Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

Winter lights in Old Town Fort Collins, image by Jill Salahub

  • Harrison Candelaria Fletcher has been named one of “The Top Ten New Latino Writers to Watch (and Read) for 2017” by the by LatinoStories.com literary website. http://latinostories.com/Top_Ten_Lists/top_10_authors.htm. The recognition was based on feedback from editors, faculty, librarians and readers. Also, a section from his book, Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams, was just nominated for a 2017 Pushcart Prize from Autumn House Press. Lastly, a new essay, “Outline Toward an Essay on Ethnicity and Miracles,” from a collection in progress, was accepted for publication by the University of Alaska’s hybrid journal, Permafrost.
  • Matthew Cooperman is pleased to report that Aby Kaupang is recovering nicely from back surgery (a discectomy; three weeks now), feeling stronger each day and remembering the joy of walking. Matthew and Aby are also pleased to report that their long-running collaborative project NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified) has been accepted by Futurepoem, a NYC press. A portion of the manuscript appeared last year as an electronic chapbook called disorder 299.00, from Essay Press. It can be found here, http://www.essaypress.org/ep-52/ A recent review of that chapbook is now up at Rain Taxi, http://www.raintaxi.com/disorder-299-00/
  • Our own Camille Dungy will be reading the names at Commencement on Saturday, January 17 at 7:30 p.m. Several faculty are already coming to the ceremony, but please join them If you want to hear Camille and recognize the graduates from our department. Senior Tim Cuevas will carry in the English banner. Thank you, Tim and Camille!
  • Kudos to Nancy Henke and Beth Lechleitner, who led a third fantastic year of the Finals Friends extravaganza. With the extra time and effort they gave, faculty had something special to look forward to in their mailboxes this week last week of classes. If you participated, thank Beth and Nancy next time you see them for this bright, cheerful reminder of how much we enjoy and appreciate each other.
  • Mike Palmquist presented a talk on writing across the curriculum at Indiana University of Pennsylvania on November 9th. He followed the talk with a day-long workshop the following day.
  • Mary Crow’s translations of lines by Roberto Juarroz were published in “Versailles: Aesthetics of the Ephemeral” by Christine Buci-Glucksmann; July, 2016. Catalog for the Exhibit: Olafur Eliasson’s Waterfall. Versailles, France. (7 June – 30 Oct. 2016)

CSU Writing Center

The CSU Writing Center will have limited hours during finals week. We will be open Monday, December 12 and Tuesday, December 13 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in Eddy Hall, room 23. We will be closed during the break, and will reopen on Monday, January 23.

Eddy 300 Lab

The Eddy 300 Lab hours for finals week: Monday –Thursday 7:30-8:00pm

Friday 7:30-4:00pm. We will be closed for winter break from Saturday, December  17th  and return on Tuesday, January 17th.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

 

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~from intern Haley Huffman

geneva02

What’s your name? Your major? When do you expect to graduate?
Geneva McCarthy.  I’m an English Major concentrating in Literature and Creative Writing with a Minor in Linguistics and Culture.  I’ll be graduating next Spring.  Finally.  It’s taken me – I can’t believe I’m going to say this – 30 years!

How do you spend most of your time in Eddy Hall?
At the moment, most of my time in Eddy is spent in the Writing Center, but I’ve often been found in the computer lab, meeting with professors, or taking classes here – Eddy is a bit like the bat cave for English majors, it seems to me.

Favorite English class or teacher?
I planned this semester well, so pretty much all my classes are my favorite.  That is, Native American Cultural Expressions, Development of the English Language (I’m learning how to read and speak Old and Middle English), Shakespeare, and British Romanticism.

What’s your favorite book, poem, quote, lyric, genre? Who is your favorite author?
Poem:  “Ode to Autumn” by John Keats – a most constant companion.  I’m immensely fond of Emerson, too.  (Yes, I split infinitives and estrange auxiliaries.) There are scores more worth mention, of course, but these are essential wellsprings.

If you were to give advice to incoming CSU English majors, what would it be?
Be bold in exploring your passion, be open to new vision, and be generous to others and to yourself.

What’s your biggest goal, priority right now?
In practical terms, keeping up with daily demands and applying to Graduate programs; in a more ephemeral realm, broadening my command of voice and register.

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mackenzieowens

Mackenzie Owens
English major, Writing concentration
Expected graduation May 2017

What brought you to CSU?
I came to CSU because my parents and my sisters all went here, and so I knew it was a great school. I also love Fort Collins and the campus, and so it was easy for me to decide to come here.

What classes are you taking this semester?
I am taking E305: Principles of Writing and Rhetoric, E405: Adolescent Literature, ECON202: Principles of Microeconomics, E487B: internship with the Greyrock Literary Review, and HONR492: Senior Honors Thesis.

Favorite English class? Favorite English teacher? Favorite assignment or project?
I have taken many great English classes at CSU, so it’s hard to pick a favorite. If I had to choose, I would probably say E406: Topics in Literacy, which was a class devoted entirely to examining and deconstructing Disney and its media empire and was taught by Lisa Langstraat, which I took last spring. I learned so much from that class about many things I used to take for granted, and had a really fun time in it as well. My favorite English teacher is Tom Conway, who was my thesis advisor this semester, and has been a wonderful mentor and cheerleader for me as I’ve progressed through my academic career. My favorite assignment was one from another class I took last spring, E333: Critical Studies of Pop Texts, which was focused on science fiction books and was taught by Leif Sorenson. We had to do a research project in that class, and we could essentially choose to do whatever we wanted as long as it related in some way to the class, and I decided to write a short science fiction story about robots that asked questions about gender, the meaning of free will, and consciousness. I never thought I’d get to do an assignment like that when I first came to CSU, and it was incredibly fun to write.

Why is it important to study English, the Humanities?

I think it’s important to study English and the Humanities because I think that it is important to learn to think, read, and write critically, and that is what a liberal arts degree will do for you. Despite all of our advancements in technology, we as a society are finding it harder than ever to just simply talk with each other in substantive and constructive ways, and being able to communicate an idea in a concise and comprehensive way is more important than ever.

The other thing that the Humanities does that I think is so important is develop empathy for different perspectives, and to be able to use that empathy to have common decency and compassion for people who might be different from you. Subjects like English create well-rounded citizens with a diverse skill set who want to reach out to and connect with others, and can create lasting change in the world.

Tell us more about the internship you did last summer in Germany.
The internship I did last summer was with the U.S. African Command, or AFRICOM, in Stuttgart, Germany, and I worked with the Secretariat for the Joint Staff as the publications intern. I was responsible for editing for clarity and content and proofreading every type of writing that was distributed throughout the command, including manuals, instructions, and proposals and then ensuring that all of it was sent to the appropriate channels for further review. I also had the opportunity to write my own manual for the command on the proper style to use for the various types of writing I edited, and it was actually approved by the Commander, General Thomas D. Waldhauser, and made official, so everyone at AFRICOM now follows style rules for their writing that I wrote, which is pretty cool.

How has your English major given you an advantage? How has it prepared you for the work, the life you hope to have?
My English major has given me an advantage but it has given me the ability to communicate with others, which is the reason I got my internship and my current jobs as an RA and as a Writing Center Consultant. I can, or at least believe I can, write well, which is a skill I know I will use in future jobs, whatever they may be, and that will also help me land those jobs in the first place. My major has also given me the ability to speak my mind in an articulate way and to stand up for what I believe in, which I will be crucial as I go forward in life.

Do you have any advice for English majors?
My advice for English majors is to read. Read whatever you can. Read books, read articles, read graffiti in the bathroom stall. Open your mind to different points of view and understand that your life experience is not the only one, that you have both privileges and disadvantages others don’t, and discover what you believe and why you believe it. And keep reading.

What advice do you have for students considering an internship?
My advice for students considering an internship is to make sure that it is something you truly want to do and that you think might be helpful experience for you later in life, as you shouldn’t be doing something if you don’t think you’ll enjoy it. But if you truly believe it is right for you, go for it. You will do things you did not expect you would be doing, you will meet many kinds of people, and you will learn far more than you ever thought you would.

What’s your biggest priority right now?
My biggest priority right now is getting through finals week in the short term, but in the long term, deciding where I will eventually want to go to graduate school after I take a year or two to teach English abroad after I graduate.

Where will we find you in five years?
In five years, I plan to be in graduate school for International Relations with a focus on Africa, gaining the skills I need to become a Foreign Service Officer and work in embassies around the world.

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allysonberry02

Allyson Berry
English major (Writing Concentration) with a minor in Business Administration

What brought you to CSU?
I transferred from Texas Tech after my freshman year. My mom lives here and I decided that CSU would be a good fit for me. I had always heard about how spectacular the English program was and once I visited I was sure that I wanted to go here. After being in Lubbock, TX (which is flat, arid, and BROWN) for a year it was nice to finally be in a place with trees! The trees sealed the deal!

What classes are you taking this semester?
I’m currently taking BUS205, E305 [Principles of Writing and Rhetoric], E320 [Introduction to the Study of Language], E341 [Literary Criticism and Theory], and SPCM100.

Favorite English class? Favorite English teacher? Favorite assignment or project?
So far my favorite English class would have to be either CO300 [Writing Arguments] or E305 [Principles of Writing and Rhetoric]. It is so incredibly hard to pick my favorite teachers but the top three have to be Christina Sutton, Paul Trembath, and Doug Cloud. They’re probably the best professors I’ve had throughout my collegiate year thus far. My favorite assignment is something I have in E320 [Introduction to the Study of Language]. I’m researching how Google has been using artificial intelligence and causal voicing to linguistically improve Google Voice Search.

Why is it important to study English, the Humanities?

I believe studying English is the key to being an effective communicator and being able to think/read/write critically. Although many people question what exactly there is to do with an English degree, I can say from experience that it has given me the clear advantage over the rest of those I’m competing with for internships and will compete with for jobs in the future.

You are the current president of the PRSSA. Tell us more about that.
Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) is a network of more than 11,000 college students that seeks to advance the public relations profession by nurturing generations of future professionals. It not only enhances member education through speakers and real-world experience but it is pivotal in broadening your network and getting internship and job offers post-graduation. I oversee the CSU Chapter and run meetings along with traveling to International conferences to hear from the greatest public relations and marketing professionals in the world. I work on inclusion, as you do not have to major in Journalism or Public Relations to be apart of PRSSA. Here I am an English Major running the whole thing! Being President has given me the opportunity to work on leadership skills, advocate for a group of people, and enhance my communication and writing skills. I cannot say enough about the organization. It has propelled me into numerous opportunities that I would not have without becoming a member.

You interned recently at the Federal Reserve in Denver doing speech writing, social media, and internal and external communications. How did that happen, and what was that like?
That’s correct. I was interning in the Public Affairs Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, Denver Branch. I met my boss at a PRSA/PRSSA International Conference last October in Atlanta, GA. She gave me her card and although I’m not a Public Relations major, she gave me a shot at the internship. I interviewed and by some miracle they gave the me job as a Sophomore going into my Junior year. (This is atypical as they try to have Junior-Senior interns to hire upon graduation in the coming year). The PA department in Denver is really a part of the Regional, Community, and Public Affairs department. As the only intern in this area, I got to try my hand at all three. I used knowledge from my business minor to understand the economics and data analysis in the Regional Affairs area. This is where the speechwriting came in. I learned about low-moderate income housing and how to integrate these people with resources that the Bank offers. And finally in PA, I was able to write stories for the quarterly publication, work on social media campaigns, educational outreach, and create a marketing and distribution plan for financial education materials to teachers in the 12th District of the Federal Reserve.

Allyson's last day of work at the Fed

Allyson’s last day of work at the Federal Reserve

Next summer you have an internship with the Pentagon. How did that happen? What will you be doing there? What are you looking forward to most about it?
I do not HAVE the internship there — yet. It is one of my options. I’ve been working to apply to multiple governmental agencies like NASA, The Department of the State, the United Nations Organization etc. Truly, in order to get these internships you have to know when to apply. That’s all there is to it. If I am to get any one of these positions in Public Affairs positions I will be most excited to see how internationally recognized organizations operate their communications. It in a sense is a whole different ball game when you have to communicate with nations around the globe.

How has your English major given you an advantage? How has it prepared you for the work, the life you hope to have?
I have the clear advantage. When comparing my work to that of let’s say a Journalism or Communications major, my work has a clear motive and is most effective in accomplishing its goal. I owe that largely to the study of rhetoric and audience analysis. We are required to take Literature classes like Intro to Poetry and British Literature— which help I’m sure, somehow, but I haven’t found out exactly how yet. However, those upper division level Lit classes require a serious competence when it comes to reading difficult texts, understanding those texts, and regurgitating and then analyzing that text. That skill alone can be applied to EVERYTHING in the business world. The world has a need for effective communicators and English majors are most likely at the top of their game when it comes to communication in any form. I can now write and give eloquent speeches, be direct in communications of any style (email, editorials, social media, blogs, etc.), I can read just about anything, and I can communicate with just about anyone. Being in the English department with such a variety of people with different personalities and interests has sculpted me to be have the skill set to work with anyone.

allysonberry

Do you have any advice for English majors?
Think outside the box. Sell yourself. When I tell people I’m an English Major they immediately ask me what grade I want to teach. It is an uphill battle to prove the worth of the English Major but the proof is in the paper. Be confident in explaining why you are the best communicator they could find and how multi-faceted your skill set. Although many are apprehensive to hire “outside of the box” I am proof that it can and will happen. Don’t think you must be an independent novelist/poet if you’re into creative writing, don’t think you have to be an editor if you’re a writing concentration, and don’t think you have to review books for the rest of your life if you’re in love with literature. You most certainly can, but that is not the ONLY option. The possibilities are endless, you just have to go out and find them.

What advice do you have for students about internships?
Research, research, research. I go on Google about twice a week and just browse internships. Also, apply for everything you may even have a SLIGHT interest in. Unlike graduate school, this application process doesn’t cost you a dime. So why not utilize that and get recognized. You might not make it past the interview but you have built your network in the process.

What’s your biggest priority right now?
At the moment — the 5 papers I have to write before finals week. (Don’t we all!) Apart from that, making sure I study effectively and am healthy by the end of this semester is taking top priority.

Where will we find you in five years?
Hopefully you will all find me as a Public Affairs Specialist for either a government agency or Fortune 500 company, living in a downtown loft, still binge-watching television but hopefully living on more than scrambled eggs and oatmeal! College, right?

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~from intern Haley Huffman

1. Trying to analyze Old English texts at 8:00 am.

via GIPHY

2. Having all your final papers due during Dead week, making finals week feel like a vacation.

Dead week:

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Finals week:

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3. When people tell you that the degree you’re working towards is useless.

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4. “Oh you’re an English major? What’s your favorite book?” But you can’t answer that question because there are too many choices.

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5. How you feel when you pick up on symbolism or a metaphor that no one else noticed.

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6. When the English Department has reading days and all of your friends still have to go to class, but you’re having a pajama dance party.

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7. Climbing the stairs to the third floor of Eddy makes you feel really out of shape.

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8. The panic you feel when you’re trying to get through the entire reading assignment in the seven minutes you have before class starts.

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emilyseto

Emily Seto
English Major, Creative Writing Concentration
Business Minor

If you asked me what my favorite book was before declaring English (Creative Writing) as my major, I would have told you that I had only read two books of fiction. That was the truth. The most common question I get is, “why are you an English major?” It’s a bit of a complicated answer but here’s what I can tell you — I wanted to learn to write stories but the English major has also guided me to becoming a successful Entrepreneur.

What brought you to CSU?
I ran my own business in high school so I wanted to pursue a degree from CSU because it had (and still has) a competitive business school. I had to take two years off of school because life happened. When I picked back up at Front Range Community College, I became a Nationally Registered Emergency Medical Technician. I worked in the medical field as I continued to run my own business. I decided to resume my business degree but I was bored out of my mind with the courses. Maybe this is why never before seen movies would begin playing out of my head right in front of me. I could see the screen, hear the characters, music and sound effects. I promise, I passed these classes with flying colors. I tried writing the stories but I had no clue how to actually write fiction. I came back to CSU in Fall of 2015 and declared English with a concentration in Creative Writing and a Business minor. I will be graduating this upcoming Spring.

Favorite English class? Favorite English teacher? Favorite assignment or project?
I am taking Intermediate Creative Writing, African American Literature, Early Women Writers, Entrepreneurship, and Management. One of the best things about being an English major at CSU are the teachers. I have learned so much from Dana Masden, Camille Dungy, and Aparna Gollapudi but the best thing about them is I feel like I can go to them for anything. They all go beyond the scope of an average class because they teach in a way that leaves you feeling connected to the world.

Why is it important to study English, the Humanities?
Declaring English as my major has been the best life decision I have ever made. It’s important to study the Humanities because it teaches you to think! Being allowed to be creative, open minded, and learning that it’s ok to value individual thoughts and feelings has given me both personal and career growth. I love being free from the confinement of someone else’s answers. We are taught to make certain decisions because they fit conventional standards and the English major is anything but. With my experience, my English major has strengthened my intuition and has given me the perception and confidence in making business decisions that made me more successful than ever.

You are currently running your own business (while taking classes full-time and working in the Writing Center). Tell us more about that.
I think I am able juggle all of the above because I don’t see any of these things as work. Running my own business is a hobby. I love my classes and working in the Writing Center reminds me of being on my old basketball team. So these are all just activities that I consider to be play instead of work.

Tell us more about what it’s like working in the Writing Center.
I love working at the Writing Center because it’s such a relaxed environment. Even as writers, we can relate to the struggles of having to write papers and projects. Everyone is very willing to help in a way that is free from judgment.

Do you have any advice for English majors?
I feel like I’m the one taking advice from other English majors. I work with them and go to their readings. I see how passionate they are about their studies and I’m reminded to do what makes me happy because everything else will fall into place.

What’s your biggest priority right now?
Surviving finals is my biggest priority right now. Within five years, I look forward to applying my degree and experience to wherever my career path takes me but I would love to return to CSU to work towards a master’s in English and Business.

 

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The Poudre River this morning (image by Jill Salahub)

The Poudre River (image by Jill Salahub)

  • On October 28th, Tim Amidon, Elizabeth Williams (Communication Studies), Kim Henry (Psychology), and Tiffany Lipsey (Health and Exercise Science) partnered with the Poudre Fire Authority to host a symposium on the intersections of work, knowledge, and safety in the fireservice. Over 70 fireservice leaders from as far away as Oakland, CA and Ontario, Canada participated in interactive, stakeholder conversations designed to help researchers and participants identify the types of human factors that impact firefighter occupational safety and health outcomes. Breakout sessions included discussions on wearable technologies and next generation PPE, post-traumatic stress, the impact of chronic stress, sleep deprivation, and diet on decision making and cognition, how blue-collar traditions and working class identity impact how firefighters value the types of labor they perform, and how the challenges of certifying skills and building learning organizations through training and education programs. The event was sponsored by PFA and Pre-Catalyst for Innovative Partnerships seed funding awarded to the research team by the Office of the Vice President for Research. Tim would also personally thank our student intern Tiffany Lingo and administrative gurus Sheila Dargon and Lilian Nugent for their support!
  • Dan Beachy-Quick has an interview up on the Kenyon Review’s website with: http://www.kenyonreview.org/conversation/dan-beachy-quick/ and a group of linked essays at EuropeNow: http://www.europenowjournal.org/2016/11/30/sunlight-and-arrows-five-invocations-for-the-silent-muse/
  • John Calderazzo will be presenting a talk on “Climate Change and Quechua Ritual” at the Sacred Landscapes and Mountains conference at the China India Institute in New York City.  The talk is based on a trip he took to a glacier-fed basin in the Peruvian Andes. John will also be the judge for the 2017 Eugene V. Shea National Poetry Contest.
  • Sue Doe and Lisa Langstraat’s essay “Faculty Development Workshops with Student Vet Participants: Seizing the Induction Possibilities” will shortly appear in Reflections: Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning (Volume 16, Issue 2).
  • On November 18, just prior to the start of Fall Break, CO130 faculty welcomed around 75 international students to a Harvest Meal in the Whitaker Room.  It was crazy fun in there, particularly as faculty watered down the soup to make it stretch to meet the larger-than-expected crowd and as Cassie Eddington’s kimchi was pronounced “Superb!” by a Korean student. This event was the brainchild of Karen Montgomery Moore and was assisted by Cassie Eddington, Virginia Chaffee, Kristie Yelinek, Hannah Caballero, Leslie Davis, Sheila Dargon, and Sue Doe.  Thanks go to our Chair, Louann Reid, for her support for this very special and timely event. Thanks also to the front office staff who participated and strongly communicated the department’s support for the diverse students of CO130! Thanks as well to our amazing Eddy custodial staff who not only helped bring food from our cars to the third floor but stuck around late to help clean up the mess!
  • On Saturday, October 15th, the Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS) hosted its 47th Annual Regional Conference at Metro State University in Denver.  This year’s theme was “For the Love of Teaching: Reclaiming the Classroom.”  CLAS presented CSU’s English Professor Emeritus William McBride with the Legacy Award.  English Education graduate student Jenna (Franklin) Martin shared her presentation, titled “Intercultural Sensitivity in the Middle School Language Arts Classroom.”  Dr. Pam Coke gave a presentation with Cheryl Kula, a fourth grade teacher at St. John the Evangelist Catholic School in Loveland, titled “Hard to Learn, Hard to Teach: Using Problem-Based Strategies in the Classroom.”  A good conference was had by all.
  • On Saturday, November 12th, CSU welcomed high school seniors from around the country to campus to take part in Senior Scholarship Day. English department colleagues led students through a writing workshop, followed by a timed writing competition.  CSU Admissions offered scholarships to the top writers. Our English department team included Tony Becker, Doug Cloud, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Tobi Jacobi, Sarah Pieplow, Jeremy Proctor, Catherine Ratliff, and fearless leader Ed Lessor. Thank you, team, for your hard work!
  • On Saturday, November 19th, Dr. Pam Coke presented her research at the National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention in Atlanta.  Her session, titled “Performing Adolescence on the Page and in the Classroom: Using Adolescents’ Literature to Advocate for Students’ Mental Health,” She helped participants examine critical questions for educators, including: Is it ethical to teach a text that I know can trigger forms of PTSD for students?  Is it irresponsible to avoid such issues in the classroom?  If and when I do teach these texts (and I believe it is irresponsible to omit controversial texts from our classrooms), what can I do to best advocate for the mental health and well-being of the students? The presentation sparked valuable conversation among attendees.
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “Canine Cardiology,” published earlier this year in The Bellevue Literary Review, has been nominated for a Pushcart prize.

speakout

SpeakOut!

We have three SpeakOut Journal Launch events during finals week. We will be celebrating the publication of our Fall 2016 issue of the SpeakOut Journal with a reading by our participants and refreshments. Please contact Tobi Jacobi (tjacobi@colostate.edu) if you would like to attend the readings at the jail or community corrections. We’d love to see you there!

SpeakOut! Youth Groups: Monday, December 12 from 6:45 to 8:15pm at Wolverine Letterpress and Publick House

SpeakOut! @ Community Corrections and Work Release: Wednesday, December 14 from 7:30 to 8:30pm at LCJ Administration Building

SpeakOut! Men & Women’s Groups @ Larimer County Jail: Thursday, December 15 from 6:30 to 8:00pm at the Larimer County Jail.

greyrockreview

Greyrock Review: Get your work published!

Fiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Galibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Nonfiction: 5,000 word limit, format should be double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri fonts. Two pieces of your best work may be submitted.

Poetry: Up to 5 poems may be submitted, each poem should be placed on a separate page in a single document. If poems have a visual formatting component, please use Adobe PDF files. Otherwise, Word (.doc files) are preferred.

Visual Arts: Any visual art form is accepted, excluding video. Please photography your work and submit digitally. 300 dpi and CMYK colored .TIFF file is preferred.

For more information please visit http://greyrockreview.colostate.edu or email Baleigh Greene at bmgreene@rams.colostate.edu

Submissions accepted from October 3, 2016 – December 16, 2016

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Scholarships Available

Apply: December 1, 2016 — March 1, 2017

For Undergraduate Students

  • Community Engagement Scholarship*
  • Donna Weyrick Memorial Scholarship*
  • Diane Keating Woodcox & Larry G. Woodcox Scholarship
  • Dr. Alfred R. Westfall Memorial Scholarship
  • Hixon Family Scholarship*
  • James J. Garvey Undergraduate English Language Scholarship*
  • John and Pat Venable CSUWA Scholarship
  • Judith A. Dean Memorial English Scholarship
  • Karyn L. Evans Memorial Scholarship
  • Page Jones Richards Palmquist Families Scholarship
  • Zambia Community Education & Health Scholarship

 

For Graduate Students

  • Ann O. Zimdahl Memorial Scholarship
  • Community Engagement Scholarship*
  • Cross-Cultural Understanding Scholarship
  • English Faculty/Staff Graduate Scholarship
  • James J. Garvey Graduate English Language Scholarship*
  • Smith-Schamberger Literature Fellowship
  • TESL/TEFL Scholarship

 

*Please note that these scholarships have supplemental questions which require additional information beyond the general scholarship application.

Apply Online

The application for all scholarships in the English department is online at www.ramweb.colostate.edu. Sign in using your eID and select the CSU Scholarship Application link.

March 1 Deadline

Students may start the application process beginning December 1, 2015. All application materials are due by 11 p.m. on March 1, 2016.

Learn More

Visit central.colostate.edu/scholarships/ to learn more about the application process. Be sure to check the main CLA Dean’s Office Scholarships list as well as the English department scholarships list for all available scholarships. E-mail questions to Sheila Dargon at Sheila.Dargon@Colostate.Edu.

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Chelsea Hansen
MFA Creative Writing: Fiction, 2nd year
Expected Graduation Spring 2018

Chelsea Hansen, in the computer lab working on her thesis.

Chelsea Hansen, in the computer lab working on her thesis.

What brought you to CSU?
I transferred to CSU in 2012 to finish my Bachelor’s Degree and returned in 2015 for my MFA. I was drawn to Colorado because it had similarities to my home state of Wyoming, while also being wholly different and giving me new experiences and nature to interact with. Coming back to CSU for my MFA was an easy choice: I liked the vast writing community and CSU’s ability to make me feel both at home and able to constantly find new things to interact with and discover.

Are you working on a thesis yet? If so, how’s that going?
I have started working on my thesis by giving chapters of it to my workshop. It’s a novel about two twin brothers, one living and one dead. As far as how it’s going, it mostly exists in colorful index cards that I reshuffle and spend way too much time looking at. But it is starting to exist in a physical place and not just as images in my head, so that’s something.

What classes are you taking this semester?
I have my fiction workshop, fiction form and technique, and teaching creative writing. All of them are different, yet focused on the process of writing, which I’ve loved this semester.

Favorite English class? Favorite English teacher? Favorite assignment or project?
I think my favorite English class will always be workshop. I like being able to see what fictional work is being imagined and created right now and by the people around me. I will always be partial to Leslee Becker, who’s been my advisor since I started my undergraduate degree in 2012. Her dedication to helping my work succeed and grow has always been unfathomably amazing to me. Roze Hentschell is also an admired professor of mine. In my undergrad, she let me write a paper about demonology for a Renaissance Literature class. In grad school, she allowed me to write a paper about Harry Potter for her Space and Place class. Both papers have easily been two of my favorite assignments during my academic career since they were a mix of both academia but also allowed me to write papers about really nerdy things I loved.

Why is it important to study English, the Humanities?
It’s important because life should be about much more than just getting a degree so you can get a job so you can make money to pay bills. The word “human” is in humanities, so there must be something profoundly “human” about studying and engaging with them. I feel most alive and grounded when I get to talk to others about a book, performance, or art. The work that comes out of English and Humanities are what tap into human emotion; they are why books make us cry or films can make us laugh, or how a theater show can make us feel connected to strangers.

Describe your work as Computer Lab manager. What is your favorite thing about it? What’s the most difficult thing about it?
I spend more time managing the computer lab employees than I do managing the computers. Sometimes I call IT in a mild panic. Other times I watch computers as they seem to obtain their own intelligences and do very, very odd things. I advise my employees that yes, they should definitely go see a doctor about that illness. My favorite thing about it is managing my employees. I’ve had most of them for almost a year and a half now, so even though I am their manager I care about them and their lives and schoolwork. I get to watch them succeed. They are all individual people from different colleges all across campus and they always tell me really good stories. I suppose the most difficult thing about it is how many strange crises can occur in a computer lab, usually when I’m not here. I had no idea that so many apocalyptic-level events could happen in a computer lab, but I suppose I’m now more equipped to deal with the strangeness that comes with living.

What has been your favorite moment at CSU?
Although I have many excellent moments from my MFA time so far, I think my favorite one would have to be when my older sister got her Master’s Degree from CSU the same day I received my Bachelor’s. It was very special for us to graduate from the same place together.

Chelsea and her sister at graduation

Chelsea and her sister at graduation

Describe Eddy in one word.
All-consuming. (I guess that’s two words. But given that I work here as well as all of my classes are here, I never see the rest of campus. What’s out there in the CSU world?)

Do you have a favorite book or author?
As with most writers, I have a lot of favorite authors and books. So I try to offer a different favorite book every time I come across this question. So this time I will say my favorite book is Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. It’s a gorgeous mix of science fiction and dystopia. If you don’t like science fiction, this book will make you like science fiction after you read it.

Do you have any advice for English majors? For writers?

The best advice for English majors that I have is to get yourself as embedded in the English and literary world as possible. Look around for people who have careers in English that you may want. Remember that your degree does and will have value; no matter what anyone else says, the world definitely is not wholly made of business and engineering degrees. There are lots of things you can do, you just have to put in the effort of getting out there and finding them.

I have a magnet in the middle of my fridge that says, “Even if it’s crap, just get it on the page.” I put it on the middle of my fridge so I have to read it every time I’m scouring around for food during my writing time. It’s okay to produce some really bad writing; that’s what first drafts are for. And until you have that first draft, you can’t really mold it into the space you want it to be. Read things that inspire you to keep hitting the keyboard. Writing is a process, but it’s a process that can’t start until you fill up that blank page with something.

What’s your biggest priority right now?
My larger priority right now is to write my elusive thesis. Which sounds pretty typical, but it consumes so much of my writing thoughts it’s getting hard to separate the rest of my life from it. My immediate priority is to not get lost in an airport over the winter break. I’m traveling for the entire month and have four one-way plane tickets that will take me to seven different airports. But I’m sure I will encounter some interesting characters in them.

Where will we find you in five years?
Most likely on the west coast somewhere, hopefully doing something in the publishing world. I look forward to finding out whatever that is.

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You might recognize Mike and Tiffany. They are work studies in the English department’s main office.

Mike Hedemark

Mike Hedemark

Mike Hedemark
Business Major, expected graduation 2019

What brought you to CSU?
I came to CSU to learn and grow on a beautiful campus with a community that is lively and sincerely nice. The CSU community is a good one and I’m glad to be a part of it.

What classes are you taking this semester?
I am taking a good number of electives this semester to prepare me for my major and next semester I plan to roll into my business classes. My classes this semester are a variety of Psychology classes with a math class and an economics class.

What is required of your position as a work study?
My position as a work study is very important as I do many things to help around the office. I generally get all of the surveys ready for the staff, I order desk copies for all the professors, and I also troubleshoot computers and the copy machines. There is also the little things that I do, that include making sure the paper is stocked, and grabbing the mail for the English department, while also running errands for the office.

What has been your favorite moment at CSU?
My favorite moment at CSU was last year for homecoming when the fireworks went off and I was able to watch them from my dorm. It was pretty cool.

Describe Eddy in one word.
Modernized.

Do you have a favorite book or author?
I don’t read as much as I should and I should read more, but If I had to pick a favorite book, I would choose the Hunger Games series. That series was a fun and entertaining read.

Do you have any advice for incoming freshmen?
My only advice to freshman is to enjoy the little things and go to class. I enjoyed living in the dorms last year and I have gained many friendships that I have with many cool people. I would suggest that you meet all of your hall mates as we had a strong bond as a group when I was a freshman. Also, go to class, it isn’t that much of a struggle especially because you choose your schedule, so go to class.

What’s your biggest priority right now?
My biggest priority right now is to get into the college of business which requires me to get a B or better in my math class. Once that is done, then I can take my business classes.

Where will we find you in five years?
In 5 years, you will find me running my own business or working my up a corporate ladder to own a business.

Tiffany Lingo

Tiffany Lingo

Tiffany Lingo
English/Communication Education Major, expected graduation Spring 2017

What brought you to CSU?
I walked onto campus and saw hundreds of smiles and hugs, even though it was a cloudy, drab day. I was excited to be a part of this happy campus!

What classes are you taking this semester?
Early Women Writers, Shakespeare I, Composition 301D, Advanced Public Speaking, Communications and Popular Culture, and Interpersonal Communications.

Favorite English class? Favorite English teacher? Favorite assignment or project?
I think my favorite English class would have to be the introduction to Poetry, the readings were fulfilling and I learned something amazing and new every day.

A favorite English Teacher is a difficult choice, but I admire Theresa Sandelin a lot and would have to choose her. She made the American Literature class I took with her very informative and clear and showed so much passion during lecture. That class was difficult for me, but I learned and enjoyed the classes so much that I loved it.

My favorite assignment is from this semester in Early Women Writers with Aparna Gollapudi, Just an Ordinary Day is a fictional, historically accurate narrative about a woman in the 18th century. Gollapudi has this assignment be about a woman of your choosing in the 1700s, and the accurate representation of a day in her life. I am really enjoying this project as I learn more and more about the 18th century, and create characters and narrate a story as if I am actually in the small London town in the 1700s.

Why is it important to study English, the Humanities?
I love to study people, and that is why I love being in the Humanities. I think it’s important to be able to connect and relate to another time or story, be able to connect to a character, or connect to an idea. When we study the inner workings of novels and poems and stories, we gain a perspective that we didn’t have before. We can understand a little bit of the life of the character and a little bit of the history of the time. In all Humanities, we study people and their thoughts, beliefs, and actions, and this is vital to understanding and helping our humanity.

What is required of your position as a work study?
In the English Department Office, I am there right up front so I can assist anyone that has a question or concern for us. I mostly help with organizing and filing documents into the appropriate place and making sure that files get to the right person at the right time.

What has been your favorite moment at CSU?
My favorite moments at CSU are during finals, students everywhere are supportive and loving, and so many were giving food and supplies that assist students.

Describe Eddy in one word.
Welcoming.

Do you have a favorite book or author?
A favorite book of mine would be To Kill a Mockingbird, and my favorite author is Edgar Allan Poe.

Do you have any advice for English majors?
Read for fun! It’s hard to be able read your personal books with the hundreds of readings that we have but keeping reading a part of your life as luxury is important.

What’s your biggest priority right now?
My biggest priority right now is to focus on grades and final projects for classes ending, and to prepare for my classes next semester.

Where will we find you in five years?
I hope you’ll find me in a high school, teaching English and Speech classes, and I also hope to be working on my Masters as well.

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