Fall 2016 English, American Studies, and Education Courses

Associate Professor Pam Coke engages in a lively discussion with her EDUC463: Methods in Teaching Language Arts class

Associate Professor Pam Coke engages in discussion with her EDUC463: Methods in Teaching Language Arts class

 

Disclaimer: We provide the following information to give a sense of what the English department has to offer, but the information here is not intended to replace the support and knowledge of an advisor, especially in the case of choosing the courses necessary to complete your degree or minor.

 

Lower Division Undergraduate Courses

 

AMST 100: Self/Community in American Culture (1600-1877)
Instructor: Robinson
MWF 8:00 am

This class will explore various events, ideas, movements, & philosophies that have combined to help form our national identity. We will work within various disciplines—history, architecture, art, religion, literature, & landscape design among them; this is not, then, a history course in the traditional sense, for we are not exploring chronologies of facts but formations and interrelationships of ideas. We will explore various American myths, the importance of religion in emerging and newly emergent societies (Native American and Calvinist), the question of whether the United States was “established” as a Christian nation, specific foundating myths of the United States, the rise of New York (the Empire City), the myth of the self-made man, elements of the American Renaissance, & the racial and cultural disparity of the 19th century. In short, this class will be an exploration of us as Americans.

 

AMST101: Self/Community in American Culture (since 1877)

Meaning and development of American culture since 1877, through themes of self and community in art, politics, society, and religion.

      Section 1 – MWF 11:00 am
      Instructor: Robinson 

This class will explore various events, ideas, presentations, movements, & philosophies since 1870 that have combined to help form our national identity. We will work within various disciplines—history, art, religion, literature, & movies among them; this is not, then, a history course in the traditional sense, for we are not exploring chronologies of facts but formations and interrelationships of ideas. We will begin the semester with an exploration of the different and changing ways in which Americans have viewed nature/land/environment; next, we will move to the 1893 Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition and the beginning of the modern world (from zippers to Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer to architecture to the rise of the American businessman); then we will follow the generations of struggle for women’s suffrage (from the Cult of True Womanhood to the 19th Amendment); and we will end with Modernism in America, the impact of World War I, and the artistic and generational revolutions in Harlem and Paris in the 1920s. In short, this class will be an exploration of us as Americans.

      Section 2 – TR 8:00
      Instructor: TBA 

      Section 3 – TR 3-5:45
      Instructor: TBA

    

E140: The Study of Literature

Basic principles of reading literary texts.

      Section 1 – MWF 11:00
      Instructor: TBA

      Section 2 – MWF 1:00 pm
      Instructor: Walker

 

E142: Reading without Borders
Instructor: TBA
MWF 2:00 pm

Reading without Borders examines the works of authors from a range of international and cross-national backgrounds, addressing a plurality of cultural and ethnic voices, and emphasizing the dynamics of their interaction and mutual interpretation.  We will study a variety of media and genres, including fiction and non-fiction, graphic texts, as well as dramatic and documentary film, to focus on themes of immigration, exile, and education.  This course deals with mature subject matter.

 

E210: Beginning Creative Writing

Basic techniques of writing fiction and poetry; may include some elements of drama.

 

      Section 1 – TR 9:30 am
      Instructor: TBA 

      Section 2 – TR 11:00 am
      Instructor: TBA 

      Section 3 – TR 12:30 pm
      Instructor: TBA 

      Section 4 – TR 2:00 pm
      Instructor: TBA

 

E232: Introduction to Humanities

Great literature of Western cultural tradition from ancient times to present.

      Section 1 – MWF 10:00 am
      Instructor: Dimon

      Section 2 – MWF 11:00 am
      Instructor: Dimon 

      Section 3 – MWF 1:00 pm
      Instructor: Lane

 

E238-4: 20th Century Fiction

20th-century fiction chosen for its relevance to global and cultural awareness. 

      Section 1 – MWF 10:00 am
      Instructor: TBA

      Section 2 – MWF 11:00 am
      Instructor: TBA 

      Section 3 – TR 9:30 am
      Instructor: Masden 

      Section 4 – TR 11:00 am
      Instructor: Proctor

Students will study the convergence between literature and important events of the twentieth century such as the Russian Revolution, the struggle for women’s rights, the aftermath of Reconstruction, the colonization of Africa, the search for morality in turbulent postmodern times, and the reaction of fundamentalists in the Middle-East. Texts may include We by Yevgeny Zamyatin; The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath; The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner; Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe; A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess; and My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk.

      Section 5 – TR 12:30 pm
      Instructor: TBA

 

E240: Introduction to Poetry

Development of critical skills necessary to understand and enjoy poetry.

      Section 1 – MWF 10:00 am
      Instructor: TBA

      Section 2 – MWF 12:00 pm
      Instructor: Sandelin 

      Section 3 – MWF 1:00 pm
      Instructor: TBA

 

E242: Reading Shakespeare
Instructor: Thompson
MWF 2:00 pm

This course surveys Shakespeare’s works through a range of critical approaches, including feminism, race and postcolonial theory, historicism, and ecocriticism. Probable reading list: the sonnets, Henry IV, Henry V, Macbeth, Othello, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, and The Tempest.

 

E245: World Drama
Instructor: TBA
MWF 11:00 am

World drama in cultural contexts.

 

E270: Introduction to American Literature

History and development of American writings from 16th-century travel narratives through early 20th-century modernism.

      Section 1 – MWF 11:00 am
      Instructor: Henke 

We will begin by working to define American literature and understand where it “belongs” in relation to history and myth. We will then examine texts that, both explicitly and implicitly, attempt to define American identities and explore the genesis and interpretations of the American Dream. We will read origin stories, explorers’ narratives, poetry, captivity narratives, slave narratives, non-fiction essays, political texts, novels, and short fiction. Authors may include Bradstreet, Paine, Poe, Dickinson, Twain, Whitman, Douglass, Chopin, and Stowe.

      Section 2 – TR 9:30 am
      Instructor: Hutchins

 

E276: Survey of British Literature I

British literature from Beowulf through the 18th century in relation to its historical contexts.

      Section 1 – MWF 12:00 pm
      Instructor: Grindle 

      Section 2 – MWF 1:00 pm
      Instructor: Grindle 

 

E277: Survey of British Literature II

British literature from the Romantics to the present in relation to its historical contexts.

      Section 1 – MWF 10:00 am
      Instructor: Quynn

This course will introduce you to influential works in British literature from the 1780s to the contemporary—from Romanticism to Postmodernism. We will study poetry, essays, novels, treatises and pamphlets, and short stories by the authors who many critics and writers consider the “greats” of modern and contemporary British Literature: Wordsworth, Coleridge, the Wollstonecraft mother and daughter, Shaw, Conrad, Woolf, Joyce, Beckett, et. al. This course offers an overview of the various socio-cultural and historical pressures that shaped writers’ imaginative productions and our understandings of the origins of modernity: the French Revolution; the rise of literacy and the literary marketplace; industrialization and urbanization; competing ideologies of gender equality and separate spheres; Darwinian science; and empire, the end of empire, and the emergence of the post-colonial consciousness.

      Section 2 – MWF 11:00 am
      Instructor: Lane

 

 

Upper Division Undergraduate Courses

 

E305: Principles of Writing and Rhetoric
Instructor: Cloud
TR 9:30 -10:45 am

This course offers a humanities-based exploration of central principles of writing and other forms of rhetoric. Students will explore critical concepts in ancient and contemporary readings—everything from Plato to Nietzsche to Foucault. We’ll ask questions like, what is rhetoric? What is writing? How has our understanding of them changed over time? Do rhetoric and writing create or merely reflect reality? How do writing and rhetoric reinforce and challenge power? And, why should we care?

 

E311A: Intermediate Fiction Workshop

Group discussion of student writing, literary models, and theory; emphasis on developing individual style. 

     Section 001 – TR 11:00 am -12:15 pm
     Instructor: Conway 

     Section 002 – TR 2:00-3:15 pm
     Instructor: Altschul

 

E311B: Intermediate Poetry Workshop
Instructor: Beachy-Quick
TR 9:30-10:45 am

Group discussion of student writing, literary models, and theory; emphasis on developing individual style.

 

E311C: Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Workshop
Instructor: Fletcher
MW 4:00 pm

Group discussion of student writing, literary models, and theory; emphasis on developing individual style.

 

E320: Introduction to the Study of Language
Instructor: TBA
MWF 2:00 pm

Varied topics covering general linguistics or the relationships between language and literature or society and science.

 

E322: English Language for Teachers
Instructor: O’Donnell-Allen
MWF 2:00 pm

Foundations of language structure, emphasizing grammar, sounds, spelling, word structure, linguistic variation, usage, acquisition, and pedagogy.

 

E326: Development of the English Language
Instructor: Marvin
MWF 1:00 pm

Chronological study of four historical stages of English (Old, Middle, Early Modern, Modern) with emphasis on grammar, vocabulary, and phonology.

 

E331 Early Modern Women Writers
Instructor: Gollapudi
TR 12:30 pm

This course studies British women writers of the long eighteenth century (1660-1800), tracing the emergence of professional women writers, the markets they came to dominate, the authorial personas they crafted, and the ideological contexts they negotiated in their writings. Poetry, fiction, drama, and feminist ‘manifestoes’ by eighteenth-century women writers will be contextualized within modern critical discourses that theorize and historicize women’s writings from the period.

 

E337: Western Mythology
Instructor: Marvin
MWF 1:00 pm

Major themes in western myth: classical, Biblical, and Germanic.

 

E338: Ethnic Literature of the U.S.
Instructor: Sorensen
MWF 1:00 pm

This course will focus on recent work by a broad range of ethnic U.S. writers. We will read poetry, fiction, essays, memoir, drama, performance texts, and graphic narratives, and think about questions including the significance of ethnic identity and race in an era that is often proclaimed to be post-racial, the role of the ethnic artist in contemporary society, and the future of both literature and ethnicity in the U.S. We will also examine initiatives that seek to promote diversity in literature and culture like We Need Diverse Books and look at how the popular culture responds to calls for diversity. Texts by Junot Díaz, Claudia Rankine, Ted Chiang, Adrien Tomine, and Cathy Park Hoang.

 

E339: Literature of the Earth
Instructor: Dungy
TR 11:00 am

How are contemporary American writers writing about the land? In this class we will read essays, short stories, and poems that consider what it means to live in the world. Climate change, resource extraction, environmental stewardship, connections between human and nonhuman animals, the history of our place on the Earth, and the pleasure we take from the wild world: all these and more are topics we will consider. You’ll be both reading and writing this semester, as we interrogate assumptions about who can write about the Earth and how and why. Look forward to opportunities to speak directly with practitioners of contemporary environmental writing as you learn more about what it means to construct literature of the Earth.

 

E341: Literary Criticism and Theory

Theory and practice of modern literary analysis and evaluation; writing about literature.

      Section 1 – MWF 11:00 am
      Instructor: Trembath

      Section 2 – MWF 2:00 pm
      Instructor: Trembath

 

E342: Shakespeare I
Instructor: Marvin
MWF 11:00 am

Shakespeare’s development as a poet and dramatist from the early plays through Hamlet.

 

E343: Shakespeare II
Instructor: Shutters
TR 2-3:15 pm

This course divorces Shakespeare from his status as singular genius to consider both what materials and cultural concepts Shakespeare adapted and revised as he wrote his plays and how we continue to adapt and revise Shakespeare through scholarship and performance. We’ll sample different versions of Shakespeare (conservative Shakespeare, feminist Shakespeare, postcolonial Shakespeare, etc.) to consider their benefits and drawbacks and the cultural agenda to which they respond. We’ll also study film adaptations of Shakespearean plays.

 

E370: American Literature in Cultural Contexts: Growing Up Latino(a)
Instructor: Fletcher
MWF 9:00 am

From the streets of the barrio to the buckskin hills of the llano, this course will confront the myth of a singular Latino(a) experience in the United States. Reading a wide range of styles and forms, we will take into account the many different groups of Latino(a)s in the U.S. and examine how place, class, religion and education have had an impact on Latino(a) self-definition and community. We will draw from history and folklore as well as media and popular culture. Course objectives include developing familiarity with Latino(a) writing and improving critical awareness and sensitivity to an area of literature too often overlooked. Readings include Ilan Stavans, Sandra Cisneros, Rudolfo Anaya, Junot Díaz, Piri Thomas, Rigoberto Gonzalez, Luís Alberto Urrea, Lorna Dee Cervantes, David T. Martinez, and Justin Torres.

 

E401: Teaching Reading
Instructor: O’Donnell-Allen
MW 4:00 pm

Theory and pedagogy for understanding, interpreting, and evaluating print and visual texts.

 

E402: Teaching Composition
Instructor: TBA
TR 4:00 pm

Theory and practice of the analysis and the teaching of writing.

 

E405: Adolescents’ Literature
Instructor: TBA
MW 5:30 pm

Survey of literature for adolescents emphasizing development of critical ability, appreciation, and taste.

 

E412A: Advanced Fiction Workshop
Instructor: Mitchell
TR 11:00 am -12:15 pm

E412A is a fiction workshop designed to help students develop the skills to better meet their individual writing goals. An anthology of contemporary short stories will be used, and writing short literary fiction will be emphasized. Through classroom workshops, discussion of contemporary fiction, and student writing assignments, students will consider a wide array of story-telling techniques. Specific topics for classroom discussion will be determined by student needs as revealed by trends in student manuscripts.

 

E422: African American Literature
Instructor: Dungy
Tues. 4:00 pm

From Phillis Wheatley—the first black person in the American colonies to publish a book—to 20th century greats like Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Toni Morrison, Nikki Giovanni, and James Baldwin, we’ll consider how African American writers of the past have influenced how Americans of all races write about the world today. Contemporary books will include Evie Shockley’s the new black, Gregory Pardlo’s Digest (winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize), and Tayari Jones’s Leaving Atlanta.

 

E426: British Romanticism
Instructor: Beachy-Quick
TR 12:30 pm

Dismissing the ease with which Romanticism is too easily dismissed as being merely “romantic”—that is, filled with poesy and flowers, melancholy and fits of swooning—we’ll spend the term examining the radical experiment in language and philosophy these diverse and great writers more truly represent. Focusing on major authors of the period (Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats and the Shelleys), as well as the curious outliers (John Clare, Leigh Hunt, Charles Lamb), we’ll seek ways to consider, through poetry and prose and letters, each author in his or her own light, as well as the broader vision that binds them together. A variety of secondary sources will help outline the historical and cultural milieu, and by semester’s end, we’ll look at some contemporary poets whose work rekindles the Romantic experiment—not, as we’ll discover, that it has ever flickered out.

 

E433: Literatures of the American West
Instructor: Cooperman
TR 4:00 pm

What is the American West? Where? When? Do we still live in the American West or is more accurately applied to Gunsmoke and spaghetti westerns? The ambiguities surrounding our definitions have shaped our national character, our sense of democracy and our institutions. We will explore our various experiences and conceptions of the American West by examining a range of sources and types of literature, from novels to histories to poetries to movies. We will also get outside. Texts by Willa Cather, Wallace Stegner, Edward Abbey, Terry Tempest Williams, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Gretel Ehrlich.

 

E460: Chaucer
Instructor: Shutters
TR 12:30-1:45 pm

This class will focus on Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. As we study this work, we’ll also study perceptions of Chaucer. Is Chaucer a quintessentially medieval poet who provides a glimpse of a bygone era? Is Chaucer modern avant la lettre? Can we fruitfully apply modern literary theory to Chaucer? Does Chaucer espouse universal themes, and if so how do we define those? Finally, why does the Canterbury Tales appeal to various audiences, including audiences today?

 

E465: Topics in Literature and Language: The Sonnet
Instructor: Hentschell
MW 4:00-5:15 pm

This course offers students the opportunity to engage closely with one of the most beloved poetic firms. We will spend the first half of the course studying the sonnet’s early development and the second half studying the 19th through 21st century American and British incarnations. We will investigate why the sonnet has remained a relevant poetic form and why it emerges as especially so in some periods. Authors will include Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Wroth, Wordsworth, Keats, Yeats, Frost, C. Rosetti, Millay, cummings, and Mackay among many others.

 

EDUC463: Methods in Teaching Language Arts
Instructor: Coke
MW 10:00 am

This course is designed to help you combine theory, research, and practice into sound strategies for teaching English in middle, junior, and senior high schools. You will begin to develop a philosophy of secondary English teaching and learn how to plan instruction that is consistent with that philosophy and with various national, state, and district guidelines. Content includes examination of and attention to Common Core State Standards; planning of lessons and units; discussion of issues involving professional educators; development of means to assess learning; and discussion of methods to teach English language arts, including journalism and speech.

 

 

Graduate Courses

E501: Theories of Writing
Instructor: Sloane
TR 2:00 pm

Students learn the primary theories of the composing process, including expressivist, cognitivist, social constructionist, and new rhetorical approaches to writing. Too often we study theories, conceptions, principles, rules, and even techniques of writing only in the abstract. This course challenges students’ assumption of their ability to be objective in studying theories of writing, exploring the point that their own, unremarked theoretical stance in its apparent neutrality may be the most blinkered and unyielding theory of all.

 

E507: Special Topics in Linguistics: Sociolinguistics
Instructor: Delahunty
MWF 1-1:50 pm

Sociolinguistics studies the interactions between language variation and a very broad range of social factors. This course will critically assess notions of “language,” “dialect,” “language variety,” “Standard English,” “computer mediated communication,” “style,” “(im)politeness,” “pidgin,” “creole,” “linguistic repertoire,” “register,” “linguistic accommodation,” “bi- and multi-lingualism,” “bi- and multi-dialectalism,” “language change,” “language beliefs,” “language attitudes,” “language choice,” “language deficit vs. language difference,” “language testing,” and many others, especially those of particular interest to the students in the course.

 

E513A: Form and Technique in Fiction: Point of View and the Art of Structure
Instructor: Altschul
Thurs. 4:00-6:45 pm

Point of view comes prior to all other aspects of storytelling. By setting the mechanical and psychological terms of a reader’s interaction with the narrative, point of view determines what stories are possible. In this course we will read fiction with complex, unconventional points of view and examine the interplay between perspective and structure. Texts by James, Woolf, Nabokov, Borges, Robbe-Grillet, Galchen, and Peter Brooks’ study of narrative structure, Reading for the Plot. Students will share pastiches and critical responses on a course blog, and develop a longer, exploratory work of fiction that grapples with the issues raised.

 

E514: Phonology/Morphology–ESL/EFL
Instructor: Delahunty
MWF 3-3:50 pm

ESL/EFL teachers must know the major patterns of English phonology, morphology, word formation, and vocabulary and their relevance to classroom materials. E514 introduces basic linguistic assumptions then focuses on English phonetics/phonology and morphology/word formation in ways that connect with EFL/ESL coursework and teaching. Students will learn to recognize and use linguistic concepts in ESL/EFL pedagogical materials and in SLA research, become proficient in basic linguistic analysis, and able to apply analytic techniques to learner data.

 

E526: Teaching English as a Second/ Foreign Language
Instructor: Nekrasova-Beker
TR 12:30 pm

This course provides an overview of second language (L2) methods and materials, focusing on the teaching and learning of four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Additional attention will be given to vocabulary and grammar. The goal of the course is to guide participants in developing the knowledge and skills needed to effectively design and implement language instruction for a diverse group of English language learners. This course is also designed to incorporate classroom observation.

 

E527: Theories of Foreign/ Second Language Learning
Instructor: Nekrasova-Beker
TR 2:00 p,

This course provides an introduction to the field of second language acquisition (SLA) focusing specifically on how humans learn a second (or third) language in addition to their native language and the factors that affect variability in their language development. Areas covered in this course include: background on the historical development of the field, universal features of the L2 learner, interlanguage development and variability, individual differences, and social factors affecting L2 learning. In addition, the course introduces a variety of experimental methods used in SLA research and highlights the implications of SLA findings for L2 teaching.

 

E600A: Research Methods – Literary Scholarship
Instructor: Hutchins
TR 11:00 am

Students will pursue research projects relevant to their individual interests, whether nineteenth-century American poetry, fourteenth-century morality plays, or twenty-first century graphic novels. In pursuit of those research projects, students will compile an annotated bibliography of relevant secondary sources and identify primary source archives pertinent to the chosen subject. Then, in the second half of the course, we will work towards writing for publication in one of the many genres and venues associated with literary studies.

 

E600B: Research Methods ­– Design
Instructor: Cloud
TR 11:00 am -12:15 pm 

This course introduces research methods used in English to study the creation, circulation and reception of discourse, in both classroom and public spaces. Students will craft research questions, learn information-gathering techniques (such as critical incident interviewing) and begin to collect sources and data for their own projects. We will also comment on early drafts of published scholars’ work. Traditions covered include: discourse analysis, rhetorical analysis, ethnographic methods and many others. Students from all programs welcome.

 

E603: Computers and Composition
Instructor: Amidon
Wed. 7:00 pm

This course explores how emergent forms of digital writing and reading challenge traditional notions of literacy and authorship. We’ll investigate the ways that infrastructures and interfaces enable and constrain the ways we might interact, write, read, and communicate. We’ll consider how human-centered design might be leveraged to improve the equity and accessibility of digital texts, spaces, and interfaces. We’ll think about how ed-tech impacts learning, pedagogies, and academic contexts. We’ll interrogate how emerging digital literacies displace embodied and analogic literacies.

 

E607A: Teaching Writing – Composition and Rhetoric
Instructor: Doe
Wed. 4:00 pm

A graduate-level pedagogy course that prepares graduate teaching assistants for the independent teaching of first-year composition. Graduate students are exposed to cutting edge theory in the teaching of writing and apply evidence-based approaches for writing classrooms, learning how to design a course, construct effective assignments, develop appropriate assessments, give meaningful feedback on writing, write student-centered lessons, lead discussions, conduct face to face conferences, introduce research approaches, and deepen student understanding of revision and peer review practices. Reading includes articles on the theory and practice of teaching composition; Mutuality in the Rhetoric and Composition Classroom, by Wallace & Ewald; and The First Year Composition Common Syllabus.

 

E607B: Teaching Writing – Creative Writing
Instructor: Mitchell
TR 2:00-3:15 pm

E607B is designed to help graduate students in the MFA program become confident, competent teachers of Beginning College Creative Writing (E210). In this class, students will explore various teaching philosophies, techniques, materials, and the basic elements of craft for writing poetry and fiction. Students will also get to explore writing exercises, and practice teaching. Upon successful completion of the course, MFA students will become eligible to teach E210, Beginning Creative Writing for compensation.

 

E608: Integrating Writing in the Academic Core

Theories and best practices associated with writing integration in the academic core. 

      Section 1 – TR 7:30 pm
      Instructor: Jacobi 

      Section 2 – TR 11:00 am
      Instructor: Jacobi 

      Section 3 – TR 12:30 pm
      Instructor: Jacobi

 

E615: Reading Literature – Recent Theories
Instructor: Trembath
MWF 1:00 pm

An introduction to literary and cultural theory as it has developed in the U.S. since the 1970s, from semiotics and deconstruction through various forms of cultural materialism, and recent developments in critical studies ranging from neo-psychoanalysis to speculative realism and object-oriented ontology. On the way to these latter forms of criticism we will cover feminisms, schizoanalysis, transcendental empiricism, lesbian and gay studies, gender and somatic criticism, postcolonialism, and cultural studies generally.  The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with many of the critical rhetorics that inform research in specialized areas of study, and to explain the conceptual antagonisms that have emerged between various approaches to literature and culture.

 

E630A: Special Topics: Colonial and Postcolonial Literature
Instructor: Brinks
TR 9:30-10:45 am

This class will have a special focus on environmental issues in literature from Africa, South Asia, Australia, and the Caribbean. How writers (and filmmakers) represent colonial and postcolonial environments and their exploitation, and offer alternative visions of community, justice, and sustainability – and how literary form, voice, point-of-view, and style foreground these subjects – are the guiding questions of this course. Sample texts: Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Mda, Heart of Redness; Sinha, Animal’s People; Habila, Oil on Water; Ten Canoes (film, dir. deHeer).

 

E 630B: Special Topics: Word & Image
Instructor: Gollapudi
Wed. 7:00 pm

The course will explore the boundaries between word and image in books of different genres and historical periods (such as medieval illuminated books, seventeenth-century emblem books, children’s picture books, and comics) within the context of recent theory about text-image relations. We will also consider the book as a physical object with material dimensions that determine and control ‘meaning’ or ‘understanding’ as much as the words or pictures printed in it.

 

E631: Crossing Boundaries: Writing in the Immersive Field
Instructor: Cooperman
Tues. 6:00 pm

This course explores writing as a mobile artifact that always already occurs in the field. Where that field is, what it looks like, how we are able/not able to enter it is our ostensible subject. Yet how to define “field?” From Olson’s “projective verse” to Gloria Anzaldua’s “borderlands” to the burgeoning field of ecopoetics, definitional questions will broaden our horizons and quicken our activity. Readings in auto-ethnography, bioregionalism, radical cartography and documentary art will provide methodological models for our inquiry. Texts by David Abram, Denis Wood, Lucy Lippard, Ed Dorn, Barry Lopez, Clifford Geertz, and Gloria Anzaldua.

 

E634: Special Topics in TEFL/TESL: Computer Applications in Linguistics
Instructor: Becker
MW 4:00 – 5:15pm

This course examines the role of technology in language learning through hands-on materials development and evaluation. Topics to be covered include: a) software and online tools for reading, writing, listening, speaking, vocabulary, and grammar; b) approaches to teaching with corpora; c) synchronous and asynchronous computer-mediated communication; d) using web 2.0 tools to develop teaching tools and materials; e) evaluating online tools and resources; and f) online communities and gaming as educational tools for learning language.

 

E640A: Graduate Fiction Workshop
Instructor: Doenges
Mon. 4:00 pm

 

E640B: Graduate Poetry Workshop
Instructor: Steensen
Mon. 4:00 pm

 

E640C: Graduate Creative Nonfiction Workshop
Instructor: Sloane
Tues. 4:00 pm