Spring 2017 English, American Studies, and Education Courses

Leif Sorensen teaching E333 Critical Studies of Popular Texts: Science Fiction, Spring 2016

Assistant Professor Leif Sorensen teaching E333 Critical Studies of Popular Texts: Science Fiction, Spring 2016

Disclaimer: We provide the following information to give a sense of what the English department has to offer, but the information here is not intended to replace the support and knowledge of an advisor, especially in the case of choosing the courses necessary to complete your degree or minor.

Lower Division Undergraduate Courses

 

AMST100: Self/Community in American Culture (1600-1877)
Instructor: Daniel Robinson
MWF 11:00

This class will explore events, ideas, presentations, movements, and philosophies that have helped form our national identity. This is not a history course in the traditional sense—we are not exploring chronologies of facts but formations and interrelationships of ideas. We will explore various American founding myths, the importance of religion in emerging and newly emergent societies (Native American and Calvinist), the question of whether the U.S. was “established” as a Christian nation, the rise of New York (the Empire City), the myth of the self-made man, elements of the American Renaissance, and the racial and cultural disparity of the 19th century.

 

AMST101: Self/Community in American Culture (since 1877)

Meaning and development of American culture since 1877, through themes of self and community in art, politics, society, and religion.

      Section 1 – MWF 1:00
      Instructor: Catherine Ratliff

      Section 2 – TR 9:30
      Instructor: Ashley Davies

This course will focus on how storytelling influences, reflects, and forms our national identity. We will employ a variety of interdisciplinary materials from the fields of literature, history, music, film, the visual arts, and others to examine the development of American identity. Texts assigned will range from high culture like sculpture, novels, and poetry to more modern and popular texts like podcasts, comics, and films.

 

E140: The Study of Literature
Instructor: Hannah Caballero
TR 11:00

This course will apply formal structural elements of literature and literary theory to closely examine texts and connect them to their larger historical and cultural contexts. We will read a variety of genres including fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction from a wide range of authors and learn how to critically think and write about texts.

 

E140: The Study of Literature
Debra Walker
Day and Time TBA

E140 is a reading intensive course in which students will use an anthology to study three literary genres: (short) fiction, poetry, and drama.  The end of the course is devoted to a novel which is sometimes a work of creative non-fiction.  Literary terms and critical approaches are covered, and assignments include quizzes, in-class activities, tests (midterm and final) and in-class writing.

 

E142: Reading without Borders
Instructor: Joelle Paulson
MWF 2:00

Reading without Borders examines the works of authors from a range of international and cross-national backgrounds, addressing a plurality of cultural and ethnic voices, and emphasizing the dynamics of their interaction and mutual interpretation. We will study a variety of media and genres, including fiction and non-fiction, graphic texts, as well as dramatic and documentary film, to focus on themes of immigration, exile, and education.  Readings may include work by Sonia Nazario, Maxine Hong Kingston, Leslie Marmon Silko, Dave Eggers, Nalo Hopkinson, and Marjane Satrapi.

 

E232: Introduction to the Humanities

Great literature of Western cultural tradition from ancient times to present.

      Section 1 – MWF 11:00
      Instructor: Debra Walker

      Section 2 – TR 9:30
      Instructor: Tom Conway

This course promotes a critical consciousness of Western intellectual thought through a survey of literature that has both articulated (e.g. Homer, Plato, Dante) and challenged (e.g. Marx, Nietzsche) the West’s most influential worldviews.

 

E238: 20th-Century Fiction

20th-century fiction chosen for its relevance to global and cultural awareness.

      Section 1 – MWF 12:00
      Instructor: Sharon Grindle

      Section 2 – TR 2:00
      Instructor: Jeremy Proctor

 

E240: Introduction to Poetry

Development of critical skills necessary to understand and enjoy poetry.

      Instructor: Deborah Dimon
      MWF 10:00

      Instructor:  Sasha Steensen
MWF 2:00

 

 

E242: Reading Shakespeare
Instructor: Sharon Grindle
MWF 1:00

Reading of Shakespeare texts, using various approaches of interpretation for understanding and relation to our contemporary cultural situation.

 

E245: World Drama
Instructor: Judith Lane
MWF 10:00

World drama in cultural contexts.

 

E270: Introduction to American Literature

History and development of American writings from 16th-century travel narratives through early 20th-century modernism.

      Section 1 – MWF 11:00
      Instructor: Nancy Henke

We will begin by working to define American literature and understand where it “belongs” in relation to history and myth, and then examine the ways in which early American literature demonstrates unbounded opportunity and distinct uneasiness with regard to the colonial endeavor and early republic. In the second half of the course, we’ll explore the genesis and interpretations of the American Dream. We will read origin stories, explorers’ narratives, poetry, captivity narratives, slave narratives, non-fiction essays, political texts, novels, and short fiction. Authors may include Bradstreet, Paine, Poe, Dickinson, Twain, Whitman, Douglass, Chopin, and Stowe.

      Section 2 – MWF 1:00
      Instructor: Daniel Robinson

Drawing on the rich traditions of Native American, British, European, and African cultures, U.S. literature has its origins in the literatures and myths of explorers and settlers, visionaries and slaves, adventurers and homebuilders.  We will explore the voices, themes, contradictions, and evolutions of our American literature, treating the literature as a record of the experience of our cultural history, in all its complexities and contradictions. To access this dynamic vision of America, we will expand the definition of “literature” by including autobiography, slave narratives, sermons, folk tales, and creation myths.

      Section 3 – TR 9:30
      Instructor: Terrie Sandelin

 

E276: Survey of British Literature I
Instructor: Lynn Shutters
TR 2:00

We will read British literature spanning roughly 1000 years, including works from Britain’s Anglo-Saxon era (700-1066), later Middle Ages (the 1300s), Renaissance (1485-1660), and the 18th century (1688-1832). We’ll consider how old texts can be made pleasurable and meaningful to modern readers. Despite the frequent notion that life was simpler in the past, we’ll discover that early literature addressed profound upheavals in British society involving politics, economics, religion, and gender. Thinking about how early British literature addressed such issues will help us consider how literature continues to operate as a powerful tool for both registering and challenging cultural changes today.

 

E277: Survey of British Literature II

British literature from the Romantics to the present in relation to its historical contexts.

      Section 1 – MWF 9:00
      Instructor: Judith Lane

      Section 2 – MWF 10:00
      Instructor: Kristina Quynn

 

E280: Introduction to Digital Humanities
Instructor: Jaime Jordan
TR 12:30

This class evaluates what the digital in digital humanities means, and how new technologies are shaping humanistic study. Through workshops, readings, and discussions, students develop an understanding of the field, including major scholars, centers, projects, resources, and methods, and contribute to the scholarly discussion through the creation of digital projects. Students learn core digital humanities tools and methods: text analysis, topic modelling, information visualization, and coding using R (no previous knowledge necessary). Readings may include Shakespeare plays and screenplays, A New Companion to Digital Humanities, Text Analysis with R for Students of Literature, and Graphs, Maps, Trees.

Upper Division Undergraduate Courses

 

E311A: Intermediate Fiction Workshop
Instructor: E. J. Levy
TR 4:00

Group discussion of student writing, literary models, and theory; emphasis on developing individual style.

 

E311B: Intermediate Poetry Workshop
Instructor: Camille Dungy
TR 12:30

A workshop focusing on creating and critiquing student-generated poetry. You will produce at least 8 new poems over the course of the term. Our classes will focus on the production, development, and revision of these poems within the context of the students’ own body of work as well as larger creative communities’. Our workshopping style will vary throughout the semester, so that we can understand what different approaches might reveal in your poems. Course texts: The Crafty Poet II edited by Diane Lockwood, Bright Dead Things by Ada Limon, and poems by Mike Lala and others.

 

E324:Teaching English as a Second language
Instructor: Cory Holland
MWF 12-12:50

Introduction to teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) for language concentration students, teacher certification candidates and for those wanting to teach abroad. This course will cover theories of first and second language acquisition, instructional design and philosophy, pedagogy, and assessments used in TESOL. Discussion of pedagogical theories is structured around the idea of ‘best practices’ as well as a thorough understanding of the linguistic structure of English. Student are required to complete a practical experience, either by observing ESL teaching or by doing such teaching themselves. A variety of opportunities are identified by the instructor.

 

E329: Pragmatics and Discourse Analysis
Instructor: Gerry Delahunty
MWF 1-1:50

E329 introduces students to the study of Pragmatics and Discourse Analysis, with examples from English and other languages that students know or are studying. The course introduces foundational assumptions about language and language use before focusing on its primary topics. Pragmatics is the study of general principles that communicators invoke when producing and interpreting language in context. Discourse analysis studies the properties of specific types of language use in specific settings, e.g., conversational, advertising, legal, medical, educational, and multi-medial, as well as such topics as politeness, ideology, gender, genre, identity, and culture, all areas of exciting current research and discovery.

 

E332: Modern Women Writers
Category 2 & 3
Instructor: E. J. Levy
TR 11:00

Is there such a thing as women’s literature? If so, how does one define it? Is it meaningful to discuss art in terms of gender, when gender categorization is itself in question? In this course we’ll read essays, short stories, memoirs, and novels by 20th- and 21st-century women writers, and consider historic and contemporary debates over the relationship between gender and literature. Engaging in critical textual analysis and creative writing, we will interrogate assumptions about the significance of gender in art, the role of the woman writer, and how stories inform life. Authors include Woolf, Wittig, Silko, Moore, Kingston, Dangarembga, Winterson, Offill, Cline.

 

E333: Critical Studies of Popular Texts, Reality Hunger
Category 3
Instructor: Harrison Candelaria Fletcher
MWF 2:00

“Genre,” says David Shields, “is a minimum security prison.” In his 2010 manifesto, Reality Hunger, he called for a riot – the creation of literary forms obliterating the walls between fiction and nonfiction, memory and imagination, perception and fact, originality and appropriation. This course will examine writers who do just that – inhabit the intersection of art and reality. Readings include: Reality Hunger and How Literature Saved My Life by Shields, About a Mountain by John D’Agata, Lying by Lauren Slater, Leaving the Atocha Station by Ben Lerner, Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston and Rings of Saturn by W.G. Sebald.

 

E341: Literary Criticism and Theory

Theory and practice of modern literary analysis and evaluation; writing about literature.

      Section 1 – MWF 9:00
      Instructor: Paul Trembath

      Section 2 – MWF 11:00
      Instructor: Aparna Gollapudi

 

E342: Shakespeare I
Category 1 & 4
Instructor: William Marvin
MWF 2:00

Shakespeare’s development as a poet and dramatist from the early plays through Hamlet.

 

E343: Shakespeare II
Category 1 & 4
Instructor: Zach Hutchins
MWF 1:00

Shakespeare’s development as a poet and dramatist after Hamlet.

 

E370: American Literature in Cultural Contexts, Postmodernism
Category 2 and 3
Instructor: Andrew Altschul
TR 2:00

In this course we will read novels, stories, essays, and films in an attempt to answer basic questions about Postmodernism. The most basic – Is there such a thing as Postmodernism? – is surprisingly difficult to answer. Others, including When did Postmodernism begin (and end)? and Who is postmodern? and What are the aesthetic, intellectual, and political positions underlying the movement? will be the subject of discussion, debate, and analysis, both in class and on a course blog to which students will regularly contribute. We will also look at the effects of postmodernity on other areas of contemporary culture.

 

E401: Teaching Reading
Instructor: Natalie Dudley
MW 4:00

Theory and pedagogy for understanding, interpreting, and evaluating print and visual texts.

 

E402: Teaching Composition
Instructor: Mary Shaffer
TR 4:00

Theory and practice of the analysis and the teaching of writing.

 

E403: Writing the Environment
Category 4
Instructor: Matthew Cooperman
TR 4:00

Creative writing in conjunction with study of recent American literature on nature and landscape.

 

E405: Adolescents’ Literature
Instructor: Todd Mitchell
TR 12:30-1:45

E405 is designed to give future teachers, writers, and literature students a survey of mostly contemporary novels for young adults. It is an extreme reading course in which students will have the opportunity to read eleven core texts, and approximately 3,000 pages of choice book reading. Class sessions will focus on discussion, ways books can be taught, and creative activities to help readers connect with texts. Central to our study will be an exploration of identity; how we “read” and “write” the self; and how adolescents are affected by issues such as race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration, culture, and consumerism.

 

E412A: Advanced Fiction Workshop

Individual projects with group discussion and analysis.

      Section 1 – TR 11:00
      Instructor: Leslee Becker

      Section 2 – TR 12:30
      Instructor: Andrew Altschul

 

E412B: Advanced Poetry Workshop
Instructor: Dan Beachy-Quick
TR 11:00

Individual projects with group discussion and analysis.

 

E412C: Nonfiction Workshop
Instructor: Todd Mitchell
TR 2:00-3:15

E412C is an advanced creative nonfiction workshop designed to help students develop the skills to better meet their individual writing goals. An anthology of contemporary creative nonfiction essays will likely be used, and exploration of different subgenres of creative nonfiction (such as memoir, personal essay, lyric essay, writing of place, creative science writing, and literary journalism) will be encouraged. Through workshops, discussion of contemporary essays, and writing assignments, students will consider a wide array of writing techniques. Specific topics will be determined by student needs as revealed by trends in student essays.

 

E440: American Prose to 1900, The Great American Novel(s)
Category 1
Instructor: Zach Hutchins
MWF 10:00-10:50

This course in the rise and development of the American novel will introduce students to runaway bestsellers (Charlotte Temple & Uncle Tom’s Cabin), critically acclaimed masterpieces (The Scarlet Letter & Moby-Dick), and classic works of children’s literature (Little Women & The Wonderful Wizard of Oz), as well as a few other excellent but more obscure books. Chances are good that you’ll cross off more than one title on that to-read list sitting on your nightstand—and in the process, you’ll gain insight on the problems of urban racism, systemic poverty, and victors’ history that continue to haunt our country.

 

E441: American Prose Since 1900, Wars We Have Seen
Category 2
Instructor: Leif Sorensen
TR 9:30

This course studies American prose since 1900 as a series of responses to, representations of, and fantasies about war and explores interdisciplinary connections between literature, politics, and technology. We will read fiction, memoir, popular texts, and reportage. Our texts have a range of goals including: capturing the true experience of war, focusing on returning veterans and the home front, imagining future wars, and presenting contemporary total war as something unrepresentable. Authors studied may include Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Leslie Marmon Silko, Tim O’Brien, Don DeLillo, Donald Barthelme, Sam Greenlee, Robert Heinlein, Kurt Vonnegut, and Anthony Swofford.

 

E444: Restoration and 18th-Century Crama
Category 1 & 4
Instructor: Aparna Gollapudi
MWF 11:00

Major plays and dramatic issues from 1660 to 1780 including Dryden, Etherege, Congreve, Sheridan, and others.

 

E455: European Literature after 1900
Instructor: Paul Trembath
MWF 11:00

Continental European texts in translation since 1900.

 

EDUC463: Methods in Teaching Language Arts
Instructor: Pam Coke
MW 10:00-11:40

This course is designed to help you combine theory, research, and practice into sound strategies for teaching English in middle, junior, and senior high schools. You will begin to develop a philosophy of secondary English teaching and learn how to plan instruction that is consistent with that philosophy and with various national, state, and district guidelines. Content includes examination of and attention to Common Core State Standards; planning of lessons and units; discussion of issues involving professional educators; development of means to assess learning; and discussion of methods to teach English language arts, including journalism and speech.

 

E465: Topics in Literature and Language
      Section 1 – MW 4:00
      Hard Feelings: Critical Emotion Studies and the Humanities
      Instructor: Lisa Langstraat

Plato thought they were dangerous. The Mayans thought  they resided in the liver. The English language has more than 400 words to describe them. Emotions have often been understood as idiosyncratic responses to stimuli—an approach that makes emotions hard to understand in light of cultural dynamics. Critical Emotion Studies (CES) has emerged as a vital and provocative area of literary and rhetorical study. This course offers an overview of contemporary theories of emotion; focuses on raced and gendered emotions; and examines case studies of specific emotions—happiness and anger—to draw connections between CES, the Humanities, and how we understand ourselves and others in the world.

      Section 2 – TR 2:00
      The Short Story
      Instructor: Leslee Becker

Storytelling—its origins, pleasures, and techniques—is a genre that tries to tell big truths in small places. We’ll read classic stories and contemporary ones to appreciate what’s involved in telling a good story, such as this whopper from folklore: God created human beings for the stories, so three apples fell from heaven, one for the storyteller, one for the listener, and the third for the person who takes the story to heart. We’ll read scores of writers, including Alice Munro, Chekhov, Hemingway, Joyce, Poe, Flannery O’Connor, Raymond Carver, Jhumpa Lahiri, Kafka, Eudora Welty, García Márquez, Sherman Alexie, Haruki Murakami, and many others.

 

E478: Modern Poetry
Category 2 & 4
Instructor: Sasha Steensen
MWF 1:00

Major British and American poets from late 19th century to World War II.

 

Professor Roze Hentschell teachers her E630C: Space and Place in Literary Studies class, Spring 2016

Professor Roze Hentschell teaches her E630C: Space and Place in Literary Studies class, Spring 2016

Graduate Courses

E504: Situating Composition Studies
Instructor: Sarah Sloane
TR 12:30

To look at how written composition is situated within the academy is to look at how writing program administrators, writing center directors, writing studies scholars and their students are located in/by different universities. We will explore academic labor issues; the general valuation and history of composition instruction; material and academic structures conducive (or not) to teaching writing; community literacy centers and other non-academic writing spaces; race, class, gender, and literacy; and the rhetoric and reality of university writing instruction. Scholarship about first-year composition curricula, critical pedagogy, and the politics and ethics of teaching writing for social action will also be covered.

 

E505B: Major Authors – American, Don DeLillo
Instructor: Judy Doenges
TR 2:00

 

E507: Special Topics in Linguistics, Language Across Cultures
Instructor: Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker
TR 2:00

The main goals of this course are: 1) to examine the ways in which language and culture interact and 2) to gain a greater understanding of how communication practices reflect cultural differences, including instances of both intercultural conflict and cooperation. The course will provide theoretical and methodological insights into intercultural communication and will give students an opportunity to apply their knowledge through reflection and critical analysis of various manifestations of intercultural communication differences. Students will carry out a research project to explore the effect of cultural variables in language use, learning, and teaching.

 

E513C: Form and Technique in the Essay
Instructor: Debby Thompson
T 4:00

Selected readings in and discussions of modern literature and criticism from the writer’s point of view with emphasis on form and technique.

 

E515: Syntax for ESL/EFL
Instructor: Gerry Delahunty
MWF 3:00

English teachers must be familiar with the typical meanings and uses of the major syntactic, inflectional, and derivational patterns of English so as to be able to select and present this material in a variety of teaching circumstances. Course topics reflect the terminology and topics in current ESL/EFL pedagogical materials. Students completing E515 understand the linguistic concepts in ESL/EFL pedagogical materials and methods and in Second Language Acquisition research; are proficient in basic linguistic analysis; can apply analytic techniques to learner data; and can make use of grammatical descriptions of English and other languages for teaching and materials development.

 

E528: Professional ESL Teaching – Theory to Practice
Instructor: Anthony Becker
MW 4:00

Theory and practice in the planning and teaching of English as a second/foreign language.

 

E608: Integrating Writing in the Academic Core
Instructor: Tobi Jacobi
TR 9:30

Theories and best practices associated with writing integration in the academic core.

 

E630A: Special Topics in Literature – Area Studies, Contemporary U.S. Fiction
Instructor: Leif Sorensen
R 4:00

This course is an in-depth study of recent fiction published in the U.S. We will read a range of contemporary writers including Colson Whitehead, Ed Park, Ruth Ozeki, Jennifer Egan, Chimimanda Ngozi Adichie, and others. As we read we will grapple with the impossibility of knowing a field that grows too fast for any one reader to keep up with (at least 50,000 works of American fiction are published each year). We will also explore critical models for theorizing our present moment. Is our moment best understood as the Age of Amazon, post-ironic, post-postmodern, neo-liberal, or the Anthopocene Era?

 

E630C: Special Topics in Literature – Theory and Technique Studies, Medieval Emotion
Instructor: Lynn Shutters
TR 11:00

This course examines medieval literature to excavate how medieval peoples formulated and practiced emotions. We will also consider how emotion studies scholars position the Middle Ages and what larger historical trajectories such positionings invite. Finally, we will consider what specific interventions literary specialists can make in emotion studies. Traditionally, literary texts have been viewed as fanciful and therefore untrustworthy as historical accounts of emotion. Literary specialists have argued against this position, although on diverse grounds. In sum, this class connects medieval, literary, and emotion studies to enrich our understanding of literature, historicism, and past and present practices of emotional life.

 

E632: Professional Concerns in English, Teenagers as Cultural Artifacts: Unpacking the Role of Adolescents around Today’s World
Instructor: Pam Coke
W 4:00

Around the world, books and movies written and produced for teenagers are becoming a central part of the larger culture, such as The Hunger Games in the United States and Battle Royale in Japan. Through books, films, games, and music, we will examine how teenagers are a social construction that reflects—and perhaps refracts—a society’s values, beliefs, and capabilities. Essential questions include: What does it mean to be a teenager in different countries around the world? How do teenagers function as cultural artifacts? In what ways are teenagers a central part of the global economy?

 

E633: Special Topics in Discourse Studies, Digital Publishing, Scholarship & Editing
Instructor: Tim Amidon
TR 11:00

Publishing in academic, literary, and popular venues increasingly leverages the affordances of digitally networked media platforms. Digital journals such as Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, & Pedgagogy and Enculturation push boundaries associated with traditional notions of composing, publishing, scholarship, and editing. Despite the growing demand for and relevancy of digital publishing, scholarship, and editing, few writers, scholars, and editors are formally trained in the literacies and proficiencies associated with this work. This course is applicable to all graduate degree programs within the English Department, as all disciplines have turned toward digital publishing and these editorial literacies are in increasing demand within/outside of the academy.

 

E635: Critical Studies in Literature and Culture, Pragmatism and American Literature
Instructor: Bruce Ronda
TR 9:30

Pragmatism emerged in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in the work of William James, Charles Sanders Peirce, and John Dewey, who located truth-claims in experience and consequences. Since the late 1980s American thinkers and literary critics like Richard Rorty, Cornell West, and Nancy Fraser have applied the insights of that movement to literary works. In this course we read essays, poems, and prose by Emerson, Dickinson, Wallace Stevens, Gertrude Stein, and Susan Howe, among others, in light of insights from Pragmatism. Our course will also push into our moment by asking about the possibility of feminist and queer pragmatisms.

 

E638: Assessment of English Language Learners, Assessment in the TEFL/TESL Classroom
Instructor: Anthony Becker
MWF 2:00

Theory, practice, and professional conduct in the assessment of English language learners.

 

E640A: Graduate Fiction Workshop
Instructor: Leslee Becker
M 4:00

 

E640B: Graduate Poetry Workshop
Instructor: Camille Dungy
T 4:00

An intensive poetry workshop focusing on creating and critiquing student-generated poetry. You will produce at least 12 new poems over the course of the term. Our classes will focus on the production, development, and revision of these poems within the context of the students’ own body of work as well as larger creative communities’. Our workshopping style will vary throughout the semester, so that we can understand what different approaches might reveal in your poems.

 

E641: Nonfiction Workshop
Instructor: Harrison Candelaria Fletcher
W 4:00