Spring 2017 Composition Courses

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Disclaimer: We provide the following information to give a sense of what the English department has to offer, but the information here is not intended to replace the support and knowledge of an advisor, especially in the case of choosing the courses necessary to complete your degree or minor.

 

CO130: Academic Writing

Students will critically read and engage with texts including videos, news articles, and scholarly articles that focus on current social conversations and issues. Students will use these texts to build academic writing skills including summarizing, analyzing, researching, and evaluating and working with sources to form arguments. This course is designed to build critical reading and thinking skills, introduce students to academic writing conventions, and prepare students for Composition 150: College Composition.

 

CO150: College Composition

Students learn rhetorical approaches to writing, which enables them to become flexible and adaptable writers who can respond to varying audiences and purposes. Students develop their critical reading abilities, engage in library and field research, develop revision and collaborative writing approaches, learn how to evaluate and integrate sources of information, and explore multimodal forms of composing/designing texts. Students examine the perspectives of stakeholders on topical issues relating to a course theme and then write a major researched argumentative academic paper. Students also construct additional arguments for varied public and professional audiences.

 

CO300: Writing Arguments

Students develop their argumentative skill in multiple contexts—academic, public, personal—by analyzing and creating a variety of texts. Students learn key concepts in rhetoric, including: audience, the rhetorical situation, Toulmin-based analysis, Rogerian argument, visual/aural argumentation and others. Special emphasis on writing processes, accessing and evaluating sources, peer critiquing, and revising. Students gain writing experience that they can apply to their roles as scholars, citizens, consumers and aspiring professionals.

 

CO301A: Writing in the Disciplines – Arts and Humanities

This course delves deeply into rhetorical analysis and sophisticated composition technique with a focus on reading and writing essays for the general public that appeal to cultural and social takes on universal issues and themes. Explore: personal essays, travel writing, literary and performance reviews, political essays, interviews, and more. Designed for those with an interest in the Arts and Humanities.

 

CO301B: Writing in the Disciplines – Sciences

Students focus on the contexts for scientific writing and how specialists in their field write for non-specialist academic and non-academic audiences. This course offers students multiple opportunities to read and analyze science writing and to research, write, and revise their own science writing. Writing in fields like microbiology, environmental and radiological sciences, neuroscience, or biomedical sciences, e.g., is a specialized skill where  scientists learn about particular genres serving different purposes for a wide range of audiences.

 

CO301C: Writing in the Disciplines – Social Sciences

Students learn writing strategies for addressing general audiences about ideas and issues in the social sciences. They learn to translate complex information and ideas into prose that is accessible to any educated reader, both inside and outside their primary or major field. During the first half of the course, students read and analyze articles to understand how texts respond to rhetorical context. In the second half of the semester, students learn and practice the range of choices available to social science writers, not just for the university but also in professional genres required when they graduate.

 

CO301D: Writing in the Disciplines – Education

Students learn writing strategies for addressing general audiences about ideas and issues in education. They learn to translate complex information and ideas into prose that is accessible to any educated reader, both inside and outside the field of education. During the first half of the course, students read and analyze articles to understand how texts respond to rhetorical context. In the second half of the semester, students learn and practice the range of choices available to writers in education, not just for the university but also in professional genres required when they graduate.

 

CO401: Writing and Style
Instructor: Doug Cloud
MWF 2:00

This course helps students go beyond academic essays and become better public writers and arguers. We pay close attention to the finer points of argument, style and sentence-level rhetoric, mastering a set of advanced writing practices with broad applicability. We will not approach genres as a set of forms to be learned, but instead practice techniques for understanding and mastering new genres we encounter. The major project in this course will be an extensively researched piece of public writing on a topic of students’ choosing, developed in multiple drafts over the course of the semester.

 

CO402: Principles of Digital Rhetoric and Design
Instructor: Tim Amidon
TR 12:30

Advanced study of rhetorical contexts shaping online texts. Includes instruction in coding and digital design.