Fall 2017: English (E), American Studies (AMST), and Education (EDUC)

Author and alumnus Steve Church talks with Sarah Sloane’s E501 class

Disclaimer: We provide the following information to give a sense of what the English department has to offer, but the information here is not intended to replace the support and knowledge of an advisor, especially in the case of choosing the courses necessary to complete your degree or minor.

AMST100: Self/Community in American Culture (1600-1877)
Instructor: Daniel Robinson
MWF 8:00am-8:50am

This class will explore events, ideas, presentations, movements, and philosophies that have helped form our national identity. This is not a history course in the traditional sense—we are not exploring chronologies of facts but formations and interrelationships of ideas. We’ll work within various disciplines—history, art, religion, literature, and film among them, concentrating on four units: The Evolving Views of ‘Land’ in late-19th century America; The White City of the 1893 Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition; The Women’s Movement from 1840s to the 19th Amendment; and Modernism in art, literature, dance, and music (especially in the Harlem Renaissance).

AMST101: Self/Community in American Culture (since 1877)

Meaning and development of American culture since 1877, through themes of self and community in art, politics, society, and religion.

            Section 001
            Instructor: Ashley Davies
            MWF 11:00am-11:50pm

Our course will focus on how narratives shapes and reflects our national identity. Unlike more traditional history courses, our focus will not be on chronologies but on American ideologies formed and reflected in a variety of interdisciplinary materials: literature, history, music, film, the visual arts, and others. The course is organized based on some of the core concepts in American Studies, specifically, Western regionalism, gender, colonialism, race, globalization, and technology. The texts assigned will range from high culture like paintings, novels and poetry to more modern and popular texts like podcasts, comics, and films.

            Section 002
            Instructor: Catherine Ratliff
            TR 9:30am-10:45am

            Section 003
            Instructor: Catherine Ratliff
            TR 4:00pm-6:45pm

What does it mean to be American? This course explores how cultural, literary, and historical narratives reflect American national identity from Reconstruction to the present. True to the spirit of American studies, this is not a traditional history course. Instead, we will engage a variety of interdisciplinary materials—literature, popular culture, and scholarly texts—in order to better understand contemporary concepts of individual and collective Americanness. Students will engage with primary and secondary sources dealing with race, gender, sexuality, identity, religion, politics, and society. Emphasis on students’ analytical skills, close reading, interdisciplinary scholarship, and critical thinking.

E140: The Study of Literature

Basic principles of reading literary texts.

            Section 001
            Instructor: Ed Lessor
            MWF 12:00pm-12:50pm

            Setion 002
            Instructor: Walker
            MWF 1:00pm-1:50pm

Students read short stories, poems, a one-act play and full-length play, and one novel. Students vote on which novel to read at the end of the course. Past examples include Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, and Cormac McCarthy’s The Road. Literary terms are studied and used to organize the course, as are critical approaches like Marxism, feminism and historical and cultural strategies. There is a midterm exam, a final exam and reaction papers we will write in class. The course is reading intensive and willingness to engage in lively class discussions is expected.

E142: Reading without Borders
Instructor: Staff
MWF 2:00pm-2:50pm

Authors from a range of international, cross-national, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds focusing on themes of immigration, exile, or education.

E210: Beginning Creative Writing

Basic techniques of writing fiction and poetry; may include some elements of drama.

            Section 001
            Instructor: Staff
            TR 9:30am-10:45am

            Section 002
            Instructor: Staff
            TR 11:00am-12:15pm

            Section 003
            Instructor: Staff
            TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

            Section 004
            Instructor: Staff
            TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

E232: Introduction to Humanities

Great literature of Western cultural tradition from ancient times to present.

            Section 001
            Instructor: Paul Trembath
            MWF 10:00am-10:50am

            Section 002
            Instructor: James Roller
            MWF 11:00am-11:50am

E236: Short Fiction
Instructor: Daniel Robinson
MWF 10:00am-10:50am

This is a new course, and this will be the first time that it is offered.  We will focus on short fiction in various forms – parables, stories, flash fiction, connected collections, and novellas; and we will study various technical elements of fiction by looking at short fiction – including plot, narrative point of view, symbolism, and setting.  Basically, this is an introduction to the forms and functions of fiction.

E238: 20th Century Fiction

20th-century fiction chosen for its relevance to global and cultural awareness.

            Section 001
            Instructor: Sharon Grindle
            MWF 12:00pm-12:50pm

 

We’ll move through the last 117 years and around the globe to examine how we perceive and influence the world around us, focusing on one of the key constructs of the modern sensibility: the human body. Our examinations of literary works will question how the body might reflect a sense of self and a sense of nationalized or otherwise categorized bodies, and how our sense of what the body is reflects changing values and conceptions.

            Section 002
            Instructor: Jeremy Proctor
            TR 11:00am-12:15pm

            Section 003
            Instructor: Todd Mitchell
            TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

            Section 004
            Instructor: Matthew Cooperman
            TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

E240: Introduction to Poetry

Development of critical skills necessary to understand and enjoy poetry.

            Section 001
            Instructor: Terrie Sandelin
            MWF 9:00am-9:50am

            Section 002
            Instructor: Deborah Dimon
            MWF 11:00am-11:50am

            Section 003
            Instructor: Sasha Steensen
            TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

E242: Reading Shakespeare
Instructor: Barbara Sebek
MWF 1:00pm-1:50pm

Reading of Shakespeare texts, using various approaches of interpretation for understanding and relation to our contemporary cultural situation.

E245: World Drama
Instructor: Amanda Memoli
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

This class introduces students to many of the major shifts in Western drama. Students will also engage with literature traditions from Africa, the Caribbean, Japan, and China. This course provides an introduction to some versions of drama from around the world in various time periods. It is merely a sampling which will acquaint students with the study of dramatic literature in cultural contexts. We will consider historical, cultural, and performance specificities. We will also explore how drama reflects and creates cultural identities.

E270: Introduction to American Literature

History and development of American writings from 16th-century travel narratives through early 20th-century modernism.

            Section 001
            Instructor: Zach Hutchins
            MWF 10:00am-10:50am

            Section 002
           Instructor:  Nancy Henke
           MWF 11:00am-11:50am

We will begin by working to define American literature and understand where it “belongs” in relation to history and myth, and then examine the ways in which early American literature demonstrates unbounded opportunity and distinct uneasiness with regard to the colonial endeavor and early republic. In the second half of the course, we’ll explore the genesis and interpretations of the American Dream. We will read origin stories, explorers’ narratives, poetry, captivity narratives, slave narratives, non-fiction essays, political texts, novels, and short fiction. Authors may include Bradstreet, Paine, Poe, Dickinson, Twain, Whitman, Douglass, Chopin, and Stowe.

E276: Survey of British Literature I

British literature from Beowulf through the 18th century in relation to its historical contexts.

            Section 001
            Instructor: William Marvin
            MWF 11:00am-11:50am

            Section 002
            Instructor: Aparna Gollapudi
            TR 11:00am-12:15pm

E277: Survey of British Literature II

British literature from the Romantics to the present in relation to its historical contexts.

            Section 001
            Instructor: Judith Lane
            MWF 9:00am-9:50am

            Section 002
            Instructor: Judith Lane
            MWF 1:00pm-1:50pm

 

E311A: Intermediate Fiction Writing

Group discussion of student writing, literary models, and theory; emphasis on developing individual style.

            Section 001
            Instructor: Thomas Conway
            TR 9:30am-10:45am

            Section 002
            Instructor: Judy Doenges
            TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

E311B: Intermediate Poetry Writing
Instructor: Matthew Cooperman
TR 4:00pm-5:15pm

Group discussion of student writing, literary models, and theory; emphasis on developing individual style.

E311C: Intermediate Nonfiction Writing
Instructor: Harrison Candelaria Fletcher
TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Group discussion of student writing, literary models, and theory; emphasis on developing individual style.

E320: Introduction to the Study of Language
Instructor: Cory Holland
TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Varied topics covering general linguistics or the relationships between language and literature or society and science.

E322: English Language for Teachers I
Instructor: Cindy O’Donnell-Allen
MWF 1:00pm-1:50pm

Foundations of language structure, emphasizing grammar, sounds, spelling, word structure, linguistic variation, usage, acquisition, and pedagogy.

E331: Medieval Women Writers
Instructor: Lynn Shutters
TR 11:00am-12:15pm

In this class we’ll contemplate how reading and writing were themselves imagined as gendered activities in the Middle Ages, and we’ll examine how women writers creatively adapted and altered their culture’s gender constructions and literary traditions. We’ll think about how we use terms like “author” or “literature” and how we might usefully expand our understanding of both. Authors are likely to include Christina of Markyate, Clemence of Barking, Marie de France, Heloise, Christine de Pizan, Joan of Arc, Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, and Margaret Paston. Finally, we’ll study some contemporary works to consider how we imagine female authorship today.

E337: Western Mythology
Instructor: William Marvin
MWF 9:00am-9:50am

Major themes in western myth: classical, Biblical, and Germanic.

E339: Literature of the Earth
Instructor: Lynn Badia
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

In this course we will explore how literary narratives shape our knowledge and experience of the natural world. Covering several literary genres over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, we will gain critical perspective on how literature informs our planetary and environmental consciousness. Over the course of the semester, we will develop a critical vocabulary for thinking about environmental issues while examining the history of concepts such as “nature” and “wilderness” and their entanglements with national and cultural projects. Readings will include the work of authors such as Thomas King, Lydia Millet, Kim Stanley Robinson, and Leslie Marmon Silko.

E340: Literature and Film Studies — (Inter)National Stages of Irish Cinema
Instructor: Kristina Quynn
MWF 1:00pm-1:50pm

This course focuses on the representation of Ireland and the Irish in modern and contemporary drama and film. We consider the staging of Irishness from the 19th-century to the contemporary moment alongside popular representations of the Irish within American, British, and Irish cinematic traditions. We pay close attention to the intersecting concerns Irish writers, artists, and filmmakers take up in representing urban/rural interests, Irish national history, the “Troubles” in Northern Ireland, “post-national” Irishness, diaspora and globalization, and shifting terrains of gender and sexuality in contemporary Ireland. Works by Yeats, O’Casey, Flaherty, Ford, McDonough, Becket, and other influential figures in Irish literature and cinema.

E341: Literary Criticism and Theory

Theory and practice of modern literary analysis and evaluation; writing about literature.

            Section 001
            Instructor: Paul Trembath
            MWF 9:00am-9:50am

            Section 002
            Instructor: Aparna Gollapudi
            TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

E342: Shakespeare I
Instructor: Barbara Sebek
MWF 11:00am-11:50am

Shakespeare’s development as a poet and dramatist from the early plays through Hamlet.

E343: Shakespeare II
Instructor: William Marvin
MWF 1:00pm-1:50pm

Shakespeare’s development as a poet and dramatist after Hamlet.

E370: American Literature in Cultural Contexts — Next American Essay
Instructor: Harrison Candelaria Fletcher
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

At its French root, essai means to attempt, to try, to endeavor. This course will do just that by removing the essay from its academic confines to examine its ancient beginnings and shape-shifting possibilities. Drawing from such sources as Lost Origins of the Essay and The Next American Essay, edited by John D’Agata, we will explore what makes an essay an essay and how events, places, memories, politics, culture and other genres influence form and narrative. In addition to class discussion and critical work we will write our own essays to experiment with approach and audience.

E405: Adolescents’ Literature
Instructor: Ricki Ginsberg
MW 4:00pm-5:15pm

This course is designed to focus on the reading, analysis, and understanding of young adult literature. The reading for the course will be intense and rewarding with approximately one core novel per week and also 3,000 pages of students’ choice reading. The course is designed primarily for future English teachers to prepare them to examine issues of adolescents/ce and to guide them with supportive practices for teaching young-adult texts critically in the classroom. Themes explored include: culture, (dis)ability, gender, immigration, intersectionality, race, sexuality, and social class.

E431: 19th Century English Fiction
Instructor: Ellen Brinks
TR 9:30am-10:45am

Nineteenth-century Britain: the great migration from rural to urban areas; the scandal of women attending university and riding public transportation; evolutionary science challenging religious beliefs; laborers fighting for their right to fair wages; the rise of a consumer society. These new social realities are reflected in the 19th-century British novel, a deeply entertaining form that includes realist, gothic, sensational, and satirical elements. Students in this course will gain an in-depth understanding of the formal and thematic variety in works by Shelley, Austen, the Brontës, Dickens, Hardy, and others. Critical approaches to the novels will constitute a central part of the course.

E456: Topics in Critical Theory — Theory and Literature of the Non-Human: Plants, Animals, Minerals
Instructor: Lynn Badia
TR 9:30am-10:45am

Over the last fifty years, experiments in narrative form have created new ways of seeing and thinking through the perspectives of the animal, vegetal, and mineral. This course examines the theoretical and narrative project of understanding deep ecology, non-human agencies, and, as Donna Haraway has described, “multispecies becoming-with.” In the process of taking on the perspective of the animal, vegetal, and mineral, these texts necessarily reconsider what it means to be human. Readings will include texts by theorists and novelists such as Anna Tsing, Timothy Morton, Karen Barad, Karen Tei Yamashita, and J.M. Coetzee.

EDUC463: Methods in Teaching Language Arts
Instructor: Ricki Ginsberg
MW 10:00am-11:40am

This course is designed to prepare middle- and high-school teachers with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to prepare, implement, and evaluate effective teaching and learning in English language arts classrooms. It will focus on the selection and organization of learning experiences and analysis of the processes, principles, and practices of developing and supporting readers, writers, speakers, and listeners. Students will examine theory and research in order to develop their own philosophies of teaching and to prepare them to enter into professional conversations about the teaching of English language arts. The course provides opportunities for students to examine the Common Core State Standards, plan and design lessons and units, assess learning, and explore methods specific to English language arts.

E465: Topics in Literature and Language

            Section 001 – Writing Democracy in a Digital Age
            Instructor: Tim Amidon
            MW 4:00pm-5:15pm

            Section 002 – Getting Medieval: Imagining the Middle Ages in Literature, Politics, and Popular Culture, 1800 to the             present
            Instructor: Lynn Shutters
            TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

The Middle Ages have always been retroactively constructed; how could one designate something in the “middle” until after that middle was over? This course asks 1) How have Western cultures imagined the Middle Ages? and 2) What cultural, political, or aesthetic purposes do such imaginings serve? By examining literary, popular, and political discourses that invoke the Middle Ages, we will see how history itself is a cultural construct that has profound effects on the present. We will focus mostly on 19th-21st century U.S. and British re-creations of the Middle Ages. And yes, we’ll discuss Game of Thrones.

E475: American Poetry before 1900 — Singing Revolution
Instructor: Zach Hutchins
MWF 11:00am-11:50am

The American War of Independence was spurred on by popular songs and poems celebrating ideals such as freedom, patriotism, and courage. This course will examine the verse that motivated citizens to become soldiers, as well as poems written in anticipation or (later) celebration of the Revolutionary War. Students will read the work of Phillis Wheatley, Annis Boudinot Stockton, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, then conclude the semester with a reading/listening of Lin Manuel Miranda’s smash Broadway hit, Hamilton. Learn about the most important event in American history in the same way that colonists-turned-citizens did: through broadsides and ballads.

E479: Recent Poetry of the United States
Instructor: Sasha Steensen
TR 11:00am-12:15pm

If recent American poetry is characterized by anything, it is variety. Contemporary American poets are indebted to their modern and post-modern predecessors, but the ways in which those debts are expressed are manifold. We will begin the semester with a brief review of modern and post-modern American poetry, and then turn our attention to the work of ten contemporary American poets, several of whom you will meet in person. Assignments will include a presentation, a short paper on an assigned text, attendance and response to a CSU-sponsored poetry reading, and a final paper.

E501: Theories of Writing
Instructor: Lisa Langstraat
TR 9:30am-10:45am

An introduction to and survey of contemporary theories of composition. Intended for future writing teachers, writers, and editors, the course prepares students to apply theoretical principles to the practical concerns of writing pedagogy, the act of writing, or editorial work. E501 offers brief historical overview of the rhetorical tradition out of which contemporary composition theory emerges; a survey of the major theoretical approaches of composing (e.g., expressive, socio-cognitive, social epistemic, genre-focused, feminist, critical, cultural studies, post-process, etc.); and case studies, topics to be determined collectively by our class members, scrutinizing writing practices and processes in specific contexts (e.g., writing for the workplace; writing in community settings; writing for academic publication; etc.).

E506A: English Literature Survey
Instructor: Ellen Brinks
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

Synthesis of literary attitudes, modes, genres of an age.

E507: Special Topics in Linguistics — World English(es)
Instructor: Gerald Delahunty
MWF 1:00pm-1:50pm

Discover how English, which began precariously as an immigrant from north-west Europe to England, became the world’s most-used language, written and spoken across the globe as a first, second, or foreign language, and as a lingua franca for diplomacy, education, science, and business. Follow its history of engagement with the world’s major and many minor languages, cultures, and societies, destroying some, borrowing from most, lending to others, so it now has unprecedented resources and influence, but such internal variation that native speakers are often mutually unintelligible and it seems to be coming apart at its dialectal seams. No linguistics background necessary.

E513B: Form and Technique in Modern Poetry
Instructor: Camille Dungy
M 4:00pm-6:45pm

This course will examine individual poems and critical writings by major modern poets in an effort to establish relationships between theory and practice, between poetics and poetry. It will trace some sources of modern and contemporary trends. Major precursors may be included for the backgrounds they provide in understanding contemporary poetry. Technical and formal issues such as the use of persona, imagery, rhythm, rhyme, stanzaic form, poetic line, diction, and figurative language will provide continuity as the course moves through literary history toward the contemporary period.

E514: Phonology/Morphology-ESL/EFL
Instructor: Gerald Delahunty
MWF 3:00-3:50pm

English sound system and word formation in relation to second language acquisition and teaching.

E526: Teaching English as a Foreign/Second Language
Instructor: Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

Principles of teaching English as a foreign/second language. Development of a coherent method, including activities, materials, and course design.

E600A: Research Methods/Theory — Literary Scholarship
Instructor: Roze Hentschell
TR 4:00pm-5:15pm

By following your own curiosity and interests, this course will help you to become proficient in advanced research techniques and become familiar with typical challenges and rewards of the intellectual exploration of literary study. You will explore what constitutes a meaningful research question, what it means to do “original” scholarship, what questions are appropriate for scholarly work, and how to gauge the “scope” of a project. You will acquire and develop various research skills, learning about resources that are important to literary studies and experimenting with various ways of formulating, broadening, narrowing, and developing research and writing projects.

E600B  Research Methods, Theory & Design
Instructor: Doug Cloud
TR 11:00am-12:15pm

This course introduces the research methods used in English to study the creation, circulation and reception of discourse, in both classroom and public spaces. Students will craft research questions, learn information-gathering techniques (such as critical incident interviewing) and begin to collect sources and data for their own projects. We will also comment on early drafts of published scholars’ work. Traditions covered include: discourse analysis, rhetorical analysis, ethnographic methods, and many others. Students from all concentrations welcome.

E601: Research Methods in TEFL/TESL
Instructor: Anthony Becker
MW 4:00pm-5:15pm

This course introduces students to classroom-based research (CBR) as a method of improving teaching and learning in TEFL/TESL classrooms. Specifically, this course focuses on conducting CBR as an important activity for refining teaching techniques and methods. Students will gain hands-on experience with conducting both quantitative- and qualitative-oriented classroom research in the four skills (i.e., listening, reading, speaking, and writing) within the context of the TEFL/TESL classroom. Finally, the course will explore the relative strengths and potential challenges of different approaches to CBR, as well as how these pieces of information can contribute to gaining expertise in TEFL/TESL teaching.

E607A: Teaching Writing: Composition & Rhetoric
Instructor: Sue Doe
W 4:00pm-6:45pm

A graduate-level pedagogy course directed toward incoming GTAs teaching first-year composition (CO150) for the first time. It serves as follow-on, continuous professional development for GTAs who will have recently completed a pre-service orientation. Students obtain current pedagogical theory and teaching practice in the development and delivery of writing instruction. The course focuses on readings, in-class practice teaching, development of reflective practices, and discussion of classroom challenges and opportunities in the teaching of writing in  higher education settings. This course is a 3-credit course and will newly count as graded graduate course credit.

E607B: Teaching Writing — Creative Writing
Instructor: Todd Mitchell
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

E607B is designed to help graduate students in the MFA program become confident, competent teachers of Beginning College Creative Writing (E210). In this class, students will explore various teaching philosophies, techniques, materials, and the basic elements of craft for writing poetry and fiction. Students will also get to explore writing exercises and practice teaching. Upon successful completion of the course, MFA students will become eligible to teach E210, Beginning Creative Writing, for compensation.

E608: Integrating Writing in the Academic Core
Instructor: Tobi Jacobi

E608 introduces theoretical and practical ways of understanding how to integrate writing into university courses. Integrating dynamic writing assignments and then evaluating/responding to student writing can accomplish two central goals—1) improving students’ comprehension of course content and 2) improving students’ proficiency in writing. E608 considers the meaningful integration of both in-class and out-of-class writing. We discuss methods for supporting undergraduate efforts to write analytically and argumentatively as well as to synthesize textual sources, acknowledge outside sources, and integrate their own ideas. Building on key theories in the teaching of writing, we explore the central role of audience, purpose and revision as well as the recursive nature of writing more generally.

            Section 001
            TR 8:00am-9:20am

            Section 002
            TR 11:00-12:15pm

            Section 003
            TR 12:30-1:45pm

E615: Reading Literature–Recent Theories
Instructor: Paul Trembath
MWF 1:00pm-1:50pm

Recent developments in critical and cultural theories of discourse.

E630B: Special Topics in Literature: Genre Studies — Homerica
Instructor: Dan Beachy-Quick
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

Over the course of the semester we’ll slowly read the book of our major concern: Homer’s Iliad. Supplementing that patient work of attuning our attention and conversation to the epic poem, will be a wide and various reading that expands and complicates our sense of the book. These other sources range from the ancient (Homeric apocrypha, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Eurpides) to the modern (Simone Weil, HD, Allen Grossman). The hope is to not only enter into the Homeric world of bronze age Mycenae and its environs, but to explore the reasons why this heroic myth has persisted through time in drawing the attention of philosophers and poets.

E630C: Special Topics in Literature: Writing Transnationalism
Instructor: Leif Sorensen
W 4:00-6:45pm

Although the academic study of literature is often organized around national traditions, contemporary culture tends not to fit neatly into such categories. This course explores two related phenomena: the rise of competing theoretical movements that seek to understand transnational cultural exchange and the proliferation of art and culture concerned with transnational geographies, economies, routes of migration, and ecologies. We will pair exemplary readings in important contemporary theoretical movements with literary and popular cultural texts (authors and artists might include M.I.A., Derek Walcott, and Chimimanda Adichie, among others) produced in a variety of locations around the Anglophone world.

E634: Special Topics in TESL/TEFL — Issues in Curriculum Development
Instructor: Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

This course provides an overview of important aspects of the ESP curriculum and syllabus design, development, and evaluation as well as an examination of current research topics in ESP. The course familiarizes students with theoretical and practical issues related to the various stages of a language course design, including the needs analysis, selection of course content, and the development of corresponding instructional materials for ESP instruction. Students have an opportunity to engage in two course projects that are tailored to meet their individual interests in ESP course design and/or research.

E637: History of Writing
Instructor: Tim Amidon
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm

Writing systems and practices across time, cultures, and varied constructions of author, text, audience, social context, technology.

E640A: Graduate Fiction Workshop
Instructor: E. J. Levy
T 4:00pm-6:45pm

Taking a toolbox approach to writing fiction, this workshop aims to equip you with strategies and techniques to generate new work and improve on what you have. We’ll read and discuss diverse works—creative and theoretical—on the art of fiction to inspire and inform our own explorations, working to discover our obsessions, material, methods, work habits, strengths, the like. In addition to reading student manuscripts, you’ll complete explorations to experiment with fiction’s formal possibilities and move beyond writing “what you know” to writing “what you can learn.” We’ll also engage in an on-going conversation about publishing and aesthetics.

E640B: Graduate Poetry Workshop
Instructor: Dan Beachy-Quick
T 4:00pm-6:45pm

E640C: Graduate Nonfiction Workshop
Instructor: Debby Thompson
M 4:00pm-6:45pm

E687C: Internship – Literary Editing
Instructor: Stephanie G’Schwind
Hours by arrangement

E692: Rhetoric and Composition Seminar
Instructor: Doug Cloud
M 4:00pm-7:00pm

Forum for faculty and student work in progress.