Adam recently has accepted a full-time English language arts position in his hometown of Anchorage, Alaska. Starting in January 2016, Adam will teach classic mythology and American literature at West Anchorage High School. Adam also published a set of poems with BlazeVOX in Western New York that he’d like to share with everyone: http://blazevox.org/index.php/journal/

 

TONIGHT: Grand Opening – Wolverine Farm Publishing – come celebrate the new Letterpress & Publick House on from 8-11pm. Listen to the beautiful words of  Poet Laureate (and CSU alumna) Aby Kaupang and the fabulous sounds of Souvenir Thread.

 

Reminder: Deadline for Greyrock Review submissions is December 9th. Visit greyrockreview.colostate.edu to submit.

 

December 1st: Scholarship online application opens.  The application for all scholarships in the English department is online at www.ramweb.colostate.edu. Sign in using your eID and select the CSU Scholarship Application link.

 

Spring 2016 Internships Available!

Unless otherwise noted, the internships listed below are open to qualifying undergraduate and graduate students. Please note that the list is likely to grow with more opportunities, so stay tuned!

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SPRING:

  • Publishing/Editorial Internships:
    • Editorial Interns, Bloomsbury Review (Denver, CO)
    • Publishing Assistant Internship (2 positions), Bailiwick Press (Ft. Collins)
    • Publication Assistant, Wolverine Farm Publishing Co. & Bookstore (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing/Editorial Internships (several positions), The Borgen Project (remote)

 

  • Educational Internships:
    • Grading Assistant, NCTE@CSU with Poudre High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Writing Coach and Grader, NCTE@CSU, Fort Collins High School (Ft. Collins)
    • Adult ESL Teacher, Global Refugee Center (Greeley, CO)

 

  • Non-Profit/Communications Internships:
    • Social Media and Communications Intern, Poudre River Library District (Ft. Collins)
    • Communications Intern (paid), Otter Products (Ft. Collins, CO)

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Please contact Mary Hickey, English Department Internship Coordinator, at Mary.Hickey@colostate.edu  for more information on these internships and how to apply.

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Image credit: Colorado State University's Facebook page

Image credit: Colorado State University’s Facebook page

  • Next week, John Calderazzo will present two science communication workshops.  He’ll work on basic communication skills with 20 or so CSU researchers in energy, vet-med, and ecology who will soon present their work at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. to members of Congress, the press, and potential funders.  He’ll also run a science storytelling workshop at CSU Pingree Park campus for the Center for Collaborative Conservation.
  • In June, John Calderazzo will present a talk at ASLE: Association for the Study of Literature and Environment, on his various communication outreach efforts with scientists and their organizations.
  • SueEllen Campbell will be running a half-day, pre-conference workshop on teaching climate change in English and humanities courses at the biannual meeting of ASLE, the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment, at the University of Idaho, in June. Then she will focus on catching up on her backlog of sources to consider adding to the Changing Climates website!   The URL is http://changingclimates.colostate.edu.
  • Matthew Cooperman and Aby Kaupang just returned from readings in L.A., including Cal State San Bernardino, where they addressed the MFA students in a thesis workshop. A long portion of Matthew and Aby’s collaborative hybrid project NOS, is just out in the latest issue of Verse.
  • Antero Garcia has been selected to be a 2015 National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellow. This fellowship will support his ongoing ethnographic research into learning, literacies, and tabletop gameplay.
  • Along with Lee Nickoson, Kris Blair, and Mary P. Sheridan, Tobi Jacobi edited a special issue of Feminist Teacher on feminist community work (available in June 2015).  She and Mary P. Sheridan co-authored a piece entitled, “Critical Feminist Practice and Campus-Community Partnerships: A Review Essay.”
  • Bruce Ronda’s essay, “’Tender Spirits Set in Ferment’: Transcendentalism and the Aesthetics of Conversation” appears in “Whither Transcendentalism?,” a special issue of Revue Française D’Études Américaines/French Review of American Studies, third trimester, 2014.
  • Barbara Sebek’s paper, “Confounding Local and Global in Frank McGuinness’s Mutabilitie (1997)” was accepted for the conference, “Appropriation in an Age of Global Shakespeare,” which will take place at the University of Georgia in November.
  • Mandi Casolo’s short story “Goat’s Mouth” is a finalist for the national literary journal Arts & Letters Fiction Prize.
  • Anton Gerth was accepted to complete his student teaching abroad at the International School of Düsseldorf in Düsseldorf, Germany for Fall 2015 semester.  This is offered through a partnership with CSU’s STEPP program and the University of Northern Iowa.
  • Natalya Stanko, M.A. student in Creative Nonfiction, had her most recent feature story for Sierra Magazine appear in the May issue.  “Enough Is Enough” profiles a small Louisiana town fighting back against a proposal to build a coal terminal inside its city limits.
  • The Washington Post recently ran a fascinating feature article on Tracy Ekstrand, who took many nonfiction writing courses in the department and who also worked on The Colorado Review and helped start the Slow Sanders writing group in town.  You can read that here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/acts-of-faith/wp/2015/03/27/how-one-woman-climbed-her-way-out-of-scientologys-elite-sea-org/?tid=hybrid_experimentrandom_3_na
  • MFA graduate Matt Goering’s satirical literary journalism story, “The Truth of What’s Really Happening Here,” about UFO “researchers” in Colorado’s San Luis Valley, has been accepted by The Normal School.

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ingersollfall

Ingersoll Hall in Fall, image by Jill Salahub

  • SueEllen Campbell and John Calderazzo recently gave a talk at Northern Arizona University, “The Real Work: Facing Climate Change.” They were also interviewed on the local NPR station. John also spoke to an environmental communications class.
  • A portfolio of essays on “The Work of Poetry” has just been released by Free Verse, including, among various riches, work by Matthew Cooperman and Dan Beachy-Quick. The special feature marks the 25th edition of Free Verse, and can be found at http://english.chass.ncsu.edu/freeverse/Archives/2014/prose/WorkOfPoetry.html
  • The most recent issue of Shakespeare Studies, vol. 42, is now available. This issue includes Barbara Sebek’s contribution to a forum on “Diet and Identity in Shakespeare’s England,” edited by Kim Coles and Gitanjali Shahani Chopra.
  • Todd Mitchell ran two writing and craft sessions at ReadCon — a High Plains Library District Event in Greeley to celebrate texts and the creation of texts. Here’s an article from Thursday’s Greeley Tribune with more information on the event: http://www.greeleytribune.com/entertainment/13486821-113/readcon-greeley-downtown-event Lit Pick recently did an author interview with Todd Mitchell. If you’re curious to learn how love letters, DFW, and snakes have influenced Todd, you can find the interview here: http://www.litpick.com/author/todd-mitchell
  • Daniel Owen, INTO adjunct, has accepted an appointment as an English Language Fellow from the Department of State. He will have a 10-month Fellowship in Yamousoukro, Cote d’Ivoire. He will be teaching at National Polytechnic Institute Felix Houphouet Boigny (INPHB). INPHB is a prestigious public university with undergraduate and graduate degree programs in sciences, engineering, and business. He will be teaching general English courses and business English at both the undergraduate and graduate level.
  • Sue Ring deRosset, (MA, Creative Nonfiction, Summer 2013), teaches creative writing workshops at Front Range Community College, recently taught a workshop through Northern Colorado Writers, and is a freelance editorial consultant for memoirists and novelists. Chapter 1 of her thesis, a memoir, appeared in the Spring 2013 Front Range Review as a stand-alone essay titled “The Chambered Nautilus.” Since graduation, she’s had poems published in the Rocky Mountain NP Poetic Inventory and online, and an essay published in the Fort Collins Courier. A book on vultures, the first in a series of limited-edition, hand-bound, letterpress books, is forthcoming from Wolverine Farm Publishing.
  • Greyrock Review Fundraiser Reading at Cranknstein Tuesday, October 28, 2014 at 7 pm to raise money for publication. Camille Dungy, Matthew Cooperman and others will read, and there will be many fabulous prizes!
  • Greyrock Review is now accepting submissions! Greyrock Review is an undergraduate anthology at Colorado State University. Submissions are open from October 6, 2014 to December 1, 2014 for original work in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual arts. Any undergraduate at CSU may submit their work at https://greyrockreview.submittable.com/submit for free and will be notified by December 15, 2014. Any questions may be sent to editor.csu@gmail.com

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